Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'tomb raider'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Extra Life News
    • Extra Life Updates
    • Best Practices
    • Community Content
    • Why I Extra Life
    • Fundraising
    • Contests
  • Gaming News
  • Features
  • Podcast

Discussions

  • Extra Life Discussions
    • General Extra Life Discussion
    • Local Extra Lifers
    • Fundraising Ideas
    • Live Streaming Tips & Tricks
    • Official Extra Life Stream Team Discussion
    • Extra Life JSON Code Discussion & Sharing
    • Extra Life United
    • Extra Life Q & A
  • Articles & Extra Life Announcements
    • Announcements
  • Official Extra Life Guilds
    • Guild information and Discussion
    • Canada
    • Northeastern US
    • Southeastern US
    • Central US
    • Western US
  • Gaming Discussions
    • General Gaming Discussion
  • Other Stuff
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Recent Posts

Calendars

  • Extra Life Community Calendar
  • Extra Life Stream Team
  • Akron Guild
  • Albany Guild
  • Albuquerque Guild
  • Anchorage Guild
  • Atlanta Guild
  • Austin Guild
  • Bakersfield Guild
  • Baltimore Guild
  • Birmingham Guild
  • Boston Guild
  • Burlington Guild
  • Buffalo Guild
  • Calgary, AB Guild
  • Morgantown Guild
  • Charlottesville Guild
  • Chicago Guild
  • Cincinnati Guild
  • Cleveland Guild
  • Columbia, MO Guild
  • Columbus, OH Guild
  • Dallas Guild
  • Dayton Guild
  • Denver Guild
  • Des Moines Guild
  • Detroit Guild
  • Edmonton, AB Guild
  • Fargo-Valley City Guild
  • Fresno Guild
  • Ft. Worth Guild
  • Gainesville-Tallahassee Guild
  • Grand Rapids Guild
  • Halifax, NS Guild
  • Hamilton, ON Guild
  • Hartford Guild
  • Hershey Guild
  • Hudson Valley Guild
  • Houston Guild
  • Indianapolis Guild
  • Jacksonville Guild
  • Kansas City Guild
  • Knoxville Guild
  • Lansing Guild
  • London, ON Guild
  • Los Angeles Guild
  • Milwaukee / Madison Guild
  • Minneapolis / Twin Cities Guild
  • Montreal / Quebec City Guild
  • Nashville Guild
  • Newark Guild
  • NYC & Long Island Guild
  • Oakland / San Francisco Guild
  • Omaha Guild
  • Orange County Guild
  • Orlando Guild
  • Ottawa, ON Guild
  • Philadelphia Guild
  • Phoenix Guild
  • Pittsburgh Guild
  • Portland, OR Guild
  • Portland, ME Guild
  • Raleigh-Durham Guild
  • Richmond Guild
  • Sacramento Guild
  • Salt Lake City Guild
  • San Antonio Guild
  • San Diego Guild
  • San Juan, PR Guild
  • Saskatchewan Guild
  • Seattle Guild
  • Spokane Guild
  • Springfield-Champaign, IL Guild
  • Springfield, MA Guild
  • St. Louis Guild
  • Syracuse Guild
  • Tampa / St. Petersburg Guild
  • Toronto, ON Guild
  • Vancouver, BC Guild
  • Washington DC Guild
  • Winnipeg, MB Guild
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Events
  • Extra Life Akron's Events

Categories

  • Broadcasting Toolkit
  • Multimedia Kit
  • Extra Life Guild Tool Kit
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Files
  • Extra Life Akron's Files

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Hospital


Location


Why I "Extra Life"


Interests


Twitter


Instagram


Twitch


Mixer


Discord


Blizzard Battletag


Nintendo ID


PSN ID


Steam


Origin


Xbox Gamertag

Found 9 results

  1. Yesterday, Square Enix teased their followers on social media, asking people to look for a big reveal sometime today. Since Kingdom Hearts 2.8 HD released earlier this week, many assumed that this might be some lead up to long awaited details on Kingdom Hearts 3. This view gained traction when Marvel's social media team put out a similar message to their followers. We didn't get more Kingdom Hearts 3 details, but something entirely new. Marvel has partnered with Square Enix to create... something. Shockingly, Square Enix has put two of its biggest, most highly acclaimed developers on The Avengers Project, Crystal Dynamics (Tomb Raider, Rise of the Tomb Raider) and Eidos Montreal (Deus Ex: Human Revolution, Deus Ex: Mankind Divided). While the teaser certainly captures the excitement generated by Marvel's superhero juggernaut, additional details have not been forthcoming. The basics like genre, release date, and platforms are still unknown. The Avengers Project might even be a working title as far as we know. View full article
  2. Jack Gardner

    Square Enix Teases The Avengers Project

    Yesterday, Square Enix teased their followers on social media, asking people to look for a big reveal sometime today. Since Kingdom Hearts 2.8 HD released earlier this week, many assumed that this might be some lead up to long awaited details on Kingdom Hearts 3. This view gained traction when Marvel's social media team put out a similar message to their followers. We didn't get more Kingdom Hearts 3 details, but something entirely new. Marvel has partnered with Square Enix to create... something. Shockingly, Square Enix has put two of its biggest, most highly acclaimed developers on The Avengers Project, Crystal Dynamics (Tomb Raider, Rise of the Tomb Raider) and Eidos Montreal (Deus Ex: Human Revolution, Deus Ex: Mankind Divided). While the teaser certainly captures the excitement generated by Marvel's superhero juggernaut, additional details have not been forthcoming. The basics like genre, release date, and platforms are still unknown. The Avengers Project might even be a working title as far as we know.
  3. It’s hard to believe that the Tomb Raider series is now 20 years old. The franchise has changed a lot during its long lifetime, and so has its iconic hero Lara Croft. The First Lady of Gaming has donned countless different appearances over the years and been rebooted two separate times. She’s travelled all over the world, solving deadly ancient puzzles and recovering artifacts of incredible power. She’s also had her fair share of enemies - everything from black magic cultists and corrupt corporate cronies to subterranean dinosaurs. While the Tomb Raider series has always been great at conveying the thrill of globetrotting adventure, recent years have seen game developers creating stronger stories and deeper characters to complement their ever-changing worlds. New intellectual properties and classic franchises alike are putting more time and effort behind writing better plotlines, backstories, and dialogue. It’s not easy, though - the biggest obstacle to a solid story in a video game is the fact that it needs to account for a random variable: the person playing it. As a result, most games struggle to balance the skill and entertainment of gameplay with the insight and subtlety that good storytelling needs. This is especially true for titles like Tomb Raider. The increasing popularity of narrative in games has brought Lara to a strange, conflicted crossroads. Her most recent reboot tries to retain the violent, explosive, trigger-happy sense of danger that the series has always been known for while also attempting to deeply humanize her in a pseudo-realistic setting. As Tomb Raider 2013 tried to get the best of both storytelling and gameplay, it only made the juxtaposition between the two more obvious. Tomb Raider created these jarring problems for itself, but its recent sequel makes noticeable strides towards solving them. The 2013 reboot of Tomb Raider was developer Crystal Dynamic’s first entry in the series after it was acquired by Square Enix, and the publisher wasted no time in hyping the game up before release. Tomb Raider 2013 promised to be a darkly compelling and intimately relatable origin story about a young, inexperienced Lara Croft. We would get to see her thrown into a do-or-die situation and watch her transform from a terrified archeologist into a hardened survivor. Once the game launched, it had a promising start – Lara and her crew were shipwrecked on the island of Yamatai. She was captured, injured, and vulnerable as she struggled to endure her early hours on the island. That pretense of believable realism didn’t last long, though. Despite Tomb Raider 2013’s deliberately slow start and steady buildup, it only had a growing sense of dissonance as the game went on. Lara soon seemed less like a survivor and more like a superhuman. Cutscenes and brief gameplay sequences that showed her hunting for food, bandaging wounds and subsisting off of what she could find began to look ridiculous in context. This was a character that didn’t have any of those human needs at any other time during the game - Lara had no necessity for sleep, shelter or even food. She was only required to shoot one deer to get the feeling of “survival” across. She could leap and climb with reckless abandon in spite of her injuries. When she was forced to kill someone for the first time, Lara collapsed to the ground and vomited from shock; seconds later, she was mowing down dozens of men and miraculously recovering from bullet wounds. Tomb Raider 2013’s gameplay experience ran completely counter to the story of arduous perseverance that it was trying to tell, and yet it was a well-received game that drew praise specifically for that story. Most of that praise was directed at the way that Lara’s ordeal transformed her as a character, but such acclaim ignored the fact that she wasn’t surviving - she was thriving thanks to her unnatural physical and mental powers. These recurring tonal issues in Tomb Raider are self-inflicted, sure, but they’re also pervasive in modern, semi-realistic games in general. The Uncharted series stars a savvy psychopath in Nathan Drake, who is really just a murderous avatar for the player. Yet the overarching narrative of the series portrays him as a likable thief with a heart of gold, and even as a sort of warped family man in Uncharted 4. Indeed, it’s never easy to write a good story with the knowledge that the story needs to be interactive. But respectable storytelling in games is rapidly becoming an expectation rather than a rarity, and developers of action/adventure games like these are learning how to adapt to that trend. A game like Rise of the Tomb Raider certainly doesn’t solve all the jarring inconsistencies of its predecessor, but it works hard to balance out as many of them as possible. While Tomb Raider 2013 tossed in a number of disposable secondary characters to provide Lara with motivation between shooting tons of cultists, Rise of the Tomb Raider introduces a militaristic Christian sect with roots in the Vatican who have manipulated her family for years. The backstory, revealed through audio logs, also shows how she was forced to confront the fairly absurd events of the first game (including her traumatic experiences, debilitating injuries and the fact that she had to kill dozens of people) in a series of therapy interviews. Rise of the Tomb Raider dives deeper into Lara’s personal history as well as her obsessive tendencies, both of which have a lot to do with her father. Suffice it to say (without spoilers) that relationships with old friends are strained as she grapples with her deceased dad’s wishes while trying to find her own legacy. She’s become almost disturbingly comfortable with killing the enemies that stand in the way of her aspirations, but the story leverages that fact instead of ignoring it. Other characters that Lara cares about worry about her, and they don’t hesitate to point out her issues. In the end, Rise of the Tomb Raider actually finds some success in making Lara seem more human than in Tomb Raider 2013 without shying away from that game’s contradictions. It makes her feel believably flawed and vulnerable – not physically, but psychologically. There’s definitely still room to improve the narrative dissonance; after all, Lara can apparently survive out in the Siberian wilderness in nothing but a long-sleeve shirt. But if Rise of the Tomb Raider is any indication, Crystal Dynamics can see those problems and is doing something about them. By acknowledging the dissonance of the past without making light of it, this retelling of Tomb Raider fills in a lot of its own plot holes and makes you start to take the new Lara Croft seriously. It manages to make me care about where the rebooted Tomb Raider series could go next, and I hope that developers of other games in the genre can learn from its small but significant steps forward. View full article
  4. Connor Trinske

    The Adventurer's Identity Crisis

    It’s hard to believe that the Tomb Raider series is now 20 years old. The franchise has changed a lot during its long lifetime, and so has its iconic hero Lara Croft. The First Lady of Gaming has donned countless different appearances over the years and been rebooted two separate times. She’s travelled all over the world, solving deadly ancient puzzles and recovering artifacts of incredible power. She’s also had her fair share of enemies - everything from black magic cultists and corrupt corporate cronies to subterranean dinosaurs. While the Tomb Raider series has always been great at conveying the thrill of globetrotting adventure, recent years have seen game developers creating stronger stories and deeper characters to complement their ever-changing worlds. New intellectual properties and classic franchises alike are putting more time and effort behind writing better plotlines, backstories, and dialogue. It’s not easy, though - the biggest obstacle to a solid story in a video game is the fact that it needs to account for a random variable: the person playing it. As a result, most games struggle to balance the skill and entertainment of gameplay with the insight and subtlety that good storytelling needs. This is especially true for titles like Tomb Raider. The increasing popularity of narrative in games has brought Lara to a strange, conflicted crossroads. Her most recent reboot tries to retain the violent, explosive, trigger-happy sense of danger that the series has always been known for while also attempting to deeply humanize her in a pseudo-realistic setting. As Tomb Raider 2013 tried to get the best of both storytelling and gameplay, it only made the juxtaposition between the two more obvious. Tomb Raider created these jarring problems for itself, but its recent sequel makes noticeable strides towards solving them. The 2013 reboot of Tomb Raider was developer Crystal Dynamic’s first entry in the series after it was acquired by Square Enix, and the publisher wasted no time in hyping the game up before release. Tomb Raider 2013 promised to be a darkly compelling and intimately relatable origin story about a young, inexperienced Lara Croft. We would get to see her thrown into a do-or-die situation and watch her transform from a terrified archeologist into a hardened survivor. Once the game launched, it had a promising start – Lara and her crew were shipwrecked on the island of Yamatai. She was captured, injured, and vulnerable as she struggled to endure her early hours on the island. That pretense of believable realism didn’t last long, though. Despite Tomb Raider 2013’s deliberately slow start and steady buildup, it only had a growing sense of dissonance as the game went on. Lara soon seemed less like a survivor and more like a superhuman. Cutscenes and brief gameplay sequences that showed her hunting for food, bandaging wounds and subsisting off of what she could find began to look ridiculous in context. This was a character that didn’t have any of those human needs at any other time during the game - Lara had no necessity for sleep, shelter or even food. She was only required to shoot one deer to get the feeling of “survival” across. She could leap and climb with reckless abandon in spite of her injuries. When she was forced to kill someone for the first time, Lara collapsed to the ground and vomited from shock; seconds later, she was mowing down dozens of men and miraculously recovering from bullet wounds. Tomb Raider 2013’s gameplay experience ran completely counter to the story of arduous perseverance that it was trying to tell, and yet it was a well-received game that drew praise specifically for that story. Most of that praise was directed at the way that Lara’s ordeal transformed her as a character, but such acclaim ignored the fact that she wasn’t surviving - she was thriving thanks to her unnatural physical and mental powers. These recurring tonal issues in Tomb Raider are self-inflicted, sure, but they’re also pervasive in modern, semi-realistic games in general. The Uncharted series stars a savvy psychopath in Nathan Drake, who is really just a murderous avatar for the player. Yet the overarching narrative of the series portrays him as a likable thief with a heart of gold, and even as a sort of warped family man in Uncharted 4. Indeed, it’s never easy to write a good story with the knowledge that the story needs to be interactive. But respectable storytelling in games is rapidly becoming an expectation rather than a rarity, and developers of action/adventure games like these are learning how to adapt to that trend. A game like Rise of the Tomb Raider certainly doesn’t solve all the jarring inconsistencies of its predecessor, but it works hard to balance out as many of them as possible. While Tomb Raider 2013 tossed in a number of disposable secondary characters to provide Lara with motivation between shooting tons of cultists, Rise of the Tomb Raider introduces a militaristic Christian sect with roots in the Vatican who have manipulated her family for years. The backstory, revealed through audio logs, also shows how she was forced to confront the fairly absurd events of the first game (including her traumatic experiences, debilitating injuries and the fact that she had to kill dozens of people) in a series of therapy interviews. Rise of the Tomb Raider dives deeper into Lara’s personal history as well as her obsessive tendencies, both of which have a lot to do with her father. Suffice it to say (without spoilers) that relationships with old friends are strained as she grapples with her deceased dad’s wishes while trying to find her own legacy. She’s become almost disturbingly comfortable with killing the enemies that stand in the way of her aspirations, but the story leverages that fact instead of ignoring it. Other characters that Lara cares about worry about her, and they don’t hesitate to point out her issues. In the end, Rise of the Tomb Raider actually finds some success in making Lara seem more human than in Tomb Raider 2013 without shying away from that game’s contradictions. It makes her feel believably flawed and vulnerable – not physically, but psychologically. There’s definitely still room to improve the narrative dissonance; after all, Lara can apparently survive out in the Siberian wilderness in nothing but a long-sleeve shirt. But if Rise of the Tomb Raider is any indication, Crystal Dynamics can see those problems and is doing something about them. By acknowledging the dissonance of the past without making light of it, this retelling of Tomb Raider fills in a lot of its own plot holes and makes you start to take the new Lara Croft seriously. It manages to make me care about where the rebooted Tomb Raider series could go next, and I hope that developers of other games in the genre can learn from its small but significant steps forward.
  5. Jack Gardner

    Tomb Raider Film Gets Release Date

    The Tomb Raider film just became that much more of a reality. Multiple sources have reported that Laura Croft's next motion picture will be releasing on March 16, 2018. The reboot of the Tomb Raider film franchise stars Oscar-winner Alicia Vikander (Danish Girl, Ex Machina) as Laura. It will be in the hands of Norwegian director Roar Uthaug, best known for his well-received 2015 film The Wave. Uthaug has said that the movie will be drawing heavily on the 2013 Tomb Raider game for its story. Speaking of the story, the screenplay is being worked on by one of the writers from Transformers 5, Geneva Robertson-Dworet. With precious little else to go on, it is nice to know that Hollywood is once again giving films based on video games a chance once again.
  6. The Tomb Raider film just became that much more of a reality. Multiple sources have reported that Laura Croft's next motion picture will be releasing on March 16, 2018. The reboot of the Tomb Raider film franchise stars Oscar-winner Alicia Vikander (Danish Girl, Ex Machina) as Laura. It will be in the hands of Norwegian director Roar Uthaug, best known for his well-received 2015 film The Wave. Uthaug has said that the movie will be drawing heavily on the 2013 Tomb Raider game for its story. Speaking of the story, the screenplay is being worked on by one of the writers from Transformers 5, Geneva Robertson-Dworet. With precious little else to go on, it is nice to know that Hollywood is once again giving films based on video games a chance once again. View full article
  7. Daddywarrbux

    Square Enix $10 Holiday Bundle

    A special promotion SE is running for the holidays. Here is a link to the original article by PC Gamer: Square Enix bundles five games in $10 Holiday Surprise Box
  8. Taking a lesson from last year, when Sony publicly mocked their DRM restrictions and announced a console that was $100 cheaper, Microsoft’s press conference was one designed to be as safe as possible. I say safe because how much more secure can you get than by opening with the next installment in the one of the most successful video game franchises of all time? We saw a gameplay trailer for Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare, where guys with cool sci-fi gadgets do things that we’ve seen guys in first-person shooters do hundreds of times before. It probably won’t be the video game equivalent of Shakespeare, but I know I’m at the very least intrigued to see how multiplayer incorporates all of the cool near-future technology showcased in the trailers and demos. Again, all DLC for Advanced Warfare will be available on Microsoft consoles. Next up, Turn 10 Studios took the stage to announce that Xbox One exclusive Forza Horizon 2 will release on September 30. Also, the new Nürburgring track will be made available this month for owners of Forza Motorsport 5. The track has been recreated down to subcentimeter levels of fidelity. Evolve made its own appearance with a new gameplay trailer focusing on the classes and introducing a new type of monster. Xbox One owners will have first dibs on both the Evolve beta and Evolve’s DLC. Just behind Call of Duty, the next safest bet in the industry is a new Assassin’s Creed game. Which is just what Ubisoft showed off at Microsoft’s press conference with Assassin’s Creed Unity. The title will be exclusive to Xbox One and PlayStation 4 and will feature 4-player co-op. If the idea of sneaking and assassinating in the midst of the French Revolution with three other friends gets you excited, this might be the perfect game for you. As someone who has little interest in the Call of Duties and Assassin’s Creeds of the world, I wasn’t feeling particularly compelled or excited about the games so far, but the newest trailer for Dragon Age: Inquisition made me do a double-take. I’m getting more excited than I probably should be for this game, but I can’t help having faith in BioWare and in the potential that the Dragon Age franchise has always shown. Once more, it seems that Xbox users will be getting some exclusive access to “premium content.” There are no details as of yet what will be contained in that DLC. Sunset Overdrive had a stellar appearance with many winks and knowing nods to the audience in a scripted sequence lampooning traditional shooters. This was followed by a live gameplay demonstration that was well-executed and impressive. Then there was a goofy teaser for a Dead Rising 3 DLC pack that I am not going to write out because it is long and purposefully obnoxious. Harmonix briefly took the stage to discuss how Disney Fantasia and Dance Central Spotlight are coming to consoles this fall and were then quickly ushered off the stage so that Microsoft could divulge some more information on Fable Legends. I haven’t played it, but my reaction to Fable Legends was one of complete and utter boredom. The game has a few interesting ideas (a group of players take on the role of heroes while another player becomes the villainous mastermind who attempts to thwart their progress), but those ideas seem to be piled under layers of uninspired fantasy. Then there was the obligatory, “Project Spark is still a thing, guys! Remember how cool that concept was!?” The trailer was fine; it looked great. However, I’ve played a bit of the game and it is hard to muster much enthusiasm for a great game creation kit that is mired in overpriced microtransactions. *Warning, what follows is riddled with sadness* Another trailer followed Project Spark, this one for a small indie game titled Ori and the Blind Forest. Will it be one of this year’s indie gems? Possibly. Will it make me cry if I play it? No …sniff… *muffled sob* One of the biggest announcements of the press conference was that on November 11, Halo: The Master Chief Collection will release. The collection contains Halo: Combat Evolved, Halo 2, Halo 3, and Halo 4 on one disc with everything unlocked. Custom playlists will combine the great moments from all four games into one epic smorgasbord. Halo 2 is also receiving the full anniversary treatment that Halo: Combat Evolved received for Halo Anniversary Edition. The original version of Halo 2 will be included alongside the revamped version. In addition to all of that, the original multiplayer that fans fought so hard to protect will be brought back. For multiplayer, every map ever released will be available in 1080p and run at 60fps on dedicated servers. Over 100 maps. That’s a lot of maps. The collection will also include Halo Nightfall, a live action prelude to Halo 5: Guardians. Speaking of Halo 5, purchasing Halo: The Master Chief Collection also nets you access to the Halo 5 beta in December. All previous games Microsoft had talked about up until this point will be released by the end of the year. The second half of the show focused on games coming in 2015 and beyond. Most of the releases talked about were indies (and there is nothing wrong with that, just not a ton of information on the individual games). Then there was the surprise reveal of Rise of the Tomb Raider, a sequel to the Tomb Raider reboot. We see Lara getting some much needed therapy after the traumatic events of the previous game and then raiding some tombs. Ahhhh, nostalgia! There were a few other moments after that, like the announcement of the Phantom Dust reboot, some hilariously scripted gameplay from The Division, and the reveal of Crackdown 3, but what got me most excited was the Xbox One exclusive from Platinum Games titled Scalebound. It looks goofy, different, has giant monsters, and the ideas on display seem like they would be a lot of fun in the hands of the developer who brought us Vanquish and Bayonetta. Honorable indie mentions: That’s it from Microsoft. On the whole, this conference was much better than last year, which is a win for the company, but I can’t help but feel that this was one of the safest press conferences in the five years I’ve watched the show. What do you think? Awesome? Just right? Meh? View full article
  9. Jack Gardner

    E3 2014 - Microsoft's Press Conference

    Taking a lesson from last year, when Sony publicly mocked their DRM restrictions and announced a console that was $100 cheaper, Microsoft’s press conference was one designed to be as safe as possible. I say safe because how much more secure can you get than by opening with the next installment in the one of the most successful video game franchises of all time? We saw a gameplay trailer for Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare, where guys with cool sci-fi gadgets do things that we’ve seen guys in first-person shooters do hundreds of times before. It probably won’t be the video game equivalent of Shakespeare, but I know I’m at the very least intrigued to see how multiplayer incorporates all of the cool near-future technology showcased in the trailers and demos. Again, all DLC for Advanced Warfare will be available on Microsoft consoles. Next up, Turn 10 Studios took the stage to announce that Xbox One exclusive Forza Horizon 2 will release on September 30. Also, the new Nürburgring track will be made available this month for owners of Forza Motorsport 5. The track has been recreated down to subcentimeter levels of fidelity. Evolve made its own appearance with a new gameplay trailer focusing on the classes and introducing a new type of monster. Xbox One owners will have first dibs on both the Evolve beta and Evolve’s DLC. Just behind Call of Duty, the next safest bet in the industry is a new Assassin’s Creed game. Which is just what Ubisoft showed off at Microsoft’s press conference with Assassin’s Creed Unity. The title will be exclusive to Xbox One and PlayStation 4 and will feature 4-player co-op. If the idea of sneaking and assassinating in the midst of the French Revolution with three other friends gets you excited, this might be the perfect game for you. As someone who has little interest in the Call of Duties and Assassin’s Creeds of the world, I wasn’t feeling particularly compelled or excited about the games so far, but the newest trailer for Dragon Age: Inquisition made me do a double-take. I’m getting more excited than I probably should be for this game, but I can’t help having faith in BioWare and in the potential that the Dragon Age franchise has always shown. Once more, it seems that Xbox users will be getting some exclusive access to “premium content.” There are no details as of yet what will be contained in that DLC. Sunset Overdrive had a stellar appearance with many winks and knowing nods to the audience in a scripted sequence lampooning traditional shooters. This was followed by a live gameplay demonstration that was well-executed and impressive. Then there was a goofy teaser for a Dead Rising 3 DLC pack that I am not going to write out because it is long and purposefully obnoxious. Harmonix briefly took the stage to discuss how Disney Fantasia and Dance Central Spotlight are coming to consoles this fall and were then quickly ushered off the stage so that Microsoft could divulge some more information on Fable Legends. I haven’t played it, but my reaction to Fable Legends was one of complete and utter boredom. The game has a few interesting ideas (a group of players take on the role of heroes while another player becomes the villainous mastermind who attempts to thwart their progress), but those ideas seem to be piled under layers of uninspired fantasy. Then there was the obligatory, “Project Spark is still a thing, guys! Remember how cool that concept was!?” The trailer was fine; it looked great. However, I’ve played a bit of the game and it is hard to muster much enthusiasm for a great game creation kit that is mired in overpriced microtransactions. *Warning, what follows is riddled with sadness* Another trailer followed Project Spark, this one for a small indie game titled Ori and the Blind Forest. Will it be one of this year’s indie gems? Possibly. Will it make me cry if I play it? No …sniff… *muffled sob* One of the biggest announcements of the press conference was that on November 11, Halo: The Master Chief Collection will release. The collection contains Halo: Combat Evolved, Halo 2, Halo 3, and Halo 4 on one disc with everything unlocked. Custom playlists will combine the great moments from all four games into one epic smorgasbord. Halo 2 is also receiving the full anniversary treatment that Halo: Combat Evolved received for Halo Anniversary Edition. The original version of Halo 2 will be included alongside the revamped version. In addition to all of that, the original multiplayer that fans fought so hard to protect will be brought back. For multiplayer, every map ever released will be available in 1080p and run at 60fps on dedicated servers. Over 100 maps. That’s a lot of maps. The collection will also include Halo Nightfall, a live action prelude to Halo 5: Guardians. Speaking of Halo 5, purchasing Halo: The Master Chief Collection also nets you access to the Halo 5 beta in December. All previous games Microsoft had talked about up until this point will be released by the end of the year. The second half of the show focused on games coming in 2015 and beyond. Most of the releases talked about were indies (and there is nothing wrong with that, just not a ton of information on the individual games). Then there was the surprise reveal of Rise of the Tomb Raider, a sequel to the Tomb Raider reboot. We see Lara getting some much needed therapy after the traumatic events of the previous game and then raiding some tombs. Ahhhh, nostalgia! There were a few other moments after that, like the announcement of the Phantom Dust reboot, some hilariously scripted gameplay from The Division, and the reveal of Crackdown 3, but what got me most excited was the Xbox One exclusive from Platinum Games titled Scalebound. It looks goofy, different, has giant monsters, and the ideas on display seem like they would be a lot of fun in the hands of the developer who brought us Vanquish and Bayonetta. Honorable indie mentions: That’s it from Microsoft. On the whole, this conference was much better than last year, which is a win for the company, but I can’t help but feel that this was one of the safest press conferences in the five years I’ve watched the show. What do you think? Awesome? Just right? Meh?
×