Showing results for tags 'sonic'. - Extra Life Community Hub Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'sonic'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Extra Life News
    • Extra Life Updates
    • Best Practices
    • Community Content
    • Why I Extra Life
    • Fundraising
    • Contests
  • Gaming News
  • Features
  • Podcast

Discussions

  • Extra Life Discussions
    • General Extra Life Discussion
    • Local Extra Lifers
    • Fundraising Ideas
    • Live Streaming Tips & Tricks
    • Official Extra Life Stream Team Discussion
    • Extra Life JSON Code Discussion & Sharing
    • Extra Life United
    • Extra Life Q & A
  • Articles & Extra Life Announcements
    • Announcements
  • Official Extra Life Guilds
    • Guild information and Discussion
    • Canada
    • Northeastern US
    • Southeastern US
    • Central US
    • Western US
  • Gaming Discussions
  • Other Stuff
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Recent Posts

Calendars

  • Extra Life Community Calendar
  • Extra Life Stream Team
  • Akron Guild
  • Albany Guild
  • Albuquerque Guild
  • Anchorage Guild
  • Atlanta Guild
  • Austin Guild
  • Bakersfield Guild
  • Baltimore Guild
  • Birmingham Guild
  • Boston Guild
  • Burlington Guild
  • Buffalo Guild
  • Calgary, AB Guild
  • Morgantown Guild
  • Charlottesville Guild
  • Chicago Guild
  • Cincinnati Guild
  • Cleveland Guild
  • Columbia, MO Guild
  • Columbus, OH Guild
  • Dallas Guild
  • Dayton Guild
  • Denver Guild
  • Des Moines Guild
  • Detroit Guild
  • Edmonton, AB Guild
  • Fargo-Valley City Guild
  • Fresno Guild
  • Ft. Worth Guild
  • Gainesville-Tallahassee Guild
  • Grand Rapids Guild
  • Halifax, NS Guild
  • Hamilton, ON Guild
  • Hartford Guild
  • Hershey Guild
  • Hudson Valley Guild
  • Houston Guild
  • Indianapolis Guild
  • Jacksonville Guild
  • Kansas City Guild
  • Knoxville Guild
  • Lansing Guild
  • London, ON Guild
  • Los Angeles Guild
  • Milwaukee / Madison Guild
  • Minneapolis / Twin Cities Guild
  • Montreal / Quebec City Guild
  • Nashville Guild
  • Newark Guild
  • NYC & Long Island Guild
  • Oakland / San Francisco Guild
  • Omaha Guild
  • Orange County Guild
  • Orlando Guild
  • Ottawa, ON Guild
  • Philadelphia Guild
  • Phoenix Guild
  • Pittsburgh Guild
  • Portland, OR Guild
  • Portland, ME Guild
  • Raleigh-Durham Guild
  • Richmond Guild
  • Sacramento Guild
  • Salt Lake City Guild
  • San Antonio Guild
  • San Diego Guild
  • San Juan, PR Guild
  • Saskatchewan Guild
  • Seattle Guild
  • Spokane Guild
  • Springfield-Champaign, IL Guild
  • Springfield, MA Guild
  • St. Louis Guild
  • Syracuse Guild
  • Tampa / St. Petersburg Guild
  • Toronto, ON Guild
  • Vancouver, BC Guild
  • Washington DC Guild
  • Winnipeg, MB Guild
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Events
  • Extra Life Akron's Events

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Hospital


Location


Why I "Extra Life"


Interests


Twitter


Instagram


Twitch


Mixer


Discord


Blizzard Battletag


Nintendo ID


PSN ID


Steam


Origin


Xbox Gamertag

Found 17 results

  1. Sonic & All-Stars Racing Transformed marked the first time Sonic rivalved Mario in any capacity since the Sega vs Nintendo war of the early 90’s. The 2012 racer seamlessly blended ground, air, and sea racing with fun results, providing a worthy alternative to Mario Kart’s juggernaut. Over five years have passed, and the blue blur wants another shot at dethroning Mario Kart. Enter Team Sonic Racing. Sega’s newest racer manages to stand out by offering something completely different from its rival. You probably guessed from the title that teamwork is the name of the game this time around, and I’m not talking about multiple riders sharing a vehicle ala Mario Kart: Double Dash. Teams of three separate racers work together on the track to take out the competition and grab the gold trophy. Making sure teammates also finish strong is just as important as focusing on reaching the coveted 1st place. For example, winning the race with Sonic doesn’t mean much if his friends, Knuckles and Tails, finish at 6th and 9th place, respectively. That’s because the cumulative scores of each team member determine the overall group ranking. You may be asking: “How can individual racers cooperate?” I wondered the same thing, and I’m pleasantly surprised with Sumo Digital’s answer. Teamwork maneuvers include transferring power-ups between teammates. Pick up a speed boost, but you’re already in the lead? Give it to a buddy lagging behind. On the flip side, getting that crucial item from a friend when you’re pulling up the rear feels like a godsend. Besides being fun, this system dramatically alters the kart racing mentality. I found myself making moves I normally wouldn’t, such as going out of my way to grab items to help my allies instead of booking for the finish line. Additionally, driving behind teammates and following their paths triggers a slingshot maneuver that rockets you forward. Drifting close to a buddy grants them a similar speed boost. The demo of Team Sonic Racing, for as solid as its mechanics were, certainly had its limitations. Driving felt mostly fine, but gameplay overall had a noticeable lack of polish..The single, basic track available also wasn’t anything to write home about. In fact, I’m having a hard time recalling anything remotely interesting about it. Hopefully the full game features more inventive courses that take full advantage of the teamwork mechanic. The demo only featured two playable teams: Sonic/Tails/Knuckles and Shadow/Rouge/E-123 Omega. The roster ditches the Sega crossover aspect in favor of a pure Sonic line-up. Although Sonic has plenty of critters to fill a roster with, I’ll miss the zaniness of racing alongside Shenmue’s Ryo and real-life racer Danica Patrick. This also means putting up with the inane banter of Sonic’s crew, like Shadow’s cheesy attempt at a catchphrase, “Make way for the ultimate lifeform!”. Team Sonic Racing seems like a neat idea that I hope gets backed by equally interesting courses and a stacked roster. Sonic and pals have an uphill drive ahead of them trying to supplant the superb Mario Kart 8. At the very least, Team Sonic Racing can do what previous entries have always succeeded at: offering an enjoyable spin on the kart racing formula. Look for Team Sonic Racing when it comes to PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC later this year. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  2. Sonic & All-Stars Racing Transformed marked the first time Sonic rivalved Mario in any capacity since the Sega vs Nintendo war of the early 90’s. The 2012 racer seamlessly blended ground, air, and sea racing with fun results, providing a worthy alternative to Mario Kart’s juggernaut. Over five years have passed, and the blue blur wants another shot at dethroning Mario Kart. Enter Team Sonic Racing. Sega’s newest racer manages to stand out by offering something completely different from its rival. You probably guessed from the title that teamwork is the name of the game this time around, and I’m not talking about multiple riders sharing a vehicle ala Mario Kart: Double Dash. Teams of three separate racers work together on the track to take out the competition and grab the gold trophy. Making sure teammates also finish strong is just as important as focusing on reaching the coveted 1st place. For example, winning the race with Sonic doesn’t mean much if his friends, Knuckles and Tails, finish at 6th and 9th place, respectively. That’s because the cumulative scores of each team member determine the overall group ranking. You may be asking: “How can individual racers cooperate?” I wondered the same thing, and I’m pleasantly surprised with Sumo Digital’s answer. Teamwork maneuvers include transferring power-ups between teammates. Pick up a speed boost, but you’re already in the lead? Give it to a buddy lagging behind. On the flip side, getting that crucial item from a friend when you’re pulling up the rear feels like a godsend. Besides being fun, this system dramatically alters the kart racing mentality. I found myself making moves I normally wouldn’t, such as going out of my way to grab items to help my allies instead of booking for the finish line. Additionally, driving behind teammates and following their paths triggers a slingshot maneuver that rockets you forward. Drifting close to a buddy grants them a similar speed boost. The demo of Team Sonic Racing, for as solid as its mechanics were, certainly had its limitations. Driving felt mostly fine, but gameplay overall had a noticeable lack of polish..The single, basic track available also wasn’t anything to write home about. In fact, I’m having a hard time recalling anything remotely interesting about it. Hopefully the full game features more inventive courses that take full advantage of the teamwork mechanic. The demo only featured two playable teams: Sonic/Tails/Knuckles and Shadow/Rouge/E-123 Omega. The roster ditches the Sega crossover aspect in favor of a pure Sonic line-up. Although Sonic has plenty of critters to fill a roster with, I’ll miss the zaniness of racing alongside Shenmue’s Ryo and real-life racer Danica Patrick. This also means putting up with the inane banter of Sonic’s crew, like Shadow’s cheesy attempt at a catchphrase, “Make way for the ultimate lifeform!”. Team Sonic Racing seems like a neat idea that I hope gets backed by equally interesting courses and a stacked roster. Sonic and pals have an uphill drive ahead of them trying to supplant the superb Mario Kart 8. At the very least, Team Sonic Racing can do what previous entries have always succeeded at: offering an enjoyable spin on the kart racing formula. Look for Team Sonic Racing when it comes to PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC later this year. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  3. Every year since 2011, Sega-Addicts.com has done a Dreamcast Dreamless 24-Hour Marathon. From 2015 forward I have taken the reigns and hosted it from my home with staff members and friends joining. Most recently we learned about Extra Life and thought the Marathon was a great chance to raise some money! Collectively over the last two years we have raised over $1,500 for a local children's hospital! And now we are inviting all of you to join us on the internet to raise money for kids while enjoying Sega's last great console on 09/01/2018. This year, we are hosting from the Mega Visions Magazine Twitch page and more ready than ever to tackle some Dreamcast insanity to help the kids! You can check out last year's marathon on YouTube here. Stay tuned for the final schedule in the coming months! We also have a Reddit topic for game recommendations here! Now the die-hard Dreamcast fans will immediately notice we are not celebrating on the actual anniversary (09/09/99) of the console. We are celebrating on Labor Day weekend to allow easier travel for the out-of-towners. We hope you understand and decided to join the insanity on Twitch! Thanks for taking a look, folks. If you feel like helping out, you can print the flyer from the group page and share to all!
  4. Sonic the Hedgehog may have been a well known character before Sonic 2 hit the shelves, but Sonic 2 gave his series of games the momentum to continue all the way to this very day, made the Sega Genesis a must-own system for kids around the world, and set the blue blur up as the pinnacle of anthropomorphic protagonists with attitude. Game critic and Sonic enthusiast Marcus Stewart joins the show to argue for Sonic 2's inclusion among the best games period. Some people love Sonic the Hedgehog, while others find the series lacking. This week, we pit the two views head to head to see which comes out on top! Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Sonic CD 'Take It All the Way' by Magellanic and PROTO·DOME (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02940) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod Be sure to follow Marcus Stewart on Twitter to keep an eye on his work and tweets about wrestling: @MarcusStewart7 New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  5. Sonic the Hedgehog may have been a well known character before Sonic 2 hit the shelves, but Sonic 2 gave his series of games the momentum to continue all the way to this very day, made the Sega Genesis a must-own system for kids around the world, and set the blue blur up as the pinnacle of anthropomorphic protagonists with attitude. Game critic and Sonic enthusiast Marcus Stewart joins the show to argue for Sonic 2's inclusion among the best games period. Some people love Sonic the Hedgehog, while others find the series lacking. This week, we pit the two views head to head to see which comes out on top! Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Sonic CD 'Take It All the Way' by Magellanic and PROTO·DOME (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02940) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod Be sure to follow Marcus Stewart on Twitter to keep an eye on his work and tweets about wrestling: @MarcusStewart7 New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  6. Sonic has spent last 15 years or so as gaming’s most reliable punchline. Poorly received modern titles have been exemplified by laughable storytelling, ill-conceived gimmicks, and, often times, broken gameplay. This left old-school fans to ask the eternal question: Why can’t Sega just make the games like they did on Sega Genesis? For the hedgehog’s 25th anniversary, Sega assembled a dream team of talented indie developers, all of whom have worked on Sonic-related ports and passion projects, to do just that. On its surface, Sonic Mania takes the series back to tried-and-true basics. That entails 16-bit graphics and sound, classic side-scrolling platforming, and three beloved characters as opposed to 37 inane critters. But Sonic Mania prevails as more than just a polished highlight reel of the Blue Blur’s best moments. A slew of creative, new ideas experiment and expand on Sonic’s classic design for wonderful results. Sonic Mania’s formula feels like the team designed it using two steps: Give players what they remember and then spice it up with a new take. The first Acts of classic areas like Chemical Plant Zone and Hydrocity Zone play largely the same with new twists sprinkled about. Changes include adding enemies and other elements that didn’t appear originally. One of my favorite examples was using the flame shield from Sonic 3 to spark raging oil fires in Sonic 2’s Oil Ocean Zone. Act 1 allows fans to re-familiarize themselves with old favorites while making them feel new again. Meanwhile, newcomers get a general idea of what these stages were originally like and maybe see why people loved them in the first place. On to the designers’ second step: presenting the spicy new take. Upon reaching the second act, classic tunes take on a remixed form and everything gets flipped on its head. Chemical Plant Zone suddenly features giant syringes that inject goo into the chemical sea, turning it into a bouncy surface. Quicksand-like trash piles litter Sonic & Knuckles’ Flying Battery Zone. The designers did a masterful job of incorporating their own crazy ideas into the original templates. The new elements don’t feel out-of-place or negatively disrupt the zone’s original flow. Rather, they complement and, in some cases like Chemical Plant Zone, improve upon it. Unfortunately, the impact these changes have will be lost on players unfamiliar with the the old levels, though newbies should still find them enjoyable. But for seasoned players intimately familiar with the old games, Act 2 feels like an exciting and unpredictable treat. A batch of imaginative new stages stand proudly beside the series’ best levels. I had a blast zapping through satellite dishes and playing powerball-style mini-games in the film-themed Studiopolis Zone. Mirage Saloon Zone has a cool blend of western aesthetics with magician elements. The new zones play wonderfully and sound just as good thanks to toe-tapping original scores composed by famed Sonic remixer, Tee Lopes. For Sonic diehards, the sprinkles of obscure nods to the series’ history offer even more sources of enjoyment and nostalgia. Boss battles take place at the end of each Act instead of one per zone, meaning there's a lot of them. Thankfully, most feel inventive and offer good fun with only a couple of duds. They can also be as surprising as the stages themselves. One memorable bout pits a pint-sized Sonic against Eggman’s gashapon (a Japanese vending machine) style ship. Hitting a knob on the ship dispenses capsules containing mini versions of past Eggman contraptions, like the classic airship and drill car, that must be taken out first. A Puyo Puyo Tetris showdown ala Dr. Robotnik’s Mean Bean Machine may be my favorite bout in terms of pure fan service. Collecting chaos emeralds involves finding hidden ring portals leading to a UFO chase special zone inspired by those in Sonic CD. Fun and challenging, I especially like how the team intentionally rendered these stages in crappy polygonal graphics that harken back to the Sega Saturn era. I can’t express the same enjoyment for the return of Sonic 3/Knuckles’ “collect the blue orbs” bonus stages. Granted, I was never a fan of this mini-game even in its time, so take this as a very personal gripe. The rewards for beating these stages include new abilities, like Sonic CD’s Super Peel Out, AKA “the figure-eight run”. The high frequency of these bonus stages became irritating because of their low barrier for entry. About 25-30 rings opens them at each checkpoint, meaning you have to halt your adventure to visit them multiple times per stage. Those who enjoy these mini-games will probably be okay with this. I began ignoring them entirely towards the end in favor of continuing uninterrupted. Outside of the main game, a time attack mode and the Sonic 2 versus competition mode, where two players race through maps, offer decent diversions. Chaos emerald collection stands as the main source of replayability, as does playing the entire game as Knuckles. You can also play the story co-op with a partner controlling everyone’s favorite two-tailed fox, Tails. Somewhat surprisingly, Sonic Mania is a tough game. Some rust with playing classic Sonic may have been a personal factor, but completing stages often left me breathing a sigh of relief. At times, the game throws every obstacle it can muster to bring Sonic to his knees. Especially the latter stages, such as the Titanic Monarch Zone, a cool but barely comprehensible labyrinth of enemies and other forms of “ouch.” I saw the Game Over screen more often than I care to admit and never had more than 6 lives throughout the game. On top of carrying over Sonic’s best qualities, Sonic Mania also inherits some of the series’ less savory traits. Forward momentum still takes an annoying time to get going when you’ve been stopped cold. You’ll hit hidden spring pads you’d never know to avoid until after Sonic’s been sent careening into a well-placed hazard. Underwater areas remain an anxiety-spiking series of traps seemingly designed to make you want to punch the screen. The end-level inverted animal pod once pushed me through the ground, killing me in a glitch befitting of the 90s. I found that my patience for this kind of stuff has waned since that decade. Be prepared to scream “Oh, come on now!” at periodic intervals. Conclusion: Sonic Mania retains everything that made the Blue Blur a household name in the first place, for better or worse. Thankfully, the hedgehog’s positive aspects shine brighter. This lovely-crafted celebration of Sonic’s most beloved era stands as his best outing in many years. Newcomers and modern fans get to enjoy a well-made look at an icon’s past. Long-time enthusiasts can feel a bit of vindication now that their hero has one good game under his belt (in this decade). On a personal and cheesy note, Sonic Mania made me the happiest Sonic fan since I bragged about the games in grade school. Sonic Mania was reviewed on PlayStation 4 and available now for Xbox One and Nintendo Switch. The PC version arrives August 29.
  7. Sonic has spent last 15 years or so as gaming’s most reliable punchline. Poorly received modern titles have been exemplified by laughable storytelling, ill-conceived gimmicks, and, often times, broken gameplay. This left old-school fans to ask the eternal question: Why can’t Sega just make the games like they did on Sega Genesis? For the hedgehog’s 25th anniversary, Sega assembled a dream team of talented indie developers, all of whom have worked on Sonic-related ports and passion projects, to do just that. On its surface, Sonic Mania takes the series back to tried-and-true basics. That entails 16-bit graphics and sound, classic side-scrolling platforming, and three beloved characters as opposed to 37 inane critters. But Sonic Mania prevails as more than just a polished highlight reel of the Blue Blur’s best moments. A slew of creative, new ideas experiment and expand on Sonic’s classic design for wonderful results. Sonic Mania’s formula feels like the team designed it using two steps: Give players what they remember and then spice it up with a new take. The first Acts of classic areas like Chemical Plant Zone and Hydrocity Zone play largely the same with new twists sprinkled about. Changes include adding enemies and other elements that didn’t appear originally. One of my favorite examples was using the flame shield from Sonic 3 to spark raging oil fires in Sonic 2’s Oil Ocean Zone. Act 1 allows fans to re-familiarize themselves with old favorites while making them feel new again. Meanwhile, newcomers get a general idea of what these stages were originally like and maybe see why people loved them in the first place. On to the designers’ second step: presenting the spicy new take. Upon reaching the second act, classic tunes take on a remixed form and everything gets flipped on its head. Chemical Plant Zone suddenly features giant syringes that inject goo into the chemical sea, turning it into a bouncy surface. Quicksand-like trash piles litter Sonic & Knuckles’ Flying Battery Zone. The designers did a masterful job of incorporating their own crazy ideas into the original templates. The new elements don’t feel out-of-place or negatively disrupt the zone’s original flow. Rather, they complement and, in some cases like Chemical Plant Zone, improve upon it. Unfortunately, the impact these changes have will be lost on players unfamiliar with the the old levels, though newbies should still find them enjoyable. But for seasoned players intimately familiar with the old games, Act 2 feels like an exciting and unpredictable treat. A batch of imaginative new stages stand proudly beside the series’ best levels. I had a blast zapping through satellite dishes and playing powerball-style mini-games in the film-themed Studiopolis Zone. Mirage Saloon Zone has a cool blend of western aesthetics with magician elements. The new zones play wonderfully and sound just as good thanks to toe-tapping original scores composed by famed Sonic remixer, Tee Lopes. For Sonic diehards, the sprinkles of obscure nods to the series’ history offer even more sources of enjoyment and nostalgia. Boss battles take place at the end of each Act instead of one per zone, meaning there's a lot of them. Thankfully, most feel inventive and offer good fun with only a couple of duds. They can also be as surprising as the stages themselves. One memorable bout pits a pint-sized Sonic against Eggman’s gashapon (a Japanese vending machine) style ship. Hitting a knob on the ship dispenses capsules containing mini versions of past Eggman contraptions, like the classic airship and drill car, that must be taken out first. A Puyo Puyo Tetris showdown ala Dr. Robotnik’s Mean Bean Machine may be my favorite bout in terms of pure fan service. Collecting chaos emeralds involves finding hidden ring portals leading to a UFO chase special zone inspired by those in Sonic CD. Fun and challenging, I especially like how the team intentionally rendered these stages in crappy polygonal graphics that harken back to the Sega Saturn era. I can’t express the same enjoyment for the return of Sonic 3/Knuckles’ “collect the blue orbs” bonus stages. Granted, I was never a fan of this mini-game even in its time, so take this as a very personal gripe. The rewards for beating these stages include new abilities, like Sonic CD’s Super Peel Out, AKA “the figure-eight run”. The high frequency of these bonus stages became irritating because of their low barrier for entry. About 25-30 rings opens them at each checkpoint, meaning you have to halt your adventure to visit them multiple times per stage. Those who enjoy these mini-games will probably be okay with this. I began ignoring them entirely towards the end in favor of continuing uninterrupted. Outside of the main game, a time attack mode and the Sonic 2 versus competition mode, where two players race through maps, offer decent diversions. Chaos emerald collection stands as the main source of replayability, as does playing the entire game as Knuckles. You can also play the story co-op with a partner controlling everyone’s favorite two-tailed fox, Tails. Somewhat surprisingly, Sonic Mania is a tough game. Some rust with playing classic Sonic may have been a personal factor, but completing stages often left me breathing a sigh of relief. At times, the game throws every obstacle it can muster to bring Sonic to his knees. Especially the latter stages, such as the Titanic Monarch Zone, a cool but barely comprehensible labyrinth of enemies and other forms of “ouch.” I saw the Game Over screen more often than I care to admit and never had more than 6 lives throughout the game. On top of carrying over Sonic’s best qualities, Sonic Mania also inherits some of the series’ less savory traits. Forward momentum still takes an annoying time to get going when you’ve been stopped cold. You’ll hit hidden spring pads you’d never know to avoid until after Sonic’s been sent careening into a well-placed hazard. Underwater areas remain an anxiety-spiking series of traps seemingly designed to make you want to punch the screen. The end-level inverted animal pod once pushed me through the ground, killing me in a glitch befitting of the 90s. I found that my patience for this kind of stuff has waned since that decade. Be prepared to scream “Oh, come on now!” at periodic intervals. Conclusion: Sonic Mania retains everything that made the Blue Blur a household name in the first place, for better or worse. Thankfully, the hedgehog’s positive aspects shine brighter. This lovely-crafted celebration of Sonic’s most beloved era stands as his best outing in many years. Newcomers and modern fans get to enjoy a well-made look at an icon’s past. Long-time enthusiasts can feel a bit of vindication now that their hero has one good game under his belt (in this decade). On a personal and cheesy note, Sonic Mania made me the happiest Sonic fan since I bragged about the games in grade school. Sonic Mania was reviewed on PlayStation 4 and available now for Xbox One and Nintendo Switch. The PC version arrives August 29. View full article
  8. Zipping around Green Hill Zone as the Sega’s flagship hedgehog on my Genesis ranks among my fondest gaming memories. As the quintessential Genesis kid, I bought into Sega’s marketing of Sonic as the embodiment of everything radical about the 90’s as I tried (and failed) to adopt that signature ‘tude into my own life. Thankfully, his games backed that up that advertising hype with well-designed platforming fueled by the hedgehog’s impressive sense of speed. As Sonic sped into the 3D era, his quality and appeal began a steady decline. The 3D-style gameplay introduced in Sonic Adventure never grabbed me the way the side-scrollers did. The rapid introduction of insipid side characters and increasingly convoluted plotlines made me pine for the days when Sonic was just a cool dude protecting his forest from a maniacal scientist. I, like many like-minded Sonic fans, were mystified as to why Sega couldn’t just stick to the winning formula that put Sonic on the map in the first place. But then Sega finally listened. Last summer, the publisher announced Sonic Mania, a game that can be aptly described as “that exact thing you old fogeys used to like but a bit better”. The retro-style throwback is an amalgamation of the best parts of Sonic’s Genesis heyday, and a well-crafted one at that. I got my hands on Sonic Mania during E3, playing through Act 1 of the reimagined Green Hill Zone. Sonic Mania scratched all the right itches: tight, identical controls and physics of the original (something Sonic 4 lacked), a hum-worthy soundtrack of remade tunes, and a nostalgic presentation. It really does play like the titles I obsessed over as a kid. But as I landed the final blow on Robotnik’s Death Egg robot at the demo’s conclusion, I couldn’t shake the sense that these memories felt too familiar. Probably because they more or less are those memories, just remixed with better music. I appreciate Sega greenlighting such a fan-focused passion project, but I can only imagine how much more excited I would be if they pitched the same concept but with entirely fresh content. New stages, never-before-seen enemies, additional power-ups, an original story – all wrapped up in a classic 16-bit package. As much as I enjoy Chemical Plant Zone, I’ve spun up and down its pipes enough to last a lifetime. Take that classic gameplay and apply it to something new, and Sega could have the comeback the hedgehog desperately needs. That’s not to say Sonic Mania won’t be a blast on its own merits. I knew I was going to purchase it the moment it was announced, and playing it for myself solidified that decision. Thus far it’s a fun and accurate throwback to a simpler period in my life. I smiled gleefully throughout the entire demo. However, it's impossible for me to ignore the overwhelming amount of creative potential that was left on the table. I guess I’ll have to wait until the game’s launch on August 15 to see if nostalgia alone is enough to resurrect my ailing childhood hero. View full article
  9. Zipping around Green Hill Zone as the Sega’s flagship hedgehog on my Genesis ranks among my fondest gaming memories. As the quintessential Genesis kid, I bought into Sega’s marketing of Sonic as the embodiment of everything radical about the 90’s as I tried (and failed) to adopt that signature ‘tude into my own life. Thankfully, his games backed that up that advertising hype with well-designed platforming fueled by the hedgehog’s impressive sense of speed. As Sonic sped into the 3D era, his quality and appeal began a steady decline. The 3D-style gameplay introduced in Sonic Adventure never grabbed me the way the side-scrollers did. The rapid introduction of insipid side characters and increasingly convoluted plotlines made me pine for the days when Sonic was just a cool dude protecting his forest from a maniacal scientist. I, like many like-minded Sonic fans, were mystified as to why Sega couldn’t just stick to the winning formula that put Sonic on the map in the first place. But then Sega finally listened. Last summer, the publisher announced Sonic Mania, a game that can be aptly described as “that exact thing you old fogeys used to like but a bit better”. The retro-style throwback is an amalgamation of the best parts of Sonic’s Genesis heyday, and a well-crafted one at that. I got my hands on Sonic Mania during E3, playing through Act 1 of the reimagined Green Hill Zone. Sonic Mania scratched all the right itches: tight, identical controls and physics of the original (something Sonic 4 lacked), a hum-worthy soundtrack of remade tunes, and a nostalgic presentation. It really does play like the titles I obsessed over as a kid. But as I landed the final blow on Robotnik’s Death Egg robot at the demo’s conclusion, I couldn’t shake the sense that these memories felt too familiar. Probably because they more or less are those memories, just remixed with better music. I appreciate Sega greenlighting such a fan-focused passion project, but I can only imagine how much more excited I would be if they pitched the same concept but with entirely fresh content. New stages, never-before-seen enemies, additional power-ups, an original story – all wrapped up in a classic 16-bit package. As much as I enjoy Chemical Plant Zone, I’ve spun up and down its pipes enough to last a lifetime. Take that classic gameplay and apply it to something new, and Sega could have the comeback the hedgehog desperately needs. That’s not to say Sonic Mania won’t be a blast on its own merits. I knew I was going to purchase it the moment it was announced, and playing it for myself solidified that decision. Thus far it’s a fun and accurate throwback to a simpler period in my life. I smiled gleefully throughout the entire demo. However, it's impossible for me to ignore the overwhelming amount of creative potential that was left on the table. I guess I’ll have to wait until the game’s launch on August 15 to see if nostalgia alone is enough to resurrect my ailing childhood hero.
  10. Sega is releasing a free update via Steam to all of its Mega Drive and Genesis titles that creates a new virtual hub that collects over 50 classic titles in one digital room. The hub recreates an early 90s bedroom complete with dynamic time-of-day conditions, Sega-themed decorations, a CRT TV, and a shelf that holds all your Sega Mega Drive and Genesis titles. Not only that, but the hub update brings some long desired features to these classic titles. Sega's retro titles will feature spot-on emulation, local co-op for games that originally supported it, options for graphical enhancements, the ability to save any time, and full controller and keyboard support. The full list of supported games can be found on Sega's announcement, but some of the highlights are Golden Axe, Altered Beast, Ecco the Dolphin, Virtua Fighter 2, Shining Force, Gunstar Heroes, Phantasy Star II-IV, Sonic the Hedgehog 1-3, and many more. Perhaps most importantly, Sega will be integrating full Steam Workshop support to allow for open modding of its retro titles. Honestly, we can't wait to see what the modding community will do with support from Sega like this! The update hits this Thursday, April 28. View full article
  11. Sega is releasing a free update via Steam to all of its Mega Drive and Genesis titles that creates a new virtual hub that collects over 50 classic titles in one digital room. The hub recreates an early 90s bedroom complete with dynamic time-of-day conditions, Sega-themed decorations, a CRT TV, and a shelf that holds all your Sega Mega Drive and Genesis titles. Not only that, but the hub update brings some long desired features to these classic titles. Sega's retro titles will feature spot-on emulation, local co-op for games that originally supported it, options for graphical enhancements, the ability to save any time, and full controller and keyboard support. The full list of supported games can be found on Sega's announcement, but some of the highlights are Golden Axe, Altered Beast, Ecco the Dolphin, Virtua Fighter 2, Shining Force, Gunstar Heroes, Phantasy Star II-IV, Sonic the Hedgehog 1-3, and many more. Perhaps most importantly, Sega will be integrating full Steam Workshop support to allow for open modding of its retro titles. Honestly, we can't wait to see what the modding community will do with support from Sega like this! The update hits this Thursday, April 28.
  12. The digital art dealer Cook & Becker is back again with a freshly released batch of prints for their Sega Collection. The newest prints for Sonic the Hedgehog and Virtua Fighter join assorted artwork available includes pieces based on Streets of Rage, Shenmue, Shinobi, Phantasy Star, Golden Axe, and Jet Set Radio. The new Sonic the Hedgehog print is by Paul Veer, best known for his pixel art for the indie studio Vlambeer (Super Crate Box, Ridiculous Fishing, and Nuclear Throne). Veer worked on the print with Team Sonic to come up with something representative of the blue blur. Talking about his design he said, "The Sonic franchise as a whole has always had a huge influence on my personal art style, so getting to do an official print with Sega was an honor and a dream come true. With that in mind, I wanted to do the entire series justice by including lots of characters from past and present Sonic games." Gerald Peral worked on the prints for Virtua Fighter, which come in red and blue variants. He also created the print for Golden Axe that depicts the characters in a classic, pulp style. John Sweeny's print for Shenmue 3 has been so commercially successful, with all of the revenue going toward creating the third installment in the game series, that he's being made into an in-game character. A few of those prints are still available, but will likely be sold out shortly. On top of all that, Cook & Becker have announced that they will be receiving a collection of Bloodborne and The Order: 1888 artwork in time for Halloween. No word on exactly when we might expect to see these prints, but it is possible to get early access or reserve prints by contacting the dealer via their site.
  13. The digital art dealer Cook & Becker is back again with a freshly released batch of prints for their Sega Collection. The newest prints for Sonic the Hedgehog and Virtua Fighter join assorted artwork available includes pieces based on Streets of Rage, Shenmue, Shinobi, Phantasy Star, Golden Axe, and Jet Set Radio. The new Sonic the Hedgehog print is by Paul Veer, best known for his pixel art for the indie studio Vlambeer (Super Crate Box, Ridiculous Fishing, and Nuclear Throne). Veer worked on the print with Team Sonic to come up with something representative of the blue blur. Talking about his design he said, "The Sonic franchise as a whole has always had a huge influence on my personal art style, so getting to do an official print with Sega was an honor and a dream come true. With that in mind, I wanted to do the entire series justice by including lots of characters from past and present Sonic games." Gerald Peral worked on the prints for Virtua Fighter, which come in red and blue variants. He also created the print for Golden Axe that depicts the characters in a classic, pulp style. John Sweeny's print for Shenmue 3 has been so commercially successful, with all of the revenue going toward creating the third installment in the game series, that he's being made into an in-game character. A few of those prints are still available, but will likely be sold out shortly. On top of all that, Cook & Becker have announced that they will be receiving a collection of Bloodborne and The Order: 1888 artwork in time for Halloween. No word on exactly when we might expect to see these prints, but it is possible to get early access or reserve prints by contacting the dealer via their site. View full article
  14. Sonic, Rayman, Luigi, Pokémon, Professor Layton, and Zelda, for your quick stop on what was covered during yesterday’s Nintendo Direct, look no further! We’ve got you covered. Satoru Iwata, global president of Nintendo, began the proceedings by digging into the upcoming Sonic Lost World. The Wii U title will feature three speeds, accommodating players of all skill levels and adding a greater degree of control over the blue hedgehog. Iwata also revealed that Sonic will be able to use “color powers” giving sonic different abilities like tunneling through dirt or transforming into a bird-creature. A 3DS version of the title will also be available. Players will be able to link a 3DS copy of Lost World with a Wii U version, importing player-created radio-controlled vehicles, which they can control on the Wii U using their 3DS. This effectively means that two friends who own the 3DS and Wii U versions can play co-operatively on the Wii U version. Sonic Lost World will release October 22. Iwata moved on to discuss Rayman Legends, which was supposed to release at the beginning of this summer, but was pushed back to the beginning of fall to release across all platforms besides the Wii U. Basically, this section of the Direct was to say, “Hey, remember how cool this game looked several months ago? It is still coming out and it still has unique Wii U GamePad functionality!” So, to reiterate, up to five players can cooperate to beat the various levels, four players on controllers and one on the GamePad. The GamePad player will have access to unique ways to influence the game world unavailable to other players. The only bit of real information was that there will be downloadable Mario and Luigi costumes for the Wii U version. Rayman Legends releases September 3 The Direct then spent some time on Ark Academy SketchPad, a downloadable software program from the eShop that will allow users to use the Wii U GamePad to create artwork. Users will be able to take screenshots of their art and share it with other users via Nintendo’s online services. Though Ark Academy launches August 9, community support will be available a few days later. Iwata also mentioned briefly that Nintendo is working on another Ark Academy title that will include detailed drawing lessons. Following the announcement regarding Ark Academy, Erik Peterson from the Treehouse division of Nintendo of America came on to discuss North American releases of Nintendo titles. Peterson kicked things off with a reminder that Pikmin 3 released and has a way of taking in-game screenshots with the GamePad controller. Players can then caption and share these pictures. If this doesn’t sound like a recipe for the kind of mischief that Nintendo has notoriously cracked down upon, I don’t know what does. Peterson also made sure to remind everyone that the Mario and Luigi Dream Team will be released on August 11 for the 3DS. Pokémon Rumble U was revealed and discussed shortly after Peterson gave an overview of Dream Team. The Wii U eShop title features frantic toy Pokémon vs. toy Pokémon action over the course of 70 levels. Following each level players will have a chance of befriending the Pokémon defeated in battle. All 649 Pokémon that have appeared through Black version 2 and White version 2 will be present and playable. Players will be able to buy figurines at participating retailers and transport them into the game via a scanner on the Wii U GamePad, similar to the popular Skylanders series. Peterson assured everyone that these figurines are completely optional and will not be necessary to see everything. Pokémon Rumble U hits the digital shelves August 29. Other downloadable titles are heading to the 3DS eShop. Retro classics like the original Donkey Kong (August 15), Tecmo Bowl (sometime before football season starts), Wario Land 3 (August 29), and Super Mario Bros. 3 (later this year) will be making their way to the eShop over the course of this year. While Peterson wasn’t able to reveal much information, he did confirm that Professor Layton and the Azran Legacy will be coming next year as well as the long awaited Professor Layton vs. Phoenix Wright Ace Attorney. Satoru Iwata took over the briefing once again. This time, he was dropping some interesting new tidbits regarding The Legend of Zelda series. He began by pointing out that the logo for The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds had not one, but two triforces, one that we are familiar with and another that appears as a shadow. He hinted that this shadow triforce might play a large role in A Link Between Worlds. Iwata also went into a bit more detail about how The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past and A Link Between Worlds are related. A Link Between Worlds takes place far in the future, many years after A Link to the Past. The main character is not the same Link, but an entirely new Link. While the normal world of A Link Between Worlds is the same as A Link to the Past, the “other” world seen in the trailers and gameplay from A Link Between Worlds, might not be the Dark World from A Link to the Past. A bit confusing, I know, but whatever the Zelda continuity, A Link Between Worlds is coming to 3DS this November. Iwata also discussed a few of the changes Nintendo has included in the HD version of The Legend of Zelda: The Windwaker. The team has fine-tuned the collection in the last half of the game, presumably making it a bit easier and including less backtracking. They’ve also adjusted wind control actions, which can now be adjusted in any direction instead of fumbling repeatedly with that dang wind baton when you get the direction wrong. Finally, they added a high-speed sailing mode to alleviate some of the tedium players experienced sailing the long stretches of empty ocean. Windwaker HD will be available this October. Luigi was also confirmed for the Wii U and 3DS Super Smash Bros. titles, which doesn’t come as much of a surprise, but I suppose it is nice to know nonetheless. Following the success of Animal Crossing: New Leaf, Iwata announced a new Animal Crossing community on Wii U and a downloadable Animal Crossing Plaza for the Wii U. Animal Crossing Plaza allows players to share screenshots with other players, send messages, see residents from other towns, share clothing designs, post about specific animals, and see updates from your 3DS town. You can download the Plaza now on Wii U. Finally, Iwata concluded yesterday’s Nintendo Direct by announcing that the Platinum Games title Wonderful 101 will be receiving its own Nintendo Direct this Friday August 9, 7 AM PT. As always, you can view the latest Nintendo Direct for yourself. What do you guys think? Interested in a Wii U or 3DS? Is Nintendo doing what it needs to in order to succeed? Let us know in the comments!
  15. Sonic, Rayman, Luigi, Pokémon, Professor Layton, and Zelda, for your quick stop on what was covered during yesterday’s Nintendo Direct, look no further! We’ve got you covered. Satoru Iwata, global president of Nintendo, began the proceedings by digging into the upcoming Sonic Lost World. The Wii U title will feature three speeds, accommodating players of all skill levels and adding a greater degree of control over the blue hedgehog. Iwata also revealed that Sonic will be able to use “color powers” giving sonic different abilities like tunneling through dirt or transforming into a bird-creature. A 3DS version of the title will also be available. Players will be able to link a 3DS copy of Lost World with a Wii U version, importing player-created radio-controlled vehicles, which they can control on the Wii U using their 3DS. This effectively means that two friends who own the 3DS and Wii U versions can play co-operatively on the Wii U version. Sonic Lost World will release October 22. Iwata moved on to discuss Rayman Legends, which was supposed to release at the beginning of this summer, but was pushed back to the beginning of fall to release across all platforms besides the Wii U. Basically, this section of the Direct was to say, “Hey, remember how cool this game looked several months ago? It is still coming out and it still has unique Wii U GamePad functionality!” So, to reiterate, up to five players can cooperate to beat the various levels, four players on controllers and one on the GamePad. The GamePad player will have access to unique ways to influence the game world unavailable to other players. The only bit of real information was that there will be downloadable Mario and Luigi costumes for the Wii U version. Rayman Legends releases September 3 The Direct then spent some time on Ark Academy SketchPad, a downloadable software program from the eShop that will allow users to use the Wii U GamePad to create artwork. Users will be able to take screenshots of their art and share it with other users via Nintendo’s online services. Though Ark Academy launches August 9, community support will be available a few days later. Iwata also mentioned briefly that Nintendo is working on another Ark Academy title that will include detailed drawing lessons. Following the announcement regarding Ark Academy, Erik Peterson from the Treehouse division of Nintendo of America came on to discuss North American releases of Nintendo titles. Peterson kicked things off with a reminder that Pikmin 3 released and has a way of taking in-game screenshots with the GamePad controller. Players can then caption and share these pictures. If this doesn’t sound like a recipe for the kind of mischief that Nintendo has notoriously cracked down upon, I don’t know what does. Peterson also made sure to remind everyone that the Mario and Luigi Dream Team will be released on August 11 for the 3DS. Pokémon Rumble U was revealed and discussed shortly after Peterson gave an overview of Dream Team. The Wii U eShop title features frantic toy Pokémon vs. toy Pokémon action over the course of 70 levels. Following each level players will have a chance of befriending the Pokémon defeated in battle. All 649 Pokémon that have appeared through Black version 2 and White version 2 will be present and playable. Players will be able to buy figurines at participating retailers and transport them into the game via a scanner on the Wii U GamePad, similar to the popular Skylanders series. Peterson assured everyone that these figurines are completely optional and will not be necessary to see everything. Pokémon Rumble U hits the digital shelves August 29. Other downloadable titles are heading to the 3DS eShop. Retro classics like the original Donkey Kong (August 15), Tecmo Bowl (sometime before football season starts), Wario Land 3 (August 29), and Super Mario Bros. 3 (later this year) will be making their way to the eShop over the course of this year. While Peterson wasn’t able to reveal much information, he did confirm that Professor Layton and the Azran Legacy will be coming next year as well as the long awaited Professor Layton vs. Phoenix Wright Ace Attorney. Satoru Iwata took over the briefing once again. This time, he was dropping some interesting new tidbits regarding The Legend of Zelda series. He began by pointing out that the logo for The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds had not one, but two triforces, one that we are familiar with and another that appears as a shadow. He hinted that this shadow triforce might play a large role in A Link Between Worlds. Iwata also went into a bit more detail about how The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past and A Link Between Worlds are related. A Link Between Worlds takes place far in the future, many years after A Link to the Past. The main character is not the same Link, but an entirely new Link. While the normal world of A Link Between Worlds is the same as A Link to the Past, the “other” world seen in the trailers and gameplay from A Link Between Worlds, might not be the Dark World from A Link to the Past. A bit confusing, I know, but whatever the Zelda continuity, A Link Between Worlds is coming to 3DS this November. Iwata also discussed a few of the changes Nintendo has included in the HD version of The Legend of Zelda: The Windwaker. The team has fine-tuned the collection in the last half of the game, presumably making it a bit easier and including less backtracking. They’ve also adjusted wind control actions, which can now be adjusted in any direction instead of fumbling repeatedly with that dang wind baton when you get the direction wrong. Finally, they added a high-speed sailing mode to alleviate some of the tedium players experienced sailing the long stretches of empty ocean. Windwaker HD will be available this October. Luigi was also confirmed for the Wii U and 3DS Super Smash Bros. titles, which doesn’t come as much of a surprise, but I suppose it is nice to know nonetheless. Following the success of Animal Crossing: New Leaf, Iwata announced a new Animal Crossing community on Wii U and a downloadable Animal Crossing Plaza for the Wii U. Animal Crossing Plaza allows players to share screenshots with other players, send messages, see residents from other towns, share clothing designs, post about specific animals, and see updates from your 3DS town. You can download the Plaza now on Wii U. Finally, Iwata concluded yesterday’s Nintendo Direct by announcing that the Platinum Games title Wonderful 101 will be receiving its own Nintendo Direct this Friday August 9, 7 AM PT. As always, you can view the latest Nintendo Direct for yourself. What do you guys think? Interested in a Wii U or 3DS? Is Nintendo doing what it needs to in order to succeed? Let us know in the comments! View full article
  16. Today in a streamed Nintendo Direct, Nintendo’s Satoru Iwata was pleased to unveil a business partnership with former rival Sega. Cementing this new connection was the revelation of a new Sonic title called Sonic Lost World for WiiU and 3DS, a new WiiU Mario & Sonic at the Olympics title for this year’s Winter Games in Sochi, Russia, and the announcement that the Nintendo E-Shop would soon be selling Sega GameGear titles. From that starting point, the Direct broadcast went on to divulge more information on various upcoming titles. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages will be sold via the E-Shop beginning May 30 for $5.99 each, but will be on sale for first month for 4.99 apiece. A couple minutes were devoted to discussing Mario and Donkey Kong Minis on the Move’s level creator and level sharing systems. Nintendo also announced a video series on Animal Crossing: New Leaf. The new Animal Crossing releases on June 9. More info was shared on Game and Wario (something involving creatures called… Fronks). The latest WiiU Wario title will retail at a $39.99 price point on June 23. In a surprise move, Nintendo also announced that New Super Luigi U, previously DLC only for New Super Mario Bros. U, would also be receiving a standalone retail version. The DLC content will be priced at $19.99, while the version available in stores will be $29.99. Also showcased was the addition of a new character called Nabbit, who will help ease the difficulty of the title for less experienced players. Iwata also hinted at upcoming info for the mysterious Platinum Games title The Wonderful 101, which will be released September 15. Reggie Fils-Aime, president and COO of Nintendo of America, concluded the Nintendo Direct by revealing that during the week of E3, people will be able to play select unreleased WiiU titles at Best Buy stores. You can view the full Nintendo Direct broadcast below.
  17. Today in a streamed Nintendo Direct, Nintendo’s Satoru Iwata was pleased to unveil a business partnership with former rival Sega. Cementing this new connection was the revelation of a new Sonic title called Sonic Lost World for WiiU and 3DS, a new WiiU Mario & Sonic at the Olympics title for this year’s Winter Games in Sochi, Russia, and the announcement that the Nintendo E-Shop would soon be selling Sega GameGear titles. From that starting point, the Direct broadcast went on to divulge more information on various upcoming titles. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages will be sold via the E-Shop beginning May 30 for $5.99 each, but will be on sale for first month for 4.99 apiece. A couple minutes were devoted to discussing Mario and Donkey Kong Minis on the Move’s level creator and level sharing systems. Nintendo also announced a video series on Animal Crossing: New Leaf. The new Animal Crossing releases on June 9. More info was shared on Game and Wario (something involving creatures called… Fronks). The latest WiiU Wario title will retail at a $39.99 price point on June 23. In a surprise move, Nintendo also announced that New Super Luigi U, previously DLC only for New Super Mario Bros. U, would also be receiving a standalone retail version. The DLC content will be priced at $19.99, while the version available in stores will be $29.99. Also showcased was the addition of a new character called Nabbit, who will help ease the difficulty of the title for less experienced players. Iwata also hinted at upcoming info for the mysterious Platinum Games title The Wonderful 101, which will be released September 15. Reggie Fils-Aime, president and COO of Nintendo of America, concluded the Nintendo Direct by revealing that during the week of E3, people will be able to play select unreleased WiiU titles at Best Buy stores. You can view the full Nintendo Direct broadcast below. View full article
×
×
  • Create New...