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Found 92 results

  1. Update 2: Telltale pulled The Walking Dead: The Final Season from digital storefronts earlier this week without giving a clear reason as to why. Good Old Games released a statement saying that it was a temporary removal requested by the company. However, we finally have an answer as to the fate of The Walking Dead: The Final Season. In a quote reported by Polygon, a Telltale representative offered this clarification: Yes, we have removed season passes for The Walking Dead: The Final Season from stores for the time being. We’re currently still working to find a way to hand off production of episodes 3 and 4 so that the season can be completed. The outcome of those efforts will determine when and how The Final Season returns to stores. We hope to have a firm announcement before the end of the week. For now, we apologize for any inconvenience. Update 1: The studio has issued a full statement via Twitter about the closure of the company. You can read it in full below: Today Telltale Games made the difficult decision to begin a majority studio closure following a year marked by insurmountable challenges. A majority of the company’s employees were dismissed earlier this morning, with a small group of 25 employees staying on to fulfill the company’s obligations to its board and partners. CEO Pete Hawley issued the following statement. “It’s been an incredibly difficult year for Telltale as we worked to set the company on a new course. Unfortunately, we ran out of time trying to get there. We released some of our best content this year and received a tremendous amount of positive feedback, but ultimately, that did not translate to sales. With a heavy heart, we watch our friends leave today to spread our brand of storytelling across the games industry.” Telltale will issue further comments regarding its product portfolio in the coming weeks. On top of that, various former Telltale employees have stated on social media that they believe the fourth and final season of the company's The Walking Dead franchise will come to a premature end after the impending release of its second episode on September 25. Additionally, the remaining employees at Telltale will instead be working to fulfill obligations to Netflix for Minecraft: Story Mode, which was set to release on the streaming service this fall. Original: The developer behind works like The Walking Dead and Tales from the Borderlands has ceased operations with the exception of 25 employees who will stay on until the final season of The Walking Dead is finished. Over 225 employees have been laid off. The studio has been oddly silent thus far with no official comments on the planned fate of the developer. Former employees have reported that all future projects after the last season of The Walking Dead have been cancelled. The games that are no more include the adaptation of Stranger Things, The Wolf Among Us Season Two, and a follow-up to their Game of Thrones title. Because of the radio silence from the studio, there's some speculation that this might not be a complete closure. Instead, it could be a massive restructuring to make the company more attractive to potential buyers. It's also possible that this change has been made to drastically reduce the size of the company to narrow the focus of the company. We're hoping that everyone who has been left in the lurch finds their feet again soon. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  2. Update 2: Telltale pulled The Walking Dead: The Final Season from digital storefronts earlier this week without giving a clear reason as to why. Good Old Games released a statement saying that it was a temporary removal requested by the company. However, we finally have an answer as to the fate of The Walking Dead: The Final Season. In a quote reported by Polygon, a Telltale representative offered this clarification: Yes, we have removed season passes for The Walking Dead: The Final Season from stores for the time being. We’re currently still working to find a way to hand off production of episodes 3 and 4 so that the season can be completed. The outcome of those efforts will determine when and how The Final Season returns to stores. We hope to have a firm announcement before the end of the week. For now, we apologize for any inconvenience. Update 1: The studio has issued a full statement via Twitter about the closure of the company. You can read it in full below: Today Telltale Games made the difficult decision to begin a majority studio closure following a year marked by insurmountable challenges. A majority of the company’s employees were dismissed earlier this morning, with a small group of 25 employees staying on to fulfill the company’s obligations to its board and partners. CEO Pete Hawley issued the following statement. “It’s been an incredibly difficult year for Telltale as we worked to set the company on a new course. Unfortunately, we ran out of time trying to get there. We released some of our best content this year and received a tremendous amount of positive feedback, but ultimately, that did not translate to sales. With a heavy heart, we watch our friends leave today to spread our brand of storytelling across the games industry.” Telltale will issue further comments regarding its product portfolio in the coming weeks. On top of that, various former Telltale employees have stated on social media that they believe the fourth and final season of the company's The Walking Dead franchise will come to a premature end after the impending release of its second episode on September 25. Additionally, the remaining employees at Telltale will instead be working to fulfill obligations to Netflix for Minecraft: Story Mode, which was set to release on the streaming service this fall. Original: The developer behind works like The Walking Dead and Tales from the Borderlands has ceased operations with the exception of 25 employees who will stay on until the final season of The Walking Dead is finished. Over 225 employees have been laid off. The studio has been oddly silent thus far with no official comments on the planned fate of the developer. Former employees have reported that all future projects after the last season of The Walking Dead have been cancelled. The games that are no more include the adaptation of Stranger Things, The Wolf Among Us Season Two, and a follow-up to their Game of Thrones title. Because of the radio silence from the studio, there's some speculation that this might not be a complete closure. Instead, it could be a massive restructuring to make the company more attractive to potential buyers. It's also possible that this change has been made to drastically reduce the size of the company to narrow the focus of the company. We're hoping that everyone who has been left in the lurch finds their feet again soon. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  3. It finally happened. After almost two full seasons, the enigma once known as John Doe emerged from his crystallis as the newly born Joker. However, the context in which he does so depends on the player’s actions. Did Bruce Wayne push Joker over the edge to becoming a menace? Or did his admiration for Batman’s cause compel him to take up crime-fighting himself? Regardless of which version of the clown you wind up with, this season finale goes out on a turbulent and exciting high note. Surprisingly, the increased gameplay mechanics stuck out to me more than anything. Not only does Same Stitch do a fantastic job of keeping players’ fingers on the buttons, but it does so in a variety of ways. In a tense bomb defusal scene, Batman uses his x-ray to cut the correct cord before a timer counts down. Inspecting photographs for clues brings a new cerebral element on top of the returning crime scene investigations. Confrontations, especially against Joker, offer satisfying brutality and style thanks to the slick manner in which prompts appear. Even the relationship updates get creative, such as the humorous “Joker totally forgot to remember that” notification when Batman reminds him that heroes don’t kill. Best of all, no gameplay segment is shared between the two paths. It’s a great way of making both stories feel separate beyond their narrative content and offers further incentive to play both sides. On that note, I love how differently the two stories play out. Though they understandably share the some pivotal plot points (mainly in regards to supporting characters), playing twice feels justified. For example, the villain Joker route comes out swinging with a gruesome opening and jaw-dropping shake-ups. Vigilante Joker kicks off on a comparatively “lighter” note as you tag team with him him in a cool fight against the Agency’s goons. The narrative gap widens from there, with some fantastic scenes sprinkled about. My favorite segment between both tales involves an explosive dinner party hosted by Joker and Harley Quinn. The episode takes a lot of crazy turns, but they all tie into the same final note: Batman and Joker are two threads of the same stitch. Going toe-to-toe with Joker feels well-earned and emotionally affecting. Because of my heavy influence, I couldn’t help but feel regretful for things I said and did to him. Same Stitch uses that relationship as the thesis for making poignant observations on Batman’s adverse influence on the people around him–unintentional or otherwise. His heart’s in the right place; however when right and wrong becomes more grey, Batman’s best judgement may not be sound. Satisfying conclusions for other threads lead to big surprises that should be fun to explore in a potential third season. Conclusion: Same Stitch offers two great stories that do justice to the Joker’s character as well as the long build to get him here. Gameplay feels the freshest and most fun it’s ever been (that includes all of Season 1), and the story is just as engaging. This might be the most entertaining Batman episode across both seasons and a fitting finale to Joker’s wonderful origin saga. In regards to The Enemy Within as a whole, it’s an exceptional follow up that begins and ends on extremely high notes. Joker’s character development is by far the highlight, but the story of Bruce’s struggle to operate within shades of grey proves fascinating as well. The plot occasionally becomes a bit messy due to the sheer number of players involved (will Freeze’s story go anywhere?) but Telltale juggles these threads well for the most part. Like Season 1, I’m impressed with how confidently the story shakes up Batman lore without mucking things up, with Harley Quinn being a shining example. The Enemy Within should be played if for no other reason than to hang around Telltale’s amazing take of Batman’s greatest foe.
  4. It finally happened. After almost two full seasons, the enigma once known as John Doe emerged from his crystallis as the newly born Joker. However, the context in which he does so depends on the player’s actions. Did Bruce Wayne push Joker over the edge to becoming a menace? Or did his admiration for Batman’s cause compel him to take up crime-fighting himself? Regardless of which version of the clown you wind up with, this season finale goes out on a turbulent and exciting high note. Surprisingly, the increased gameplay mechanics stuck out to me more than anything. Not only does Same Stitch do a fantastic job of keeping players’ fingers on the buttons, but it does so in a variety of ways. In a tense bomb defusal scene, Batman uses his x-ray to cut the correct cord before a timer counts down. Inspecting photographs for clues brings a new cerebral element on top of the returning crime scene investigations. Confrontations, especially against Joker, offer satisfying brutality and style thanks to the slick manner in which prompts appear. Even the relationship updates get creative, such as the humorous “Joker totally forgot to remember that” notification when Batman reminds him that heroes don’t kill. Best of all, no gameplay segment is shared between the two paths. It’s a great way of making both stories feel separate beyond their narrative content and offers further incentive to play both sides. On that note, I love how differently the two stories play out. Though they understandably share the some pivotal plot points (mainly in regards to supporting characters), playing twice feels justified. For example, the villain Joker route comes out swinging with a gruesome opening and jaw-dropping shake-ups. Vigilante Joker kicks off on a comparatively “lighter” note as you tag team with him him in a cool fight against the Agency’s goons. The narrative gap widens from there, with some fantastic scenes sprinkled about. My favorite segment between both tales involves an explosive dinner party hosted by Joker and Harley Quinn. The episode takes a lot of crazy turns, but they all tie into the same final note: Batman and Joker are two threads of the same stitch. Going toe-to-toe with Joker feels well-earned and emotionally affecting. Because of my heavy influence, I couldn’t help but feel regretful for things I said and did to him. Same Stitch uses that relationship as the thesis for making poignant observations on Batman’s adverse influence on the people around him–unintentional or otherwise. His heart’s in the right place; however when right and wrong becomes more grey, Batman’s best judgement may not be sound. Satisfying conclusions for other threads lead to big surprises that should be fun to explore in a potential third season. Conclusion: Same Stitch offers two great stories that do justice to the Joker’s character as well as the long build to get him here. Gameplay feels the freshest and most fun it’s ever been (that includes all of Season 1), and the story is just as engaging. This might be the most entertaining Batman episode across both seasons and a fitting finale to Joker’s wonderful origin saga. In regards to The Enemy Within as a whole, it’s an exceptional follow up that begins and ends on extremely high notes. Joker’s character development is by far the highlight, but the story of Bruce’s struggle to operate within shades of grey proves fascinating as well. The plot occasionally becomes a bit messy due to the sheer number of players involved (will Freeze’s story go anywhere?) but Telltale juggles these threads well for the most part. Like Season 1, I’m impressed with how confidently the story shakes up Batman lore without mucking things up, with Harley Quinn being a shining example. The Enemy Within should be played if for no other reason than to hang around Telltale’s amazing take of Batman’s greatest foe. View full article
  5. Trust. Everything revolves around that word in Fractured Mask. With threats closing in from all sides, should Bruce Wayne expand his inner circle or insist on carrying on alone? Relationships take big steps forward (or backwards) based on that question, but that focus comes at the expense of a looming threat still struggling to get off of the ground. Episode 2 saw Bruce Wayne infiltrating and reluctantly working with The Pact, the super villain alliance led by Harley Quinn Maintaining Bruce’s cover at all costs becomes increasingly tricky with Harley becoming wise of a mole within the ranks. Conspiring against the group keeps the tension high with some close calls with the skeptical Bane and Quinn. The Pact returns from last episode’s mission one member short based on who players chose to abandon during the conclusion. Not that it matters, as the missing party immediately reappears without anything close to an explanation. Disappointing, as keeping that character out of the picture for longer could have led to an interesting shake-up in the ranks. No matter who got ditched, Bruce’ standing with them takes no significant hits, making the whole thing feel like a missed opportunity. Fractured Mask tugs the curtain back a little bit more on the villain’s endgame but there’s still not enough shown to feel threatened. Being as we’re over halfway through the season, this worries me. Fractured Mask feels like the point where their scheme should become at least mostly clear. Instead, we’re still putting together vague pieces or the larger puzzle. I’m not sure Telltale can reveal the plan and resolve it in two episodes. Or, at the very least, pull it all off in a way that feels satisfactory. Catwoman slinks back into the spotlight and remains an alluring temptress who’s fun to be around and tough to say no to. Though the song and dance with her isn’t much different than in Season 1. However, choosing whether to let Selina in or keep her at arm’s reach takes the relationship to meaningful highs and lows. Tiffany Fox and Bruce Wayne’s tense stand-off takes an unexpected turn to a much needed payoff. The same applies to Amanda Waller and Jim Gordon’s feud with the latter party in particular reaching a boiling point that could lead to something promising. The underlying story of Alfred’s fragile emotional stability takes a few sad baby steps forward. The background is a suitable place for that subplot for now and I look forward to see how that pans out. John’s road to...whatever he may wind up becoming takes an important pit stop in his first encounter with Batman. It just feels right to see him finally interact with the persona he’s destined to tangle with, especially with the intriguing angle their going with. As a fan of the Bat and eager to learn from him, the dialogue allows players to potentially mold John’s ultimate opinion of him for the day they likely face-off. Players who humor John’s almost innocent infatuation with Batman are treated to a cute and surreal scene involving Batman teaching him some pointers. Once again, Telltale does a good job of presenting plausible alternative outcomes to John’s journey to keep players guessing. A solid puzzle segment early on serves as the most substantial gameplay contribution from Telltale. Beyond combat encounters and the introduction of a new but simple investigation type, it seems the most interesting mechanics died with the Riddler. Given how well his modus operandi fits Telltale’s gameplay style I can’t help but question taking him out of the season so quickly. Conclusion: Fractured Mask features good moments but stands as the weakest installment thus far. I wouldn’t call it bad, only that it comes and goes without the punch of previous installments. Adding layers to the established character drama, while entertaining, takes precedence over fleshing out the primary threat. I can’t help but feel that particular aspect could wind up being a mess. Here’s hoping the next episode proves me wrong.
  6. Trust. Everything revolves around that word in Fractured Mask. With threats closing in from all sides, should Bruce Wayne expand his inner circle or insist on carrying on alone? Relationships take big steps forward (or backwards) based on that question, but that focus comes at the expense of a looming threat still struggling to get off of the ground. Episode 2 saw Bruce Wayne infiltrating and reluctantly working with The Pact, the super villain alliance led by Harley Quinn Maintaining Bruce’s cover at all costs becomes increasingly tricky with Harley becoming wise of a mole within the ranks. Conspiring against the group keeps the tension high with some close calls with the skeptical Bane and Quinn. The Pact returns from last episode’s mission one member short based on who players chose to abandon during the conclusion. Not that it matters, as the missing party immediately reappears without anything close to an explanation. Disappointing, as keeping that character out of the picture for longer could have led to an interesting shake-up in the ranks. No matter who got ditched, Bruce’ standing with them takes no significant hits, making the whole thing feel like a missed opportunity. Fractured Mask tugs the curtain back a little bit more on the villain’s endgame but there’s still not enough shown to feel threatened. Being as we’re over halfway through the season, this worries me. Fractured Mask feels like the point where their scheme should become at least mostly clear. Instead, we’re still putting together vague pieces or the larger puzzle. I’m not sure Telltale can reveal the plan and resolve it in two episodes. Or, at the very least, pull it all off in a way that feels satisfactory. Catwoman slinks back into the spotlight and remains an alluring temptress who’s fun to be around and tough to say no to. Though the song and dance with her isn’t much different than in Season 1. However, choosing whether to let Selina in or keep her at arm’s reach takes the relationship to meaningful highs and lows. Tiffany Fox and Bruce Wayne’s tense stand-off takes an unexpected turn to a much needed payoff. The same applies to Amanda Waller and Jim Gordon’s feud with the latter party in particular reaching a boiling point that could lead to something promising. The underlying story of Alfred’s fragile emotional stability takes a few sad baby steps forward. The background is a suitable place for that subplot for now and I look forward to see how that pans out. John’s road to...whatever he may wind up becoming takes an important pit stop in his first encounter with Batman. It just feels right to see him finally interact with the persona he’s destined to tangle with, especially with the intriguing angle their going with. As a fan of the Bat and eager to learn from him, the dialogue allows players to potentially mold John’s ultimate opinion of him for the day they likely face-off. Players who humor John’s almost innocent infatuation with Batman are treated to a cute and surreal scene involving Batman teaching him some pointers. Once again, Telltale does a good job of presenting plausible alternative outcomes to John’s journey to keep players guessing. A solid puzzle segment early on serves as the most substantial gameplay contribution from Telltale. Beyond combat encounters and the introduction of a new but simple investigation type, it seems the most interesting mechanics died with the Riddler. Given how well his modus operandi fits Telltale’s gameplay style I can’t help but question taking him out of the season so quickly. Conclusion: Fractured Mask features good moments but stands as the weakest installment thus far. I wouldn’t call it bad, only that it comes and goes without the punch of previous installments. Adding layers to the established character drama, while entertaining, takes precedence over fleshing out the primary threat. I can’t help but feel that particular aspect could wind up being a mess. Here’s hoping the next episode proves me wrong. View full article
  7. The episodic adventure game developer behind the video game adaptations of properties like The Walking Dead, Fables, and Guardians of the Galaxy has announced that they would be undergoing a massive restructuring. As part of that business shift, they let go of over 90 of their employees, roughly 25% of their workforce, effective immediately. The chance was announced as part of an effort to "make the company more competitive as a developer and publisher of groundbreaking story-driven gaming experiences with an emphasis on high quality in the years ahead," according to a representative from Telltale. In case you're worried that this move might push back Telltale's ongoing episodic projects, don't be. As part of their statement, Telltale assured their fans that all previously announced games will not be affected. This restructuring comes on the heels of a series of leadership shake-ups at the independent studio. In 2015, co-founder and CEO Dan Connors stepped down from his position citing that the studio's boom in growth had introduced new challenges. Fellow co-founder Kevin Bruner took Connors' place as CEO with Connors supporting the transition and remaining on Telltale's board of directors. Earlier this year, Bruner stepped down from the CEO position and handed operations of the studio over to Connors, while remaining on the board of directors. Telltale then brought on Pete Hawley, a former vice president at Zynga, to replace Bruner as CEO. Pete Hawley offered a statement on the move that cut nearly 100 jobs from Telltale: Our industry has shifted in tremendous ways over the past few years. The realities of the environment we face moving forward demand we evolve, as well, reorienting our organization with a focus on delivering fewer, better games with a smaller team. I'd like to express our respect for all the contributions that these incredibly talented artists, storytellers and more have made to this company, and that this decision is in no way a reflection on the quality or dedication of their work. We have made available our full career assistance services to help our affected colleagues and friends - and their families - navigate this difficult transition as quickly as possible. The studio plans to invest more resources into "more proven technologies that will fast-track innovation in its core products as it works with new partners to bring its games to new audiences." That extremely corporate sentence indicates that Telltale might finally be putting more development emphasis on the engine that runs its games, which has been criticized in the past for lagging behind its contemporaries. It could also indicate a shift in priorities for the game developer - maybe we will see a more action-oriented game from the studio in the near future? Perhaps the long-rumored original IP that they've been working on for years? Here's hoping that all of the affected members of the Telltale team land on their feet.
  8. The episodic adventure game developer behind the video game adaptations of properties like The Walking Dead, Fables, and Guardians of the Galaxy has announced that they would be undergoing a massive restructuring. As part of that business shift, they let go of over 90 of their employees, roughly 25% of their workforce, effective immediately. The chance was announced as part of an effort to "make the company more competitive as a developer and publisher of groundbreaking story-driven gaming experiences with an emphasis on high quality in the years ahead," according to a representative from Telltale. In case you're worried that this move might push back Telltale's ongoing episodic projects, don't be. As part of their statement, Telltale assured their fans that all previously announced games will not be affected. This restructuring comes on the heels of a series of leadership shake-ups at the independent studio. In 2015, co-founder and CEO Dan Connors stepped down from his position citing that the studio's boom in growth had introduced new challenges. Fellow co-founder Kevin Bruner took Connors' place as CEO with Connors supporting the transition and remaining on Telltale's board of directors. Earlier this year, Bruner stepped down from the CEO position and handed operations of the studio over to Connors, while remaining on the board of directors. Telltale then brought on Pete Hawley, a former vice president at Zynga, to replace Bruner as CEO. Pete Hawley offered a statement on the move that cut nearly 100 jobs from Telltale: Our industry has shifted in tremendous ways over the past few years. The realities of the environment we face moving forward demand we evolve, as well, reorienting our organization with a focus on delivering fewer, better games with a smaller team. I'd like to express our respect for all the contributions that these incredibly talented artists, storytellers and more have made to this company, and that this decision is in no way a reflection on the quality or dedication of their work. We have made available our full career assistance services to help our affected colleagues and friends - and their families - navigate this difficult transition as quickly as possible. The studio plans to invest more resources into "more proven technologies that will fast-track innovation in its core products as it works with new partners to bring its games to new audiences." That extremely corporate sentence indicates that Telltale might finally be putting more development emphasis on the engine that runs its games, which has been criticized in the past for lagging behind its contemporaries. It could also indicate a shift in priorities for the game developer - maybe we will see a more action-oriented game from the studio in the near future? Perhaps the long-rumored original IP that they've been working on for years? Here's hoping that all of the affected members of the Telltale team land on their feet. View full article
  9. After The Enigma laid the table cloth for what’s to come, The Pact continues to set the silverware. More than anything else, the second episode cashes in on the development of Joker-in-progress John Doe by smartly flipping the roles of his most iconic relationship. The Pact injects a big dose of villainy with a few new faces, most notably one Dr. Harleen Quinzel. But this ain’t your 90s afternoon cartoon Harley Quinn. Keeping in line with Telltale’s penchant for shake-ups, Harley debuts as an established, independent, and intelligent killer. While she still retains her sick yet charming sense of humor, Quinn is far from the ditzy sidekick role she typically assumes. In fact, The Pact marks the first time I’ve ever felt genuinely intimidated by Harley. The change works surprisingly well, largely because of how Telltale managed a skillful switch-a-roo in her relationship with John Doe. Basically, John assumes Harley’s original role. Completely infatuated with Quinn, he aims to impress however possible. After establishing John’s new origin and behavior, his characterization (side note: his sad innocence actually made me feel sorry for him) pays off by making him a believable second-fiddle to Harley. This dynamic, along with your friendship with John, comes to a head during an edge-of-your-seat mission involving the twisted pair and the player. I won’t go into details, but trying to navigating the minefield of both psychos’ temperaments while completing a high-stakes task stands as The Pact’s defining moment. Maintaining Bruce’s increasingly blurry code of conduct is a demanding balancing act that The Pact does a nice job of showcasing. Chiefly, during the aforementioned mission and especially in Bruce’s tumultuous dealings with Tiffany Fox. The latter takes a profound leap forward in a couple of different ways, both of which I’m anxious to see the result of. On the opposite spectrum, Jim Gordon and Amanda Waller’s feud stagnates, lessening the tension. Their story remains the same “we don’t like/trust each other” thread without any real development. Speaking of Waller, The Pact fumbles out of the gate by not logically following-up on last episode’s cliffhanger i.e. Batman not flat-out asking Amanda “So how did you find that out?” Gameplay in general takes a backseat to dialogue choices outside of the action-packed opening chapter. That sounds worse than it actually is, as conversations largely keep you guessing and demand attention to details and consistency with your answers. My contradictions were called out several times in a great touch of realism. In classic Telltale fashion, a Bruce-focused chapter towards the end teases potential failure, yet seems difficult to actually pull off. Based on the seemingly concrete conclusion, that suggestion of variance mostly feels like smoke and mirrors. The same might be said of how players choose to assist John in making a good impression with Harley. I went out of my way to screw that up for him, but the result didn’t differ from if I’d been an ideal wingman. Granted, that could be a facade on John’s part and potentially bite me in the butt later, but at the moment I’m a little bummed how similarly that subplot pans out here. Conclusion: The Pact’s firm middle section is the strongest aspect of an otherwise decent block-building episode. I loved the Harley Quinn stuff, and it plays beautifully into John’s slow burn towards his awakening, so to speak. Maintaining Bruce’s integrity becomes easier said than done, leading to some painful choices and intense moments. The non-answer to The Enigma’s big question bugs me. For logic’s sake, I hope that gets resolved sooner than later. Overall, a solid installment that introduces more fascinating pieces for the story to come. Batman: The Enemy Within - The Pact was reviewed on PlayStation 4. It’s also available now for Xbox One, PC and will launch later for iOS and Android. View full article
  10. After The Enigma laid the table cloth for what’s to come, The Pact continues to set the silverware. More than anything else, the second episode cashes in on the development of Joker-in-progress John Doe by smartly flipping the roles of his most iconic relationship. The Pact injects a big dose of villainy with a few new faces, most notably one Dr. Harleen Quinzel. But this ain’t your 90s afternoon cartoon Harley Quinn. Keeping in line with Telltale’s penchant for shake-ups, Harley debuts as an established, independent, and intelligent killer. While she still retains her sick yet charming sense of humor, Quinn is far from the ditzy sidekick role she typically assumes. In fact, The Pact marks the first time I’ve ever felt genuinely intimidated by Harley. The change works surprisingly well, largely because of how Telltale managed a skillful switch-a-roo in her relationship with John Doe. Basically, John assumes Harley’s original role. Completely infatuated with Quinn, he aims to impress however possible. After establishing John’s new origin and behavior, his characterization (side note: his sad innocence actually made me feel sorry for him) pays off by making him a believable second-fiddle to Harley. This dynamic, along with your friendship with John, comes to a head during an edge-of-your-seat mission involving the twisted pair and the player. I won’t go into details, but trying to navigating the minefield of both psychos’ temperaments while completing a high-stakes task stands as The Pact’s defining moment. Maintaining Bruce’s increasingly blurry code of conduct is a demanding balancing act that The Pact does a nice job of showcasing. Chiefly, during the aforementioned mission and especially in Bruce’s tumultuous dealings with Tiffany Fox. The latter takes a profound leap forward in a couple of different ways, both of which I’m anxious to see the result of. On the opposite spectrum, Jim Gordon and Amanda Waller’s feud stagnates, lessening the tension. Their story remains the same “we don’t like/trust each other” thread without any real development. Speaking of Waller, The Pact fumbles out of the gate by not logically following-up on last episode’s cliffhanger i.e. Batman not flat-out asking Amanda “So how did you find that out?” Gameplay in general takes a backseat to dialogue choices outside of the action-packed opening chapter. That sounds worse than it actually is, as conversations largely keep you guessing and demand attention to details and consistency with your answers. My contradictions were called out several times in a great touch of realism. In classic Telltale fashion, a Bruce-focused chapter towards the end teases potential failure, yet seems difficult to actually pull off. Based on the seemingly concrete conclusion, that suggestion of variance mostly feels like smoke and mirrors. The same might be said of how players choose to assist John in making a good impression with Harley. I went out of my way to screw that up for him, but the result didn’t differ from if I’d been an ideal wingman. Granted, that could be a facade on John’s part and potentially bite me in the butt later, but at the moment I’m a little bummed how similarly that subplot pans out here. Conclusion: The Pact’s firm middle section is the strongest aspect of an otherwise decent block-building episode. I loved the Harley Quinn stuff, and it plays beautifully into John’s slow burn towards his awakening, so to speak. Maintaining Bruce’s integrity becomes easier said than done, leading to some painful choices and intense moments. The non-answer to The Enigma’s big question bugs me. For logic’s sake, I hope that gets resolved sooner than later. Overall, a solid installment that introduces more fascinating pieces for the story to come. Batman: The Enemy Within - The Pact was reviewed on PlayStation 4. It’s also available now for Xbox One, PC and will launch later for iOS and Android.
  11. Telltale Games has revealed the release date and trailer for the upcoming part two of Batman: The Enemy Within. Titled 'The Pact,' the second episode of the five episode series focuses on the aftermath of a mysterious assassin's latest handiwork. Explosions across Gotham shake the city to its very core. Batman attempts to track down the culprits behind these misdeeds, but finds himself up against a foe that might even stump the Dark Knight himself. Meanwhile, John Doe traps Bruce Wayne in a complicated scheme - and the only way out is to follow it through. Beginning with episode two, Telltale will be launching all episodes on all platforms simultaneously. We reached out to Telltale for clarification on whether that simultaneous release schedule will extend to other Telltale game series or if it is limited to The Enemy Within. We will update with an answer. Episode Two 'The Pact' launches October 3 on Xbox One, PlayStation 4, PC, and Mac. In addition, the first two episodes of the series will become available on iOS and Android-based devices that same day. The boxed version, which Telltale has taken to calling the 'Season Pass Disc,' will also release in stores on October 3. The disc unlocks all previous episodes as well as all future episodes as they release.
  12. Telltale Games has revealed the release date and trailer for the upcoming part two of Batman: The Enemy Within. Titled 'The Pact,' the second episode of the five episode series focuses on the aftermath of a mysterious assassin's latest handiwork. Explosions across Gotham shake the city to its very core. Batman attempts to track down the culprits behind these misdeeds, but finds himself up against a foe that might even stump the Dark Knight himself. Meanwhile, John Doe traps Bruce Wayne in a complicated scheme - and the only way out is to follow it through. Beginning with episode two, Telltale will be launching all episodes on all platforms simultaneously. We reached out to Telltale for clarification on whether that simultaneous release schedule will extend to other Telltale game series or if it is limited to The Enemy Within. We will update with an answer. Episode Two 'The Pact' launches October 3 on Xbox One, PlayStation 4, PC, and Mac. In addition, the first two episodes of the series will become available on iOS and Android-based devices that same day. The boxed version, which Telltale has taken to calling the 'Season Pass Disc,' will also release in stores on October 3. The disc unlocks all previous episodes as well as all future episodes as they release. View full article
  13. “Expect the unexpected” would have been an appropriate tagline for Batman’s first season. By the series’ end the Wayne Family name stands forever tarnished, a perennial ally turns becomes a major foe, and Harvey Dent’s scars may only be mental. The surprises keep coming in The Enemy Within. An eventful premier throws players for a loop right out of the gate with big shocks, difficult choices, and gut-punching consequences. A year removed from the triple threat of the Children of Arkham, Penguin, and Two-Face sees Gotham on the mend. Bruce Wayne’s reputation appears largely repaired. Batman’s publicized partnership with newly appointed police commissioner Jim Gordon resulted in dramatically reduced crime rates. But that delicate peace breaks when a dangerous shadow from Gotham’s past reemerges: The Riddler. I dug Telltale’s menacing take on this classic foe. Armed with a question-mark shaped sickle, this Riddler almost finds as much pleasure in slicing throats as perplexing victims with cruel conundrums–almost. He remains the long-winded, insufferable show-off, but now displays a nice, gritty edge. Riddler’s new character wrinkle as Gotham’s first costumed crook plays perfectly into his trademark narcissism and superiority complex. Believing himself better because he came first (among other reasons), his additional source of arrogance makes punching his teeth out all the more satisfying. Riddler’s penchant for puzzles works well with Telltale’s mechanics and dialogue choices. One neat segment involves unraveling one of his death games. Gameplay in general gets a good showing in The Enigma. Combat now presents slightly more dynamic options, like selecting multiple interactive points during battle. Last season’s worthless finishing move meter has thankfully been dropped. I never put the controller down for too long–always a positive for a Telltale title. Like Season 1, juggling the public perceptions of Bruce Wayne and Batman can create genuine decision-making crises. Choices feel less about right and wrong and more about which path might backfire less painfully. This creates a series of tricky moral tightropes to walk across. Batman’s relationship with the debuting Amanda Waller acts as a great example. Waller plays an exciting role acting as the controversial figurehead behind the Suicide Squad and leader of the shadowy government bureau known simply as The Agency. Her organization takes over Gotham’s authorities in pursuit of Riddler. Despite Waller and Batman sharing mutual goals, The Agency’s dubious history makes her difficult to trust. More importantly, a collaboration with her might chip away at Batman’s fragile relationship with Gordon. Do you jeopardize Gordon’s favor by working with Amanda in the name of the greater good? Or do you keep her at a distance and risk creating a powerful new adversary? Armed with years of comics history, I thought I knew that answer from the outset. As the episode progressed, though, my stance shifted in unexpected ways. Doing the “right” thing feels less obvious than ever, and I burned trusted bridges doing what I felt was necessary. Chalk that up to how Telltale skillfully paints choices with thoughtful coats of morally grey. Additionally, The Enigma reminded me to consider suspending any prior Batman knowledge because things don’t always play out as predicted. Bruce’s uneasy dealings with the pale, green-haired “John Doe” highlighted that point. The first conversation with this enigmatic figure had me biting my lip with nerves the entire time, unsure of how to react. His underlying insanity keeps you on edge, but his apparent need for approval from Bruce generates sympathy as well. Could it be he just needs someone good to lean on and perhaps guide him? Somehow, Telltale turned the no-brainer of “how to deal with The Joker” into a complicated dilemma. His arc thus far seems to signal a potentially different outcome than what I’m expecting. I look forward to seeing this simmering story reach its boiling point. A new on-screen indicator of a character’s shift in feeling gives immediate and helpful feedback during relationship milestones. I liked receiving validation that my current path may be working, as well as knowing exactly when I may have messed up with someone. A new post-game report card explains how big choices resulted in your current standing with someone, offering some good food for thought. I walked away from The Enigma pondering how to best improve certain relationships using the info given. Additionally, this provides a helpful reference to mix things up in future replays. Choosing a path can be a fun roller coaster overall, but I took umbrage with one scenario towards the end. Without spoiling, somehow the choice of saving lives led to Batman seemingly becoming more vilified than if he allowed someone to die on his watch. Other characters failed to see the big picture, and that questionable writing almost made me scream at my TV. Telltale continues to drop bombshells with a couple of shocking developments involving pivotal characters. These surprises do a nice job of keeping your emotions on guard. Exciting narrative threads emerge from these moments. One in particular concerns a potentially awesome new ally. I also love that The Enigma features its own self-contained arc, kind of like an episode of a Batman TV show. A central thread begins and ends here, providing an immediate sense of closure and giving the long-term stories some breathing room. The Enigma attempts to do a lot as a pilot and, impressively, accomplishes much of it with relative ease. Conclusion: The Enigma starts Batman’s second season on the right foot. Boasting several jaw-dropping moments, intense conversation scenes, a great villain, and promising story developments, there’s a lot to love here. Tack on a healthy dose of interactivity, and you’ve got the answer to the riddle “how do you open a new season with a successful bang?” Batman: The Enemy Within - The Enigma was reviewed on PlayStation 4. It’s also available now for Xbox One, PC and will launch later for iOS and Android.
  14. “Expect the unexpected” would have been an appropriate tagline for Batman’s first season. By the series’ end the Wayne Family name stands forever tarnished, a perennial ally turns becomes a major foe, and Harvey Dent’s scars may only be mental. The surprises keep coming in The Enemy Within. An eventful premier throws players for a loop right out of the gate with big shocks, difficult choices, and gut-punching consequences. A year removed from the triple threat of the Children of Arkham, Penguin, and Two-Face sees Gotham on the mend. Bruce Wayne’s reputation appears largely repaired. Batman’s publicized partnership with newly appointed police commissioner Jim Gordon resulted in dramatically reduced crime rates. But that delicate peace breaks when a dangerous shadow from Gotham’s past reemerges: The Riddler. I dug Telltale’s menacing take on this classic foe. Armed with a question-mark shaped sickle, this Riddler almost finds as much pleasure in slicing throats as perplexing victims with cruel conundrums–almost. He remains the long-winded, insufferable show-off, but now displays a nice, gritty edge. Riddler’s new character wrinkle as Gotham’s first costumed crook plays perfectly into his trademark narcissism and superiority complex. Believing himself better because he came first (among other reasons), his additional source of arrogance makes punching his teeth out all the more satisfying. Riddler’s penchant for puzzles works well with Telltale’s mechanics and dialogue choices. One neat segment involves unraveling one of his death games. Gameplay in general gets a good showing in The Enigma. Combat now presents slightly more dynamic options, like selecting multiple interactive points during battle. Last season’s worthless finishing move meter has thankfully been dropped. I never put the controller down for too long–always a positive for a Telltale title. Like Season 1, juggling the public perceptions of Bruce Wayne and Batman can create genuine decision-making crises. Choices feel less about right and wrong and more about which path might backfire less painfully. This creates a series of tricky moral tightropes to walk across. Batman’s relationship with the debuting Amanda Waller acts as a great example. Waller plays an exciting role acting as the controversial figurehead behind the Suicide Squad and leader of the shadowy government bureau known simply as The Agency. Her organization takes over Gotham’s authorities in pursuit of Riddler. Despite Waller and Batman sharing mutual goals, The Agency’s dubious history makes her difficult to trust. More importantly, a collaboration with her might chip away at Batman’s fragile relationship with Gordon. Do you jeopardize Gordon’s favor by working with Amanda in the name of the greater good? Or do you keep her at a distance and risk creating a powerful new adversary? Armed with years of comics history, I thought I knew that answer from the outset. As the episode progressed, though, my stance shifted in unexpected ways. Doing the “right” thing feels less obvious than ever, and I burned trusted bridges doing what I felt was necessary. Chalk that up to how Telltale skillfully paints choices with thoughtful coats of morally grey. Additionally, The Enigma reminded me to consider suspending any prior Batman knowledge because things don’t always play out as predicted. Bruce’s uneasy dealings with the pale, green-haired “John Doe” highlighted that point. The first conversation with this enigmatic figure had me biting my lip with nerves the entire time, unsure of how to react. His underlying insanity keeps you on edge, but his apparent need for approval from Bruce generates sympathy as well. Could it be he just needs someone good to lean on and perhaps guide him? Somehow, Telltale turned the no-brainer of “how to deal with The Joker” into a complicated dilemma. His arc thus far seems to signal a potentially different outcome than what I’m expecting. I look forward to seeing this simmering story reach its boiling point. A new on-screen indicator of a character’s shift in feeling gives immediate and helpful feedback during relationship milestones. I liked receiving validation that my current path may be working, as well as knowing exactly when I may have messed up with someone. A new post-game report card explains how big choices resulted in your current standing with someone, offering some good food for thought. I walked away from The Enigma pondering how to best improve certain relationships using the info given. Additionally, this provides a helpful reference to mix things up in future replays. Choosing a path can be a fun roller coaster overall, but I took umbrage with one scenario towards the end. Without spoiling, somehow the choice of saving lives led to Batman seemingly becoming more vilified than if he allowed someone to die on his watch. Other characters failed to see the big picture, and that questionable writing almost made me scream at my TV. Telltale continues to drop bombshells with a couple of shocking developments involving pivotal characters. These surprises do a nice job of keeping your emotions on guard. Exciting narrative threads emerge from these moments. One in particular concerns a potentially awesome new ally. I also love that The Enigma features its own self-contained arc, kind of like an episode of a Batman TV show. A central thread begins and ends here, providing an immediate sense of closure and giving the long-term stories some breathing room. The Enigma attempts to do a lot as a pilot and, impressively, accomplishes much of it with relative ease. Conclusion: The Enigma starts Batman’s second season on the right foot. Boasting several jaw-dropping moments, intense conversation scenes, a great villain, and promising story developments, there’s a lot to love here. Tack on a healthy dose of interactivity, and you’ve got the answer to the riddle “how do you open a new season with a successful bang?” Batman: The Enemy Within - The Enigma was reviewed on PlayStation 4. It’s also available now for Xbox One, PC and will launch later for iOS and Android. View full article
  15. Telltale Games announced a couple weeks ago that we would be getting another episodic series based on Batman. Today, they released the official launch trailer for Batman: The Enemy Within along with a few key details about what players can expect from the five-part series. Episode one, titled 'The Enigma,' releases next week on August 8 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, PC, and Mac. Those looking for an Android or iOS release will have to wait until early October. The episode focuses on the return of The Riddler, a sadistic villain with a love for constructing brutal puzzles that torture his victims. Batman's investigation is complicated by the arrival of a federal agent and the appearance of the Joker. To accomplish his mission, Bruce Wayne will have to navigate a web of deceit and decide who to trust when he dons his cape to become Batman. Telltale Games has put an effort into making The Enemy Within welcoming to those who never played the first series as well as veterans. Players can come in completely blind or carry their decisions over from Batman: The Telltale Series for smooth continuity. The multiplayer Crowd Play feature will be available to players who want to play as a family or group, allowing multiple people to vote on what course of action should be pursued. Troy Baker returns as the voice of Bruce Wayne/Batman alongside Anthony Ingruber who voiced the mysterious John Doe in the previous series. The physical disc will hit store shelves on October 3 for Xbox One and PS4 (expect to see the Android and iOS version around this same time). The disc will contain the first episode and allow for downloadable access to all future episodes. View full article
  16. Telltale Games announced a couple weeks ago that we would be getting another episodic series based on Batman. Today, they released the official launch trailer for Batman: The Enemy Within along with a few key details about what players can expect from the five-part series. Episode one, titled 'The Enigma,' releases next week on August 8 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, PC, and Mac. Those looking for an Android or iOS release will have to wait until early October. The episode focuses on the return of The Riddler, a sadistic villain with a love for constructing brutal puzzles that torture his victims. Batman's investigation is complicated by the arrival of a federal agent and the appearance of the Joker. To accomplish his mission, Bruce Wayne will have to navigate a web of deceit and decide who to trust when he dons his cape to become Batman. Telltale Games has put an effort into making The Enemy Within welcoming to those who never played the first series as well as veterans. Players can come in completely blind or carry their decisions over from Batman: The Telltale Series for smooth continuity. The multiplayer Crowd Play feature will be available to players who want to play as a family or group, allowing multiple people to vote on what course of action should be pursued. Troy Baker returns as the voice of Bruce Wayne/Batman alongside Anthony Ingruber who voiced the mysterious John Doe in the previous series. The physical disc will hit store shelves on October 3 for Xbox One and PS4 (expect to see the Android and iOS version around this same time). The disc will contain the first episode and allow for downloadable access to all future episodes.
  17. Telltale followed up their first entry into the world of The Walking Dead with a second season that did a number of risky things in the world of video games. Players took on the role of Clementine, a young girl who has been burdened with the onerous task of growing up during the apocalypse. The brutality, the cruelty of life under those desperate circumstances permeate Season 2. Tough decisions allow players to shape what kind of a person our hero may become and the haunting prompts from the previous season, "Clementine will remember that," are now left unsaid, but hang heavy in every facial expression. As a sequel to an episodic game that some claimed was the greatest adventure game of all time, does The Walking Dead: Season Two stand up on its own merits as one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Walking Dead: Season Two 'In the Pines - Credits Theme' by Jared Emerson-Johnson & Janel Drewis (https://telltalegames.bandcamp.com/) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  18. Telltale followed up their first entry into the world of The Walking Dead with a second season that did a number of risky things in the world of video games. Players took on the role of Clementine, a young girl who has been burdened with the onerous task of growing up during the apocalypse. The brutality, the cruelty of life under those desperate circumstances permeate Season 2. Tough decisions allow players to shape what kind of a person our hero may become and the haunting prompts from the previous season, "Clementine will remember that," are now left unsaid, but hang heavy in every facial expression. As a sequel to an episodic game that some claimed was the greatest adventure game of all time, does The Walking Dead: Season Two stand up on its own merits as one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Walking Dead: Season Two 'In the Pines - Credits Theme' by Jared Emerson-Johnson & Janel Drewis (https://telltalegames.bandcamp.com/) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  19. Well, look at that! Telltale Games has decreed that today they would release the fully titled Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series - Episode One: Tangled Up in Blue (phew, try saying that five times fast). The first episode sees the Guardians responding to a distress call from the Nova Corps, entering ancient ruins, and doing battle with Thanos himself. While Thanos might be the biggest bad in the Marvel cinematic universe and the trailer shows the Guardians trying to fight him, he's not the main antagonist of Telltale's series. Who is it? We'll probably have to play it to find out. The first episode releases digitally today for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, PC, Mac, Android and iOS, but physical copies will be available in retail stores starting May 2.
  20. Well, look at that! Telltale Games has decreed that today they would release the fully titled Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series - Episode One: Tangled Up in Blue (phew, try saying that five times fast). The first episode sees the Guardians responding to a distress call from the Nova Corps, entering ancient ruins, and doing battle with Thanos himself. While Thanos might be the biggest bad in the Marvel cinematic universe and the trailer shows the Guardians trying to fight him, he's not the main antagonist of Telltale's series. Who is it? We'll probably have to play it to find out. The first episode releases digitally today for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, PC, Mac, Android and iOS, but physical copies will be available in retail stores starting May 2. View full article
  21. Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series made some waves when adventure game developer Telltale Games teased it at the tail end of last year. We now have a narrower release window with the series set to premiere this spring on consoles, PC, Android, and iOS. Much like Telltale's Game of Thrones, their Guardians of the Galaxy series will tell a new story set within the universe seen in the films. Familiar characters such as Star-Lord, Gamora, Drax, Rocket Raccoon, and Groot all return with a redesigned that aims to fit them in with the art style of Telltale's vision. The new tale follows the galactic group of reluctant heroes as they discover an artifact of immense power following a climactic encounter. Each member of the team has a competing interest in the item, but so does an enemy who represents the last of a dying race who will hunt the team to the ends of the galaxy to obtain it. The Guardians will be traveling to a wide number of locations including Earth, the starship Milano, the hollowed out space titan skull called Knowhere, and beyond to locations not seen in the films. Borrowing from the films (and Telltale's natural affinity for including fantastic musical accompaniments to their games), the Guardians of the Galaxy series will feature a licensed soundtrack of its own to help players slip into the retro-camp fun in store for them. today at PAX East in Boston at 6pm in the Albatross Theater, so if you are at the show be sure to stop and give it a look. Telltale Games will be hosting a panel discussing their creative process on the title. Those who can't be there in person can check it out live on Twitch. Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series premiers on March 17 at SXSW in Austin, TX at the Paramount Theater. Telltale will be hosting a Crowd Play event where attendees can help decide what decisions are made on the big screen during the live gameplay via their mobile devices. In order to attend, interested people will need to obtain either an SXSW or SXSW Gaming badge and seats will be available on a first come, first serve basis. The voices for the Guardians of the Galaxy series won't be the same as the ones from the movies. Instead, Scott Porter (Friday Night Lights, The Walking Dead: The Telltale Series) will take on the role of Star-Lord, Emily O'Brien (Middle-Earth: Shadow of Mordor) tackles Gamora, Nolan North (basically all games with voice acting, Uncharted) becomes Rocket Raccoon, Brandon Paul Eells (Watch Dogs) gives life to Drax, and Adam Harrington (The Wolf Among Us, League of Legends) groots his best as Groot. Guardians of the Galaxy 2 releases on May 5 and with a narrower release day centered on this spring, I'd be willing to bet Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series will be releasing around that same time, possibly in late April.
  22. Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series made some waves when adventure game developer Telltale Games teased it at the tail end of last year. We now have a narrower release window with the series set to premiere this spring on consoles, PC, Android, and iOS. Much like Telltale's Game of Thrones, their Guardians of the Galaxy series will tell a new story set within the universe seen in the films. Familiar characters such as Star-Lord, Gamora, Drax, Rocket Raccoon, and Groot all return with a redesigned that aims to fit them in with the art style of Telltale's vision. The new tale follows the galactic group of reluctant heroes as they discover an artifact of immense power following a climactic encounter. Each member of the team has a competing interest in the item, but so does an enemy who represents the last of a dying race who will hunt the team to the ends of the galaxy to obtain it. The Guardians will be traveling to a wide number of locations including Earth, the starship Milano, the hollowed out space titan skull called Knowhere, and beyond to locations not seen in the films. Borrowing from the films (and Telltale's natural affinity for including fantastic musical accompaniments to their games), the Guardians of the Galaxy series will feature a licensed soundtrack of its own to help players slip into the retro-camp fun in store for them. today at PAX East in Boston at 6pm in the Albatross Theater, so if you are at the show be sure to stop and give it a look. Telltale Games will be hosting a panel discussing their creative process on the title. Those who can't be there in person can check it out live on Twitch. Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series premiers on March 17 at SXSW in Austin, TX at the Paramount Theater. Telltale will be hosting a Crowd Play event where attendees can help decide what decisions are made on the big screen during the live gameplay via their mobile devices. In order to attend, interested people will need to obtain either an SXSW or SXSW Gaming badge and seats will be available on a first come, first serve basis. The voices for the Guardians of the Galaxy series won't be the same as the ones from the movies. Instead, Scott Porter (Friday Night Lights, The Walking Dead: The Telltale Series) will take on the role of Star-Lord, Emily O'Brien (Middle-Earth: Shadow of Mordor) tackles Gamora, Nolan North (basically all games with voice acting, Uncharted) becomes Rocket Raccoon, Brandon Paul Eells (Watch Dogs) gives life to Drax, and Adam Harrington (The Wolf Among Us, League of Legends) groots his best as Groot. Guardians of the Galaxy 2 releases on May 5 and with a narrower release day centered on this spring, I'd be willing to bet Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series will be releasing around that same time, possibly in late April. View full article
  23. Telltale’s Batman kicked off with a promising, but so-so, pilot and goes home with a triumphant bang. City of Light combines dramatic storytelling with an increased focus on gameplay to conclude Bruce Wayne’s struggle on an overall high note. The final episode impresses right out of the gate by presenting two vastly different opening chapters (determined by the player’s final choice in Guardian of Gotham). Both introductions kick things off in high gear with tense conversations and high-octane action. I also enjoyed seeing how the effects of the previous episode’s ending ripple throughout City of Light. These differences chiefly affect Batman’s tech and provide worthwhile differences in gameplay, including a neat little costume makeover midway through. After playing every chapter in the series twice, City of Light’s playthroughs feel the most unique from one another. Villain arcs wrap up in satisfying, if bittersweet, fashion. It feels liberating to finally knock off adversaries after being pressed under their thumbs for so long. I especially enjoyed the dark revelation to Catwoman’s story, which manages to surprise even a wised-up fan like myself. Lady Arkham, however, left me wanting a bit more in terms of development. Although City of Light illuminates her shadowy origin in a chilling segment, key questions I’ve been pondering in regards to her rise to power remain shrouded in mystery and feel like plot holes. On a positive front, Telltale succeeds at hammering the idea that she’s ultimately a disturbing, twisted reflection of the type of person Bruce Wayne could have potentially become. In a tale centered on Bruce’s identity crisis – both as a Wayne and under the cowl– Lady Arkham stacks up as an appropriate foil. Her climatic encounter with the Bat ends in spectacular fashion as well. Witnessing the strained bond between Alfred and Batman has been a highlight throughout the series and comes to an emotional head. Their relationship has been severely tested; Alfred blames his lack of honesty regarding the Wayne family’s sinister past for causing many of Bruce’s current woes. He’s not completely wrong, but I always did my best to mend that crumbling bridge. That love endures nerve-wracking trials in the third act that, while ultimately leading to the same outcome regardless of making a pivotal choice, leads to one of the series’ more touching scenes. Speaking of choices, do yours matter in the end? Yes and no. In traditional Telltale fashion, the story wraps up largely the same with notable differences peppered about to highlight your decision-making. However, City of Light’s final decision, as well as an ominous favor promised to a certain character, are seemingly poised to pay off in a potential second season. If a sequel comes to pass – and I expect/hope it will – I don’t mind Telltale leaving these enticing threads dangling as they’ve already got me itching to see more from this universe. If not, then they’ve left some large narrative holes, to say the least. A lack of engaging gameplay hindered previous entries in the series. That’s not the case in episode five. City of Light showcases everything Telltale’s Batman has to offer with the most interactive sequences yet. The latest detective puzzles require increased deductive effort making them more fun to unravel. Even a fresh (albeit simple) spin on the concept appears when Batman must locate a missing ally. Unlike certain previous gameplay activities, nothing here feels uninspired or tacked on. Fast-paced and frequently occurring fight sequences entertain more so than in any other episode. Frustratingly, enduring technical flaws occasionally mar the fun. A stuttering frame rate and hard crashes to the home screen make the experience feel like it’s held together by bat guano at times. One especially bizarre (and humorous) bug caused an NPC to become invisible save for his floating eyes and teeth, sucking much of the gravity from an otherwise violent combat segment. Conclusion Technical flaws and a strange, underwhelming final scene aside, City of Light closes the book on Telltale’s captivating Batman saga in good form. A wonderful balance of high drama and interactive thrills kept me glued to the screen in a way that hadn’t happened since the stellar Children of Arkham. It’s been a lot of fun watching Telltale successfully shake-up Batman’s mythos while simultaneously making a Bruce Wayne-focused experience genuinely enjoyable. City of Light is a fine conclusion that inspires hope for a sequel. Batman: Episode 5 was reviewed on PlayStation 4 and is available for Xbox One, PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, iOS, and Android View full article
  24. Marcus Stewart

    Review: Batman Episode 5 - City of Light

    Telltale’s Batman kicked off with a promising, but so-so, pilot and goes home with a triumphant bang. City of Light combines dramatic storytelling with an increased focus on gameplay to conclude Bruce Wayne’s struggle on an overall high note. The final episode impresses right out of the gate by presenting two vastly different opening chapters (determined by the player’s final choice in Guardian of Gotham). Both introductions kick things off in high gear with tense conversations and high-octane action. I also enjoyed seeing how the effects of the previous episode’s ending ripple throughout City of Light. These differences chiefly affect Batman’s tech and provide worthwhile differences in gameplay, including a neat little costume makeover midway through. After playing every chapter in the series twice, City of Light’s playthroughs feel the most unique from one another. Villain arcs wrap up in satisfying, if bittersweet, fashion. It feels liberating to finally knock off adversaries after being pressed under their thumbs for so long. I especially enjoyed the dark revelation to Catwoman’s story, which manages to surprise even a wised-up fan like myself. Lady Arkham, however, left me wanting a bit more in terms of development. Although City of Light illuminates her shadowy origin in a chilling segment, key questions I’ve been pondering in regards to her rise to power remain shrouded in mystery and feel like plot holes. On a positive front, Telltale succeeds at hammering the idea that she’s ultimately a disturbing, twisted reflection of the type of person Bruce Wayne could have potentially become. In a tale centered on Bruce’s identity crisis – both as a Wayne and under the cowl– Lady Arkham stacks up as an appropriate foil. Her climatic encounter with the Bat ends in spectacular fashion as well. Witnessing the strained bond between Alfred and Batman has been a highlight throughout the series and comes to an emotional head. Their relationship has been severely tested; Alfred blames his lack of honesty regarding the Wayne family’s sinister past for causing many of Bruce’s current woes. He’s not completely wrong, but I always did my best to mend that crumbling bridge. That love endures nerve-wracking trials in the third act that, while ultimately leading to the same outcome regardless of making a pivotal choice, leads to one of the series’ more touching scenes. Speaking of choices, do yours matter in the end? Yes and no. In traditional Telltale fashion, the story wraps up largely the same with notable differences peppered about to highlight your decision-making. However, City of Light’s final decision, as well as an ominous favor promised to a certain character, are seemingly poised to pay off in a potential second season. If a sequel comes to pass – and I expect/hope it will – I don’t mind Telltale leaving these enticing threads dangling as they’ve already got me itching to see more from this universe. If not, then they’ve left some large narrative holes, to say the least. A lack of engaging gameplay hindered previous entries in the series. That’s not the case in episode five. City of Light showcases everything Telltale’s Batman has to offer with the most interactive sequences yet. The latest detective puzzles require increased deductive effort making them more fun to unravel. Even a fresh (albeit simple) spin on the concept appears when Batman must locate a missing ally. Unlike certain previous gameplay activities, nothing here feels uninspired or tacked on. Fast-paced and frequently occurring fight sequences entertain more so than in any other episode. Frustratingly, enduring technical flaws occasionally mar the fun. A stuttering frame rate and hard crashes to the home screen make the experience feel like it’s held together by bat guano at times. One especially bizarre (and humorous) bug caused an NPC to become invisible save for his floating eyes and teeth, sucking much of the gravity from an otherwise violent combat segment. Conclusion Technical flaws and a strange, underwhelming final scene aside, City of Light closes the book on Telltale’s captivating Batman saga in good form. A wonderful balance of high drama and interactive thrills kept me glued to the screen in a way that hadn’t happened since the stellar Children of Arkham. It’s been a lot of fun watching Telltale successfully shake-up Batman’s mythos while simultaneously making a Bruce Wayne-focused experience genuinely enjoyable. City of Light is a fine conclusion that inspires hope for a sequel. Batman: Episode 5 was reviewed on PlayStation 4 and is available for Xbox One, PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, iOS, and Android
  25. A new season of Telltale's The Walking Dead begins later this month, which has led to a lot of people wondering what exactly it will be about. Last week, Telltale gave just a bit more information via a sequence taken from the first episode of the upcoming series. In it, we get to know one of our main protagonists, Javier, as he and his family go through the initial outbreak of the zombie virus. At the end of the trailer, we see the heart of Telltale's The Walking Dead: Clementine. The scene with Javier's family takes place years before the events of the game itself, with a more grown up and weathered Clementine. She looks like she's seen some more human depravity and now comes wielding a shotgun. It's both heartbreaking and gratifying to see that the world hasn't taken her down yet. Javier and Clementine will be dealing with pockets of civilization that have formed and adapted to the zombie apocalypse. There have been some obvious improvements to the Telltale Engine, the software Telltales uses to run their games. Animations seem smoother, environments present more objects and details, and the lighting effects have improved (though the eye shine seems a bit distracting). The Walking Dead: A New Frontier premiers on December 20 with two episodes titled titled 'Ties That Bind Part 1' and 'Ties That Bind Part 2.' The episodic adventure series is slated to come to PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC, and mobile devices on the 20th, but Telltale says that it will also come to other platforms at an unspecified time in the future, so Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 owners might still see versions come their way. View full article
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