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Found 8 results

  1. Indie developer The Molasses Flood is bringing the charming, country rogue-like the Flame in the Flood to the Switch's eShop later this month. The bleak, beautiful game has players scrambling to survive in a hostile wilderness as they traverse the currents of a procedurally generated river. Camping spots to scavenge for supplies and contend with beasts of all kinds offer both safe havens and danger. Accompanied by your dog, Aesop, players must try to make their way down the river to find peace. The Flame in the Flood released last year to generally positive reviews that praised the challenge of its survival elements, while also acknowledging flaws like a less than compelling narrative and a clunky menu system. The gameplay seems to have been what captured the attention of many, which isn't surprising since The Molasses Flood's ranks are composed of developers who worked on titles like BioShock and Halo 2. Perhaps one of the biggest hooks for The Flame in the Flood remains it soundtrack. Composed and performed by Chuck Ragan, it perfectly captures the rambling, serene, and intense feeling The Flame and the Flood provokes in players. Give it a listen if you're the kind of person who enjoys good music. “The natural rhythm of The Flame In The Flood—sailing from island to island, gathering resources and hunting wild animals—is a perfect fit for the Nintendo Switch,” said Forrest Dowling, lead designer of The Flame in the Flood. “Like Scout’s journey of survival, players will be able to shape their story wherever they see fit, be it on the couch, the bus, or even on a boat gently meandering down the Mississippi river.” The Flame in the Flood will release on the Nintendo Switch eShop October 12.
  2. Indie developer The Molasses Flood is bringing the charming, country rogue-like the Flame in the Flood to the Switch's eShop later this month. The bleak, beautiful game has players scrambling to survive in a hostile wilderness as they traverse the currents of a procedurally generated river. Camping spots to scavenge for supplies and contend with beasts of all kinds offer both safe havens and danger. Accompanied by your dog, Aesop, players must try to make their way down the river to find peace. The Flame in the Flood released last year to generally positive reviews that praised the challenge of its survival elements, while also acknowledging flaws like a less than compelling narrative and a clunky menu system. The gameplay seems to have been what captured the attention of many, which isn't surprising since The Molasses Flood's ranks are composed of developers who worked on titles like BioShock and Halo 2. Perhaps one of the biggest hooks for The Flame in the Flood remains it soundtrack. Composed and performed by Chuck Ragan, it perfectly captures the rambling, serene, and intense feeling The Flame and the Flood provokes in players. Give it a listen if you're the kind of person who enjoys good music. “The natural rhythm of The Flame In The Flood—sailing from island to island, gathering resources and hunting wild animals—is a perfect fit for the Nintendo Switch,” said Forrest Dowling, lead designer of The Flame in the Flood. “Like Scout’s journey of survival, players will be able to shape their story wherever they see fit, be it on the couch, the bus, or even on a boat gently meandering down the Mississippi river.” The Flame in the Flood will release on the Nintendo Switch eShop October 12. View full article
  3. The Binding of Isaac is getting yet another expansion with The Binding of Isaac: Afterbirth+! If you think that expansion seems familiar, that's probably because the name is exactly the same as the previous expansion, but this time it has a plus sign after it. That plus sign comes with a whole lot of extra content, however. Those who pick up Afterbirth+ will get a slew of new goodies to freshen up their Binding of Isaac experience. The $9.99 pack brings full access mod tools for players who want to make their own new additions to The Binding of Isaac. It also comes with 67 new items, 27 new equippables, and over 10 new power-ups. There's also an entire additional chapter with a new final boss, playable character, 62 achievements, an overhauled greed mode, brand new music and cutscenes, and hundreds of new rooms to freshen up the rogue-like experience of running Isaac's dungeons. A new "victory lap" feature lets players continue playing the game after they have defeated the final boss. Heck, have you ever wondered about the creatures you encounter throughout The Binding of Isaac? Afterbirth+ introduces a bestiary that tracks all of the creatures killed in-game. Edmund McMillen has also promised to provide monthly updates for the expansion post-release with both his own content and the best fan creations. Those who own the previous Afterbirth expansion will be able to purchase the + for a discounted $6.66. Afterbirth+ releases for PC on January 3 next year, and later during Spring 2017 for consoles.
  4. The Binding of Isaac is getting yet another expansion with The Binding of Isaac: Afterbirth+! If you think that expansion seems familiar, that's probably because the name is exactly the same as the previous expansion, but this time it has a plus sign after it. That plus sign comes with a whole lot of extra content, however. Those who pick up Afterbirth+ will get a slew of new goodies to freshen up their Binding of Isaac experience. The $9.99 pack brings full access mod tools for players who want to make their own new additions to The Binding of Isaac. It also comes with 67 new items, 27 new equippables, and over 10 new power-ups. There's also an entire additional chapter with a new final boss, playable character, 62 achievements, an overhauled greed mode, brand new music and cutscenes, and hundreds of new rooms to freshen up the rogue-like experience of running Isaac's dungeons. A new "victory lap" feature lets players continue playing the game after they have defeated the final boss. Heck, have you ever wondered about the creatures you encounter throughout The Binding of Isaac? Afterbirth+ introduces a bestiary that tracks all of the creatures killed in-game. Edmund McMillen has also promised to provide monthly updates for the expansion post-release with both his own content and the best fan creations. Those who own the previous Afterbirth expansion will be able to purchase the + for a discounted $6.66. Afterbirth+ releases for PC on January 3 next year, and later during Spring 2017 for consoles. View full article
  5. Developer Squishy Games has released a new trailer for their rogue-like, isometric sidescroller Rogue Invader. Based on a game made for fun nearly 20 years ago, Rogue Invader places players in the role of an invading force of soldiers trying to conquer the homeworld of the aliens who have brought unimaginable war and devastation upon the human race. To do this, soldiers with various different types of customizable weapons and armor will have to make their way across the planet's surface, through the alien defenses, and defeat the vile King Zenos. Each playthrough is randomized and many secrets lurk for those who explore enough to find them. While the title is currently running a Kickstarter campaign, it has been green lit on Steam and will be released whether or not the Kickstarter succeeds (which currently looks doubtful). The Kickstarter, as stated up front by Squishy Games, is mostly for bumping up the quality of the soundtrack and the art assets. However, the game itself has been largely finished, though additional areas and items will be added in patches. Rogue Invader will be coming to PC, Mac, and Linux later this fall. View full article
  6. Developer Squishy Games has released a new trailer for their rogue-like, isometric sidescroller Rogue Invader. Based on a game made for fun nearly 20 years ago, Rogue Invader places players in the role of an invading force of soldiers trying to conquer the homeworld of the aliens who have brought unimaginable war and devastation upon the human race. To do this, soldiers with various different types of customizable weapons and armor will have to make their way across the planet's surface, through the alien defenses, and defeat the vile King Zenos. Each playthrough is randomized and many secrets lurk for those who explore enough to find them. While the title is currently running a Kickstarter campaign, it has been green lit on Steam and will be released whether or not the Kickstarter succeeds (which currently looks doubtful). The Kickstarter, as stated up front by Squishy Games, is mostly for bumping up the quality of the soundtrack and the art assets. However, the game itself has been largely finished, though additional areas and items will be added in patches. Rogue Invader will be coming to PC, Mac, and Linux later this fall.
  7. I don't usually talk much about Early Access games on Steam. I've found that it's often unfair to form a coherent opinion on unfinished works. If I am being quite honest, I tend to dislike how Steam curates Early Access, but that's a topic for another time. Few Early Access titles could be described as whole experiences, but Darkest Dungeon is quite the exception. Darkest Dungeon is a turn-based rogue-like with a grim, gothic art style that compliments the deadly world in which the action takes place. Tasked with restoring their old estate to glory and defeating the evil that lurks in the deepest dungeon below the grounds of their family's faded house, players must lead parties of adventurers into dens of madness and monsters. That's all to say that you should go in expecting to have your adventurers die. A lot. Adventurers come in all different types; priests, warriors, minstrels, grave diggers, highwaymen, occultists, and more. Each randomly generated seeker has their own quirks, abilities, and names that make them unique. As these heroes for hire progress, they will acquire new mental and physical traits depending on their experiences. These traits can help in battle or while exploring, but they can often prove to be detrimental as well. An adventurer might gain an advantage against human enemies and simultaneously discover that they have an uncontrollable impulse to steal items. Players will have to keep a close eye on their adventurers' sanity, as well. If they reach their mind's threshold, they will suffer a form of limit break. Most often this manifests as a debilitating state, such as hopelessness or cowardice, but there is a slim chance that they might find a shred of heroism and receive a massive surge in ability. Half of the fun of Darkest Dungeon is making the best of completely awful situations. You should expect to have terrible things happen to your adventurers. In my very first foray into a dungeon, all of my characters died, either sliced to ribbons by monsters or their own insanity. In fact, the same could be said about my second party of adventurers... and my third. Grinding through the difficulty can be frustrating, but it makes every small victory that much sweeter. Darkest Dungeon plays like a traditional turn-based RPG with dungeon crawling elements. It is simplistic and easy to understand, but each decision made in battle and while exploring dungeons can have long-lasting consequences with deadly ramifications. Choose to ignore a weaker enemy? They might attack during the next round and infect one of your party members with rabies (not making that up, you can totally get rabies in Darkest Dungeon). Choose to press ahead in a dungeon instead of turning back? You open up your adventurers to derangement and death. Darkest Dungeon revolves around player choice and forces players to live with the results. Screw ups usually end with deaths. One of the most immediately attractive aspects of Darkest Dungeon is its graphic novel aesthetic. The monsters and world draw on elements of Lovecraftian horror; warped monsters, tentacles, death, and disease, images that erode sanity. Heavy shadows and dark narration emphasize the moody atmosphere that persists throughout the game world. It is twisted, awful, and beautiful all at the same time. To clarify, this isn't a review. Instead, this is more of a "hey, this is a really cool game that hasn't been fully released, but is currently being sold" situation. Darkest Dungeon only released in its Early Access state yesterday, but I can't stop thinking about it. It's not done, more will be added and bugs will be patched, but it feels like the core experience is finished and amazingly solid. Check it out on Steam if you're willing to face the darkness full of terrors.
  8. I don't usually talk much about Early Access games on Steam. I've found that it's often unfair to form a coherent opinion on unfinished works. If I am being quite honest, I tend to dislike how Steam curates Early Access, but that's a topic for another time. Few Early Access titles could be described as whole experiences, but Darkest Dungeon is quite the exception. Darkest Dungeon is a turn-based rogue-like with a grim, gothic art style that compliments the deadly world in which the action takes place. Tasked with restoring their old estate to glory and defeating the evil that lurks in the deepest dungeon below the grounds of their family's faded house, players must lead parties of adventurers into dens of madness and monsters. That's all to say that you should go in expecting to have your adventurers die. A lot. Adventurers come in all different types; priests, warriors, minstrels, grave diggers, highwaymen, occultists, and more. Each randomly generated seeker has their own quirks, abilities, and names that make them unique. As these heroes for hire progress, they will acquire new mental and physical traits depending on their experiences. These traits can help in battle or while exploring, but they can often prove to be detrimental as well. An adventurer might gain an advantage against human enemies and simultaneously discover that they have an uncontrollable impulse to steal items. Players will have to keep a close eye on their adventurers' sanity, as well. If they reach their mind's threshold, they will suffer a form of limit break. Most often this manifests as a debilitating state, such as hopelessness or cowardice, but there is a slim chance that they might find a shred of heroism and receive a massive surge in ability. Half of the fun of Darkest Dungeon is making the best of completely awful situations. You should expect to have terrible things happen to your adventurers. In my very first foray into a dungeon, all of my characters died, either sliced to ribbons by monsters or their own insanity. In fact, the same could be said about my second party of adventurers... and my third. Grinding through the difficulty can be frustrating, but it makes every small victory that much sweeter. Darkest Dungeon plays like a traditional turn-based RPG with dungeon crawling elements. It is simplistic and easy to understand, but each decision made in battle and while exploring dungeons can have long-lasting consequences with deadly ramifications. Choose to ignore a weaker enemy? They might attack during the next round and infect one of your party members with rabies (not making that up, you can totally get rabies in Darkest Dungeon). Choose to press ahead in a dungeon instead of turning back? You open up your adventurers to derangement and death. Darkest Dungeon revolves around player choice and forces players to live with the results. Screw ups usually end with deaths. One of the most immediately attractive aspects of Darkest Dungeon is its graphic novel aesthetic. The monsters and world draw on elements of Lovecraftian horror; warped monsters, tentacles, death, and disease, images that erode sanity. Heavy shadows and dark narration emphasize the moody atmosphere that persists throughout the game world. It is twisted, awful, and beautiful all at the same time. To clarify, this isn't a review. Instead, this is more of a "hey, this is a really cool game that hasn't been fully released, but is currently being sold" situation. Darkest Dungeon only released in its Early Access state yesterday, but I can't stop thinking about it. It's not done, more will be added and bugs will be patched, but it feels like the core experience is finished and amazingly solid. Check it out on Steam if you're willing to face the darkness full of terrors. View full article
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