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Found 45 results

  1. It was unclear whether Yakuza 6: The Song of Life would have a demo after Sega removed it from the PlayStation Network last month. The demo was notable for its size due to the demo including all of the data for the full game. The idea was to allow those who played the demo to carry over their progress and trophies to the full game on release day. However, the demo was intended to cap progress at the end of the first chapter of Yakuza 6, but some players either didn't run into that cap or found a way around it. Once that became public knowledge, Sega pulled the demo. It seems that some tweaks have been made to the demo to ensure no one can get access to the full game now. Players will be able to progress up to the end of the first chapter and then grind experience that will carry over into the full release. However, if you've already played through the demo, any trophies you've earned will be reset. If you were one of the players who made it past the chapter one cut off point, you will not be able to load that data for the demo. However, the full version of Yakuza 6 should still load that data so you can pick up where you left off.
  2. It was unclear whether Yakuza 6: The Song of Life would have a demo after Sega removed it from the PlayStation Network last month. The demo was notable for its size due to the demo including all of the data for the full game. The idea was to allow those who played the demo to carry over their progress and trophies to the full game on release day. However, the demo was intended to cap progress at the end of the first chapter of Yakuza 6, but some players either didn't run into that cap or found a way around it. Once that became public knowledge, Sega pulled the demo. It seems that some tweaks have been made to the demo to ensure no one can get access to the full game now. Players will be able to progress up to the end of the first chapter and then grind experience that will carry over into the full release. However, if you've already played through the demo, any trophies you've earned will be reset. If you were one of the players who made it past the chapter one cut off point, you will not be able to load that data for the demo. However, the full version of Yakuza 6 should still load that data so you can pick up where you left off. View full article
  3. It seems that Sega has a bit of a kerfuffle on it's hands. After releasing the demo of Yakuza 6: The Song of Life on PSN, players found a way to use it to unlock the full game prior to its official release date. The demo apparently was the full Yakuza 6 game and was designed to lock progression after completing the first chapter. The intent of approaching the demo this way was to allow players to make progress in the game in a way that would carry over to the full release if they made the leap to the fully priced game. While progress was indeed locked for users in regions around the world, that did not happen for certain players in North America. It's not clear if those players were able to tamper with the demo to break the lock or if it was simply never locked to begin with. Whatever the case, Sega issued a statement via their social media channels to alert players that the demo would no longer be available in North America: We apologize, but have had to remove the Yakuza 6: The Song of Life demo from the PlayStation Store. We are as upset as you are, and had hoped to have this demo available for everyone today. We discovered that some were able to use the demo to unlock the full game. We’re looking into the nature of the issue. Thank you for your patience. It is unclear if Sega intends to re-release the demo at this time. Yakuza 6: The Song of Life is currently slated for an April 17 release date on the PlayStation 4.
  4. It seems that Sega has a bit of a kerfuffle on it's hands. After releasing the demo of Yakuza 6: The Song of Life on PSN, players found a way to use it to unlock the full game prior to its official release date. The demo apparently was the full Yakuza 6 game and was designed to lock progression after completing the first chapter. The intent of approaching the demo this way was to allow players to make progress in the game in a way that would carry over to the full release if they made the leap to the fully priced game. While progress was indeed locked for users in regions around the world, that did not happen for certain players in North America. It's not clear if those players were able to tamper with the demo to break the lock or if it was simply never locked to begin with. Whatever the case, Sega issued a statement via their social media channels to alert players that the demo would no longer be available in North America: We apologize, but have had to remove the Yakuza 6: The Song of Life demo from the PlayStation Store. We are as upset as you are, and had hoped to have this demo available for everyone today. We discovered that some were able to use the demo to unlock the full game. We’re looking into the nature of the issue. Thank you for your patience. It is unclear if Sega intends to re-release the demo at this time. Yakuza 6: The Song of Life is currently slated for an April 17 release date on the PlayStation 4. View full article
  5. This is it. Sonic the Hedgehog will be coming to theaters courtesy of Paramount Studios next year. According to The Hollywood Reporter, SEGA's blue blur will spin attack his way onto the silver screen on November 15, 2019. It's a bit nebulous as to what form the film will take, though some outlets are reporting that it will be a mixture of CGI and live-action, suggesting that the film might be drawing on the Sonic Adventure games for inspiration. A number of high-profile names, along with a few unknowns, are attached to the project. Neal H. Moritz will produce with Tim Miller, the director of Deadpool, serving as the film's executive producer. Sonic will be adapted to the big screen by first time director Jeff Fowler. Fowler made a name for himself by directing a 2005 Oscar-nominated short titled Gopher Broke. This film seems like it has the potential to be solidly good or fantastically bad, but either way, I'm suddenly a bit more excited for November 15, 2019. Perhaps Sonic might even beat Nintendo's upcoming Mario film into theaters? View full article
  6. This is it. Sonic the Hedgehog will be coming to theaters courtesy of Paramount Studios next year. According to The Hollywood Reporter, SEGA's blue blur will spin attack his way onto the silver screen on November 15, 2019. It's a bit nebulous as to what form the film will take, though some outlets are reporting that it will be a mixture of CGI and live-action, suggesting that the film might be drawing on the Sonic Adventure games for inspiration. A number of high-profile names, along with a few unknowns, are attached to the project. Neal H. Moritz will produce with Tim Miller, the director of Deadpool, serving as the film's executive producer. Sonic will be adapted to the big screen by first time director Jeff Fowler. Fowler made a name for himself by directing a 2005 Oscar-nominated short titled Gopher Broke. This film seems like it has the potential to be solidly good or fantastically bad, but either way, I'm suddenly a bit more excited for November 15, 2019. Perhaps Sonic might even beat Nintendo's upcoming Mario film into theaters?
  7. Jillian Ryan

    Favorite Old School RPG??

    Hey guys! I was wondering what some of your favorite old school rpgs are??? Lets say anything ps1 and older! Mine are: Chrono trigger, lunar silver star story complete, legend of dragoon, shining force and a few others!!!
  8. TheGiant

    Sega Genesis (and Genesis Homebrew)

    Considering picking up a Genesis soon as my next retro console re-acquisition. Anyone still play one now? What are your favorite Genesis games? As far as new games go, Piko Interactive is a good place to look, they get ahold of licenses of games that never had a chance to get released in the US (or at all) and finish them up and put them on carts to play on the real hardware. (Not just for Genesis, but this IS a genesis thread lol)
  9. Sonic the Hedgehog may have been a well known character before Sonic 2 hit the shelves, but Sonic 2 gave his series of games the momentum to continue all the way to this very day, made the Sega Genesis a must-own system for kids around the world, and set the blue blur up as the pinnacle of anthropomorphic protagonists with attitude. Game critic and Sonic enthusiast Marcus Stewart joins the show to argue for Sonic 2's inclusion among the best games period. Some people love Sonic the Hedgehog, while others find the series lacking. This week, we pit the two views head to head to see which comes out on top! Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Sonic CD 'Take It All the Way' by Magellanic and PROTO·DOME (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02940) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod Be sure to follow Marcus Stewart on Twitter to keep an eye on his work and tweets about wrestling: @MarcusStewart7 New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  10. Sonic the Hedgehog may have been a well known character before Sonic 2 hit the shelves, but Sonic 2 gave his series of games the momentum to continue all the way to this very day, made the Sega Genesis a must-own system for kids around the world, and set the blue blur up as the pinnacle of anthropomorphic protagonists with attitude. Game critic and Sonic enthusiast Marcus Stewart joins the show to argue for Sonic 2's inclusion among the best games period. Some people love Sonic the Hedgehog, while others find the series lacking. This week, we pit the two views head to head to see which comes out on top! Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Sonic CD 'Take It All the Way' by Magellanic and PROTO·DOME (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02940) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod Be sure to follow Marcus Stewart on Twitter to keep an eye on his work and tweets about wrestling: @MarcusStewart7 New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  11. The Valkyria Chronicles series returns next year with its fourth mainline entry coming to PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, and Xbox One. While that might throw off some fans of the first Valkyria Chronicles that released for the PlayStation 3 back in 2008, Valkyria Chronicles 2 and 3 were only ever released for the PlayStation Portable. That means that by the time Valkyria Chronicles 4 releases, it will have been a decade since a mainline game from the franchise has appeared on consoles. It should be noted that Valkyria Chronicles has been considered the core series while titles like the recent Valkyria Revolution and Valkyria Chronicles D are spin-offs of the franchise. The signature watercolor look of the series returns along with its World War II-inspired political turmoil, weaponry, and drama. Players will join the ranks of Squad E as they undertake a desperate mission to capture the enemy's capital and bring the war to an end. Losses in war will bring heartbreak, test friendships, and determine the fate of the war. Of course, Squad E will also have their encounters with the mysterious and powerful Valkyria. Sega has teased that other mysteries will be introduced in this entry, too. In addition to a new engine built specifically to help better render the watercolor aesthetic of the series, Valkyria Chronicles 4 offers the next iteration of its unique mash-up of real-time and turn-based combat. One part strategy, one part third-person shooter, and one part RPG, the revamped system offers a new class, the grenadier, battleship support, a last stand opportunity for soldiers near death, and larger maps than were possible on the consoles of the previous generation. Valkyria Chronicles 4 releases sometime in 2018 for PS4, Switch, and Xbox One. View full article
  12. The Valkyria Chronicles series returns next year with its fourth mainline entry coming to PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, and Xbox One. While that might throw off some fans of the first Valkyria Chronicles that released for the PlayStation 3 back in 2008, Valkyria Chronicles 2 and 3 were only ever released for the PlayStation Portable. That means that by the time Valkyria Chronicles 4 releases, it will have been a decade since a mainline game from the franchise has appeared on consoles. It should be noted that Valkyria Chronicles has been considered the core series while titles like the recent Valkyria Revolution and Valkyria Chronicles D are spin-offs of the franchise. The signature watercolor look of the series returns along with its World War II-inspired political turmoil, weaponry, and drama. Players will join the ranks of Squad E as they undertake a desperate mission to capture the enemy's capital and bring the war to an end. Losses in war will bring heartbreak, test friendships, and determine the fate of the war. Of course, Squad E will also have their encounters with the mysterious and powerful Valkyria. Sega has teased that other mysteries will be introduced in this entry, too. In addition to a new engine built specifically to help better render the watercolor aesthetic of the series, Valkyria Chronicles 4 offers the next iteration of its unique mash-up of real-time and turn-based combat. One part strategy, one part third-person shooter, and one part RPG, the revamped system offers a new class, the grenadier, battleship support, a last stand opportunity for soldiers near death, and larger maps than were possible on the consoles of the previous generation. Valkyria Chronicles 4 releases sometime in 2018 for PS4, Switch, and Xbox One.
  13. If you were a Sega fanatic back in the day and have been searching for an inexpensive (read: free) way to relieve those memories, Sega just might have something for you. Sega Forever, which launched today, is a free collection of classic games for download on iOS and Android devices. The collection's library spans the Master System to the Dreamcast and everything in between. Each title features wireless Bluetooth controller support, leaderboards and saves. The site promises new releases every month, and kicks off with Sonic the Hedgehog, Altered Beast, Phantasy Star II, Comix Zone and Kid Chameleon. While the games are all free, they do contain in-game ads, so the experience certainly comes with that caveat. Players will have to pay a one-time fee of $1.99 in order to dismiss ads from a select game permanently. Game controls from consoles transferred over to mobile devices also aren't always the smoothest, so allowing players to decide if a port is worth $1.99 is probably one of the more consumer-friendly ways of implementing this retro gaming program. You can find out more about Sega Forever by visiting its official website. If you want to experience an insane blast from the past, check out the website's hyper-90's launch trailer. What do you think about Sega Forever? Let us know how you feel about playing your favorite Sega classics on the go! View full article
  14. If you were a Sega fanatic back in the day and have been searching for an inexpensive (read: free) way to relieve those memories, Sega just might have something for you. Sega Forever, which launched today, is a free collection of classic games for download on iOS and Android devices. The collection's library spans the Master System to the Dreamcast and everything in between. Each title features wireless Bluetooth controller support, leaderboards and saves. The site promises new releases every month, and kicks off with Sonic the Hedgehog, Altered Beast, Phantasy Star II, Comix Zone and Kid Chameleon. While the games are all free, they do contain in-game ads, so the experience certainly comes with that caveat. Players will have to pay a one-time fee of $1.99 in order to dismiss ads from a select game permanently. Game controls from consoles transferred over to mobile devices also aren't always the smoothest, so allowing players to decide if a port is worth $1.99 is probably one of the more consumer-friendly ways of implementing this retro gaming program. You can find out more about Sega Forever by visiting its official website. If you want to experience an insane blast from the past, check out the website's hyper-90's launch trailer. What do you think about Sega Forever? Let us know how you feel about playing your favorite Sega classics on the go!
  15. Zipping around Green Hill Zone as the Sega’s flagship hedgehog on my Genesis ranks among my fondest gaming memories. As the quintessential Genesis kid, I bought into Sega’s marketing of Sonic as the embodiment of everything radical about the 90’s as I tried (and failed) to adopt that signature ‘tude into my own life. Thankfully, his games backed that up that advertising hype with well-designed platforming fueled by the hedgehog’s impressive sense of speed. As Sonic sped into the 3D era, his quality and appeal began a steady decline. The 3D-style gameplay introduced in Sonic Adventure never grabbed me the way the side-scrollers did. The rapid introduction of insipid side characters and increasingly convoluted plotlines made me pine for the days when Sonic was just a cool dude protecting his forest from a maniacal scientist. I, like many like-minded Sonic fans, were mystified as to why Sega couldn’t just stick to the winning formula that put Sonic on the map in the first place. But then Sega finally listened. Last summer, the publisher announced Sonic Mania, a game that can be aptly described as “that exact thing you old fogeys used to like but a bit better”. The retro-style throwback is an amalgamation of the best parts of Sonic’s Genesis heyday, and a well-crafted one at that. I got my hands on Sonic Mania during E3, playing through Act 1 of the reimagined Green Hill Zone. Sonic Mania scratched all the right itches: tight, identical controls and physics of the original (something Sonic 4 lacked), a hum-worthy soundtrack of remade tunes, and a nostalgic presentation. It really does play like the titles I obsessed over as a kid. But as I landed the final blow on Robotnik’s Death Egg robot at the demo’s conclusion, I couldn’t shake the sense that these memories felt too familiar. Probably because they more or less are those memories, just remixed with better music. I appreciate Sega greenlighting such a fan-focused passion project, but I can only imagine how much more excited I would be if they pitched the same concept but with entirely fresh content. New stages, never-before-seen enemies, additional power-ups, an original story – all wrapped up in a classic 16-bit package. As much as I enjoy Chemical Plant Zone, I’ve spun up and down its pipes enough to last a lifetime. Take that classic gameplay and apply it to something new, and Sega could have the comeback the hedgehog desperately needs. That’s not to say Sonic Mania won’t be a blast on its own merits. I knew I was going to purchase it the moment it was announced, and playing it for myself solidified that decision. Thus far it’s a fun and accurate throwback to a simpler period in my life. I smiled gleefully throughout the entire demo. However, it's impossible for me to ignore the overwhelming amount of creative potential that was left on the table. I guess I’ll have to wait until the game’s launch on August 15 to see if nostalgia alone is enough to resurrect my ailing childhood hero.
  16. Zipping around Green Hill Zone as the Sega’s flagship hedgehog on my Genesis ranks among my fondest gaming memories. As the quintessential Genesis kid, I bought into Sega’s marketing of Sonic as the embodiment of everything radical about the 90’s as I tried (and failed) to adopt that signature ‘tude into my own life. Thankfully, his games backed that up that advertising hype with well-designed platforming fueled by the hedgehog’s impressive sense of speed. As Sonic sped into the 3D era, his quality and appeal began a steady decline. The 3D-style gameplay introduced in Sonic Adventure never grabbed me the way the side-scrollers did. The rapid introduction of insipid side characters and increasingly convoluted plotlines made me pine for the days when Sonic was just a cool dude protecting his forest from a maniacal scientist. I, like many like-minded Sonic fans, were mystified as to why Sega couldn’t just stick to the winning formula that put Sonic on the map in the first place. But then Sega finally listened. Last summer, the publisher announced Sonic Mania, a game that can be aptly described as “that exact thing you old fogeys used to like but a bit better”. The retro-style throwback is an amalgamation of the best parts of Sonic’s Genesis heyday, and a well-crafted one at that. I got my hands on Sonic Mania during E3, playing through Act 1 of the reimagined Green Hill Zone. Sonic Mania scratched all the right itches: tight, identical controls and physics of the original (something Sonic 4 lacked), a hum-worthy soundtrack of remade tunes, and a nostalgic presentation. It really does play like the titles I obsessed over as a kid. But as I landed the final blow on Robotnik’s Death Egg robot at the demo’s conclusion, I couldn’t shake the sense that these memories felt too familiar. Probably because they more or less are those memories, just remixed with better music. I appreciate Sega greenlighting such a fan-focused passion project, but I can only imagine how much more excited I would be if they pitched the same concept but with entirely fresh content. New stages, never-before-seen enemies, additional power-ups, an original story – all wrapped up in a classic 16-bit package. As much as I enjoy Chemical Plant Zone, I’ve spun up and down its pipes enough to last a lifetime. Take that classic gameplay and apply it to something new, and Sega could have the comeback the hedgehog desperately needs. That’s not to say Sonic Mania won’t be a blast on its own merits. I knew I was going to purchase it the moment it was announced, and playing it for myself solidified that decision. Thus far it’s a fun and accurate throwback to a simpler period in my life. I smiled gleefully throughout the entire demo. However, it's impossible for me to ignore the overwhelming amount of creative potential that was left on the table. I guess I’ll have to wait until the game’s launch on August 15 to see if nostalgia alone is enough to resurrect my ailing childhood hero. View full article
  17. Sega Europe is teaming up with a new studio headed by Gary Carr and Mark Webley, who you might recognize for their work on games like Black & White, Theme Park, and Fable. Sega's European branch will be working with the duo's Two Point Studios to create an entirely new IP that will modernize the soul of what made the franchises they worked on great. The game, currently unnamed, but in development, impressed Sega. John Clark, the senior VP of commercial publishing at Sega Europe, stated that, "We've been talking to Two Point Studios for a long time and are really impressed with their vision. We're delighted to announce our partnership and look forward to revealing more about the project early next year." Likewise, Sega dazzled the indie studio with Webley explaining that, "Sega Europe have really impressed us with their approach to working with creative teams, their reputation as a PC publisher and their commitment to quality - they are an ideal partner for us." While not much is currently known about the unannounced title, Carr and Webley's team at Two Point Studios consists mainly of ex-Bullfrog and ex-Lionhead developers. Gary Carr did drop a hint at what type of game might be in the works, saying, "We are really excited to be working with Sega and between us we feel confident that we can create something special, and realise our vision of crafting a beautiful, charming and challenging sim game." Challenging sim game, huh? That statement, along with the personnel involved, points us toward what the experienced team at Two Point might be making. Black & White: Theme Park, anyone? Become a god of life or death, lording over a digital theme par- wait, no, that's what people already do in theme park games. Whatever this unannounced game winds up becoming, we will have more details about it in early 2018.
  18. Sega Europe is teaming up with a new studio headed by Gary Carr and Mark Webley, who you might recognize for their work on games like Black & White, Theme Park, and Fable. Sega's European branch will be working with the duo's Two Point Studios to create an entirely new IP that will modernize the soul of what made the franchises they worked on great. The game, currently unnamed, but in development, impressed Sega. John Clark, the senior VP of commercial publishing at Sega Europe, stated that, "We've been talking to Two Point Studios for a long time and are really impressed with their vision. We're delighted to announce our partnership and look forward to revealing more about the project early next year." Likewise, Sega dazzled the indie studio with Webley explaining that, "Sega Europe have really impressed us with their approach to working with creative teams, their reputation as a PC publisher and their commitment to quality - they are an ideal partner for us." While not much is currently known about the unannounced title, Carr and Webley's team at Two Point Studios consists mainly of ex-Bullfrog and ex-Lionhead developers. Gary Carr did drop a hint at what type of game might be in the works, saying, "We are really excited to be working with Sega and between us we feel confident that we can create something special, and realise our vision of crafting a beautiful, charming and challenging sim game." Challenging sim game, huh? That statement, along with the personnel involved, points us toward what the experienced team at Two Point might be making. Black & White: Theme Park, anyone? Become a god of life or death, lording over a digital theme par- wait, no, that's what people already do in theme park games. Whatever this unannounced game winds up becoming, we will have more details about it in early 2018. View full article
  19. You'll get a lot, and I mean A LOT, of different answers if you ask a group of gamers about the best Sonic the Hedgehog game. Some are die-hard supporters of 3D-era Sonic, some will swear by the 3D Sonic Revival that happened after Sonic 2006, and some maintain that there were never any good Sonic the Hedgehog games at all (an opinion that might start some flame wars in certain corners of the internet). However, if there is one thing that most people can agree on it is that Sonic's best streak of games was found on the Sega Genesis. Sonic Mania pursues that ear of nostalgia perfectly in the trailer released today. The trailer features animation work done by Tyson Hesse, the artist and author of the comic Diesel. The music comes courtesy of the YouTube channel Hyper Potions. Together with Sega, Hesse and Hyper Potions managed to really capture a the retro feel of the franchise while covering it in a new coat of paint. Oh, and Sonic Mania will be returning to the franchise's Sega Genesis roots with 2D platforming. Players will be able to play as Sonic, Tails, and Knuckles that brings fans all new levels, reimagined versions of classic stages, and boss battles. I mean, look at that trailer! It definitely left me smiling. Sonic Mania releases on August 15 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC. Fans can also nab a Collector's Edition of the game that comes with a Sonic/console statue, a faux cartridge with a golden ring, and a big, ol' box. The old timey commercial Sega put together to advertise it is pretty funny, so check that out below.
  20. You'll get a lot, and I mean A LOT, of different answers if you ask a group of gamers about the best Sonic the Hedgehog game. Some are die-hard supporters of 3D-era Sonic, some will swear by the 3D Sonic Revival that happened after Sonic 2006, and some maintain that there were never any good Sonic the Hedgehog games at all (an opinion that might start some flame wars in certain corners of the internet). However, if there is one thing that most people can agree on it is that Sonic's best streak of games was found on the Sega Genesis. Sonic Mania pursues that ear of nostalgia perfectly in the trailer released today. The trailer features animation work done by Tyson Hesse, the artist and author of the comic Diesel. The music comes courtesy of the YouTube channel Hyper Potions. Together with Sega, Hesse and Hyper Potions managed to really capture a the retro feel of the franchise while covering it in a new coat of paint. Oh, and Sonic Mania will be returning to the franchise's Sega Genesis roots with 2D platforming. Players will be able to play as Sonic, Tails, and Knuckles that brings fans all new levels, reimagined versions of classic stages, and boss battles. I mean, look at that trailer! It definitely left me smiling. Sonic Mania releases on August 15 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC. Fans can also nab a Collector's Edition of the game that comes with a Sonic/console statue, a faux cartridge with a golden ring, and a big, ol' box. The old timey commercial Sega put together to advertise it is pretty funny, so check that out below. View full article
  21. Soulcalibur released for the Sega Dreamcast as part of the console's North American launch in 1999. Developed by Project Soul, the fighting title served as a successor to Soul Blade on the PlayStation. Two versions of Soulcalibur were developed - one for arcades and one for the Dreamcast. Though the arcade version launched in 1998, the Dreamcast version contained numerous improvements and additional game modes while offering graphics and animations on the same level as the arcade version - something almost unheard of in 3D gaming before the turn of the millennium. Harold Goldberg, prolific video game writer, author of All Your Base Are Belong to Us: How 50 Years of Videogames Conquered Pop Culture, and founder of The New York Videogame Critics Circle, joins the show this week to defend his nomination of Soulcalibur. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Soul Blade 'Jazzer Soul' by MkVaff (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR00194) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  22. Soulcalibur released for the Sega Dreamcast as part of the console's North American launch in 1999. Developed by Project Soul, the fighting title served as a successor to Soul Blade on the PlayStation. Two versions of Soulcalibur were developed - one for arcades and one for the Dreamcast. Though the arcade version launched in 1998, the Dreamcast version contained numerous improvements and additional game modes while offering graphics and animations on the same level as the arcade version - something almost unheard of in 3D gaming before the turn of the millennium. Harold Goldberg, prolific video game writer, author of All Your Base Are Belong to Us: How 50 Years of Videogames Conquered Pop Culture, and founder of The New York Videogame Critics Circle, joins the show this week to defend his nomination of Soulcalibur. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Soul Blade 'Jazzer Soul' by MkVaff (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR00194) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  23. A couple years back, we told you about how the Internet Archive had added 2,400 MS-DOS games to its collection. That number of MS-DOS titles has since grown to over 4,000, but there are actually almost double that number of gaming titles that archived from other systems and consoles. The current total number of explorable gaming software on the Archive stands at 7,700. That's a lot of games! The console collection of The Internet Archive includes a staggering number of obscure systems. Ever wondered what it was like to play a Fairchild Channel F? They have 45 games anyone can try out. Never heard of the Epoch Game Pocket Computer? You can play five of those titles. In fact, there are 27 collections of uploaded and emulated software available, including over 1,500 Sega games across four of their consoles. Below you can find a comprehensive list of the consoles, the number of games in the collection, and links to their related collections on Internet Archive: Amstrad GX-4000 - 23 APF-MP1000 - 15 Atari 2600 - 519 Atari 5200 - 43 Atari 7800 – 73 Bally Astrocade - 20 Bandai Super Vision 8000 - 7 Coleco Colecovision - 234 Emerson Arcadia – 58 Entex Adventure Vision - 4 Epoch Game Pocket Computer - 5 Epoch Super Cassette Vision - 31 The Fairchild Channel F – 45 Magnavox Odyssey 2 – 122 Mattel Aquarius - 13 Mattel Intelevision - 21 Mega Duck WG-108 - 9 Neo Geo Pocket/Pocket Color – 316 Sega Game Gear - 446 Sega Genesis - 575 Sega Master System - 563 Sega SG-1000 - 74 Socrates - 8 Shoot ‘Em Up Construction Kit games - 323 Super A’Can – 9 VTech Creativision - 17 Watara Supervision - 44 However, are all of those games worth looking into? That answer is definitely a bit hazy. While Internet Archive can successfully emulate all of these titles, the controls and responsiveness of said games leaves a lot to be desired. The ideal way to play these is definitely not on the Archive, but it stands as a useful repository of history and research for those who want to know more about gaming's past. The uploaded titles include unfinished prototypes and builds for various games, too! Just be warned - there are a lot of... eccentric titles on the Internet Archive that have been made by homebrew developers and may contain some explicit material.
  24. A couple years back, we told you about how the Internet Archive had added 2,400 MS-DOS games to its collection. That number of MS-DOS titles has since grown to over 4,000, but there are actually almost double that number of gaming titles that archived from other systems and consoles. The current total number of explorable gaming software on the Archive stands at 7,700. That's a lot of games! The console collection of The Internet Archive includes a staggering number of obscure systems. Ever wondered what it was like to play a Fairchild Channel F? They have 45 games anyone can try out. Never heard of the Epoch Game Pocket Computer? You can play five of those titles. In fact, there are 27 collections of uploaded and emulated software available, including over 1,500 Sega games across four of their consoles. Below you can find a comprehensive list of the consoles, the number of games in the collection, and links to their related collections on Internet Archive: Amstrad GX-4000 - 23 APF-MP1000 - 15 Atari 2600 - 519 Atari 5200 - 43 Atari 7800 – 73 Bally Astrocade - 20 Bandai Super Vision 8000 - 7 Coleco Colecovision - 234 Emerson Arcadia – 58 Entex Adventure Vision - 4 Epoch Game Pocket Computer - 5 Epoch Super Cassette Vision - 31 The Fairchild Channel F – 45 Magnavox Odyssey 2 – 122 Mattel Aquarius - 13 Mattel Intelevision - 21 Mega Duck WG-108 - 9 Neo Geo Pocket/Pocket Color – 316 Sega Game Gear - 446 Sega Genesis - 575 Sega Master System - 563 Sega SG-1000 - 74 Socrates - 8 Shoot ‘Em Up Construction Kit games - 323 Super A’Can – 9 VTech Creativision - 17 Watara Supervision - 44 However, are all of those games worth looking into? That answer is definitely a bit hazy. While Internet Archive can successfully emulate all of these titles, the controls and responsiveness of said games leaves a lot to be desired. The ideal way to play these is definitely not on the Archive, but it stands as a useful repository of history and research for those who want to know more about gaming's past. The uploaded titles include unfinished prototypes and builds for various games, too! Just be warned - there are a lot of... eccentric titles on the Internet Archive that have been made by homebrew developers and may contain some explicit material. View full article
  25. The folks at Lizardcube release their side-scrolling action-platformer Wonder Boy today. The vibrant, dream-like game follows the either Hu-Man or Hu-Girl as he/she ventures into Monster Land in search of the dragon's room. Unfortunately for our hero, the room isn't without its traps. The dragon curses Wonder Boy, dooming him to live in various animal-human forms. The trailer shows these forms in action: Lizard-Man, Mouse-Man, Lion-Man, Piranha-Man, and Hawk-Man. Each one has different advantages, like a fire breath attack as Lizard-Man or the ability to fly as Hawk-Man. Players will need to master each form in order to recover the Salamander Cross and remove the curse for good. As a nice added bonus, players can switch back and forth from the modern, hand-animated style or a retro 8-bit aesthetic. These changes can be made on the fly and even extend to the audio and sound effects. Wonder Boy is an old Sega franchise that had some of the strangest numbering and naming conventions, even by gaming standards. The series goes Wonder Boy, Wonder Boy: Monster Land, Wonder Boy III: Monster Lair, Wonder Boy III: The Dragon's Trap, Wonder Boy V: Monster World III, and Monster World IV. Wonder Boy: The Dragon's Trap is a modern reimagining of the 1989 Sega Master System title Wonder Boy III: The Dragon's Trap for modern consoles and possibly an attempt to revive the dormant Wonder Boy IP for a new era. Wonder Boy: The Dragon's Trap is available now for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch