Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'roguelike'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Extra Life News
    • Extra Life Updates
    • Best Practices
    • Community Content
    • Why I Extra Life
    • Fundraising
    • Contests
  • Gaming News
  • Features
  • Podcast

Discussions

  • Extra Life Discussions
    • General Extra Life Discussion
    • Local Extra Lifers
    • Fundraising Ideas
    • Live Streaming Tips & Tricks
    • Official Extra Life Stream Team Discussion
    • Extra Life JSON Code Discussion & Sharing
    • Extra Life United
    • Extra Life Q & A
  • Articles & Extra Life Announcements
    • Announcements
  • Official Extra Life Guilds
    • Guild information and Discussion
    • Canada
    • Northeastern US
    • Southeastern US
    • Central US
    • Western US
  • Gaming Discussions
    • General Gaming Discussion
  • Other Stuff
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Recent Posts

Calendars

  • Extra Life Community Calendar
  • Extra Life Stream Team
  • Akron Guild
  • Albany Guild
  • Albuquerque Guild
  • Anchorage Guild
  • Atlanta Guild
  • Austin Guild
  • Bakersfield Guild
  • Baltimore Guild
  • Birmingham Guild
  • Boston Guild
  • Burlington Guild
  • Buffalo Guild
  • Calgary, AB Guild
  • Morgantown Guild
  • Charlottesville Guild
  • Chicago Guild
  • Cincinnati Guild
  • Cleveland Guild
  • Columbia, MO Guild
  • Columbus, OH Guild
  • Dallas Guild
  • Dayton Guild
  • Denver Guild
  • Des Moines Guild
  • Detroit Guild
  • Edmonton, AB Guild
  • Fargo-Valley City Guild
  • Fresno Guild
  • Ft. Worth Guild
  • Gainesville-Tallahassee Guild
  • Grand Rapids Guild
  • Halifax, NS Guild
  • Hamilton, ON Guild
  • Hartford Guild
  • Hershey Guild
  • Hudson Valley Guild
  • Houston Guild
  • Indianapolis Guild
  • Jacksonville Guild
  • Kansas City Guild
  • Knoxville Guild
  • Lansing Guild
  • London, ON Guild
  • Los Angeles Guild
  • Milwaukee / Madison Guild
  • Minneapolis / Twin Cities Guild
  • Montreal / Quebec City Guild
  • Nashville Guild
  • Newark Guild
  • NYC & Long Island Guild
  • Oakland / San Francisco Guild
  • Omaha Guild
  • Orange County Guild
  • Orlando Guild
  • Ottawa, ON Guild
  • Philadelphia Guild
  • Phoenix Guild
  • Pittsburgh Guild
  • Portland, OR Guild
  • Portland, ME Guild
  • Raleigh-Durham Guild
  • Richmond Guild
  • Sacramento Guild
  • Salt Lake City Guild
  • San Antonio Guild
  • San Diego Guild
  • San Juan, PR Guild
  • Saskatchewan Guild
  • Seattle Guild
  • Spokane Guild
  • Springfield-Champaign, IL Guild
  • Springfield, MA Guild
  • St. Louis Guild
  • Syracuse Guild
  • Tampa / St. Petersburg Guild
  • Toronto, ON Guild
  • Vancouver, BC Guild
  • Washington DC Guild
  • Winnipeg, MB Guild
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Events
  • Extra Life Akron's Events

Categories

  • Broadcasting Toolkit
  • Multimedia Kit
  • Extra Life Guild Tool Kit
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Files
  • Extra Life Akron's Files

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Hospital


Location


Why I "Extra Life"


Interests


Twitter


Instagram


Twitch


Mixer


Discord


Blizzard Battletag


Nintendo ID


PSN ID


Steam


Origin


Xbox Gamertag

Found 18 results

  1. Edmund McMillen's The Binding of Isaac helped jump start the mainstreaming of roguelike elements in indie games that we have been seeing trickle into the AAA industry over the last few years. Mixing top-down shooting with the dungeon exploration of a classic The Legend of Zelda title, The Binding of Isaac plays pitch perfectly for what it's designed to be. The randomized elements fit together seamlessly for a gameplay experience that's never the same twice in a row. Over all of that, McMillen paints the story of Isaac, a small boy in a scary world full of horrible monsters (that still manage to seem friendly and charming despite being, you know, monsters). Should this 2011 indie hit be considered one of the best games of all-time? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Binding of Isaac 'The Clubbing of Isaac' by Big Giant Circles (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02302) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  2. Edmund McMillen's The Binding of Isaac helped jump start the mainstreaming of roguelike elements in indie games that we have been seeing trickle into the AAA industry over the last few years. Mixing top-down shooting with the dungeon exploration of a classic The Legend of Zelda title, The Binding of Isaac plays pitch perfectly for what it's designed to be. The randomized elements fit together seamlessly for a gameplay experience that's never the same twice in a row. Over all of that, McMillen paints the story of Isaac, a small boy in a scary world full of horrible monsters (that still manage to seem friendly and charming despite being, you know, monsters). Should this 2011 indie hit be considered one of the best games of all-time? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Binding of Isaac 'The Clubbing of Isaac' by Big Giant Circles (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02302) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  3. Dewey Owens has a strange internship. He's not overly important in the grand scheme of things, just another cog in the corporate machine of DevTech... until the fire nation aliens attacked Earth. Now Dewey must enter the Hypergun Simulation, a technology designed to find the best weapon configuration to defeat the invaders and save the world. Each time Dewey enters the simulation, it will be entirely different from the last attempt to defeat the simulated alien threat. The FPS gameplay seems reminiscent of classics like Doom crossed with the RPGness of the Borderlands series. As players progress toward finding the perfect weapon, Dewey will pick up over 150 different augmentations for the titular hypergun. This leads to a dazzling number of weapon configurations with which players can experiment. To add even more spice into the mix, players can unlock additional powers and abilities by gaining access to Dewey's co-worker's accounts. There are over 40 of these, so players will have to poke around and really push themselves to find them all. The neon color palate and bright flashes seem ideal for people who looked at Tron and thought it wasn't "Extra(tm)" enough. You can also explore DevTech's offices and find passive-aggressive sticky notes. I can dig it. Hypergun releases on August 23 for PC and later this fall for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  4. Dewey Owens has a strange internship. He's not overly important in the grand scheme of things, just another cog in the corporate machine of DevTech... until the fire nation aliens attacked Earth. Now Dewey must enter the Hypergun Simulation, a technology designed to find the best weapon configuration to defeat the invaders and save the world. Each time Dewey enters the simulation, it will be entirely different from the last attempt to defeat the simulated alien threat. The FPS gameplay seems reminiscent of classics like Doom crossed with the RPGness of the Borderlands series. As players progress toward finding the perfect weapon, Dewey will pick up over 150 different augmentations for the titular hypergun. This leads to a dazzling number of weapon configurations with which players can experiment. To add even more spice into the mix, players can unlock additional powers and abilities by gaining access to Dewey's co-worker's accounts. There are over 40 of these, so players will have to poke around and really push themselves to find them all. The neon color palate and bright flashes seem ideal for people who looked at Tron and thought it wasn't "Extra(tm)" enough. You can also explore DevTech's offices and find passive-aggressive sticky notes. I can dig it. Hypergun releases on August 23 for PC and later this fall for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  5. The Onus Helm made its debut in a humble Kickstarter campaign that looks to secure $5,500 to finish development. The roguelike dungeon crawler stars an enigmatic character who awakens to find themselves in a mysterious, seemingly endless labyrinth with a burdensome, irremovable helmet placed on their head. To uncover the secrets of the helm and find freedom, players will have to navigate the dangers of the deadly maze and defeat the evils that have taken up residence in its ever shifting halls. The demo put out by developer B-Cubed Labs puts a full level on display. It takes the randomly generated room approach found in The Binding of Isaac and puts its own unique spin on the formula, something that could certainly intrigue fans in the retro-indie community. Players make their way through the dungeon room by room. Each room can hold enemies, secrets, items, or upgrades. Players will need to explore as much as possible to be prepared for the boss, a maniacal shadow that can summon floating swords. Each trip through the demo proves to be different. On one occasion, I was able to find a room in which an NPC played a flute on a tree stump. On another, I found a thief-like creature who gave me more insight into the surreal world of The Onus Helm where every character has been cursed with a similar helmet that they can't remove. Should you fall in battle, the next playthrough mixes up the dungeon, shifting the rooms in new and interesting ways. A small array of weapons can drastically how one approaches the enemies in-game. Players start out with a sword and an infinite ammo slingshot. However, there are many other treasures to be found or bought that can help the player survive. A larger sword upgrade can be obtained that makes melee combat much easier, a powerful bow with limited ammo or a boomerang can replace the slingshot, and bombs prove to be a necessity for both secrets and strategic combat. Potions, health upgrades, and other non-weapons can be uncovered, too. The look of B-Cubed Labs indie project is certainly arresting. Mixed with a more retro throwback aesthetic, a lot of influence from the original Legend of Zelda appears readily apparent. It manages to straddle the line between homage and novelty really well in a way that feels both familiar and different. The final version of The Onus Helm is planned to include simply more stuff than is in the demo. More rooms, enemies, items, weapons, NPCs, and bosses will offer a more fully rounded experience. The planned PC release will offer both keyboard and controller support and a built-in speedrun clock for those who feel the need for speed. The core game has been mostly finished so even if the Kickstarter fails The Onus Helm will likely see the light of day. The Kickstarter seems to be for funding additional assets and mechanics with stretch goals for even more stuff like more music, co-op, a console release, and a larger development team to add even more stuff into the roguelike generation system B-Cubed has set up. Overall, my impression of The Onus Helm was that it's a game worthy of time and attention. I hope it meets its goal in the next nine days and I encourage everyone to check out the Kickstarter and demo. It should release sometime later this year. View full article
  6. The Onus Helm made its debut in a humble Kickstarter campaign that looks to secure $5,500 to finish development. The roguelike dungeon crawler stars an enigmatic character who awakens to find themselves in a mysterious, seemingly endless labyrinth with a burdensome, irremovable helmet placed on their head. To uncover the secrets of the helm and find freedom, players will have to navigate the dangers of the deadly maze and defeat the evils that have taken up residence in its ever shifting halls. The demo put out by developer B-Cubed Labs puts a full level on display. It takes the randomly generated room approach found in The Binding of Isaac and puts its own unique spin on the formula, something that could certainly intrigue fans in the retro-indie community. Players make their way through the dungeon room by room. Each room can hold enemies, secrets, items, or upgrades. Players will need to explore as much as possible to be prepared for the boss, a maniacal shadow that can summon floating swords. Each trip through the demo proves to be different. On one occasion, I was able to find a room in which an NPC played a flute on a tree stump. On another, I found a thief-like creature who gave me more insight into the surreal world of The Onus Helm where every character has been cursed with a similar helmet that they can't remove. Should you fall in battle, the next playthrough mixes up the dungeon, shifting the rooms in new and interesting ways. A small array of weapons can drastically how one approaches the enemies in-game. Players start out with a sword and an infinite ammo slingshot. However, there are many other treasures to be found or bought that can help the player survive. A larger sword upgrade can be obtained that makes melee combat much easier, a powerful bow with limited ammo or a boomerang can replace the slingshot, and bombs prove to be a necessity for both secrets and strategic combat. Potions, health upgrades, and other non-weapons can be uncovered, too. The look of B-Cubed Labs indie project is certainly arresting. Mixed with a more retro throwback aesthetic, a lot of influence from the original Legend of Zelda appears readily apparent. It manages to straddle the line between homage and novelty really well in a way that feels both familiar and different. The final version of The Onus Helm is planned to include simply more stuff than is in the demo. More rooms, enemies, items, weapons, NPCs, and bosses will offer a more fully rounded experience. The planned PC release will offer both keyboard and controller support and a built-in speedrun clock for those who feel the need for speed. The core game has been mostly finished so even if the Kickstarter fails The Onus Helm will likely see the light of day. The Kickstarter seems to be for funding additional assets and mechanics with stretch goals for even more stuff like more music, co-op, a console release, and a larger development team to add even more stuff into the roguelike generation system B-Cubed has set up. Overall, my impression of The Onus Helm was that it's a game worthy of time and attention. I hope it meets its goal in the next nine days and I encourage everyone to check out the Kickstarter and demo. It should release sometime later this year.
  7. An adorable roguelike is on its way toward becoming a reality as Pixel Princess Blitz reached its funding goal on Kickstarter yesterday. The indie project cleared its €77,700 goal with a whopping €102,418. The money will be used by the Hamburg-based indie group to create the PC version of their sandbox action RPG with a crazy endearing art style. The indie devs plan to port the title to PlayStation 4, PS Vita, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch after the PC version of Pixel Princess Blitz releases mid 2018. Pixel Princess Blitz has huge ambitions to present an open world spread out over a grid that is explored in turn-based form. Encounters and dungeons are tackled in real-time with special attacks, reactive AI, and fluid action. Players will need to use the resources they discover to survive, outfitting themselves with upgradable items. Players who aren't careful could see themselves fall victim to permadeath, a system the devs describe as tough, but fair. Multiple factions inhabit the world and how players interact with them shapes how the story unfolds. In fact, every NPC that players encounter has a backstory and motivations that they pursue - that might even include a romantic relationship with the protagonist, Kuruna. Strengthening ties to NPCs can yield a slew of benefits, like combat companions and perhaps even the chance that they will show up to save your from the brink of death itself! Players take on the role of Kuruna, a young adventurer who travels the kingdom of Verad to help those in need. Some strange activities have been reported in the province of Hummingwoods, so Kuruna begins a patrol of the area that quickly becomes much more than she ever imagined. Keep an eye out for Pixel Princess Blitz sometime next year on PC. View full article
  8. An adorable roguelike is on its way toward becoming a reality as Pixel Princess Blitz reached its funding goal on Kickstarter yesterday. The indie project cleared its €77,700 goal with a whopping €102,418. The money will be used by the Hamburg-based indie group to create the PC version of their sandbox action RPG with a crazy endearing art style. The indie devs plan to port the title to PlayStation 4, PS Vita, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch after the PC version of Pixel Princess Blitz releases mid 2018. Pixel Princess Blitz has huge ambitions to present an open world spread out over a grid that is explored in turn-based form. Encounters and dungeons are tackled in real-time with special attacks, reactive AI, and fluid action. Players will need to use the resources they discover to survive, outfitting themselves with upgradable items. Players who aren't careful could see themselves fall victim to permadeath, a system the devs describe as tough, but fair. Multiple factions inhabit the world and how players interact with them shapes how the story unfolds. In fact, every NPC that players encounter has a backstory and motivations that they pursue - that might even include a romantic relationship with the protagonist, Kuruna. Strengthening ties to NPCs can yield a slew of benefits, like combat companions and perhaps even the chance that they will show up to save your from the brink of death itself! Players take on the role of Kuruna, a young adventurer who travels the kingdom of Verad to help those in need. Some strange activities have been reported in the province of Hummingwoods, so Kuruna begins a patrol of the area that quickly becomes much more than she ever imagined. Keep an eye out for Pixel Princess Blitz sometime next year on PC.
  9. Jack Gardner

    Feature: Review: Tharsis

    In one of the developer diaries, Zach Gage, the system designer at Choice Provisions, talks about the decision to make die rolls the foremost mechanic in Tharsis. In that particular video, Gage states that he wanted to make a game where, “the dice are the arbiter of [the player’s] life.” To Choice Provisions’ credit, Tharsis accomplishes exactly that. Tharsis puts players in control of the first manned mission to Mars. The astronauts under the player’s command were sent to investigate a mysterious signal coming from the Tharsis region of the red planet. However, mere weeks from their destination, the crew of the Iktomi meet disaster. Their vessel rockets through a field of micro-meteoroids, destroying their food supply and killing two crew members. The game tasks players to lead the surviving astronauts to Mars while facing down the dangers posed by the damage done to the ship and the dwindling scraps of food that remain on board. On top of that, every playthrough is randomized, leading to completely different experiences with every attempt to reach Tharsis. It’s a catchy premise and one which certainly caught my initial interest. However, the way in which Choice Provisions executed on that premise leaves something to be desired. Imagine you are playing slots at a casino. You are pulling the lever, watching the results mix around on the machine, sometimes winning, more often losing. Along comes the owner of the casino with an offer: You can participate in the grand slot game of the night! In order to win, you have to successfully combine the right slot results over the course of ten rounds. Each round, the required slot results change at random while the casino reduces the number of slot machines you can use. I have basically just described Tharsis. You see, Tharsis revolves entirely on digital dice rolls. Every round represents another week in space and each astronaut can move to one module of the spacecraft and make rolls to perform tasks, fix broken systems, or use special abilities. However, each week new problems arise that will cause more damage to the ship, the health of the astronauts, or the number of dice available to the crew. These disasters can be fixed with dice rolls added together to hit a target number. If the ship runs out of health, it explodes. If a crew member loses their last remaining point of health, they croak. On top of that, the crew loses one die for every action taken. Juggling health, dice, and the structural integrity of the ship is a delicate act of probability weighing. One false move could mean almost instant death for the entire mission. Tharsis shines best during that balancing act. Unfortunately, much like in the earlier comparison to a casino game, Tharsis is heavily weighted against the player. Two to three new events happen each round and all of them are bad. Any attempt to repair the resulting malfunctions carries with it the risk of to freezing certain dice results so they can’t be rerolled, completely taking certain rolls out of play, or damaging the crew member working on the fix. Combine these stresses with an ever decreasing dice pool for each astronaut (barring some exceptionally lucky rolls in the right areas) and the frustrations become clearer. Choice Provisions attempts to alleviate those frustrations via a mechanic with which players can save and spend die rolls for certain boosts like additional die or ship repairs. These boosts revolve in groups of three and are generated at random. Sometimes they can be immensely helpful and other times they merely represent the hollow hope of survival. If the dice situation becomes extremely bad, players can resort to cannibalism to keep surviving crew members alive and rolling large dice pools. I dearly wish Tharsis had any amount of character development. Who are these astronauts? Why should I care about them? It sucks when a crewman dies, but it sucks because I don’t get their dice anymore, not because I care about them in any other respect. Cannibalizing these people should be horrible, but it instead feels like a very mechanical decision done for dice with little to no thought about the digital humans stuck in that situation. Having characters we can care about would only serve to deepen our investment in the game and the sense of importance each dice roll possesses. On the aesthetic front, Tharsis consists mainly of the Iktomi, close ups of the crew in their helpfully colored space suits, and some animatics. While the animatics are visually engaging, the ship and crew appear bland in comparison. The audio in Tharsis is slim, but serviceable. When it plays, the music draws you into the desperate atmosphere of the doomed ship. Meanwhile the voice acting effectively conveys emotion and mounting intensity as the crew approaches their destination. The small budget shows, but it does what it needs to regarding the visuals and audio. Conclusion: I can’t shake the feeling that there is something really great in Tharsis despite the amount of frustration it gave me. Perhaps with additional ways for players to save their good fortune for the harsh events and poor rolls that inevitably occur along with general rebalancing could save this game. The potential exists for Tharsis to create a more engaging, exciting experience with an expanded array of random events and character development. The core concept of the dice being the arbiters of life and death is a good one, but maybe one or two bad rolls shouldn’t be a death sentence. Tharsis would be a great hit as a co-op tabletop experience in the same vein as Pandemic. I can see a group of friends really enjoying themselves while taking a morbid trip to Mars, casting lots to see who should be cannibalized to give the others a shot at successfully completing the doomed journey. However, as a video game it feels almost hopelessly stacked against the player, leading to a frustrating time with none of the distractions or house rules that a group of friends can provide. I can’t in good conscience recommend it at the price of $15. Tharsis is available now on PC and PlayStation 4 View full article
  10. Jack Gardner

    Review: Tharsis

    In one of the developer diaries, Zach Gage, the system designer at Choice Provisions, talks about the decision to make die rolls the foremost mechanic in Tharsis. In that particular video, Gage states that he wanted to make a game where, “the dice are the arbiter of [the player’s] life.” To Choice Provisions’ credit, Tharsis accomplishes exactly that. Tharsis puts players in control of the first manned mission to Mars. The astronauts under the player’s command were sent to investigate a mysterious signal coming from the Tharsis region of the red planet. However, mere weeks from their destination, the crew of the Iktomi meet disaster. Their vessel rockets through a field of micro-meteoroids, destroying their food supply and killing two crew members. The game tasks players to lead the surviving astronauts to Mars while facing down the dangers posed by the damage done to the ship and the dwindling scraps of food that remain on board. On top of that, every playthrough is randomized, leading to completely different experiences with every attempt to reach Tharsis. It’s a catchy premise and one which certainly caught my initial interest. However, the way in which Choice Provisions executed on that premise leaves something to be desired. Imagine you are playing slots at a casino. You are pulling the lever, watching the results mix around on the machine, sometimes winning, more often losing. Along comes the owner of the casino with an offer: You can participate in the grand slot game of the night! In order to win, you have to successfully combine the right slot results over the course of ten rounds. Each round, the required slot results change at random while the casino reduces the number of slot machines you can use. I have basically just described Tharsis. You see, Tharsis revolves entirely on digital dice rolls. Every round represents another week in space and each astronaut can move to one module of the spacecraft and make rolls to perform tasks, fix broken systems, or use special abilities. However, each week new problems arise that will cause more damage to the ship, the health of the astronauts, or the number of dice available to the crew. These disasters can be fixed with dice rolls added together to hit a target number. If the ship runs out of health, it explodes. If a crew member loses their last remaining point of health, they croak. On top of that, the crew loses one die for every action taken. Juggling health, dice, and the structural integrity of the ship is a delicate act of probability weighing. One false move could mean almost instant death for the entire mission. Tharsis shines best during that balancing act. Unfortunately, much like in the earlier comparison to a casino game, Tharsis is heavily weighted against the player. Two to three new events happen each round and all of them are bad. Any attempt to repair the resulting malfunctions carries with it the risk of to freezing certain dice results so they can’t be rerolled, completely taking certain rolls out of play, or damaging the crew member working on the fix. Combine these stresses with an ever decreasing dice pool for each astronaut (barring some exceptionally lucky rolls in the right areas) and the frustrations become clearer. Choice Provisions attempts to alleviate those frustrations via a mechanic with which players can save and spend die rolls for certain boosts like additional die or ship repairs. These boosts revolve in groups of three and are generated at random. Sometimes they can be immensely helpful and other times they merely represent the hollow hope of survival. If the dice situation becomes extremely bad, players can resort to cannibalism to keep surviving crew members alive and rolling large dice pools. I dearly wish Tharsis had any amount of character development. Who are these astronauts? Why should I care about them? It sucks when a crewman dies, but it sucks because I don’t get their dice anymore, not because I care about them in any other respect. Cannibalizing these people should be horrible, but it instead feels like a very mechanical decision done for dice with little to no thought about the digital humans stuck in that situation. Having characters we can care about would only serve to deepen our investment in the game and the sense of importance each dice roll possesses. On the aesthetic front, Tharsis consists mainly of the Iktomi, close ups of the crew in their helpfully colored space suits, and some animatics. While the animatics are visually engaging, the ship and crew appear bland in comparison. The audio in Tharsis is slim, but serviceable. When it plays, the music draws you into the desperate atmosphere of the doomed ship. Meanwhile the voice acting effectively conveys emotion and mounting intensity as the crew approaches their destination. The small budget shows, but it does what it needs to regarding the visuals and audio. Conclusion: I can’t shake the feeling that there is something really great in Tharsis despite the amount of frustration it gave me. Perhaps with additional ways for players to save their good fortune for the harsh events and poor rolls that inevitably occur along with general rebalancing could save this game. The potential exists for Tharsis to create a more engaging, exciting experience with an expanded array of random events and character development. The core concept of the dice being the arbiters of life and death is a good one, but maybe one or two bad rolls shouldn’t be a death sentence. Tharsis would be a great hit as a co-op tabletop experience in the same vein as Pandemic. I can see a group of friends really enjoying themselves while taking a morbid trip to Mars, casting lots to see who should be cannibalized to give the others a shot at successfully completing the doomed journey. However, as a video game it feels almost hopelessly stacked against the player, leading to a frustrating time with none of the distractions or house rules that a group of friends can provide. I can’t in good conscience recommend it at the price of $15. Tharsis is available now on PC and PlayStation 4
  11. Sublevel Zero is a roguelike, first-person shooter that casts players as the pilot of a lone gunship attempting to sift through the ruins of the human empire in a desperate bid to find a key that will prevent the unraveling of the universe. Each attempt to reach Sublevel Zero features proceedurally-generated environments, dangerous enemies, and permadeath. Killing enemies and finding loot will allow you to craft better weapons and armor from the remnants of humanity. Because Sublevel Zero takes place in space, players will be able to rotate in whatever direction they wish to best encounter the enemy. The indie title places a heavy emphasis on survival, with brutal enemies and limited ammo. Can you survive to reach the final floor? Sublevel Zero releases on October 8 for PC and Mac. A console version will be coming sometime in 2016.
  12. Sublevel Zero is a roguelike, first-person shooter that casts players as the pilot of a lone gunship attempting to sift through the ruins of the human empire in a desperate bid to find a key that will prevent the unraveling of the universe. Each attempt to reach Sublevel Zero features proceedurally-generated environments, dangerous enemies, and permadeath. Killing enemies and finding loot will allow you to craft better weapons and armor from the remnants of humanity. Because Sublevel Zero takes place in space, players will be able to rotate in whatever direction they wish to best encounter the enemy. The indie title places a heavy emphasis on survival, with brutal enemies and limited ammo. Can you survive to reach the final floor? Sublevel Zero releases on October 8 for PC and Mac. A console version will be coming sometime in 2016. View full article
  13. Indie developer DEKDEV's Path to the Sky is an interesting project, to say the least. It's a roguelike platformer with procedural world generation, a day-night cycle, weather, and its own physics engine. The premise is simple, too: Get to the top. The teaser is no longer available for viewing. DEKEDEV describes the story of his game thusly: In Path to the Sky, you'll play the role of a hired crewman aboard a spice trading vessel sailing the Indian Ocean during the 17th century. While on route, the ship is sacked and plundered by buccaneers. The vessel is sunk and its crew is lost to the sea. Alone, you find yourself stranded on the beach of an unknown island. This is where the adventure begins. Players will have to fight their way up to the top of the island, gaining items and powers along the way while facing ever more aggresive and deadly birds of prey. The set up is simple, the mechanics look solid, and I'm definitely itching to play it. People interested in pre-ordering Path to the Sky for PC or Mac can do so on the developer's website. Pre-orders will grant acces to the game as soon as it enters beta. View full article
  14. Indie developer DEKDEV's Path to the Sky is an interesting project, to say the least. It's a roguelike platformer with procedural world generation, a day-night cycle, weather, and its own physics engine. The premise is simple, too: Get to the top. The teaser is no longer available for viewing. DEKEDEV describes the story of his game thusly: In Path to the Sky, you'll play the role of a hired crewman aboard a spice trading vessel sailing the Indian Ocean during the 17th century. While on route, the ship is sacked and plundered by buccaneers. The vessel is sunk and its crew is lost to the sea. Alone, you find yourself stranded on the beach of an unknown island. This is where the adventure begins. Players will have to fight their way up to the top of the island, gaining items and powers along the way while facing ever more aggresive and deadly birds of prey. The set up is simple, the mechanics look solid, and I'm definitely itching to play it. People interested in pre-ordering Path to the Sky for PC or Mac can do so on the developer's website. Pre-orders will grant acces to the game as soon as it enters beta.
  15. The award-winning game Faster Than Light is receiving a free expansion that includes a slew of new features and it will now see an iOS release on the iPad. FTL, a beautiful, brutally difficult Rogue-like game, is one of my favorite indie games or the last few years. You take command of a spaceship tasked with warning the Federation of an impending attack by rebel forces. Every playthrough is drastically different and exhilarating, and players find them selves compelled to play again and again even though beating the game is a near herculean feat of micromanagement and luck. The expansion includes new tools, systems, and weapon abilities including: mind control, hacking, area of effect targeting, weapon overcharging, and basically more of everything. A new sector as well as new events have been added to the game, written by returning writer Tom Jubert and special guest Chris Avellone, who has worked on Planescape, Wasteland 2, and Project Eternity. Additionally, developer Subset games has listened to community feedback and added a few oft requested features like saving crew positions on the ship, the ability to save and quit during combat, and finding more items to purchase in stores. As someone who loves FTL, this is pretty much a dream come true. The PC and iPad versions will launch at the same time in early 2014. Subset will also be working to get FTL on Android tablets, but will not be bringing the title to phones due to the limited amount of interface space. View full article
  16. Jack Gardner

    FTL: Advanced Edition Coming Soon

    The award-winning game Faster Than Light is receiving a free expansion that includes a slew of new features and it will now see an iOS release on the iPad. FTL, a beautiful, brutally difficult Rogue-like game, is one of my favorite indie games or the last few years. You take command of a spaceship tasked with warning the Federation of an impending attack by rebel forces. Every playthrough is drastically different and exhilarating, and players find them selves compelled to play again and again even though beating the game is a near herculean feat of micromanagement and luck. The expansion includes new tools, systems, and weapon abilities including: mind control, hacking, area of effect targeting, weapon overcharging, and basically more of everything. A new sector as well as new events have been added to the game, written by returning writer Tom Jubert and special guest Chris Avellone, who has worked on Planescape, Wasteland 2, and Project Eternity. Additionally, developer Subset games has listened to community feedback and added a few oft requested features like saving crew positions on the ship, the ability to save and quit during combat, and finding more items to purchase in stores. As someone who loves FTL, this is pretty much a dream come true. The PC and iPad versions will launch at the same time in early 2014. Subset will also be working to get FTL on Android tablets, but will not be bringing the title to phones due to the limited amount of interface space.
  17. “Legend has it there is a treasure on the 26th floor,” and so begins the Legend of Dungeon, a beautiful, dungeon-crawling, action RPG that features permadeath by the small team at Robot Loves Kitty. Armed with only a sword and whatever you can gather from your local tavern, you control a brave adventurer (of whatever gender you may prefer) through the perils of Dungeon. Making your way to the 26th floor and back again, however, is easier said than done. The halls of this Rogue-like adventure are deadly affairs, with each new room holding unknown enemies, traps, and treasures. At first glance, the most arresting aspect of Legend of Dungeon is the striking 8-bit graphics mixed with dynamic lighting effects. Fire casts flickering shadows and sends up 8-bit gouts of flame, leveling up gives off a small semi-circle of radiance, and lanterns illuminate limited parts of pitch black rooms. Creatures as well as the player’s avatar will cast shadows near powerful light sources that grow or shrink depending on the proximity to said light source. This aesthetic choice lends Dungeon a look and feel entirely unique to itself that is quite pleasing to the eyes. The audio goes hand-in-hand with the visuals. Featuring music that responds and adapts to the player’s situation within the various rooms. Composer David Dirig created eighteen original songs which were shifted around and reassembled into 244 different tracks that serve as the audioscape for Legend of Dungeon. Dirig’s soundtrack works to hammer home the mystery and danger of the place in which players have chosen to delve for treasure and glory. The combat, much like other aspects of Legend of Dungeon, functions in a simple, yet elegant manner. You can play with either a mouse and keyboard or a PC compatible controller, and it is a painless task to map out new control schemes in the options menu. My set up used WASD for movement, the space bar to jump, my mouse to attack/use item, and the scroll wheel to switch between items. That’s the entirety of Legend of Dungeon’s control scheme. However, don’t let the simplicity of the controls fool you: Legend of Dungeon is a hard game. In my time with it, I never made it farther than the tenth floor (curse you, zombie-raising skeleton wizard!). Every time a player starts a new game, the dungeon’s layout is changed, meaning you never know what you will encounter. Maybe the first room you walk into is a shop or maybe it has a switch that releases a powerful Evil Warlock that can kill you in two or three hits. Luckily, the early levels of Dungeon are rarely life threatening. You have ample time and energy to explore and search for useful items and magic. If you are lucky you might find a powerful weapon, hat (hats function as armor), or spell. New weapons and magic drastically affect how players can approach enemies. Did you find a gun? Pepper your foes from a distance. Stumble across a shield? Automatically protect yourself from damage AND use it as a weapon. Manage to scrounge up a magic book? Raise an army of cannon fodder skeleton zombies to act as a distraction. The possibilities only get more ridiculous the more time you spend exploring Dungeon. It is worth mentioning here that players can tackle Legend of Dungeon solo or with up to three friends locally. No online co-op was available in the version I played and currently there does not appear to be plans for it to be added for the retail release. To have a better chance of emerging from the dark depths of Dungeon alive, I would recommend playing with allies. As players progress, they will accumulate a small arsenal of weapons and having different people fulfilling different roles to combat any and all potential challenges the dungeon might see fit to throw out can never be a bad thing. I had two issues that occurred throughout my time with Legend of Dungeon. The first one deals with hit detection. The action of the game takes place in a brawler-like manner, meaning you can move up, down, left, and right, but you are usually moving either left or right to proceed. This can make hitting enemies on a different vertical plane a bit spotty and results in players taking additional hits, which can sometimes mean the difference between life and death. The second issue which caused me a small amount of frustration was the lack of a strafing. There were times where being able to face one direction constantly would have been quite a boon. Instead, when fighting off waves of enemies I had to fight, turn away to run back a bit, then turn to fight again. Invariably this resulted in accruing two or three extra hits of damage, which begins to add up the deeper you find yourself within the ever shifting halls of Dungeon. All-in-all, Legend of Dungeon is shaping up to be an excellent game. The full retail version will be available September 13 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. If you can’t wait that long to get your hands on it, you can pre-order from Steam or from Robot Loves Kitty’s website and have access to the beta version leading up to the official release. If you are one of the people who has already bought the beta version and are feeling in need of some guidance on tackling the dangers that lurk below, here is a handy guide on some of the basics of Legend of Dungeon written up by the developers. View full article
  18. “Legend has it there is a treasure on the 26th floor,” and so begins the Legend of Dungeon, a beautiful, dungeon-crawling, action RPG that features permadeath by the small team at Robot Loves Kitty. Armed with only a sword and whatever you can gather from your local tavern, you control a brave adventurer (of whatever gender you may prefer) through the perils of Dungeon. Making your way to the 26th floor and back again, however, is easier said than done. The halls of this Rogue-like adventure are deadly affairs, with each new room holding unknown enemies, traps, and treasures. At first glance, the most arresting aspect of Legend of Dungeon is the striking 8-bit graphics mixed with dynamic lighting effects. Fire casts flickering shadows and sends up 8-bit gouts of flame, leveling up gives off a small semi-circle of radiance, and lanterns illuminate limited parts of pitch black rooms. Creatures as well as the player’s avatar will cast shadows near powerful light sources that grow or shrink depending on the proximity to said light source. This aesthetic choice lends Dungeon a look and feel entirely unique to itself that is quite pleasing to the eyes. The audio goes hand-in-hand with the visuals. Featuring music that responds and adapts to the player’s situation within the various rooms. Composer David Dirig created eighteen original songs which were shifted around and reassembled into 244 different tracks that serve as the audioscape for Legend of Dungeon. Dirig’s soundtrack works to hammer home the mystery and danger of the place in which players have chosen to delve for treasure and glory. The combat, much like other aspects of Legend of Dungeon, functions in a simple, yet elegant manner. You can play with either a mouse and keyboard or a PC compatible controller, and it is a painless task to map out new control schemes in the options menu. My set up used WASD for movement, the space bar to jump, my mouse to attack/use item, and the scroll wheel to switch between items. That’s the entirety of Legend of Dungeon’s control scheme. However, don’t let the simplicity of the controls fool you: Legend of Dungeon is a hard game. In my time with it, I never made it farther than the tenth floor (curse you, zombie-raising skeleton wizard!). Every time a player starts a new game, the dungeon’s layout is changed, meaning you never know what you will encounter. Maybe the first room you walk into is a shop or maybe it has a switch that releases a powerful Evil Warlock that can kill you in two or three hits. Luckily, the early levels of Dungeon are rarely life threatening. You have ample time and energy to explore and search for useful items and magic. If you are lucky you might find a powerful weapon, hat (hats function as armor), or spell. New weapons and magic drastically affect how players can approach enemies. Did you find a gun? Pepper your foes from a distance. Stumble across a shield? Automatically protect yourself from damage AND use it as a weapon. Manage to scrounge up a magic book? Raise an army of cannon fodder skeleton zombies to act as a distraction. The possibilities only get more ridiculous the more time you spend exploring Dungeon. It is worth mentioning here that players can tackle Legend of Dungeon solo or with up to three friends locally. No online co-op was available in the version I played and currently there does not appear to be plans for it to be added for the retail release. To have a better chance of emerging from the dark depths of Dungeon alive, I would recommend playing with allies. As players progress, they will accumulate a small arsenal of weapons and having different people fulfilling different roles to combat any and all potential challenges the dungeon might see fit to throw out can never be a bad thing. I had two issues that occurred throughout my time with Legend of Dungeon. The first one deals with hit detection. The action of the game takes place in a brawler-like manner, meaning you can move up, down, left, and right, but you are usually moving either left or right to proceed. This can make hitting enemies on a different vertical plane a bit spotty and results in players taking additional hits, which can sometimes mean the difference between life and death. The second issue which caused me a small amount of frustration was the lack of a strafing. There were times where being able to face one direction constantly would have been quite a boon. Instead, when fighting off waves of enemies I had to fight, turn away to run back a bit, then turn to fight again. Invariably this resulted in accruing two or three extra hits of damage, which begins to add up the deeper you find yourself within the ever shifting halls of Dungeon. All-in-all, Legend of Dungeon is shaping up to be an excellent game. The full retail version will be available September 13 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. If you can’t wait that long to get your hands on it, you can pre-order from Steam or from Robot Loves Kitty’s website and have access to the beta version leading up to the official release. If you are one of the people who has already bought the beta version and are feeling in need of some guidance on tackling the dangers that lurk below, here is a handy guide on some of the basics of Legend of Dungeon written up by the developers.
×