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Found 395 results

  1. It's hard for people to game if they don't have reliable control over two hands. That very simple premise has given rise to various organizations like dedicated to hacking traditional controllers or even fabricating entirely new and specialized controllers on an individual basis for wounded veterans, people born with disabilities, and those who have been through traumatic accidents. These groups, like AbleGamers or Warfighter Engaged, have spent years working to find solutions for people who love gaming, but find it difficult or even impossible to use a traditional controller. Yesterday, Microsoft announced something amazing: The Xbox Adaptive Controller. This device will release later this year and can be customized to a very wide variety of specialized peripherals to create set ups that anyone can play with regardless of physical ability. The back of the controller has clearly labeled plug-ins for a variety of external buttons, switches, and joysticks that can then be physically placed anywhere for the most convenient use by the player. It can be used to play Xbox One and Windows 10 PC titles and supports button remapping. It can even save three different game profiles so that it can switch seamlessly between different game types on the fly. Solomon Romney, a retail learning specialist for Microsoft, has had months to test out the final build of the Adaptive Controller. "I can customize how I interface with the Xbox Adaptive Controller to whatever I want," he said. “If I want to play a game entirely with my feet, I can. I can make the controls fit my body, my desires, and I can change them anytime I want. You plug in whatever you want and go. It takes virtually no time to set it up and use it. It could not be simpler." Romney was born without fingers on his left hand, which makes operating a traditional controller difficult. "I get to redesign my controller every day and get to choose how I want to play. For me, that's the greatest thing ever." For Microsoft and the people who worked on the Adaptive Controller, this is the culmination of years of effort to justify the creation of a niche peripheral designed for an often under-served group of gamers. The journey began back in 2014 when Twitter, through a twist of fate, connected a Microsoft engineer with Warfighter Engaged, a nonprofit that works with wounded veterans to keep them gaming. The organization's founder, Ken Jones, was a mechanical engineer and struggled to create gaming equipment to meet the specific needs of all the veterans who came to Warfighter Engaged seeking help. That connection blossomed into an awareness at Microsoft for this underlying need in the game industry for accessible gaming equipment. The next year, Microsoft held its annual Ability Summit, an event dedicated to getting the company to consider accessibility in its devices and solutions. For a hackathon tournament, the winning entry was a device that was able to work with the Kinect to track movement and read those as button and joystick inputs on a traditional controller. Another team took that idea and refined it into a prototype device that could attach to an Xbox One controller and allow other input devices to be connected. Around the same time, Microsoft launched the Gaming for Everyone initiative with the goal of broadening the community of people who can play and enjoy games. Headed by Kris Hunter, the director of devices user research and hardware accessibility, and Bryce Johnson, a senior Xbox designer, the initiative worked quietly to make the Adaptive Controller a reality. What really solidified the idea of what the Adaptive Controller would eventually be was the launch of the Xbox One's Copilot feature in 2017. Copilot allows players to link two Xbox One controllers as if they were one device. The original idea was that it would allow players to play a single player game together without transferring a controller back and forth. However, they discovered it was also used by those with disabilities to game in creative ways Microsoft hadn't expected, such as using a head or foot to operate the second controller. That realization brought together all of the different ideas that Microsoft had been toying with since that chance 2014 Twitter encounter. Instead of using a device like that from the hackathon or the subsequent controller add-on, Copilot could be used to attach a device that allowed for more flexible gaming inputs that could cater to a wide variety of people. Making a device like that would allow for it to be sleek, elegant, even. It wouldn't be an afterthought, but a fully executed and produced device worthy of the Microsoft brand. Those pushing for the device to make it to retail apparently met with internal opposition to the idea, but advocates like Kris Hunter wouldn't let the idea die. "I had a passion for it and I didn't give up," she said. "I kept saying, 'This product is too important. [...] If we really want to be intentional and we really want to walk the walk versus just talk the talk, this is the product that will do it." Microsoft turned to the nonprofits who had helped bring this niche to light at the very beginning. Warfighter Engaged, AbleGamers, SpecialEffect, Craig Hospital, and the Cerebral Palsy Foundation, came together to consult on how to best design a controller that would fit the needs of the people they worked with every day. Ideas like spreading out the 19 input jacks across the back of the device to make them easier to differentiate, a rectangular shape to make it comfortable in a gamer's lap, or threaded inserts to secure the controller to a standard wheelchair, lapboard, or desk all came about from conversations with these nonprofits. The The design process even led to something Microsoft is considering adding to all future products - a groove above each port to provide a tactile reference for where things are supposed to be plugged in. "One message heard clearly from the accessibility community was 'don't infantilize the device' — don't make it look like a Fisher-Price toy," said Bryce Johnson. "People often don't want to use adaptive technology because it looks like a toy." That became a guiding principal behind the design of the Adaptive Controller. First and foremost, Microsoft wanted the Adaptive Controller to be something proudly carrying the brand as a symbol; something that adults wouldn't feel embarrassed to use in front of friends or family. With a price of $100, the Adaptive Controller positions itself as the most affordable option for those looking for accessibility solutions in gaming. The price is an important to keep in mind for all of the hospitals and patients out there who previously needed to find a custom build for their particular needs or forgo gaming completely. If the work we're doing to raise money for Children's Miracle Network Hospitals through Extra Life can go toward helping kids rediscover their ability to game with the help of the Xbox Adaptive Controller... well, that's an incredibly exciting thing. The Xbox Adaptive Controller will release later this year and we will likely receive more details when E3 rolls around. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  2. It's hard for people to game if they don't have reliable control over two hands. That very simple premise has given rise to various organizations like dedicated to hacking traditional controllers or even fabricating entirely new and specialized controllers on an individual basis for wounded veterans, people born with disabilities, and those who have been through traumatic accidents. These groups, like AbleGamers or Warfighter Engaged, have spent years working to find solutions for people who love gaming, but find it difficult or even impossible to use a traditional controller. Yesterday, Microsoft announced something amazing: The Xbox Adaptive Controller. This device will release later this year and can be customized to a very wide variety of specialized peripherals to create set ups that anyone can play with regardless of physical ability. The back of the controller has clearly labeled plug-ins for a variety of external buttons, switches, and joysticks that can then be physically placed anywhere for the most convenient use by the player. It can be used to play Xbox One and Windows 10 PC titles and supports button remapping. It can even save three different game profiles so that it can switch seamlessly between different game types on the fly. Solomon Romney, a retail learning specialist for Microsoft, has had months to test out the final build of the Adaptive Controller. "I can customize how I interface with the Xbox Adaptive Controller to whatever I want," he said. “If I want to play a game entirely with my feet, I can. I can make the controls fit my body, my desires, and I can change them anytime I want. You plug in whatever you want and go. It takes virtually no time to set it up and use it. It could not be simpler." Romney was born without fingers on his left hand, which makes operating a traditional controller difficult. "I get to redesign my controller every day and get to choose how I want to play. For me, that's the greatest thing ever." For Microsoft and the people who worked on the Adaptive Controller, this is the culmination of years of effort to justify the creation of a niche peripheral designed for an often under-served group of gamers. The journey began back in 2014 when Twitter, through a twist of fate, connected a Microsoft engineer with Warfighter Engaged, a nonprofit that works with wounded veterans to keep them gaming. The organization's founder, Ken Jones, was a mechanical engineer and struggled to create gaming equipment to meet the specific needs of all the veterans who came to Warfighter Engaged seeking help. That connection blossomed into an awareness at Microsoft for this underlying need in the game industry for accessible gaming equipment. The next year, Microsoft held its annual Ability Summit, an event dedicated to getting the company to consider accessibility in its devices and solutions. For a hackathon tournament, the winning entry was a device that was able to work with the Kinect to track movement and read those as button and joystick inputs on a traditional controller. Another team took that idea and refined it into a prototype device that could attach to an Xbox One controller and allow other input devices to be connected. Around the same time, Microsoft launched the Gaming for Everyone initiative with the goal of broadening the community of people who can play and enjoy games. Headed by Kris Hunter, the director of devices user research and hardware accessibility, and Bryce Johnson, a senior Xbox designer, the initiative worked quietly to make the Adaptive Controller a reality. What really solidified the idea of what the Adaptive Controller would eventually be was the launch of the Xbox One's Copilot feature in 2017. Copilot allows players to link two Xbox One controllers as if they were one device. The original idea was that it would allow players to play a single player game together without transferring a controller back and forth. However, they discovered it was also used by those with disabilities to game in creative ways Microsoft hadn't expected, such as using a head or foot to operate the second controller. That realization brought together all of the different ideas that Microsoft had been toying with since that chance 2014 Twitter encounter. Instead of using a device like that from the hackathon or the subsequent controller add-on, Copilot could be used to attach a device that allowed for more flexible gaming inputs that could cater to a wide variety of people. Making a device like that would allow for it to be sleek, elegant, even. It wouldn't be an afterthought, but a fully executed and produced device worthy of the Microsoft brand. Those pushing for the device to make it to retail apparently met with internal opposition to the idea, but advocates like Kris Hunter wouldn't let the idea die. "I had a passion for it and I didn't give up," she said. "I kept saying, 'This product is too important. [...] If we really want to be intentional and we really want to walk the walk versus just talk the talk, this is the product that will do it." Microsoft turned to the nonprofits who had helped bring this niche to light at the very beginning. Warfighter Engaged, AbleGamers, SpecialEffect, Craig Hospital, and the Cerebral Palsy Foundation, came together to consult on how to best design a controller that would fit the needs of the people they worked with every day. Ideas like spreading out the 19 input jacks across the back of the device to make them easier to differentiate, a rectangular shape to make it comfortable in a gamer's lap, or threaded inserts to secure the controller to a standard wheelchair, lapboard, or desk all came about from conversations with these nonprofits. The The design process even led to something Microsoft is considering adding to all future products - a groove above each port to provide a tactile reference for where things are supposed to be plugged in. "One message heard clearly from the accessibility community was 'don't infantilize the device' — don't make it look like a Fisher-Price toy," said Bryce Johnson. "People often don't want to use adaptive technology because it looks like a toy." That became a guiding principal behind the design of the Adaptive Controller. First and foremost, Microsoft wanted the Adaptive Controller to be something proudly carrying the brand as a symbol; something that adults wouldn't feel embarrassed to use in front of friends or family. With a price of $100, the Adaptive Controller positions itself as the most affordable option for those looking for accessibility solutions in gaming. The price is an important to keep in mind for all of the hospitals and patients out there who previously needed to find a custom build for their particular needs or forgo gaming completely. If the work we're doing to raise money for Children's Miracle Network Hospitals through Extra Life can go toward helping kids rediscover their ability to game with the help of the Xbox Adaptive Controller... well, that's an incredibly exciting thing. The Xbox Adaptive Controller will release later this year and we will likely receive more details when E3 rolls around. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  3. This tease seemed to come out of nowhere. Russian developer Mundfish announced a very slick looking game called Atomic Heart earlier this week. Players will explore a research lab/military base (that might also double as a theme park?) during the height of the Soviet Union. Dr. Stockhausen has been conducting unholy experiments in the heart of the facility that have had an effect on both machines and the bodies of the dead that they have left in their wake. What exactly the nature of those experiments might have been remains a mystery for players to uncover as they delve into the secrets of Atomic Heart. The name seems to reference a bit of lore teased by the team back in March - a picture of two human hearts hooked to machines and a cryptic message about the love of two employees in Facility #3826. Players get drawn into this alternate history version of the Soviet Union as investigator P-3 who has been dispatched to investigate 3826. They find the facility in a state of decay and chaos as a wide variety of machines run amok alongside resurrected soldiers, some of whom have been creepily painted as clowns. As players explore, they'll find a variety of insane, mind-bending experiments still in progress, like people made of blood or strange, seemingly sentient pockets of air under water. Beware of making too much of a scene, though. Drawing the attention of the rampaging machines by running afoul of their patrol drones can lead to a quick, messy death. Atomic Heart seems to have an in-depth crafting system for weapons that will allow players to gear up as they progress and make weapons that suit their playstyle. While the trailer doesn't hint at an official release date, Mundfish expects to release Atomic Heart sometime this year for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One.
  4. This tease seemed to come out of nowhere. Russian developer Mundfish announced a very slick looking game called Atomic Heart earlier this week. Players will explore a research lab/military base (that might also double as a theme park?) during the height of the Soviet Union. Dr. Stockhausen has been conducting unholy experiments in the heart of the facility that have had an effect on both machines and the bodies of the dead that they have left in their wake. What exactly the nature of those experiments might have been remains a mystery for players to uncover as they delve into the secrets of Atomic Heart. The name seems to reference a bit of lore teased by the team back in March - a picture of two human hearts hooked to machines and a cryptic message about the love of two employees in Facility #3826. Players get drawn into this alternate history version of the Soviet Union as investigator P-3 who has been dispatched to investigate 3826. They find the facility in a state of decay and chaos as a wide variety of machines run amok alongside resurrected soldiers, some of whom have been creepily painted as clowns. As players explore, they'll find a variety of insane, mind-bending experiments still in progress, like people made of blood or strange, seemingly sentient pockets of air under water. Beware of making too much of a scene, though. Drawing the attention of the rampaging machines by running afoul of their patrol drones can lead to a quick, messy death. Atomic Heart seems to have an in-depth crafting system for weapons that will allow players to gear up as they progress and make weapons that suit their playstyle. While the trailer doesn't hint at an official release date, Mundfish expects to release Atomic Heart sometime this year for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. View full article
  5. Aardman Animation, the studio behind animated accomplishments like Wallace and Gromit and Chicken Run, has announced a development partnership with game developers DigixArt to create a title based in the trenches of World War I. 11-11: Memories Retold will weave a tale of war, life, and loss using a striking style that gives the impression that each frame was painstakingly painted by hand. What exactly compelled an animation studio known for its lovable and lighthearted creations to tackle such a sober subject? Dave Sproxton, the founder of Aardman explained saying, “engaging audiences with compelling stories through animation is at the heart of what we are trying to do at Aardman. With this project we want to produce an emotionally rich experience with distinctive visual character to help you understand what war is all about.” Yoan Fanise, the director of 11-11: Memories Retold, expressed the desire that it would expand the perception of what games can be and the hope that it would leave a lasting impression on the people who encounter it. What exactly the content of 11-11 might be is still a mystery, but Fanise hints that it won't be the kind of game we typically get about war and conflict. Instead it will be an emotional, taxing journey both in-game and within the player. 1-11: Memories Retold has no solid release date, but it will be coming to PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.
  6. Aardman Animation, the studio behind animated accomplishments like Wallace and Gromit and Chicken Run, has announced a development partnership with game developers DigixArt to create a title based in the trenches of World War I. 11-11: Memories Retold will weave a tale of war, life, and loss using a striking style that gives the impression that each frame was painstakingly painted by hand. What exactly compelled an animation studio known for its lovable and lighthearted creations to tackle such a sober subject? Dave Sproxton, the founder of Aardman explained saying, “engaging audiences with compelling stories through animation is at the heart of what we are trying to do at Aardman. With this project we want to produce an emotionally rich experience with distinctive visual character to help you understand what war is all about.” Yoan Fanise, the director of 11-11: Memories Retold, expressed the desire that it would expand the perception of what games can be and the hope that it would leave a lasting impression on the people who encounter it. What exactly the content of 11-11 might be is still a mystery, but Fanise hints that it won't be the kind of game we typically get about war and conflict. Instead it will be an emotional, taxing journey both in-game and within the player. 1-11: Memories Retold has no solid release date, but it will be coming to PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. View full article
  7. Ninja Theory's epic descent into mythology and psychosis has made its way to Xbox One after having limited exclusivity on PlayStation 4. Players take on the role of the Pict warrior Senua as she journeys to a strange land filled with shadows, giants, and monsters to save the soul of a man named Dillon. It focuses on Senua's struggles with her curse, a chorus of voices that speak doubts and encouragement to her and sometimes directly to the player, too. Because of the game's heavy emphasis on Senua's curse, her struggles with psychosis and the social stigma associated with it, Ninja Theory worked heavily with mental health experts and facilities to better understand their hero. Through those learning experiences and encounters, the team was able to shape the game into something that resonated with many players. It also led the team to use the game as a platform to help dispel some of the stigma that still clings to mental health. To that end, Ninja Theory donated all profit from the sale of Hellblade on World Mental Health Day in 2017 to the organization Rethink Mental Illness. With the Xbox One release, Ninja Theory wants to continue that spirit of giving. If they can sell 50,000 copies of the game by April 18, they have pledged to donate $25,000 to Mental Health America. If they manage to hit 100,000 sales of Senua's Sacrifice, they will donate up to $50,000. So far, they've manage to sell roughly 12,000 copies. If you want a really unique game that tackles interesting subject matter in a thoughtful and mesmerizing way, Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice is a great choice and could contribute to helping those who need mental healthcare. That's a pretty neat deal.
  8. Ninja Theory's epic descent into mythology and psychosis has made its way to Xbox One after having limited exclusivity on PlayStation 4. Players take on the role of the Pict warrior Senua as she journeys to a strange land filled with shadows, giants, and monsters to save the soul of a man named Dillon. It focuses on Senua's struggles with her curse, a chorus of voices that speak doubts and encouragement to her and sometimes directly to the player, too. Because of the game's heavy emphasis on Senua's curse, her struggles with psychosis and the social stigma associated with it, Ninja Theory worked heavily with mental health experts and facilities to better understand their hero. Through those learning experiences and encounters, the team was able to shape the game into something that resonated with many players. It also led the team to use the game as a platform to help dispel some of the stigma that still clings to mental health. To that end, Ninja Theory donated all profit from the sale of Hellblade on World Mental Health Day in 2017 to the organization Rethink Mental Illness. With the Xbox One release, Ninja Theory wants to continue that spirit of giving. If they can sell 50,000 copies of the game by April 18, they have pledged to donate $25,000 to Mental Health America. If they manage to hit 100,000 sales of Senua's Sacrifice, they will donate up to $50,000. So far, they've manage to sell roughly 12,000 copies. If you want a really unique game that tackles interesting subject matter in a thoughtful and mesmerizing way, Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice is a great choice and could contribute to helping those who need mental healthcare. That's a pretty neat deal. View full article
  9. We've known four player co-op has been on its way to Stardew Valley for a while now. Back in January, Eric Barone, the game's developer, tweeted out that he had been experimenting with a co-op build of the game with friends and found it a really great time. The reveal of that potential feature coming in the near future was exciting, but there wasn't any general timeline of when to expect the feature to make its way into the game. Now we at least have an idea. Eric Barone, who tweets under the handle Concerned Ape on Twitter, announced that development of the co-op update has been going well and that if squashing bugs continues at the current rate the update should release in about a month. That's by no means a hard timeline, but it at least gives us all an idea of when we might expect to see our friends in our digital fields. The update will bring a bunch of additional features, too, though what all of those might be remains unknown. At the very least we will get the ability to put hats on horses. That's right. Hats. On. Horses. And that's pretty awesome.
  10. We've known four player co-op has been on its way to Stardew Valley for a while now. Back in January, Eric Barone, the game's developer, tweeted out that he had been experimenting with a co-op build of the game with friends and found it a really great time. The reveal of that potential feature coming in the near future was exciting, but there wasn't any general timeline of when to expect the feature to make its way into the game. Now we at least have an idea. Eric Barone, who tweets under the handle Concerned Ape on Twitter, announced that development of the co-op update has been going well and that if squashing bugs continues at the current rate the update should release in about a month. That's by no means a hard timeline, but it at least gives us all an idea of when we might expect to see our friends in our digital fields. The update will bring a bunch of additional features, too, though what all of those might be remains unknown. At the very least we will get the ability to put hats on horses. That's right. Hats. On. Horses. And that's pretty awesome. View full article
  11. Capcom aims to hit 2018 with all the nostalgia it can muster for the Blue Bomber's resurgence. Mega Man X Legacy Collection 1 and 2, which we reported on last year, will be hitting the PC, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, and Xbox One this summer as part of the 30th anniversary of Mega Man. Mega Man X Legacy Collection 1 will include Mega Man X, X2, X3, and X4 while the second collection will feature X5, X6, X7, and X8. Mega Man X Legacy Collection 1 and 2 have received something of a remaster treatment from Capcom. The retro games all have cleaned up sprites with or without smoothing and CRT filters that the developers have included. X7 and X8, games that took the X series into 3D, have been given a new coat of paint to provide the best visual experience while remaining true to the original games. Each game can be played in its original resolution, full screen with the original aspect ratio, or in widescreen. Both collections contain a slew of goodies that fans of the series might find really interesting. Both collections include The Day of Σ, a short video that was shipped with Maverick Hunter X (a remake of Mega Man X for the PSP) and details the origins of Sigma and his chaotic legion of robotic Mavericks, serving as something of a prelude to the events in Mega Man X. Each collection also includes a digital museum full of Mega Man X history including hi-res trailers for each game in the series. Each collection also comes with a soundtrack that encompasses the soundscape of each game in the series (along with a few Collection specific tunes and remixes). A challenge mode called X Challenge will also be included in the X Legacy Collections. The mode tests the mettle of Mega Man fanatics by putting them up against two bosses at a time armed with up to three bonus weapons. The boss rush mode will include online leaderboards for players to compare times and vie for high scores. Both Mega Man X Legacy Collections will release on July 24. A retail bundle that includes both will be available on Xbox One, PS4, and Switch. The version for Xbox One and PS4 will include discs for both collections while the Switch version will have a cartridge for the first collection and a digital code for the second. All of this will help Capcom build hype for Mega Man 11 which releases later this summer.
  12. Capcom aims to hit 2018 with all the nostalgia it can muster for the Blue Bomber's resurgence. Mega Man X Legacy Collection 1 and 2, which we reported on last year, will be hitting the PC, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, and Xbox One this summer as part of the 30th anniversary of Mega Man. Mega Man X Legacy Collection 1 will include Mega Man X, X2, X3, and X4 while the second collection will feature X5, X6, X7, and X8. Mega Man X Legacy Collection 1 and 2 have received something of a remaster treatment from Capcom. The retro games all have cleaned up sprites with or without smoothing and CRT filters that the developers have included. X7 and X8, games that took the X series into 3D, have been given a new coat of paint to provide the best visual experience while remaining true to the original games. Each game can be played in its original resolution, full screen with the original aspect ratio, or in widescreen. Both collections contain a slew of goodies that fans of the series might find really interesting. Both collections include The Day of Σ, a short video that was shipped with Maverick Hunter X (a remake of Mega Man X for the PSP) and details the origins of Sigma and his chaotic legion of robotic Mavericks, serving as something of a prelude to the events in Mega Man X. Each collection also includes a digital museum full of Mega Man X history including hi-res trailers for each game in the series. Each collection also comes with a soundtrack that encompasses the soundscape of each game in the series (along with a few Collection specific tunes and remixes). A challenge mode called X Challenge will also be included in the X Legacy Collections. The mode tests the mettle of Mega Man fanatics by putting them up against two bosses at a time armed with up to three bonus weapons. The boss rush mode will include online leaderboards for players to compare times and vie for high scores. Both Mega Man X Legacy Collections will release on July 24. A retail bundle that includes both will be available on Xbox One, PS4, and Switch. The version for Xbox One and PS4 will include discs for both collections while the Switch version will have a cartridge for the first collection and a digital code for the second. All of this will help Capcom build hype for Mega Man 11 which releases later this summer. View full article
  13. The route to an official announcement of the Spyro Reignited Trilogy has been long and confusing. Back in February, Kotaku sources revealed that the game would be coming with an announcement in March for a release in late 2018. Then a Target PR rep accidentally dished on the title just two weeks ago. We now have an official reveal and trailer along with a release date. It turns out that the manager of the Ask Target twitter account didn't have the most recent information on the upcoming trilogy dubbing it the Spyro Treasure Trilogy. It could be that was the working title for Activision's remaster project or it may have been changed at the last minute which led to a delay in the official reveal to early April. Spyro returns in the Spyro Reignited Trilogy which remasters Spyro the Dragon, Spyro 2: Ripto's Rage!, and Spyro: Year of the Dragon. The games have been given an entirely new set of assets based on the original characters and locations from the PlayStation 1 classics. The collection honestly looks like a completely different series of games in the best way possible. As a nod to the original Spyro reveal, players who have the Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy on the PS4 can input the following code on the title screen for Crash Bandicoot 3: Warped (↑ ↑ ↓ ↓ ← → ← → square) to watch the trailer for the Spyro Reignited Trilogy (or you can just watch it below). The trilogy was remastered by Toys for Bob and includes revamped environments, modernized controls, and fully recreated cinematics. The team even managed to bring back Tom Kenny, who voiced Spyro in Ripto's Rage! and Year of the Dragon, to rerecord his roles as well as the dialogue for the first title in the series. “We’re deeply passionate about staying true to the legacy of the original three Spyro games with the Spyro Reignited Trilogy,” said Paul Yan, the chief creative officer at Toys for Bob. “We’ve poured a lot of love into making the personalities and worlds feel just like fans remember them, while also keeping the game collection surprisingly fresh with lush, high definition detail. We’re bringing back the Spyro we all fell in love with 20 years ago.” The Spyro Reignited Trilogy will release on September 21 on PS4 and Xbox One.
  14. The route to an official announcement of the Spyro Reignited Trilogy has been long and confusing. Back in February, Kotaku sources revealed that the game would be coming with an announcement in March for a release in late 2018. Then a Target PR rep accidentally dished on the title just two weeks ago. We now have an official reveal and trailer along with a release date. It turns out that the manager of the Ask Target twitter account didn't have the most recent information on the upcoming trilogy dubbing it the Spyro Treasure Trilogy. It could be that was the working title for Activision's remaster project or it may have been changed at the last minute which led to a delay in the official reveal to early April. Spyro returns in the Spyro Reignited Trilogy which remasters Spyro the Dragon, Spyro 2: Ripto's Rage!, and Spyro: Year of the Dragon. The games have been given an entirely new set of assets based on the original characters and locations from the PlayStation 1 classics. The collection honestly looks like a completely different series of games in the best way possible. As a nod to the original Spyro reveal, players who have the Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy on the PS4 can input the following code on the title screen for Crash Bandicoot 3: Warped (↑ ↑ ↓ ↓ ← → ← → square) to watch the trailer for the Spyro Reignited Trilogy (or you can just watch it below). The trilogy was remastered by Toys for Bob and includes revamped environments, modernized controls, and fully recreated cinematics. The team even managed to bring back Tom Kenny, who voiced Spyro in Ripto's Rage! and Year of the Dragon, to rerecord his roles as well as the dialogue for the first title in the series. “We’re deeply passionate about staying true to the legacy of the original three Spyro games with the Spyro Reignited Trilogy,” said Paul Yan, the chief creative officer at Toys for Bob. “We’ve poured a lot of love into making the personalities and worlds feel just like fans remember them, while also keeping the game collection surprisingly fresh with lush, high definition detail. We’re bringing back the Spyro we all fell in love with 20 years ago.” The Spyro Reignited Trilogy will release on September 21 on PS4 and Xbox One. View full article
  15. THQ Nordic announced today that Red Faction Guerrilla would be getting the remaster treatment for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. The official title of the game will be Red Faction Guerrilla Re-Mars-tered. That punny title is 100% real. Red Faction Guerrilla takes place about 50 years after the events of the original Red Faction. Players take on the role of a freedom fighter seeking to toss off the oppressive yoke of the Earth Defense Force (unrelated to the Earth Defense Force series). The game made a name for itself in 2009 with the unprecedented level of environment and structure destruction afforded to players who set foot in its open world. Re-Mars-tered will feature fully overhauled graphics that rework and freshen up the textures, modify the lighting and shadows, and shift how shader and post processing work. The new Red Faction Guerrilla will also support 4k resolution. Though we don't know exactly when Red Faction Guerrilla Re-Mars-tered will release, we know that it will hit stores sometime during Q2 of 2018, sometime between the beginning April and the end of June.
  16. THQ Nordic announced today that Red Faction Guerrilla would be getting the remaster treatment for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. The official title of the game will be Red Faction Guerrilla Re-Mars-tered. That punny title is 100% real. Red Faction Guerrilla takes place about 50 years after the events of the original Red Faction. Players take on the role of a freedom fighter seeking to toss off the oppressive yoke of the Earth Defense Force (unrelated to the Earth Defense Force series). The game made a name for itself in 2009 with the unprecedented level of environment and structure destruction afforded to players who set foot in its open world. Re-Mars-tered will feature fully overhauled graphics that rework and freshen up the textures, modify the lighting and shadows, and shift how shader and post processing work. The new Red Faction Guerrilla will also support 4k resolution. Though we don't know exactly when Red Faction Guerrilla Re-Mars-tered will release, we know that it will hit stores sometime during Q2 of 2018, sometime between the beginning April and the end of June. View full article
  17. Asher Vollmer programmed Threes in a shockingly short amount of time in 2013, but then assembled a team that would come to be known as Sirvo to refine the idea over the next year. Threes humbly released in 2014 for $2 on iOS and Android. Since then, people have been playing it like crazy. Mobile developers point to it as one of the best puzzle games out there. What is Threes? It's a game where players slide together 1s and 2s to make 3 and two 3s to make a 6 and so on. Despite it's seeming simplicity, the first player to reach the "end" only managed it a couple of months ago after years of playing the satisfying sliding game. So what's the deal with Threes? Is it one of the best games period? Naomi Lugo joins as a co-host to get to the bottom of this conundrum. Outro music: Threes 'Threes Is the Bees Knees' by timaeus222 (http://ocremix.org/song/26532/threes-is-the-bees-knees) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod You can follow Naomi on Twitter @NaomiNLugo where you can find her thoughts on Detective Pikachu and Isle of Dogs. You can also find her work on Extra Life (that's here!) and Twin Cities Geek! New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  18. Jack Gardner

    The Best Games Period - Episode 89 - Threes

    Asher Vollmer programmed Threes in a shockingly short amount of time in 2013, but then assembled a team that would come to be known as Sirvo to refine the idea over the next year. Threes humbly released in 2014 for $2 on iOS and Android. Since then, people have been playing it like crazy. Mobile developers point to it as one of the best puzzle games out there. What is Threes? It's a game where players slide together 1s and 2s to make 3 and two 3s to make a 6 and so on. Despite it's seeming simplicity, the first player to reach the "end" only managed it a couple of months ago after years of playing the satisfying sliding game. So what's the deal with Threes? Is it one of the best games period? Naomi Lugo joins as a co-host to get to the bottom of this conundrum. Outro music: Threes 'Threes Is the Bees Knees' by timaeus222 (http://ocremix.org/song/26532/threes-is-the-bees-knees) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod You can follow Naomi on Twitter @NaomiNLugo where you can find her thoughts on Detective Pikachu and Isle of Dogs. You can also find her work on Extra Life (that's here!) and Twin Cities Geek! New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  19. Titan Quest may have been out for over a decade, but it has just released on consoles for the first time. Players can now experience the Diablo-like ARPG based on mythologies from around the world. Crafted by Brian Sullivan, one of the co-creators of Age of Empires, players travel across Europe, the Middle East, and Asia in an attempt to stop the long imprisoned Titans from destroying the planet. With the help of the gods themselves, it might just be possible. Titan Quest is notable for its story having been written by Randall Wallace, the mind behind the film Braveheart. The console version features completely overhauled graphics that bring the 2006 game up to modern graphical standards. It also supports online co-op play for up to six players. That's right, up to five of your friends can run around the ancient world doing battle with mythical creatures. With controls remapped to console gamepads, it's never been easier to play. Titan Quest is available now for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. A Nintendo Switch version is currently in development, but the official word is that it will be released when it is done. A couch co-op mode is also on the way. What do you think? Will you be picking up Titan Quest? View full article
  20. Titan Quest may have been out for over a decade, but it has just released on consoles for the first time. Players can now experience the Diablo-like ARPG based on mythologies from around the world. Crafted by Brian Sullivan, one of the co-creators of Age of Empires, players travel across Europe, the Middle East, and Asia in an attempt to stop the long imprisoned Titans from destroying the planet. With the help of the gods themselves, it might just be possible. Titan Quest is notable for its story having been written by Randall Wallace, the mind behind the film Braveheart. The console version features completely overhauled graphics that bring the 2006 game up to modern graphical standards. It also supports online co-op play for up to six players. That's right, up to five of your friends can run around the ancient world doing battle with mythical creatures. With controls remapped to console gamepads, it's never been easier to play. Titan Quest is available now for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. A Nintendo Switch version is currently in development, but the official word is that it will be released when it is done. A couch co-op mode is also on the way. What do you think? Will you be picking up Titan Quest?
  21. A Kickstarter that succeeded in 2015 will be paying off later this year when Shape of the World releases on PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One - and now the Nintendo Switch, too. "I’m thrilled to officially announced that Shape of the World is coming to Nintendo Switch this year," said Hollow Tree Games' founder Stu Maxwell, "nobody on the team expected the game to look so nice on the Switch, we’re really happy with it… We can’t wait to see what everyone else thinks." Maxwell also works as a senior VFX artist at The Coalition, the studio behind Gears of War 4. Part first-person exploration and part surreal art piece, Shape of the World places players in a technicolor world filled with psychedelic flora and fauna. That world expands and grows as players progress through it. Waterfalls, mountains, mysterious monoliths, and more procedurally sprout from the surrounding terrain, making each foray into the world. Shape of the World is intended as a relaxing, stress-free experience. There won't be any enemies or challenges beyond the thrill of evergreen exploration. Players can interact with animals, plants, and the various ruins that dot the world to uncover its secrets. Hollow Tree Games has also included a soundtrack that follows progress through the procedurally generated world. Shape of the World will launch on PC, PS4, Switch, and Xbox One in the next few months. View full article
  22. A Kickstarter that succeeded in 2015 will be paying off later this year when Shape of the World releases on PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One - and now the Nintendo Switch, too. "I’m thrilled to officially announced that Shape of the World is coming to Nintendo Switch this year," said Hollow Tree Games' founder Stu Maxwell, "nobody on the team expected the game to look so nice on the Switch, we’re really happy with it… We can’t wait to see what everyone else thinks." Maxwell also works as a senior VFX artist at The Coalition, the studio behind Gears of War 4. Part first-person exploration and part surreal art piece, Shape of the World places players in a technicolor world filled with psychedelic flora and fauna. That world expands and grows as players progress through it. Waterfalls, mountains, mysterious monoliths, and more procedurally sprout from the surrounding terrain, making each foray into the world. Shape of the World is intended as a relaxing, stress-free experience. There won't be any enemies or challenges beyond the thrill of evergreen exploration. Players can interact with animals, plants, and the various ruins that dot the world to uncover its secrets. Hollow Tree Games has also included a soundtrack that follows progress through the procedurally generated world. Shape of the World will launch on PC, PS4, Switch, and Xbox One in the next few months.
  23. As we reported last August, Frontier Developments has been working on a RollerCoaster Tycoon-like park building sim based on Jurassic World. Now they have upped the number of Jeff Goldblums working on their game alongside them from 0 to 1. Jeff Goldblum will be taking up the mantle of Dr. Ian Malcolm in the upcoming theme park building sim Jurassic World Evolution. Frontier Developments, the studio behind Elite: Dangerous, Planet Coaster, and RollerCoaster Tycoon 3, managed to snag the actor to provide the guiding voice for their game tie-in with the upcoming Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. for PC, PlayStation®4 and Xbox One Jurassic World Evolution will give players the opportunity to build Jurassic World for themselves and see if they can make sure that life doesn't find a way - all accompanied by the soothing voice of Jeff Goldblum. As Dr. Ian Malcolm, Goldblum will introduce tactical and moral choices that players will encounter as they build an ever larger park of ever more dangerous dinos. While the game itself focuses on park building, it does contain a story. The narrative will be separate from that of the Jurassic World films, though familiar faces will certainly make appearances. Jurassic World Evolution will release this summer for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One, likely around the theatrical release of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom in June. View full article
  24. As we reported last August, Frontier Developments has been working on a RollerCoaster Tycoon-like park building sim based on Jurassic World. Now they have upped the number of Jeff Goldblums working on their game alongside them from 0 to 1. Jeff Goldblum will be taking up the mantle of Dr. Ian Malcolm in the upcoming theme park building sim Jurassic World Evolution. Frontier Developments, the studio behind Elite: Dangerous, Planet Coaster, and RollerCoaster Tycoon 3, managed to snag the actor to provide the guiding voice for their game tie-in with the upcoming Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. for PC, PlayStation®4 and Xbox One Jurassic World Evolution will give players the opportunity to build Jurassic World for themselves and see if they can make sure that life doesn't find a way - all accompanied by the soothing voice of Jeff Goldblum. As Dr. Ian Malcolm, Goldblum will introduce tactical and moral choices that players will encounter as they build an ever larger park of ever more dangerous dinos. While the game itself focuses on park building, it does contain a story. The narrative will be separate from that of the Jurassic World films, though familiar faces will certainly make appearances. Jurassic World Evolution will release this summer for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One, likely around the theatrical release of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom in June.
  25. The Long Dark presents players with an existential apocalypse and tasks them with surviving the wild in the face of an unending winter. Originally a Kickstarter project, The Long Dark has come a long way from its humble beginnings in 2013. Launched in 2014 as an Early Access title, the team at Hinterland has patiently improved and updated their studio's premier title up to and beyond its official release in 2017. The Long Dark still lacks its entire single-player campaign with two episodes of its five episode story mode released to date. That being said, it stands unique among the most prominent survival titles with its focus squarely on survival, stripping many of the distractions away from the gameplay and pitting players on an inexorable collision course with death. With such a long and transparent development process, there seems to be a wide range of opinions on The Long Dark. Can it stand as one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker 'All I Want for Christmas Is Grandma's Sweet Elixir Soup' by Ridiculously Garrett (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03696) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod You can follow Naomi on Twitter @NaomiNLugo where you can find her thoughts on Final Fantasy XV, the live-action adaptations of Death Note and Full Metal Alchemist, and her work. You can also find her work on Extra Life (that's here!) and Twin Cities Geek! New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
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