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Found 65 results

  1. I don’t own a virtual reality headset and have little familiarity with the Sniper Elite series but Sniper Elite VR made me consider diving into both. The upcoming game, a collaboration between developers Rebellion and Just Add Water, uses the immersion of VR to enhance the already tense thrill of sharpshooting. This reinvention on the popular series is a standalone entry set in World War 2 era Sicily. Nazi forces, specifically German U-boats, occupy the Italian city. Players join up with the local resistance force to help drive them out. Story specifics are scarce, but author Tony Schumacher, known for his John Rosset series of war novels, lends his writing chops to the campaign. Rebellion boasts the adventure will take players across a variety of locales, from wartorn villages to airfields and bunkers. I spent a brief time with Sniper Elite VR at E3 where it had been officially unveiled. Rebellion had the game set up for PlayStation VR, though it’s also compatible with Oculus Rift and available through SteamVR and Viveport. On Sony’s headset, players can control the game using either PlayStation Move, PlayStation Aim, or the DualShock 4. The Aim became my weapon of choice; it’s gun-shaped form lends to the most authentic sniper experience. The demo began by dropping onto the rooftop of village warzone. Shots whizzed perilously towards by my head from an enemy on the ground which forced me to quickly grab a weapon to retaliate. As I brought the the Aim controller to up my eye the view transitioned into a sniper scope for realistic aiming. It’s an awesome mechanic that effectively sold the idea that I was holding an actual sniper rifle. I took the shot which then entered into Sniper Elite’s famous slow-motion x-ray kill cam, which has been rebuilt from scratch to suit VR. The bullet tore through his sternum, graphically displaying every shattered bone and ruptured organ as it exited his body. I dashed across makeshift bridges to other rooftops and took down foes hunkered in adjacent buildings and on the street. At one point a tank entered the fray and unleashed a barrage of cannonfire. The explosions looked and sounded great. The well-tuned controls impressed; I never had an issue with performing an action. Popping in and out of cover, physically dodging incoming fire, then peering into the scope and nailing a clean headshot felt unexpectedly thrilling. Movement and camera control can either be the standard smooth transition like in regular shooters or the staple VR teleport. I opted for the former and used the sticks to run and look around as normal. Though functional and familiar, that smoothness came at a price: a mild spell of motion sickness that forced me to wrap things up sooner than expected. Still, as I hobbled out of the demo room, I walked away pleased with what I played. Rebellion has done a lot of work to make VR a natural fit for Sniper Elite and it should be a unique treat for fans. Unfortunately, the game has no release window as of yet. We’ll have to wait and see when we can engage in this brutal and immersive fight for liberation. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games
  2. I don’t own a virtual reality headset and have little familiarity with the Sniper Elite series but Sniper Elite VR made me consider diving into both. The upcoming game, a collaboration between developers Rebellion and Just Add Water, uses the immersion of VR to enhance the already tense thrill of sharpshooting. This reinvention on the popular series is a standalone entry set in World War 2 era Sicily. Nazi forces, specifically German U-boats, occupy the Italian city. Players join up with the local resistance force to help drive them out. Story specifics are scarce, but author Tony Schumacher, known for his John Rosset series of war novels, lends his writing chops to the campaign. Rebellion boasts the adventure will take players across a variety of locales, from wartorn villages to airfields and bunkers. I spent a brief time with Sniper Elite VR at E3 where it had been officially unveiled. Rebellion had the game set up for PlayStation VR, though it’s also compatible with Oculus Rift and available through SteamVR and Viveport. On Sony’s headset, players can control the game using either PlayStation Move, PlayStation Aim, or the DualShock 4. The Aim became my weapon of choice; it’s gun-shaped form lends to the most authentic sniper experience. The demo began by dropping onto the rooftop of village warzone. Shots whizzed perilously towards by my head from an enemy on the ground which forced me to quickly grab a weapon to retaliate. As I brought the the Aim controller to up my eye the view transitioned into a sniper scope for realistic aiming. It’s an awesome mechanic that effectively sold the idea that I was holding an actual sniper rifle. I took the shot which then entered into Sniper Elite’s famous slow-motion x-ray kill cam, which has been rebuilt from scratch to suit VR. The bullet tore through his sternum, graphically displaying every shattered bone and ruptured organ as it exited his body. I dashed across makeshift bridges to other rooftops and took down foes hunkered in adjacent buildings and on the street. At one point a tank entered the fray and unleashed a barrage of cannonfire. The explosions looked and sounded great. The well-tuned controls impressed; I never had an issue with performing an action. Popping in and out of cover, physically dodging incoming fire, then peering into the scope and nailing a clean headshot felt unexpectedly thrilling. Movement and camera control can either be the standard smooth transition like in regular shooters or the staple VR teleport. I opted for the former and used the sticks to run and look around as normal. Though functional and familiar, that smoothness came at a price: a mild spell of motion sickness that forced me to wrap things up sooner than expected. Still, as I hobbled out of the demo room, I walked away pleased with what I played. Rebellion has done a lot of work to make VR a natural fit for Sniper Elite and it should be a unique treat for fans. Unfortunately, the game has no release window as of yet. We’ll have to wait and see when we can engage in this brutal and immersive fight for liberation. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games View full article
  3. Jetpacks sit high among the list of awesome contraptions many of us will likely never use. Fortunately, Ascend is a virtual reality title that simulates that experience while adding a competitive wrinkle. Team Newspaper Hats’ upcoming game pits competing headset users against each other in clashes that combine aerial dogfights with Capture the Flag-style gameplay. At E3 2019, I strapped inside of an Oculus Rift to take to the skies in, quite literally, high-stakes combat. Ascend takes place on an abandoned, dystopian world where its remaining warriors engage in aerial contests in the name of glory. The demo features two characters: Mufid the Inventor and Gloriana the Highborne. The former wields plasma blasters while the latter uses twin holoswords. Ascend’s multiplayer supports up to three players so I imagine at last one more warrior will be added in the future. Since I have more experience using guns in VR than melee weapons, I opt for Mufid. The free-for-all mode Fracture stands as the centerpiece of Ascend. This contest tasks players with collecting objectives and then delivering them to the top of a tower at the map’s center. The first person to deliver them all wins. Objectives are represented by glowing orbs scattered across the area. Since VR still hasn’t been widely adopted, a multiplayer game runs the high risk of having a shallow user pool. Thankfully, Ascend supports cross-play across its three platforms: Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, and Windows MR. This should hopefully help bolster the player count. Flight is executed by Ascend’s Lean Motion System. Leaning your head forward allows players to soar in that direction. Designated buttons on the Oculus Touch controllers operate upward and downward propulsion. While it does emulate the sensation of a using a jetpack, I also couldn’t help but feel like I was piloting Tony Stark’s Iron Man suit. As I load into the tutorial area the somewhat sensitive head-tracking takes adjusting. I repeatedly wiz headfirst into walls (the virtual kind, thankfully) until I figure out the right degree to lean in for smooth flight. Once I do, I’m able to zip around the world with relative ease and it feels great. Best and most importantly of all, I don’t feel a hint of motion sickness. Fracture begins and I immediately notice the in-game markers indicating the general locations of the objectives. I spot the first orb, collect it, and then race upwards towards the top of the tower. Just when I figure out how to correctly stick the landing in this zone, my opponent and demo partner discovers and eradicates me. If nothing else, the setback reminds me of my own offensive arsenal. In addition to shooting lasers Mufid has a neat special ability. Holding the controllers sideways charges her Bullet Hell technique. Upon release Mufid fires a spherical barrier that traps and ricochets any bullet fired inside of it. This is great for capturing foes and then tearing them to shreds with a single shot. After respawning I locate my opponent, now clutching an orb, racing to the tower. I see this as a great chance to try my special move. Miraculously, I catch her inside of the sphere on my first attempt and watch in glee as my follow up shot annihilates my adversary. I collect the now free orb, fly up to the tower unimpeded, and, after waiting for a timer to deplete, score the first point. I have my bearings by this point so I proceed to go on the offensive, relentlessly chasing and blasting my opponent before they can locate the last two objectives. Shooting feels good and it’s genuinely thrilling to take someone down. My aggressive strategy pays off; I capture the remaining two orbs with relative ease, giving me the 3-0 victory. Ascend plays well and definitely has its thrills, but I worry about its longevity. Fracture seems to be the only mode it has going for it thus far, and playing the same thing will eventually get old. Hopefully some more destinations will make their way into the game. But if jetpacks + sports + combat sounds like a winning formula, look for Ascend to launch on PC this summer. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games
  4. Jetpacks sit high among the list of awesome contraptions many of us will likely never use. Fortunately, Ascend is a virtual reality title that simulates that experience while adding a competitive wrinkle. Team Newspaper Hats’ upcoming game pits competing headset users against each other in clashes that combine aerial dogfights with Capture the Flag-style gameplay. At E3 2019, I strapped inside of an Oculus Rift to take to the skies in, quite literally, high-stakes combat. Ascend takes place on an abandoned, dystopian world where its remaining warriors engage in aerial contests in the name of glory. The demo features two characters: Mufid the Inventor and Gloriana the Highborne. The former wields plasma blasters while the latter uses twin holoswords. Ascend’s multiplayer supports up to three players so I imagine at last one more warrior will be added in the future. Since I have more experience using guns in VR than melee weapons, I opt for Mufid. The free-for-all mode Fracture stands as the centerpiece of Ascend. This contest tasks players with collecting objectives and then delivering them to the top of a tower at the map’s center. The first person to deliver them all wins. Objectives are represented by glowing orbs scattered across the area. Since VR still hasn’t been widely adopted, a multiplayer game runs the high risk of having a shallow user pool. Thankfully, Ascend supports cross-play across its three platforms: Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, and Windows MR. This should hopefully help bolster the player count. Flight is executed by Ascend’s Lean Motion System. Leaning your head forward allows players to soar in that direction. Designated buttons on the Oculus Touch controllers operate upward and downward propulsion. While it does emulate the sensation of a using a jetpack, I also couldn’t help but feel like I was piloting Tony Stark’s Iron Man suit. As I load into the tutorial area the somewhat sensitive head-tracking takes adjusting. I repeatedly wiz headfirst into walls (the virtual kind, thankfully) until I figure out the right degree to lean in for smooth flight. Once I do, I’m able to zip around the world with relative ease and it feels great. Best and most importantly of all, I don’t feel a hint of motion sickness. Fracture begins and I immediately notice the in-game markers indicating the general locations of the objectives. I spot the first orb, collect it, and then race upwards towards the top of the tower. Just when I figure out how to correctly stick the landing in this zone, my opponent and demo partner discovers and eradicates me. If nothing else, the setback reminds me of my own offensive arsenal. In addition to shooting lasers Mufid has a neat special ability. Holding the controllers sideways charges her Bullet Hell technique. Upon release Mufid fires a spherical barrier that traps and ricochets any bullet fired inside of it. This is great for capturing foes and then tearing them to shreds with a single shot. After respawning I locate my opponent, now clutching an orb, racing to the tower. I see this as a great chance to try my special move. Miraculously, I catch her inside of the sphere on my first attempt and watch in glee as my follow up shot annihilates my adversary. I collect the now free orb, fly up to the tower unimpeded, and, after waiting for a timer to deplete, score the first point. I have my bearings by this point so I proceed to go on the offensive, relentlessly chasing and blasting my opponent before they can locate the last two objectives. Shooting feels good and it’s genuinely thrilling to take someone down. My aggressive strategy pays off; I capture the remaining two orbs with relative ease, giving me the 3-0 victory. Ascend plays well and definitely has its thrills, but I worry about its longevity. Fracture seems to be the only mode it has going for it thus far, and playing the same thing will eventually get old. Hopefully some more destinations will make their way into the game. But if jetpacks + sports + combat sounds like a winning formula, look for Ascend to launch on PC this summer. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games View full article
  5. Namco Bandai has announced that they will be offering Ace Combat 5: The Unsung War in its entirety as a pre-order incentive for Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown. It will be available for both digital and physical editions of Ace Combat 7, though those who opt for the physical copy could miss out on a dynamic theme. Here's what's included in the pre-order bundle: Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown dynamic theme - only available for digital pre-orders A McDonnell Douglas F-4E plane and three aircraft skins Ace Combat 5: The Unsung War Ace Combat 7 will be a full $60 at launch with a season pass available for $25 that includes three extra planes, three new stages, and an in-game music player. A deluxe edition will be sold digitally that packages the game with the season pass and will include the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter plane. Presumably, this means that Namco Bandai has updated Ace Combat 5 for modern systems, which might be worth the price of admission on its own. The hightlight of the PlayStation 2 run of the Ace Combat series, 5 puts players in the middle of a fictionalized version of our world, dubbed affectionately Strangereal, that has its two major superpowers on the brink of turning its Cold War into a hot one. The characters, flight controls, and scenarios are all excellent as each mission escalates in intensity. It's one of the best arcade flight sims out there, so seeing it in the air once again will be a real treat. We got some time to play with Ace Combat 7's VR features hands-on last year and it was a really amazing experience. Despite being the seventh numbered title in the Ace Combat series, 7 will be a direct sequel to 5. Sunau Katabuchi, the writer of Ace Combat 5, will return to write for Skies Unknown and has left open the possibility that characters from The Unsung War will return to fly again. The story will focus on the political conflict over the construction of a massive space elevator that spans multiple nations. Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown will release on January 18, 2018 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. The VR version will be exclusive to the PS4 version. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  6. Namco Bandai has announced that they will be offering Ace Combat 5: The Unsung War in its entirety as a pre-order incentive for Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown. It will be available for both digital and physical editions of Ace Combat 7, though those who opt for the physical copy could miss out on a dynamic theme. Here's what's included in the pre-order bundle: Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown dynamic theme - only available for digital pre-orders A McDonnell Douglas F-4E plane and three aircraft skins Ace Combat 5: The Unsung War Ace Combat 7 will be a full $60 at launch with a season pass available for $25 that includes three extra planes, three new stages, and an in-game music player. A deluxe edition will be sold digitally that packages the game with the season pass and will include the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter plane. Presumably, this means that Namco Bandai has updated Ace Combat 5 for modern systems, which might be worth the price of admission on its own. The hightlight of the PlayStation 2 run of the Ace Combat series, 5 puts players in the middle of a fictionalized version of our world, dubbed affectionately Strangereal, that has its two major superpowers on the brink of turning its Cold War into a hot one. The characters, flight controls, and scenarios are all excellent as each mission escalates in intensity. It's one of the best arcade flight sims out there, so seeing it in the air once again will be a real treat. We got some time to play with Ace Combat 7's VR features hands-on last year and it was a really amazing experience. Despite being the seventh numbered title in the Ace Combat series, 7 will be a direct sequel to 5. Sunau Katabuchi, the writer of Ace Combat 5, will return to write for Skies Unknown and has left open the possibility that characters from The Unsung War will return to fly again. The story will focus on the political conflict over the construction of a massive space elevator that spans multiple nations. Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown will release on January 18, 2018 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. The VR version will be exclusive to the PS4 version. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  7. Elijah Wood's company SpectreVision reminded everyone at E3 that their strange VR project Transference still exists and will be releasing later this year. While we didn't know much about it when it debuted in 2017, this year's showing revealed quite a bit about the game Wood described as a darkly twisted psychological thriller. Transference will tell the story of the unfortunate Hayes family whose minds have been linked by an experiment conducted by the father, Raymond Hayes. Players will flit between the three consciousnesses to see the perspective of each family member, but it rapidly becomes apparent that the data, their memories, are corrupted - and there's something else stalking through their minds. The darkly unsettling narrative hopes to achieve a disturbing atmosphere at least in part with its blended use of live-action and digital scenes. That's still not a ton of information to go on, but we will certainly learn more when Transference launches this fall for VR devices (PlayStation VR, Oculus Rift, HTC Vive) and the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC sans VR.
  8. Elijah Wood's company SpectreVision reminded everyone at E3 that their strange VR project Transference still exists and will be releasing later this year. While we didn't know much about it when it debuted in 2017, this year's showing revealed quite a bit about the game Wood described as a darkly twisted psychological thriller. Transference will tell the story of the unfortunate Hayes family whose minds have been linked by an experiment conducted by the father, Raymond Hayes. Players will flit between the three consciousnesses to see the perspective of each family member, but it rapidly becomes apparent that the data, their memories, are corrupted - and there's something else stalking through their minds. The darkly unsettling narrative hopes to achieve a disturbing atmosphere at least in part with its blended use of live-action and digital scenes. That's still not a ton of information to go on, but we will certainly learn more when Transference launches this fall for VR devices (PlayStation VR, Oculus Rift, HTC Vive) and the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC sans VR. View full article
  9. A new VR game releasing today that pits players against a horde of increasingly silly zombies. Your only weapons? Your bare hands and anything else that might possibly be thrown as a projectile. Players will have to defend themselves by throwing items at the encroaching zombie horde - hopefully driving them back from a variety of ridiculous locations. In Throw Anything, players are able to grab items in their environment to appropriate them as thrown weapons. Of course, players might run short on throwables and might be forced to resort to breaking apart large items in their vicinity, or even use the NPCs around them in a pinch! The Early Access game launching on Steam today will include five levels for players to master. These levels are filled with zombies, four mid bosses, and five intimidating main bosses to overcome. Kalev Jung, the CEO of developer VisualLight released a statement saying, “Throw Anything is not for the faint of heart. Action tower defense takes on a whole new meaning in VR! Suddenly, the threat is right in front of you – and you need to be quick on your feet to avoid getting your face eaten.” Throw Anything will be available for HTC Vive starting today via Steam Early Access with PSVR and Oculus Rift support coming later this year.
  10. A new VR game releasing today that pits players against a horde of increasingly silly zombies. Your only weapons? Your bare hands and anything else that might possibly be thrown as a projectile. Players will have to defend themselves by throwing items at the encroaching zombie horde - hopefully driving them back from a variety of ridiculous locations. In Throw Anything, players are able to grab items in their environment to appropriate them as thrown weapons. Of course, players might run short on throwables and might be forced to resort to breaking apart large items in their vicinity, or even use the NPCs around them in a pinch! The Early Access game launching on Steam today will include five levels for players to master. These levels are filled with zombies, four mid bosses, and five intimidating main bosses to overcome. Kalev Jung, the CEO of developer VisualLight released a statement saying, “Throw Anything is not for the faint of heart. Action tower defense takes on a whole new meaning in VR! Suddenly, the threat is right in front of you – and you need to be quick on your feet to avoid getting your face eaten.” Throw Anything will be available for HTC Vive starting today via Steam Early Access with PSVR and Oculus Rift support coming later this year. View full article
  11. Just a Quick Question , As i was Wondering if people stream or what going on.
  12. There's a lot of weird, experimental things happening in VR these days *cough* VRChat *cough*. One game on the horizon seems like it might be attempting to find more conventional success - with a bit of a twist. Playful Corp has been hard at work on Star Child, a game exclusive to PlayStation VR, following the release of Super Lucky's Tale for Xbox One and PC. Star Child offers up a narrative focused platformer with a cinematic edge. It follows a woman named Spectra on a mission of utmost importance that crashes her on a hostile planet, uncovering a threat to the entire universe. Interestingly enough for a game dedicated to VR, Star Child isn't a first-person game. Instead, it embraces the perspective offered by side-scrolling platformers. How exactly that will translate into a unique virtual reality experience remains to be seen, but Playful Corp has teased that their use of virtual reality will shine a new light on the familiar genre and interact with Spectra's evolving abilities in novel ways. Paul Bettner, the CEO and founder of Playful Corp, explained in a recent blog post how the developer has approached their project: With Star Child, we were drawn to the elegant simplicity of the side-scrolling platformer genre, which can convey an incredible amount of narrative through non-traditional means. There’s a subtle power to telling a story through continuously changing environments and cinematic visuals, as well as character animations, especially the way players can move Spectra forward and learn to master their surroundings through gameplay. Enhanced by the magic of virtual reality, these elements take on a new dimension as Spectra’s powers grow and she pushes deeper into a strange, immersive world full of dark secrets. Inspired by countless science fiction adventure classics across games, books and movies, Star Child is at its heart both a mystery and journey of self-discovery. Star Child launches some time this year for the PlayStation 4's VR setup.
  13. There's a lot of weird, experimental things happening in VR these days *cough* VRChat *cough*. One game on the horizon seems like it might be attempting to find more conventional success - with a bit of a twist. Playful Corp has been hard at work on Star Child, a game exclusive to PlayStation VR, following the release of Super Lucky's Tale for Xbox One and PC. Star Child offers up a narrative focused platformer with a cinematic edge. It follows a woman named Spectra on a mission of utmost importance that crashes her on a hostile planet, uncovering a threat to the entire universe. Interestingly enough for a game dedicated to VR, Star Child isn't a first-person game. Instead, it embraces the perspective offered by side-scrolling platformers. How exactly that will translate into a unique virtual reality experience remains to be seen, but Playful Corp has teased that their use of virtual reality will shine a new light on the familiar genre and interact with Spectra's evolving abilities in novel ways. Paul Bettner, the CEO and founder of Playful Corp, explained in a recent blog post how the developer has approached their project: With Star Child, we were drawn to the elegant simplicity of the side-scrolling platformer genre, which can convey an incredible amount of narrative through non-traditional means. There’s a subtle power to telling a story through continuously changing environments and cinematic visuals, as well as character animations, especially the way players can move Spectra forward and learn to master their surroundings through gameplay. Enhanced by the magic of virtual reality, these elements take on a new dimension as Spectra’s powers grow and she pushes deeper into a strange, immersive world full of dark secrets. Inspired by countless science fiction adventure classics across games, books and movies, Star Child is at its heart both a mystery and journey of self-discovery. Star Child launches some time this year for the PlayStation 4's VR setup. View full article
  14. First-person puzzler/philosophical journey The Talos Principle received acclaim when it first released on PC in late 2014. After being ported to console and mobile, the game makes the next logical leap: virtual reality. The Talos Principle VR is available now on Steam for Oculus Rift and HTC Vive. According to developer Croteam, the game has been entirely redesigned for VR and features fully customizable controls. This version runs for $39.99 but owners of the original game receive a 25% discount (knocking it down to around $29.99). Additionally, the four-episode Road to Gehenna expansion is included with The Talos Principle VR. Any of you Oculus or Vive users plan on to taking a look at The Talos Principle?
  15. First-person puzzler/philosophical journey The Talos Principle received acclaim when it first released on PC in late 2014. After being ported to console and mobile, the game makes the next logical leap: virtual reality. The Talos Principle VR is available now on Steam for Oculus Rift and HTC Vive. According to developer Croteam, the game has been entirely redesigned for VR and features fully customizable controls. This version runs for $39.99 but owners of the original game receive a 25% discount (knocking it down to around $29.99). Additionally, the four-episode Road to Gehenna expansion is included with The Talos Principle VR. Any of you Oculus or Vive users plan on to taking a look at The Talos Principle? View full article
  16. The sky-high price tag for VR has been one of the primary barriers keeping a majority of gamers away from the technology. At Oculus' Connect 4 event earlier today, Facebook announced plans to remedy that situation by dropping the price of its original headset as well as introducing a significantly cheaper model. In with the new first. Oculus Go is a standalone, "all-in-one" headset retailing for $199. Similar Samsung Gear VR, no PC (or phone) is required; just strap it on and play using the Wii nunchuck-esque single palm controller. Oculus Go arrives in early 2018. As of today, you can purchase the standard Oculus Rift model for $399.That package includes two touch controllers, two sensors, and seven free games. That's one whole Benjamin down from the $500 price that went into effect earlier this year, which in itself was a cut from $600 launch tag. If you've been eyeing VR but haven't taken the plunge yet, are these announcements enough to entice you? Does VR interest you at all?
  17. The sky-high price tag for VR has been one of the primary barriers keeping a majority of gamers away from the technology. At Oculus' Connect 4 event earlier today, Facebook announced plans to remedy that situation by dropping the price of its original headset as well as introducing a significantly cheaper model. In with the new first. Oculus Go is a standalone, "all-in-one" headset retailing for $199. Similar Samsung Gear VR, no PC (or phone) is required; just strap it on and play using the Wii nunchuck-esque single palm controller. Oculus Go arrives in early 2018. As of today, you can purchase the standard Oculus Rift model for $399.That package includes two touch controllers, two sensors, and seven free games. That's one whole Benjamin down from the $500 price that went into effect earlier this year, which in itself was a cut from $600 launch tag. If you've been eyeing VR but haven't taken the plunge yet, are these announcements enough to entice you? Does VR interest you at all? View full article
  18. Earth has been destroyed. The century following the apocalypse saw to a massive shift in the planet's ecosystem as the world grew cold and dark. What remained of humanity entered into a new ice age known as the Great Freeze. To survive, humans retreated to the narrow equatorial band around the planet and set up remote colonies over highly valuable resources outside of the habitable zone. ARKTIKA.1 focuses on a mercenary sent to defend one of those colonies in the ruins of old Russia. Known as ARKTIKA.1, the colony finds itself besieged by raiders, robots, and horrifying creatures that have adapted to the harsh climate. Players must use tactics, quick reflexes, and an array of customizable weaponry to combat those threats and discover what happened to ARKTIKA.1. This VR title comes to us courtesy of 4A Games, the developers of the Metro series. They've developed a new engine for use with VR tech that they tout will have "some of the most impressive visuals ever seen in VR." They've taken steps into the VR world while also working on the upcoming Metro Exodus slated for release next year. ARKTIKA.1 releases on October 10 for the Oculus Touch. It will be accompanied by a simultaneously released ebook titled ARKTIKA.1: My Name is Viktoria.
  19. Earth has been destroyed. The century following the apocalypse saw to a massive shift in the planet's ecosystem as the world grew cold and dark. What remained of humanity entered into a new ice age known as the Great Freeze. To survive, humans retreated to the narrow equatorial band around the planet and set up remote colonies over highly valuable resources outside of the habitable zone. ARKTIKA.1 focuses on a mercenary sent to defend one of those colonies in the ruins of old Russia. Known as ARKTIKA.1, the colony finds itself besieged by raiders, robots, and horrifying creatures that have adapted to the harsh climate. Players must use tactics, quick reflexes, and an array of customizable weaponry to combat those threats and discover what happened to ARKTIKA.1. This VR title comes to us courtesy of 4A Games, the developers of the Metro series. They've developed a new engine for use with VR tech that they tout will have "some of the most impressive visuals ever seen in VR." They've taken steps into the VR world while also working on the upcoming Metro Exodus slated for release next year. ARKTIKA.1 releases on October 10 for the Oculus Touch. It will be accompanied by a simultaneously released ebook titled ARKTIKA.1: My Name is Viktoria. View full article
  20. In a world where robots can control the skies as effectively as pilots, what's the point of human aviators? Ace Combat 7 brings its Strangereal universe (the term given to the grounded, but entirely fictional world portrayed in the majority of Ace Combat titles) into the near future to explore that very scenario. Ace Combat 7: Unknown Skies takes place several years after the events of Ace Combat 6: Fires of Liberation and takes the series back to Osea, the main location from Ace Combat 5: The Unsung War (with the possibility of characters from 5 reappearing in 7). The Osean Federation has undertaken a massive construction project to create a space elevator. Unfortunately, that construction spilled over into the Kingdom of Erusea, and they don't take too kindly to the project. That leads to a declaration of war from their ruler, Princess Rosa Cossette D'Elise. The writing and story are being handled by Sunao Katabuchi, who also wrote the highly acclaimed Ace Combat 5. I had a chance to play with the PSVR version of Ace Combat 7 recently. The VR setup for the combat flight sim places players directly in the pilot's seat, leading to one of the greatest VR experiences I've personally had to date. The demo constituted one of the early missions from the game, tasking players to launch themselves from an aircraft carrier to engage several incoming waves of adversaries. Being able to look out of the cockpit at various angles to identify bogies as I did barrel rolls and loops through the air was incredibly freeing. While Ace Combat 7 will release on Xbox One and PC as well as PlayStation 4, the PSVR version of the title will release with unique missions. Outside of the VR experience, Ace Combat 7 sticks to the classic Ace Combat gamepad control scheme. While the series might strive for realism in the graphics department, the moment to moment gameplay resembles an arcade flier more than anything else. Players take to the skies in aircraft that are sometimes armed with upwards of 100 missiles. Simple controls make learning the ropes relatively easy for newcomers, while veterans will find enough depth and difficulty to keep themselves hooked for a long, long time. Players can take to the skies in two player local co-op or multiplayer. Ace Combat 7, originally slated for a 2017 release, will now become available sometime in 2018 on PS4, Xbox One and PC.
  21. In a world where robots can control the skies as effectively as pilots, what's the point of human aviators? Ace Combat 7 brings its Strangereal universe (the term given to the grounded, but entirely fictional world portrayed in the majority of Ace Combat titles) into the near future to explore that very scenario. Ace Combat 7: Unknown Skies takes place several years after the events of Ace Combat 6: Fires of Liberation and takes the series back to Osea, the main location from Ace Combat 5: The Unsung War (with the possibility of characters from 5 reappearing in 7). The Osean Federation has undertaken a massive construction project to create a space elevator. Unfortunately, that construction spilled over into the Kingdom of Erusea, and they don't take too kindly to the project. That leads to a declaration of war from their ruler, Princess Rosa Cossette D'Elise. The writing and story are being handled by Sunao Katabuchi, who also wrote the highly acclaimed Ace Combat 5. I had a chance to play with the PSVR version of Ace Combat 7 recently. The VR setup for the combat flight sim places players directly in the pilot's seat, leading to one of the greatest VR experiences I've personally had to date. The demo constituted one of the early missions from the game, tasking players to launch themselves from an aircraft carrier to engage several incoming waves of adversaries. Being able to look out of the cockpit at various angles to identify bogies as I did barrel rolls and loops through the air was incredibly freeing. While Ace Combat 7 will release on Xbox One and PC as well as PlayStation 4, the PSVR version of the title will release with unique missions. Outside of the VR experience, Ace Combat 7 sticks to the classic Ace Combat gamepad control scheme. While the series might strive for realism in the graphics department, the moment to moment gameplay resembles an arcade flier more than anything else. Players take to the skies in aircraft that are sometimes armed with upwards of 100 missiles. Simple controls make learning the ropes relatively easy for newcomers, while veterans will find enough depth and difficulty to keep themselves hooked for a long, long time. Players can take to the skies in two player local co-op or multiplayer. Ace Combat 7, originally slated for a 2017 release, will now become available sometime in 2018 on PS4, Xbox One and PC. View full article
  22. This is Quill. She's the protagonist of an upcoming VR title called Moss and has enraptured thousands of gamers across the United States. How did she achieve that feat? Simple. She introduced herself - in American Sign Language. Last week, Polyarc animator Richard Lico made a routine tweet about his work bringing Quill to life. He'd had a bit of inspiration and decided that the voiceless mouse might be able to use sign language to communicate. "Since she can only squeak, I figured I'd play around with ways she can communicate with the player. Also a great perk for our deaf players," he tweeted. Seeing an endearing mouse using American Sign Language in a video game understandably caught a lot of attention, snagging tens of thousands of likes on social media. "Quill often needs to communicate with her guide, [the player], and I'm exploring ways in which she can do so. I came up with the idea of using ASL in conjunction with her existing pantomime methods, and wanted to test the idea," explained Lico in a short video posted the next day. "I had never animated sign language before, so I did some homework, and created this as a test example of what she could do in game. The response has been positive, and we're super excited about the opportunity to help support those who rely on ASL." In Moss, players take on the role of a spirit guide for Quill as she embarks on a heroic journey. The plan for Quill was always to have her communicate wordlessly with the player. She would use squeaks and broad pantomiming motions to get her points across. However, the strong reaction from the gaming community toward Lico's animation seems to have cemented the use of various ASL signs in Moss. “Sometimes she’ll pantomime if there’s not a good sign for it, and other times she’ll flat-out sign language what she wants you to know. This tweet really confirmed that we should do this,” Lico elaborated to Kotaku. “I’ve been blown away by the responses. Especially the ones where you get actual deaf people saying ‘Thank you.’ I just had no idea, being able to emotionally connect with something like that.” While this might seem like a small thing, sign language has largely been absent from video games. In fact, searching for any other results for sign language in games only turns up results for games that help people learn sign language, a barren Reddit thread from 2016 that mentions how some sign language is used in the background of Fullbright Company's Tacoma, and articles about Quill. There was some buzz way back in 2009 that Half-Life 2: Episode 3 would include a deaf character and sign-language, but... well... it's a Half-Life game and Valve, so we might not be seeing that any time soon. It's pretty incredible that Quill might just be the first video game character to communicate with predominantly via sign language in video game history. Moss is set to release sometime this winter for PlayStation VR.
  23. This is Quill. She's the protagonist of an upcoming VR title called Moss and has enraptured thousands of gamers across the United States. How did she achieve that feat? Simple. She introduced herself - in American Sign Language. Last week, Polyarc animator Richard Lico made a routine tweet about his work bringing Quill to life. He'd had a bit of inspiration and decided that the voiceless mouse might be able to use sign language to communicate. "Since she can only squeak, I figured I'd play around with ways she can communicate with the player. Also a great perk for our deaf players," he tweeted. Seeing an endearing mouse using American Sign Language in a video game understandably caught a lot of attention, snagging tens of thousands of likes on social media. "Quill often needs to communicate with her guide, [the player], and I'm exploring ways in which she can do so. I came up with the idea of using ASL in conjunction with her existing pantomime methods, and wanted to test the idea," explained Lico in a short video posted the next day. "I had never animated sign language before, so I did some homework, and created this as a test example of what she could do in game. The response has been positive, and we're super excited about the opportunity to help support those who rely on ASL." In Moss, players take on the role of a spirit guide for Quill as she embarks on a heroic journey. The plan for Quill was always to have her communicate wordlessly with the player. She would use squeaks and broad pantomiming motions to get her points across. However, the strong reaction from the gaming community toward Lico's animation seems to have cemented the use of various ASL signs in Moss. “Sometimes she’ll pantomime if there’s not a good sign for it, and other times she’ll flat-out sign language what she wants you to know. This tweet really confirmed that we should do this,” Lico elaborated to Kotaku. “I’ve been blown away by the responses. Especially the ones where you get actual deaf people saying ‘Thank you.’ I just had no idea, being able to emotionally connect with something like that.” While this might seem like a small thing, sign language has largely been absent from video games. In fact, searching for any other results for sign language in games only turns up results for games that help people learn sign language, a barren Reddit thread from 2016 that mentions how some sign language is used in the background of Fullbright Company's Tacoma, and articles about Quill. There was some buzz way back in 2009 that Half-Life 2: Episode 3 would include a deaf character and sign-language, but... well... it's a Half-Life game and Valve, so we might not be seeing that any time soon. It's pretty incredible that Quill might just be the first video game character to communicate with predominantly via sign language in video game history. Moss is set to release sometime this winter for PlayStation VR. View full article
  24. The potential for the Hololens was recently showcased by a fan creation. Abhishek Singh recreated the infamous World 1-1 from Super Mario Bros. using the Unity 3 engine and then tried it out in a very public location: Central Park in New York City. Singh donned the very famous plumber's iconic outfit and a headset to walk the level in real life. Goombas and green pipes sprawled out on the trail. Although Singh walked around some of the articles, he still jumped for mushrooms, stomped Goombas and leaped over trippy looking gaps. When consuming the mushrooms, the world shrank in reaction. People in the area didn't seem too concerned about a real-life Mario hopping around. This could be viewed as a small experiment in augmented reality's impact in real life perhaps? What retro games should be made in augmented reality? Would you play the Hololens in public? View full article
  25. The potential for the Hololens was recently showcased by a fan creation. Abhishek Singh recreated the infamous World 1-1 from Super Mario Bros. using the Unity 3 engine and then tried it out in a very public location: Central Park in New York City. Singh donned the very famous plumber's iconic outfit and a headset to walk the level in real life. Goombas and green pipes sprawled out on the trail. Although Singh walked around some of the articles, he still jumped for mushrooms, stomped Goombas and leaped over trippy looking gaps. When consuming the mushrooms, the world shrank in reaction. People in the area didn't seem too concerned about a real-life Mario hopping around. This could be viewed as a small experiment in augmented reality's impact in real life perhaps? What retro games should be made in augmented reality? Would you play the Hololens in public?
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