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Found 7 results

  1. Extra Life's partnership with Wizards of the Coast has been incredible over the years. This year, Wizards of the Coast managed the incredible feat of managing to raise over $1 million USD! They surpassed that momentous mark this year through the combined might of their D&D Super Team holding fundraising events throughout the year and the incredible efforts of their Magic: The Gathering team. A huge thank you to Wizards of the Coast and all the employees and creators who helped make this achievement possible! The D&D Super Team has managed to raise a a colossal sum of over $250,000 USD and is expected to hit $275,000 USD by the time the dust settles at the end of 2019. They reached that incredible number by kicking off a three month campaign with the Founders & Legends Day celebration on July 27, which featured Luke Gygax talking about the origins of tabletop roleplaying as well as several D&D one-shot games. With numerous streams and smaller events in between, along with the hard work of D&D players, DMs, and fans working to support their local hospitals, their last major fundraising push happened from October 31 through November 3 with Gamehole Con and on November 9 with Seattle Children's Hospital Game Day. Seattle Children's Hospital Game Day had Wizards of the Coast playing Dungeon Mayhem, the company's D&D-themed card game, and full-tabletop sessions for new players and kids. The other half of Wizards of the Coast's fundraising efforts belonged to Magic: The Gathering. The Magic community really rallied around Wizards this year between more people pitching in on Game Day and the debut of Ponies: The Galloping. Three official Magic: The Gathering cards featuring four of the most beloved ponies from My Little Pony debuted as part of a special collection benefiting Extra Life. The limited edition cards went on sale on October 22 along with a series of matching playmats, sales of which also benefited Extra Life. The playmats and cards sold out incredibly quickly, with the entire offering disappearing almost immediately. During the same time period, Magic: The Gathering auctioned off a series of coveted foil card sheets fresh from their printers. The sheets were sold for thousands of dollars per piece, giving die hard Magic fans a chance to own an irreplaceable piece of the game. In total between the Magic community and the My Little Pony crossover, Magic: The Gathering managed to raise over $875,000 USD #ForTheKids! However, 2019 isn't over quite yet! Those who still want to contribute to Wizards of the Coast's Extra Life mission can purchase one or more of the special modules that the D&D team has put together for Extra Life over the years. Past adventures and supplements include: Lost Laboratory of Kwalish, Volo’s Waterdeep Enchiridion, Tortle Package, One Grung Above, and The Lost Kenku. This year, the Wizards of the Coast team has outdone them selves and offered not one, not two, but THREE additional adventures and supplements that can be used to spice up your tabletop gaming sessions: Adventure with Muk offers an adventure into the Dankwood with the plucky Muk and his best friend Birdsquirrel on a quest to find an incredible treasure. Adventure with Muk is meant for all ages and can even be printed out and used as a coloring book! Infernal Machine Rebuild is a short adventure in a ruined clock tower that involves traveling to different times and planes of existence in order to reconstruct the legendary Infernal Machine of Lum the Mad, a fantastical contraption of great power... and great danger. Locathah Rising gives players a short adventure for 9th level characters and the rules for creating locathah characters, a race of fish people that make friends out of sea otters. They're great - and this is the only official way to get these fun, fishy dudes in your games! Remember, every purchase of each of these adventures benefits the kids, with all proceeds going to Extra Life! It's never too late to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! Donations for 2019 are accepted year-round! View full article
  2. Extra Life's partnership with Wizards of the Coast has been incredible over the years. This year, Wizards of the Coast managed the incredible feat of managing to raise over $1 million USD! They surpassed that momentous mark this year through the combined might of their D&D Super Team holding fundraising events throughout the year and the incredible efforts of their Magic: The Gathering team. A huge thank you to Wizards of the Coast and all the employees and creators who helped make this achievement possible! The D&D Super Team has managed to raise a a colossal sum of over $250,000 USD and is expected to hit $275,000 USD by the time the dust settles at the end of 2019. They reached that incredible number by kicking off a three month campaign with the Founders & Legends Day celebration on July 27, which featured Luke Gygax talking about the origins of tabletop roleplaying as well as several D&D one-shot games. With numerous streams and smaller events in between, along with the hard work of D&D players, DMs, and fans working to support their local hospitals, their last major fundraising push happened from October 31 through November 3 with Gamehole Con and on November 9 with Seattle Children's Hospital Game Day. Seattle Children's Hospital Game Day had Wizards of the Coast playing Dungeon Mayhem, the company's D&D-themed card game, and full-tabletop sessions for new players and kids. The other half of Wizards of the Coast's fundraising efforts belonged to Magic: The Gathering. The Magic community really rallied around Wizards this year between more people pitching in on Game Day and the debut of Ponies: The Galloping. Three official Magic: The Gathering cards featuring four of the most beloved ponies from My Little Pony debuted as part of a special collection benefiting Extra Life. The limited edition cards went on sale on October 22 along with a series of matching playmats, sales of which also benefited Extra Life. The playmats and cards sold out incredibly quickly, with the entire offering disappearing almost immediately. During the same time period, Magic: The Gathering auctioned off a series of coveted foil card sheets fresh from their printers. The sheets were sold for thousands of dollars per piece, giving die hard Magic fans a chance to own an irreplaceable piece of the game. In total between the Magic community and the My Little Pony crossover, Magic: The Gathering managed to raise over $875,000 USD #ForTheKids! However, 2019 isn't over quite yet! Those who still want to contribute to Wizards of the Coast's Extra Life mission can purchase one or more of the special modules that the D&D team has put together for Extra Life over the years. Past adventures and supplements include: Lost Laboratory of Kwalish, Volo’s Waterdeep Enchiridion, Tortle Package, One Grung Above, and The Lost Kenku. This year, the Wizards of the Coast team has outdone them selves and offered not one, not two, but THREE additional adventures and supplements that can be used to spice up your tabletop gaming sessions: Adventure with Muk offers an adventure into the Dankwood with the plucky Muk and his best friend Birdsquirrel on a quest to find an incredible treasure. Adventure with Muk is meant for all ages and can even be printed out and used as a coloring book! Infernal Machine Rebuild is a short adventure in a ruined clock tower that involves traveling to different times and planes of existence in order to reconstruct the legendary Infernal Machine of Lum the Mad, a fantastical contraption of great power... and great danger. Locathah Rising gives players a short adventure for 9th level characters and the rules for creating locathah characters, a race of fish people that make friends out of sea otters. They're great - and this is the only official way to get these fun, fishy dudes in your games! Remember, every purchase of each of these adventures benefits the kids, with all proceeds going to Extra Life! It's never too late to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! Donations for 2019 are accepted year-round!
  3. At PAX West this year, I had the chance to meet Kennedy, a Miracle Child from Seattle Children's Hospital. She was at the event with her father, volunteering her time and energy to share her firsthand experiences in one of the many hospitals supported by Extra Lifers across North America. This was something she had done several times over the years after managing to beat the leukemia she was diagnosed with at age 7. The former football player has had to undergo extensive surgeries to repair the damage to her body, but she maintains and spreads a bright, hopeful energy. One of the amazing things about Kennedy has been her long involvement in Extra Life. Not only has she volunteered at events like PAX West, but she is a member of the Seattle Extra Life Guild. That position has set her up to work with organizations like Wizards of the Coast to both spread the word about the work Extra Life does in hospitals as well as raise money. Back in 2017, she appeared on the official Dungeons & Dragons Game Day stream to play the tabletop game live and help the team bring in as many donations as possible. Kennedy was generous enough to step away from the Extra Life booth at PAX West for a few minutes to tell her story. --- Jack Gardner: So where does this all start? Kennedy: I was about seven. I was playing football at the time. Later in the year, I started having problems with my body. I’d have less and less energy by the minute. I wouldn’t feel that great, and I passed out a couple of times. It wasn’t going… well. We went to the doctor’s one day, they got a blood sample, and we went home. About one or two in the morning, we got a phone call saying I had leukemia. We rushed to Children’s Hospital in Seattle. [They] had everything ready, I got both my IVs in with antibiotics and everything. It’s a bit fuzzy, I don’t remember exactly a lot of it. JG: Was that scary? K: Yes, I was very concerned. Because I was 7, I didn’t know exactly what was going on. I wasn’t entirely sure what was happening. Later on, I got my port in, but I was not the best at, like, blood, needles, stuff like that. JG: Trust me, I’m the same way. K: It’s not my thing. I was definitely not nice to my nurses. Screaming and crying was one of the things that has happened… all the time. JG: I’m pretty good at crying, too. K: It’s one of my specialties. We had problems with my port- JG: And what is a port? K: The port is like this little metal thing in your chest which then you access with a big needle with a little thing inside so it’s easier to get blood transfusions - I had those a lot. We had trouble with that because [the port] was moving all over the place so we had to get it removed and put in a second time. Later, I started complaining about my joints in my hips and my shoulders. We got that tested, and it turns out -I don’t exactly know what it’s called- part of the chemo made the circulation to my joints cut off, so the joints died. It hurt a lot when I walked. I had to use a wheelchair. I started first with hiking canes, then a walker, and then a wheelchair. About… two years later it was my three year mark. We saw this surgeon. His name was Chappie. He was willing to replace my hips because no one else would do that to a 10-year-old. He argued with the board all the time because they didn’t want him to do surgery on a 10-year-old. He moved, so that didn’t happen. A year later, I’m finally done with treatment. My last day, I have a bunch of photos, I had a big sign that said "Last Day of Chemo!" A couple months later, my parents were looking at different surgeons that would do it, replace my hips and such. One popped up, this doctor, he and his other surgeon were willing to do both of my hip surgeries. Just last year, I got both of them done. JG: How old are you now? K: I’m 12, almost 13. I’m going to get my shoulders replaced – we don’t know when, but it’s going to happen soon. JG: Do your joints still hurt? K: My hips don’t hurt – nothing else hurts aside from my shoulders. I can only lift them so far up, and I can’t do a lot of tasks with them. We’re working to do my shoulders. I had leukemia for four years. It was kind of a rough time. I missed so much school. I didn’t even know how I was going to pass, but I had these amazing teachers who came to my house and tutored me. Even though [leukemia] had this bad impact, it gave me this good view on how everyone should live – never second guess yourself and just always do something. JG: How did you get involved with Extra Life? K: We are really close with the hospital and everyone in the hospital. It was one of my doctors who said, "Extra Life is a gaming 24-hour thing that you can do. They want to recruit kids and their families to help them out." Me and my dad and my sister applied, so my dad emailed one of the guys and said, “Hey, my daughter had leukemia, and we’re looking at this gaming thing that you have going on. It seems really fun and we would like to help you out with that kind of stuff.” We got recruited – this is my third year coming to PAX and volunteering – so three years ago, they were like, “Hey, we are doing PAX this year, if you want to do it, Extra Life is working there and you can come along." You get a free pass and get some breaks, but you also get to help out children at the children’s hospitals. JG: Do you play a lot of games? K: Yes. I really like video games. Especially multiplayer since my sister likes to play, too. I don’t really have a favorite…. JG: I know for me, it is hard to choose just one favorite, but do you have a top three of your go-to games? K: Yes! I am a really old person, and I like Minecraft. That was the first game I ever played in my life. JG: [Laughs] Oh, gosh, you just made me feel ancient! K: It the first one I ever played. It’s a classic – I’d say it’s my favorite. My second one would be… like… little, free games on Xbox. They’re kinda short? I can’t think of a specific one. JG: It’s hard to think sometimes when you get put on the spot. K: Then probably… it’s not a genre, but I like the games where you can see the work people put into the games. Good graphic designs- even a character model where you can tell how much work went into it. I already like the game. Even one scene can change my whole perspective on a game. I really like people who do really good work and design on a game, really good coding. JG: What’s a scene that’d be an example? K: My sister plays this game called Undertale. She was playing it one day and I saw the opening scene. I really loved it. It was really well done – I felt it was really great. All the character models, her favorite was the little skeleton dude. JG: The skeleton knight and a cape or the skeleton in the hoodie? K: I think it was the skeleton knight? Yeah, the guy with the cape! I think that’s some really good design, so I think that’s really good work. JG: You’re here with Extra Life – what’s it like volunteering here and basically being a spokesperson? K: It’s really fun. You get to recruit other people into helping children and children’s hospitals. Plus, you get to have fun while doing it. You sign up and play games for 24 hours. You can play whatever you want, card games, video games. Hanging out with everybody who has been involved with Extra Life, it’s fun having conversations about video games because… I don’t have many friends who are interested in video games. So, it’s fun to talk about different kinds of games coming out or what they are doing later at PAX or what they are going to do on their lunch break. It’s fun to hang out with people who have the same interests as you. JG: Are there any hard parts that you weren’t really expecting? K: I didn’t know I had to talk to people! I thought you just stood there and gave people stuff. JG: [Laughs] That would be nice. Has everyone been good when you talked with them? K: Yeah, most people. Last year, because I was 11… not a lot of people who would listen to me because I was a child. That was pretty frustrating, but… either way, it’s pretty good. [...] It’s cool to have people interviewing me now. It’s kind of weird! [Laughs] JG: Did you play a lot of games when you were going through your treatments and recovery? K: Yes, I would bring my Xbox and leave it connected to the TV in there. I played a lot of different games on my Xbox. JG: Did you like games before that? K: Yeah, I liked games before that. I never used to have any video games or a console or anything, so I’d go over to my friend’s house and then we’d go play. I think that’s why I like playing games with other people because that’s how I started liking video games. JG: Was Minecraft the thing you played the most in the hospital? K: Yes. Oh! I also played a lot of Overcooked. My younger sister got Overcooked for her birthday. We played a LOT of Overcooked. A lot of Minecraft. A lot of free games. There was also a game room where you can grab video games or different kinds of board games that you can grab and bring up to your room. JG: What’s been your takeaway from events like PAX? K: I think it’s a really good opportunity for people who want to help support children or just anything? But you can do it in a fun and good way. You are actually interested in doing it instead of just feeling like you have to because you feel bad. JG: Does it make you feel hopeful that so many people are coming by the booth and showing interest? K: Yeah! And really just how cool people will stop by and be like, “how do we get this?” you explain how you do it and they are like, “well, I want to give back, too!” Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  4. At PAX West this year, I had the chance to meet Kennedy, a Miracle Child from Seattle Children's Hospital. She was at the event with her father, volunteering her time and energy to share her firsthand experiences in one of the many hospitals supported by Extra Lifers across North America. This was something she had done several times over the years after managing to beat the leukemia she was diagnosed with at age 7. The former football player has had to undergo extensive surgeries to repair the damage to her body, but she maintains and spreads a bright, hopeful energy. One of the amazing things about Kennedy has been her long involvement in Extra Life. Not only has she volunteered at events like PAX West, but she is a member of the Seattle Extra Life Guild. That position has set her up to work with organizations like Wizards of the Coast to both spread the word about the work Extra Life does in hospitals as well as raise money. Back in 2017, she appeared on the official Dungeons & Dragons Game Day stream to play the tabletop game live and help the team bring in as many donations as possible. Kennedy was generous enough to step away from the Extra Life booth at PAX West for a few minutes to tell her story. --- Jack Gardner: So where does this all start? Kennedy: I was about seven. I was playing football at the time. Later in the year, I started having problems with my body. I’d have less and less energy by the minute. I wouldn’t feel that great, and I passed out a couple of times. It wasn’t going… well. We went to the doctor’s one day, they got a blood sample, and we went home. About one or two in the morning, we got a phone call saying I had leukemia. We rushed to Children’s Hospital in Seattle. [They] had everything ready, I got both my IVs in with antibiotics and everything. It’s a bit fuzzy, I don’t remember exactly a lot of it. JG: Was that scary? K: Yes, I was very concerned. Because I was 7, I didn’t know exactly what was going on. I wasn’t entirely sure what was happening. Later on, I got my port in, but I was not the best at, like, blood, needles, stuff like that. JG: Trust me, I’m the same way. K: It’s not my thing. I was definitely not nice to my nurses. Screaming and crying was one of the things that has happened… all the time. JG: I’m pretty good at crying, too. K: It’s one of my specialties. We had problems with my port- JG: And what is a port? K: The port is like this little metal thing in your chest which then you access with a big needle with a little thing inside so it’s easier to get blood transfusions - I had those a lot. We had trouble with that because [the port] was moving all over the place so we had to get it removed and put in a second time. Later, I started complaining about my joints in my hips and my shoulders. We got that tested, and it turns out -I don’t exactly know what it’s called- part of the chemo made the circulation to my joints cut off, so the joints died. It hurt a lot when I walked. I had to use a wheelchair. I started first with hiking canes, then a walker, and then a wheelchair. About… two years later it was my three year mark. We saw this surgeon. His name was Chappie. He was willing to replace my hips because no one else would do that to a 10-year-old. He argued with the board all the time because they didn’t want him to do surgery on a 10-year-old. He moved, so that didn’t happen. A year later, I’m finally done with treatment. My last day, I have a bunch of photos, I had a big sign that said "Last Day of Chemo!" A couple months later, my parents were looking at different surgeons that would do it, replace my hips and such. One popped up, this doctor, he and his other surgeon were willing to do both of my hip surgeries. Just last year, I got both of them done. JG: How old are you now? K: I’m 12, almost 13. I’m going to get my shoulders replaced – we don’t know when, but it’s going to happen soon. JG: Do your joints still hurt? K: My hips don’t hurt – nothing else hurts aside from my shoulders. I can only lift them so far up, and I can’t do a lot of tasks with them. We’re working to do my shoulders. I had leukemia for four years. It was kind of a rough time. I missed so much school. I didn’t even know how I was going to pass, but I had these amazing teachers who came to my house and tutored me. Even though [leukemia] had this bad impact, it gave me this good view on how everyone should live – never second guess yourself and just always do something. JG: How did you get involved with Extra Life? K: We are really close with the hospital and everyone in the hospital. It was one of my doctors who said, "Extra Life is a gaming 24-hour thing that you can do. They want to recruit kids and their families to help them out." Me and my dad and my sister applied, so my dad emailed one of the guys and said, “Hey, my daughter had leukemia, and we’re looking at this gaming thing that you have going on. It seems really fun and we would like to help you out with that kind of stuff.” We got recruited – this is my third year coming to PAX and volunteering – so three years ago, they were like, “Hey, we are doing PAX this year, if you want to do it, Extra Life is working there and you can come along." You get a free pass and get some breaks, but you also get to help out children at the children’s hospitals. JG: Do you play a lot of games? K: Yes. I really like video games. Especially multiplayer since my sister likes to play, too. I don’t really have a favorite…. JG: I know for me, it is hard to choose just one favorite, but do you have a top three of your go-to games? K: Yes! I am a really old person, and I like Minecraft. That was the first game I ever played in my life. JG: [Laughs] Oh, gosh, you just made me feel ancient! K: It the first one I ever played. It’s a classic – I’d say it’s my favorite. My second one would be… like… little, free games on Xbox. They’re kinda short? I can’t think of a specific one. JG: It’s hard to think sometimes when you get put on the spot. K: Then probably… it’s not a genre, but I like the games where you can see the work people put into the games. Good graphic designs- even a character model where you can tell how much work went into it. I already like the game. Even one scene can change my whole perspective on a game. I really like people who do really good work and design on a game, really good coding. JG: What’s a scene that’d be an example? K: My sister plays this game called Undertale. She was playing it one day and I saw the opening scene. I really loved it. It was really well done – I felt it was really great. All the character models, her favorite was the little skeleton dude. JG: The skeleton knight and a cape or the skeleton in the hoodie? K: I think it was the skeleton knight? Yeah, the guy with the cape! I think that’s some really good design, so I think that’s really good work. JG: You’re here with Extra Life – what’s it like volunteering here and basically being a spokesperson? K: It’s really fun. You get to recruit other people into helping children and children’s hospitals. Plus, you get to have fun while doing it. You sign up and play games for 24 hours. You can play whatever you want, card games, video games. Hanging out with everybody who has been involved with Extra Life, it’s fun having conversations about video games because… I don’t have many friends who are interested in video games. So, it’s fun to talk about different kinds of games coming out or what they are doing later at PAX or what they are going to do on their lunch break. It’s fun to hang out with people who have the same interests as you. JG: Are there any hard parts that you weren’t really expecting? K: I didn’t know I had to talk to people! I thought you just stood there and gave people stuff. JG: [Laughs] That would be nice. Has everyone been good when you talked with them? K: Yeah, most people. Last year, because I was 11… not a lot of people who would listen to me because I was a child. That was pretty frustrating, but… either way, it’s pretty good. [...] It’s cool to have people interviewing me now. It’s kind of weird! [Laughs] JG: Did you play a lot of games when you were going through your treatments and recovery? K: Yes, I would bring my Xbox and leave it connected to the TV in there. I played a lot of different games on my Xbox. JG: Did you like games before that? K: Yeah, I liked games before that. I never used to have any video games or a console or anything, so I’d go over to my friend’s house and then we’d go play. I think that’s why I like playing games with other people because that’s how I started liking video games. JG: Was Minecraft the thing you played the most in the hospital? K: Yes. Oh! I also played a lot of Overcooked. My younger sister got Overcooked for her birthday. We played a LOT of Overcooked. A lot of Minecraft. A lot of free games. There was also a game room where you can grab video games or different kinds of board games that you can grab and bring up to your room. JG: What’s been your takeaway from events like PAX? K: I think it’s a really good opportunity for people who want to help support children or just anything? But you can do it in a fun and good way. You are actually interested in doing it instead of just feeling like you have to because you feel bad. JG: Does it make you feel hopeful that so many people are coming by the booth and showing interest? K: Yeah! And really just how cool people will stop by and be like, “how do we get this?” you explain how you do it and they are like, “well, I want to give back, too!” Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  5. This past weekend, gamers from all over the world traveled to Seattle, Washington to attend PAX West, one of the largest gaming conventions in North America. Of course, where there are gamers there are also Extra Lifers! Extra Life turned out for PAX West in a big way, coming to the event with a booth, a panel, and moving stories from the kids themselves. The dedicated Extra Life booth has become a staple of events around the United States and Canada. For PAX West, we were set up in a nice corner between two of the major convention halls on the 4th floor of the Seattle Convention Center. The location afforded a degree of protection from the overwhelming noise of the show floor proper, allowing the amazing volunteers from the Seattle Extra Life Guild to have amazing conversations with con-goers. We were fortunate for PAX West to have a miracle child ambassador from Seattle Children's Hospital. Kennedy and her father volunteered at the Extra Life booth, sharing their stories with people who stopped by to say hello. Not only that, but Kennedy was able to tour the show floor and experience one of the most amazing events in gaming. Their help was invaluable in demonstrating the good that Extra Life does in the lives of those it touches. In total, over 700 people decided to sign up to participate in Game Day! That's freaking amazing! This year, Extra Life's Game Day takes place on November 2, so make sure that you've also signed up over on Extra Life. To top off the booth experience at PAX West, we were able to reveal a special collaboration with gaming chair manufacturer DXRacer. They graciously gave us an incredible version of one of their chairs decked out in Extra Life's colors and the iconic gaming controller with wings. We decided to put the chair up for auction to raise some additional money, so please check out the eBay page and place your bids before the opportunity disappears forever in only a handful of hours! A big thank you to KontrolFreek for taking on the task of organizing an Extra Life scavenger hunt, as well. PAX West attendees could obtain a card at KontrolFreek's booth and then needed to visit Astro, Gunnar, and Extra Life's booth to fill it up. Once filled, the card could be turned in for a chance to win a prize that changed daily. KontrolFreek organized all of the partnered organizations to support this event and deserve all our love and gratitude. Finally, Extra Life was included in an official PAX West panel. The talk, titled Gaming for "Charity: Inspiring Through Play," provided an informed look at how to engage communities effectively to gain charitable support for a good cause and how that scales depending on the size of a person's audience. The panelists included Extra Life ambassadors TheOnlyRyann and Deejay Knight, I Need Diverse Games' Tanya DePass, Twitch's Jon Brence, Child's Play's Erick Blandin, and Extra Life's very own director of community Lou Adducci. It was inspiring to see people turn out to listen to all of these talented and important voices in the industry tell stories about their experiences and share their expertise. With PAX West in the rear view mirror, TwitchCon 2019 approaches! On September 27-29, the streaming community will gather for their yearly celebration of their primary platform. Extra Life will be there with the customary booth in order to represent Children's Miracle Network Hospitals, but we will be bringing back one of our most popular event spectacles: The human claw machine! DonorDrive will be hosting a charity streaming area called the DonorDrive Charity Arcade. Children's Miracle Network Hospitals has been selected as one of the premier charities that the arcade will raise money for during TwitchCon. Attendees will be able to grab free prizes as they dangle above a pit of mystery prizes, suspended by a huge claw machine. Don't miss us if you're planning on attending! Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  6. This past weekend, gamers from all over the world traveled to Seattle, Washington to attend PAX West, one of the largest gaming conventions in North America. Of course, where there are gamers there are also Extra Lifers! Extra Life turned out for PAX West in a big way, coming to the event with a booth, a panel, and moving stories from the kids themselves. The dedicated Extra Life booth has become a staple of events around the United States and Canada. For PAX West, we were set up in a nice corner between two of the major convention halls on the 4th floor of the Seattle Convention Center. The location afforded a degree of protection from the overwhelming noise of the show floor proper, allowing the amazing volunteers from the Seattle Extra Life Guild to have amazing conversations with con-goers. We were fortunate for PAX West to have a miracle child ambassador from Seattle Children's Hospital. Kennedy and her father volunteered at the Extra Life booth, sharing their stories with people who stopped by to say hello. Not only that, but Kennedy was able to tour the show floor and experience one of the most amazing events in gaming. Their help was invaluable in demonstrating the good that Extra Life does in the lives of those it touches. In total, over 700 people decided to sign up to participate in Game Day! That's freaking amazing! This year, Extra Life's Game Day takes place on November 2, so make sure that you've also signed up over on Extra Life. To top off the booth experience at PAX West, we were able to reveal a special collaboration with gaming chair manufacturer DXRacer. They graciously gave us an incredible version of one of their chairs decked out in Extra Life's colors and the iconic gaming controller with wings. We decided to put the chair up for auction to raise some additional money, so please check out the eBay page and place your bids before the opportunity disappears forever in only a handful of hours! A big thank you to KontrolFreek for taking on the task of organizing an Extra Life scavenger hunt, as well. PAX West attendees could obtain a card at KontrolFreek's booth and then needed to visit Astro, Gunnar, and Extra Life's booth to fill it up. Once filled, the card could be turned in for a chance to win a prize that changed daily. KontrolFreek organized all of the partnered organizations to support this event and deserve all our love and gratitude. Finally, Extra Life was included in an official PAX West panel. The talk, titled Gaming for "Charity: Inspiring Through Play," provided an informed look at how to engage communities effectively to gain charitable support for a good cause and how that scales depending on the size of a person's audience. The panelists included Extra Life ambassadors TheOnlyRyann and Deejay Knight, I Need Diverse Games' Tanya DePass, Twitch's Jon Brence, Child's Play's Erick Blandin, and Extra Life's very own director of community Lou Adducci. It was inspiring to see people turn out to listen to all of these talented and important voices in the industry tell stories about their experiences and share their expertise. With PAX West in the rear view mirror, TwitchCon 2019 approaches! On September 27-29, the streaming community will gather for their yearly celebration of their primary platform. Extra Life will be there with the customary booth in order to represent Children's Miracle Network Hospitals, but we will be bringing back one of our most popular event spectacles: The human claw machine! DonorDrive will be hosting a charity streaming area called the DonorDrive Charity Arcade. Children's Miracle Network Hospitals has been selected as one of the premier charities that the arcade will raise money for during TwitchCon. Attendees will be able to grab free prizes as they dangle above a pit of mystery prizes, suspended by a huge claw machine. Don't miss us if you're planning on attending! Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  7. until
    Who: Our Team of gamers here at the University Village Microsoft Store. What: 6 of us will be playing a 24 hour Overwatch game stream. Others will be playing whatever games they want. They may be doing a 24-hour stream, or will make up the 24 hours over the course of the month. When: 6 of us will be playing Overwatch-PC on October 22nd-23rd from 8am-8am. We will have a live twitch stream. Attached is my twitch page, but I each member of the roster is encouraged to include links to their twitch channel on their individual page. https://www.twitch.tv/gregor2424 Where: From our Homes, preferably wearing super comfortable and nerdy clothes. Why: To raise money for The Seattle Children's Hospital Foundation. 100% of the proceeds go to the foundation. Our Team goal is $1,000, and anything you can give helps a child in need.The goal may go up depending on the donation outlook. I give my sincerest thank you for your support and donations. For more information, I have included the default Extra Life message if I missed any of the talking points. Our team is on a mission to save kids through gaming, and we need your help. Each of us has chosen our local Children's Miracle Network Hospital where thousands of children are treated each year, regardless of their family's ability to pay. These kids are facing scary stuff like cancer, cystic fibrosis, and injuries from accidents to name just a few. We'll be part of a huge international celebration of the social impact of gamers with Extra Life, and it's our sincere hope that you'll find it in your heart to support us with a monthly pledge or one-time gift that will go directly to that team member's chosen hospital. Your donation is tax-deductible, and ALL PROCEEDS go to help kids. Last year, Extra Life raised more than $8 million dollars to save kids, but in 2016 our goals, just like the needs of the kids we serve, are much, much higher. We can't do this without your help. Donating online is safe and easy! To make an online donation, please click on the "Roster" tab, then on a participant's name and then click the "Donate" button on their page. Thank you for caring for our kids!
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