Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'rime'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Extra Life News
    • Extra Life Updates
    • Best Practices
    • Community Content
    • Why I Extra Life
    • Fundraising
    • Contests
  • Gaming News
  • Features
  • Podcast

Discussions

  • Extra Life Discussions
    • General Extra Life Discussion
    • Local Extra Lifers
    • Fundraising Ideas
    • Live Streaming Tips & Tricks
    • Official Extra Life Stream Team Discussion
    • Extra Life JSON Code Discussion & Sharing
    • Extra Life United
    • Extra Life Q & A
  • Articles & Extra Life Announcements
    • Announcements
  • Official Extra Life Guilds
    • Guild information and Discussion
    • Canada
    • Northeastern US
    • Southeastern US
    • Central US
    • Western US
  • Gaming Discussions
    • General Gaming Discussion
  • Other Stuff
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Recent Posts

Calendars

  • Extra Life Community Calendar
  • Extra Life Stream Team
  • Akron Guild
  • Albany Guild
  • Albuquerque Guild
  • Anchorage Guild
  • Atlanta Guild
  • Austin Guild
  • Bakersfield Guild
  • Baltimore Guild
  • Birmingham Guild
  • Boston Guild
  • Burlington Guild
  • Buffalo Guild
  • Calgary, AB Guild
  • Morgantown Guild
  • Charlottesville Guild
  • Chicago Guild
  • Cincinnati Guild
  • Cleveland Guild
  • Columbia, MO Guild
  • Columbus, OH Guild
  • Dallas Guild
  • Dayton Guild
  • Denver Guild
  • Des Moines Guild
  • Detroit Guild
  • Edmonton, AB Guild
  • Fargo-Valley City Guild
  • Fresno Guild
  • Ft. Worth Guild
  • Gainesville-Tallahassee Guild
  • Grand Rapids Guild
  • Halifax, NS Guild
  • Hamilton, ON Guild
  • Hartford Guild
  • Hershey Guild
  • Hudson Valley Guild
  • Houston Guild
  • Indianapolis Guild
  • Jacksonville Guild
  • Kansas City Guild
  • Knoxville Guild
  • Lansing Guild
  • London, ON Guild
  • Los Angeles Guild
  • Milwaukee / Madison Guild
  • Minneapolis / Twin Cities Guild
  • Montreal / Quebec City Guild
  • Nashville Guild
  • Newark Guild
  • NYC & Long Island Guild
  • Oakland / San Francisco Guild
  • Omaha Guild
  • Orange County Guild
  • Orlando Guild
  • Ottawa, ON Guild
  • Philadelphia Guild
  • Phoenix Guild
  • Pittsburgh Guild
  • Portland, OR Guild
  • Portland, ME Guild
  • Raleigh-Durham Guild
  • Richmond Guild
  • Sacramento Guild
  • Salt Lake City Guild
  • San Antonio Guild
  • San Diego Guild
  • San Juan, PR Guild
  • Saskatchewan Guild
  • Seattle Guild
  • Spokane Guild
  • Springfield-Champaign, IL Guild
  • Springfield, MA Guild
  • St. Louis Guild
  • Syracuse Guild
  • Tampa / St. Petersburg Guild
  • Toronto, ON Guild
  • Vancouver, BC Guild
  • Washington DC Guild
  • Winnipeg, MB Guild
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Events
  • Extra Life Akron's Events

Categories

  • Broadcasting Toolkit
  • Multimedia Kit
  • Extra Life Guild Tool Kit
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Files
  • Extra Life Akron's Files

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Hospital


Location


Why I "Extra Life"


Interests


Twitter


Instagram


Twitch


Mixer


Discord


Blizzard Battletag


Nintendo ID


PSN ID


Steam


Origin


Xbox Gamertag

Found 12 results

  1. Vane, an upcoming indie game courtesy of developers who previously worked on The Last Guardian, thrusts players into the skin of a bird who can take the form of a young child to explore the ruins of a decrepit civilization. Created by the folks at Friend & Foe Games, players will have to delve deeper and deeper into the mystical ruins of a culture long gone (or is it?). The trailer seems to intentionally remind the viewer of minimalist titles like Ico and Journey. Vane comes to us courtesy of Friend & Foe Games, a studio founded in 2014 by several developers who have worked on titles like the previously mentioned The Last Guardian, but their pedigree also includes action-oriented games like Battlefield 3 and Killzone. Despite the impressive credentials, the studio isn't a large one. Their website only lists a team of eight who have worked on Vane. They also seem to have another project in the works; an arcade brawler titled Dangerous Men, though not much is known about it at this time. As far as the story goes, all we know is that a pile of mysterious, golden dust transforms a curious crow into a young child. Armed with curiosity and the ability to transform back into a bird form, the kid begins to explore a vast world filled with wonder, excitement, danger, and dread. Mysterious technology begins to churn to life at the child's approach, reshaping the world as they continue their journey to who-knows-where. As the journey continues, who knows what shape the barren desert might take as it awakens. If you ever wondered what Ico would be like if you could turn into a bird and were exposed to existential terror, Vane might be right up your alley. in many ways it reminds me of Rime, last year's indie game about a child exploring a strange world from Tequila Works. That's some high praise given that Rime was flippin' great. Also, the synth music buoying the action in the above trailer is just excellent. Vane will release on January 15 for the PlayStation 4. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  2. Vane, an upcoming indie game courtesy of developers who previously worked on The Last Guardian, thrusts players into the skin of a bird who can take the form of a young child to explore the ruins of a decrepit civilization. Created by the folks at Friend & Foe Games, players will have to delve deeper and deeper into the mystical ruins of a culture long gone (or is it?). The trailer seems to intentionally remind the viewer of minimalist titles like Ico and Journey. Vane comes to us courtesy of Friend & Foe Games, a studio founded in 2014 by several developers who have worked on titles like the previously mentioned The Last Guardian, but their pedigree also includes action-oriented games like Battlefield 3 and Killzone. Despite the impressive credentials, the studio isn't a large one. Their website only lists a team of eight who have worked on Vane. They also seem to have another project in the works; an arcade brawler titled Dangerous Men, though not much is known about it at this time. As far as the story goes, all we know is that a pile of mysterious, golden dust transforms a curious crow into a young child. Armed with curiosity and the ability to transform back into a bird form, the kid begins to explore a vast world filled with wonder, excitement, danger, and dread. Mysterious technology begins to churn to life at the child's approach, reshaping the world as they continue their journey to who-knows-where. As the journey continues, who knows what shape the barren desert might take as it awakens. If you ever wondered what Ico would be like if you could turn into a bird and were exposed to existential terror, Vane might be right up your alley. in many ways it reminds me of Rime, last year's indie game about a child exploring a strange world from Tequila Works. That's some high praise given that Rime was flippin' great. Also, the synth music buoying the action in the above trailer is just excellent. Vane will release on January 15 for the PlayStation 4. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  3. We've known for a while that Tequila Works was going to be bringing their adventure game Rime to Nintendo Switch. Now we know when it will be hitting Nintendo's flagship console. Rime launches for Nintendo Switch on November 14. It will be receiving a special, physical edition that contains the full game and the original soundtrack by David García Díaz (a soaring, magical score that would be right at home in a Studio Ghibli film). The physical edition will retail at $39.99 and a digital version will be available on the Nintendo eShop for $29.99. Rime is being ported to the Nintendo Switch by Tantalus, a company that specializes in bringing third-party titles to Nintendo systems. "As big fans of Nintendo, we truly appreciate our fans’ patience as Tantalus and Tequila Works continue working on RiME on Nintendo Switch; we are all committed to making sure all players get the high-quality experience they deserve," said Raúl Rubio Munárriz, CEO and creative director of Tequila Works. Now that Tequila Works has completed work on Rime, they've moved on to developing several other original IPs. The only one publicly known at this time is The Invisible Hours, a VR murder mystery. Rime is currently available for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Be sure to read our review of the PS4 version! View full article
  4. Jack Gardner

    Rime Launches on Nintendo Switch This Fall

    We've known for a while that Tequila Works was going to be bringing their adventure game Rime to Nintendo Switch. Now we know when it will be hitting Nintendo's flagship console. Rime launches for Nintendo Switch on November 14. It will be receiving a special, physical edition that contains the full game and the original soundtrack by David García Díaz (a soaring, magical score that would be right at home in a Studio Ghibli film). The physical edition will retail at $39.99 and a digital version will be available on the Nintendo eShop for $29.99. Rime is being ported to the Nintendo Switch by Tantalus, a company that specializes in bringing third-party titles to Nintendo systems. "As big fans of Nintendo, we truly appreciate our fans’ patience as Tantalus and Tequila Works continue working on RiME on Nintendo Switch; we are all committed to making sure all players get the high-quality experience they deserve," said Raúl Rubio Munárriz, CEO and creative director of Tequila Works. Now that Tequila Works has completed work on Rime, they've moved on to developing several other original IPs. The only one publicly known at this time is The Invisible Hours, a VR murder mystery. Rime is currently available for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Be sure to read our review of the PS4 version!
  5. Jack Gardner

    Feature: Review: Rime

    Rime begins with stormy seas, a red scrap of cloth buffeted by the wind whipping through the air, and a young boy washed up on the shores of an island covered in the ruins of a once mighty civilization. Without a word, players assume control of this child and help him to move through this world full of spirits, magic, and ancient technology. In fact, Rime contains not one line of dialogue – Tequila Works communicate their entire narrative through breathtaking visuals and an absolutely astounding score by David Garcia Diaz. Bright colors swirl across the landscape making everything feel alive and vibrant. The use of these popping colors make it all the more potent when the adventure inevitably descends into darkness and mystery. Majestic soundscapes weave an element of vanished magic into the game, as if the music itself was always grasping to reclaim just a little more of the lost glory the island’s ruined spires. The world of Rime is one that has been afflicted by something terrible. Something so destructive that it has shattered the very fabric of the world. This loss permeates every facet of the adventure. Weeping statues and grasping, shade-filled halls lay in the world’s forgotten corners. For every bright, shining moment in the sun, there is one in which the shadows envelop the red-caped protagonist. That ever-present conflict between light and dark? That escalating tension and deepening mystery? Those are the building blocks of every great adventure. The entire presentation readily draws comparisons to the work of Studio Ghibli, a similarity noted in other reviews of Rime. While I think the observation surprisingly apt for the audio-visual elements, Ghibli tends to make their work aimed squarely at children – Rime takes aim at an older crowd. While it can certainly be enjoyed by younger gamers, the themes and payoff will affect more seasoned players on a deeper level. The seemingly overplayed narrative carries an edge that cuts to the bone with loss and love. <a data-cke-saved-href="http://music.greybox.com/album/rime-deluxe-soundtrack" href="http://music.greybox.com/album/rime-deluxe-soundtrack">RiME (Deluxe Soundtrack) by David García Díaz</a> Each step of Rime’s journey presents an obstacle to be overcome, puzzles to be solved, or enemies to defeat. However, Rime isn’t about any one of those aspects on their own. There are some platforming sections, but it isn’t a platformer. Problems beg for solutions, but Rime isn’t a puzzle game. While sometimes enemies do make an appearance, few would ever describe Rime as a game about combat. Instead, Rime places its focus squarely on maintaining a sense of adventure and subtle storytelling. That emphasis on adventure smooths the gameplay experience. Few will need to grab a strategy guide or watch a walkthrough in order to find the solution to a puzzle. The platforming demands little in the way of reflexes. Combat is about as far from hack and slash as one can get; it’s more of a larger, faster puzzle than anything else. One might wonder how Rime manages to remain compelling with its gameplay when enjoyment doesn’t come from reflexive skill. The narrative hook of learning what happened to the island and our protagonist pulls the player relentlessly forward. Lacking any dialogue to explain the situation or internal monologue to learn what kind of a person the protagonist might be, all we learn about him is from what we can see during gameplay – how he chooses to interact with the world. Perhaps most informative interaction comes from the child’s ability to shout, which causes different interactions with objects throughout the world. Sometimes that shout is a call; other times it becomes a humming sing-song of a half remembered song; and as danger mounts it becomes a whimper. That one interaction can show our protagonist cry, laugh, and grieve. But through all those emotions, he continues to move through the world on his journey, leaving much up to the player’s interpretation. Rime certainly doesn’t overstay its welcome. A relatively focused playthrough can make it from beginning to end in about four hours. Tequila Works doesn’t reuse puzzles – though occasionally similar puzzles reappear as character-building moments. The short length works in Rime’s favor and lends itself to multiple playthroughs. Players who love to scour every inch of their game worlds will find a nice challenge in discovering all the knickknacks hidden away (which all serve a narrative purpose as well). There are certain tropes that fledgling story writers are taught to avoid at all costs: Never open a scene with an alarm clock going off; do not include a gunshot followed by a cut to black; and never ever end with the dreaded phrase, “it was all a dream.” The overuse of these storytelling devices drill them into the public consciousness and rendering them clichés. However – and this is one of storytelling’s biggest secrets - a story can use a cliché, provided that it works. For example, a house full of alarm clocks fills the opening of Back to the Future and that works because the movie revolves around our human relationship with time. The film makes appropriate use of the device in a refreshing way - it’s played as a joke that reinforces the central premise of the film - turning it from a cliché back into a trope, and tropes are just tools in a storyteller’s toolbox. In a gaming landscape filled to bursting with indies, many might take a look at Rime and imagine it to be the latest in a long line of Ben “Yahtzee” Croshaw dubbed Small Child, Scary World (SCSW) games. Limbo, Ico, Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons, Braid, these games all take similar forms and tackle themes of being alone in an unknowable world that threatens danger at every turn. The storytelling trope of SCSW has certainly proven to be effective, but its overuse threatens to plunge into cliché territory. And while Rime certainly does fit into the same category, it turns the very concept on its head in a way that works beautifully. Conclusion: Some people might have certain expectations as to what Rime will be – Set those expectations aside and to go into it blind. While Rime certainly might seem to have the trappings of indie gaming tropes that are coming closer to cliché, Tequila Works subverts those expectations in a masterful fashion. 2017 has been a fantastic year for video games – so many quality titles, both big and small, have released. It is a testament to Rime’s quality that it stands as the best thing I have played so far amid the AAA giants that have flexed their gaming muscle over the past several months. It conjures up a mythical adventure that sweeps players up in its majesty. Rime expertly plays with emotion like a master pianist would compose a captivating solo. Rime ends on a haunting final note that doesn’t deliver the empowering resolution many might desire, but it leaves the player with something much better: A powerful artistic statement about how beautiful and terrible and lovely and difficult life can be – and how we can all recover from the worst tragedies and find peace. Rime is now available on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC - a Switch version is scheduled to release later this year View full article
  6. Jack Gardner

    Review: Rime

    Rime begins with stormy seas, a red scrap of cloth buffeted by the wind whipping through the air, and a young boy washed up on the shores of an island covered in the ruins of a once mighty civilization. Without a word, players assume control of this child and help him to move through this world full of spirits, magic, and ancient technology. In fact, Rime contains not one line of dialogue – Tequila Works communicate their entire narrative through breathtaking visuals and an absolutely astounding score by David Garcia Diaz. Bright colors swirl across the landscape making everything feel alive and vibrant. The use of these popping colors make it all the more potent when the adventure inevitably descends into darkness and mystery. Majestic soundscapes weave an element of vanished magic into the game, as if the music itself was always grasping to reclaim just a little more of the lost glory the island’s ruined spires. The world of Rime is one that has been afflicted by something terrible. Something so destructive that it has shattered the very fabric of the world. This loss permeates every facet of the adventure. Weeping statues and grasping, shade-filled halls lay in the world’s forgotten corners. For every bright, shining moment in the sun, there is one in which the shadows envelop the red-caped protagonist. That ever-present conflict between light and dark? That escalating tension and deepening mystery? Those are the building blocks of every great adventure. The entire presentation readily draws comparisons to the work of Studio Ghibli, a similarity noted in other reviews of Rime. While I think the observation surprisingly apt for the audio-visual elements, Ghibli tends to make their work aimed squarely at children – Rime takes aim at an older crowd. While it can certainly be enjoyed by younger gamers, the themes and payoff will affect more seasoned players on a deeper level. The seemingly overplayed narrative carries an edge that cuts to the bone with loss and love. <a data-cke-saved-href="http://music.greybox.com/album/rime-deluxe-soundtrack" href="http://music.greybox.com/album/rime-deluxe-soundtrack">RiME (Deluxe Soundtrack) by David García Díaz</a> Each step of Rime’s journey presents an obstacle to be overcome, puzzles to be solved, or enemies to defeat. However, Rime isn’t about any one of those aspects on their own. There are some platforming sections, but it isn’t a platformer. Problems beg for solutions, but Rime isn’t a puzzle game. While sometimes enemies do make an appearance, few would ever describe Rime as a game about combat. Instead, Rime places its focus squarely on maintaining a sense of adventure and subtle storytelling. That emphasis on adventure smooths the gameplay experience. Few will need to grab a strategy guide or watch a walkthrough in order to find the solution to a puzzle. The platforming demands little in the way of reflexes. Combat is about as far from hack and slash as one can get; it’s more of a larger, faster puzzle than anything else. One might wonder how Rime manages to remain compelling with its gameplay when enjoyment doesn’t come from reflexive skill. The narrative hook of learning what happened to the island and our protagonist pulls the player relentlessly forward. Lacking any dialogue to explain the situation or internal monologue to learn what kind of a person the protagonist might be, all we learn about him is from what we can see during gameplay – how he chooses to interact with the world. Perhaps most informative interaction comes from the child’s ability to shout, which causes different interactions with objects throughout the world. Sometimes that shout is a call; other times it becomes a humming sing-song of a half remembered song; and as danger mounts it becomes a whimper. That one interaction can show our protagonist cry, laugh, and grieve. But through all those emotions, he continues to move through the world on his journey, leaving much up to the player’s interpretation. Rime certainly doesn’t overstay its welcome. A relatively focused playthrough can make it from beginning to end in about four hours. Tequila Works doesn’t reuse puzzles – though occasionally similar puzzles reappear as character-building moments. The short length works in Rime’s favor and lends itself to multiple playthroughs. Players who love to scour every inch of their game worlds will find a nice challenge in discovering all the knickknacks hidden away (which all serve a narrative purpose as well). There are certain tropes that fledgling story writers are taught to avoid at all costs: Never open a scene with an alarm clock going off; do not include a gunshot followed by a cut to black; and never ever end with the dreaded phrase, “it was all a dream.” The overuse of these storytelling devices drill them into the public consciousness and rendering them clichés. However – and this is one of storytelling’s biggest secrets - a story can use a cliché, provided that it works. For example, a house full of alarm clocks fills the opening of Back to the Future and that works because the movie revolves around our human relationship with time. The film makes appropriate use of the device in a refreshing way - it’s played as a joke that reinforces the central premise of the film - turning it from a cliché back into a trope, and tropes are just tools in a storyteller’s toolbox. In a gaming landscape filled to bursting with indies, many might take a look at Rime and imagine it to be the latest in a long line of Ben “Yahtzee” Croshaw dubbed Small Child, Scary World (SCSW) games. Limbo, Ico, Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons, Braid, these games all take similar forms and tackle themes of being alone in an unknowable world that threatens danger at every turn. The storytelling trope of SCSW has certainly proven to be effective, but its overuse threatens to plunge into cliché territory. And while Rime certainly does fit into the same category, it turns the very concept on its head in a way that works beautifully. Conclusion: Some people might have certain expectations as to what Rime will be – Set those expectations aside and to go into it blind. While Rime certainly might seem to have the trappings of indie gaming tropes that are coming closer to cliché, Tequila Works subverts those expectations in a masterful fashion. 2017 has been a fantastic year for video games – so many quality titles, both big and small, have released. It is a testament to Rime’s quality that it stands as the best thing I have played so far amid the AAA giants that have flexed their gaming muscle over the past several months. It conjures up a mythical adventure that sweeps players up in its majesty. Rime expertly plays with emotion like a master pianist would compose a captivating solo. Rime ends on a haunting final note that doesn’t deliver the empowering resolution many might desire, but it leaves the player with something much better: A powerful artistic statement about how beautiful and terrible and lovely and difficult life can be – and how we can all recover from the worst tragedies and find peace. Rime is now available on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC - a Switch version is scheduled to release later this year
  7. Rime has been a long time coming. Developer Tequila Works began work on the project nearly four years ago. Originally slated as a PlayStation 4 exclusive, the game is now coming to multiple platforms. Rime centers around a young boy who, after getting shipwrecked during a storm, awakens on a mysterious, uninhabited island. A giant tower at the center of the island beckons the boy. With the help and guidance of a small fox and equipped with a strange, magical voice, the boy must reach the tower and uncover the island’s secrets. At this year’s PAX South, I sat down with Tequila Works Creative Director Raul Rubio and picked his brain about Rime’s development. During our talk, I uncovered several intriguing, lesser known facts about the highly-anticipated puzzle-platformer. Zelda and Ico Were Not Direct Influences “Ico meets Wind Waker” has been one of Rime’s go-to descriptors since the game debuted. Though an understandable comparison, Link’s seafaring adventure had zero impact on Rime’s conception. “I'm disappointed to say no, we didn't look into the Wind Waker.” Rubio confirmed. Tequila Works drew inspiration elsewhere, including films such as the animated works of Studio Ghibli. Raul stated one of the team’s main starting points was Journey. “Not the gameplay of Journey–the experience of Journey. In the sense that in Journey, the important thing was the journey.” Another, more surprising, influence has been the Jak & Daxter series. “In Jak & Daxter 2, you have this combination of platforming, open-world exploration, and, more importantly, you have this relationship between Jak and Daxter.” Rubio explained. “So in this game you have a relationship with the fox and he's your companion, your guide.” The Witness Connection While discussing Rime’s influences, I remarked about how Rime’s color palette and island setting reminded me more of The Witness than of Wind Waker. To my surprise, Raul revealed a relationship between the development of Rime and The Witness dating back to the 2013 Game Developer’s Conference. Both games had presentations at the event centered on their respective art styles: “And the thing is we both attended the other's talks because we were curious, and they found the same challenges we found, sometimes [similar] solutions, but other times we took totally different paths because we have different goals.” Rubio recalled. “And I remember that Jonathan Blow, they asked him literally this: ‘Oh have you seen Rime? Did they take inspirations from The Witness?’ I believe he said ‘Well, you should ask them.’ So now we can say, no, we didn't take inspiration [from] The Witness.” Raul said that until just a couple of months ago, he and his team hadn’t played The Witness. The reason? An employee rule to not play any other puzzle games during Rime’s development. Raul stated this was done to prevent Rime’s puzzle design from becoming “contaminated” by existing ideas and trends. Tequila Works could follow their unique vision rather than fall into the creative trap of only catering to player expectations. Legit Animation Chops One of Rime’s smaller but impressive elements is the boy’s animations. Subtle mannerisms and a satisfying sense of weight when jumping and climbing made me assume motion-capture was responsible. Raul revealed the boy was entirely hand-animated by a three-person team led by veteran animator Sandra Christensen. Prior to Rime, Christensen’s animation credits include LucasArts titles including the Star Wars: Force Unleashed games and Monkey Island, as well as other titles such as Psychonauts. She also had a tenure at Pixar, having worked on A Bug’s Life. A Blend of Cultural and Artistic Influences Creating a game that meshes aspects of different cultures is important to Tequila Works. The small team consists of a melting pot of nationalities, religious backgrounds, and artistic tastes. Rime’s aesthetic blends the individual artistic tastes and influences of the team members into a cohesive package. Raul explained, “Our art director was obsessed with The Master of Light, who is a 20th century Spanish painter. For other people it was Giorgio de Chirico who is the Italian architectural surrealist artist who inspired Team Ico. For other people, it was more like the surrealism of Dali and the negative space that he created. So in the end everything is mixed together.” The architecture and color palette of the Mediterranean coast heavily influenced Rime’s presentation. “It's like going on holiday to Spain or Greece” said Rubio. While such sights are relatively common for the Madrid-based studio, Raul revealed that he hopes Rime will make what seems relatively ordinary to him and the team extraordinary to the rest of the world. Childhood Experiences Drive Everything Rime stars an adolescent boy, and Tequila Works is committed to capturing the whimsy that comes from experiencing life from the perspective of a child. Raul stated that one thing every person has in common is that we were all kids at one point. “So the key to understand Rime is trying to see the world with the eyes of a kid.” Rubio explained. “And you are a child again, you can do things that you did very naturally when you were a child that you forgot when you became an adult.” Raul said he believes that one of those forgotten traits is the ability to be amazed by your surroundings without overanalyzing them the way an adult likely would. Capturing that same sense of wonder when players explore the remnants of the island’s ancient civilization has been one of the team’s key goals. To help realize that vision, Tequila Works studied videos of children playing in parks as a reference for how kids boldly attempt new challenges (especially when adults aren’t watching). Raul elaborated “You try to climb a tree now [you think], ‘Well if I try, I'm going to fall and [I’m] probably going to harm my hip, etc.’ But when you're a kid, you were not aware of the dangers of the world, right? Climbing a tree was something fun, not dangerous. That's the kind of inspiration for us.” Nearly every visible area in Rime can be reached by platforming, so Raul said he hopes that players channel that same child-like boldness when romping around the island. Rime’s controls and animation has been influenced by the protagonist’s young age as well. Raul explained that the balance of making the boy feel “fragile, but not literally helpless” was a balance the animation team was challenged to pull off. Every action needed to feel the way an 8-year old would, which Raul described as being “simple and complicated at the same time." I took Rime for a spin in a hands-on session and came away itching to play more. The puzzles I encountered, which involved using the boy’s voice to activate statues, were enjoyable and fairly inventive. Tequila Works promised increasingly diverse and complex conundrums throughout the experience. Platforming felt great and offers an enjoyable physical challenge on top of the mental aspect. Most of all, Rime’s ambient soundtrack and calm atmosphere make it a genuinely relaxing journey. By the time I finished, I wanted nothing more than to melt away and continue knocking out puzzles at my leisure. If the full experience continues to evolve in exciting ways, Rime has the potential to be one of the year’s premier titles. Rime launches this May for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC.
  8. Rime has been a long time coming. Developer Tequila Works began work on the project nearly four years ago. Originally slated as a PlayStation 4 exclusive, the game is now coming to multiple platforms. Rime centers around a young boy who, after getting shipwrecked during a storm, awakens on a mysterious, uninhabited island. A giant tower at the center of the island beckons the boy. With the help and guidance of a small fox and equipped with a strange, magical voice, the boy must reach the tower and uncover the island’s secrets. At this year’s PAX South, I sat down with Tequila Works Creative Director Raul Rubio and picked his brain about Rime’s development. During our talk, I uncovered several intriguing, lesser known facts about the highly-anticipated puzzle-platformer. Zelda and Ico Were Not Direct Influences “Ico meets Wind Waker” has been one of Rime’s go-to descriptors since the game debuted. Though an understandable comparison, Link’s seafaring adventure had zero impact on Rime’s conception. “I'm disappointed to say no, we didn't look into the Wind Waker.” Rubio confirmed. Tequila Works drew inspiration elsewhere, including films such as the animated works of Studio Ghibli. Raul stated one of the team’s main starting points was Journey. “Not the gameplay of Journey–the experience of Journey. In the sense that in Journey, the important thing was the journey.” Another, more surprising, influence has been the Jak & Daxter series. “In Jak & Daxter 2, you have this combination of platforming, open-world exploration, and, more importantly, you have this relationship between Jak and Daxter.” Rubio explained. “So in this game you have a relationship with the fox and he's your companion, your guide.” The Witness Connection While discussing Rime’s influences, I remarked about how Rime’s color palette and island setting reminded me more of The Witness than of Wind Waker. To my surprise, Raul revealed a relationship between the development of Rime and The Witness dating back to the 2013 Game Developer’s Conference. Both games had presentations at the event centered on their respective art styles: “And the thing is we both attended the other's talks because we were curious, and they found the same challenges we found, sometimes [similar] solutions, but other times we took totally different paths because we have different goals.” Rubio recalled. “And I remember that Jonathan Blow, they asked him literally this: ‘Oh have you seen Rime? Did they take inspirations from The Witness?’ I believe he said ‘Well, you should ask them.’ So now we can say, no, we didn't take inspiration [from] The Witness.” Raul said that until just a couple of months ago, he and his team hadn’t played The Witness. The reason? An employee rule to not play any other puzzle games during Rime’s development. Raul stated this was done to prevent Rime’s puzzle design from becoming “contaminated” by existing ideas and trends. Tequila Works could follow their unique vision rather than fall into the creative trap of only catering to player expectations. Legit Animation Chops One of Rime’s smaller but impressive elements is the boy’s animations. Subtle mannerisms and a satisfying sense of weight when jumping and climbing made me assume motion-capture was responsible. Raul revealed the boy was entirely hand-animated by a three-person team led by veteran animator Sandra Christensen. Prior to Rime, Christensen’s animation credits include LucasArts titles including the Star Wars: Force Unleashed games and Monkey Island, as well as other titles such as Psychonauts. She also had a tenure at Pixar, having worked on A Bug’s Life. A Blend of Cultural and Artistic Influences Creating a game that meshes aspects of different cultures is important to Tequila Works. The small team consists of a melting pot of nationalities, religious backgrounds, and artistic tastes. Rime’s aesthetic blends the individual artistic tastes and influences of the team members into a cohesive package. Raul explained, “Our art director was obsessed with The Master of Light, who is a 20th century Spanish painter. For other people it was Giorgio de Chirico who is the Italian architectural surrealist artist who inspired Team Ico. For other people, it was more like the surrealism of Dali and the negative space that he created. So in the end everything is mixed together.” The architecture and color palette of the Mediterranean coast heavily influenced Rime’s presentation. “It's like going on holiday to Spain or Greece” said Rubio. While such sights are relatively common for the Madrid-based studio, Raul revealed that he hopes Rime will make what seems relatively ordinary to him and the team extraordinary to the rest of the world. Childhood Experiences Drive Everything Rime stars an adolescent boy, and Tequila Works is committed to capturing the whimsy that comes from experiencing life from the perspective of a child. Raul stated that one thing every person has in common is that we were all kids at one point. “So the key to understand Rime is trying to see the world with the eyes of a kid.” Rubio explained. “And you are a child again, you can do things that you did very naturally when you were a child that you forgot when you became an adult.” Raul said he believes that one of those forgotten traits is the ability to be amazed by your surroundings without overanalyzing them the way an adult likely would. Capturing that same sense of wonder when players explore the remnants of the island’s ancient civilization has been one of the team’s key goals. To help realize that vision, Tequila Works studied videos of children playing in parks as a reference for how kids boldly attempt new challenges (especially when adults aren’t watching). Raul elaborated “You try to climb a tree now [you think], ‘Well if I try, I'm going to fall and [I’m] probably going to harm my hip, etc.’ But when you're a kid, you were not aware of the dangers of the world, right? Climbing a tree was something fun, not dangerous. That's the kind of inspiration for us.” Nearly every visible area in Rime can be reached by platforming, so Raul said he hopes that players channel that same child-like boldness when romping around the island. Rime’s controls and animation has been influenced by the protagonist’s young age as well. Raul explained that the balance of making the boy feel “fragile, but not literally helpless” was a balance the animation team was challenged to pull off. Every action needed to feel the way an 8-year old would, which Raul described as being “simple and complicated at the same time." I took Rime for a spin in a hands-on session and came away itching to play more. The puzzles I encountered, which involved using the boy’s voice to activate statues, were enjoyable and fairly inventive. Tequila Works promised increasingly diverse and complex conundrums throughout the experience. Platforming felt great and offers an enjoyable physical challenge on top of the mental aspect. Most of all, Rime’s ambient soundtrack and calm atmosphere make it a genuinely relaxing journey. By the time I finished, I wanted nothing more than to melt away and continue knocking out puzzles at my leisure. If the full experience continues to evolve in exciting ways, Rime has the potential to be one of the year’s premier titles. Rime launches this May for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC. View full article
  9. One part Ico and one part The Wind Waker, RIME has definitely caught our attention. RIME takes players to a mysterious island that harbors the ruins of a past civilization. As a (at least currently) nameless young boy, players explore the ancient artifacts that have been left scattered around the island. Here is the first trailer: No release date or price has been announced for RIME, which will be coming to PlayStation 4. Personally, this is one of my most anticipated indie games on the horizon. What are some of the games on your watch list, PS4 or otherwise? View full article
  10. One part Ico and one part The Wind Waker, RIME has definitely caught our attention. RIME takes players to a mysterious island that harbors the ruins of a past civilization. As a (at least currently) nameless young boy, players explore the ancient artifacts that have been left scattered around the island. Here is the first trailer: No release date or price has been announced for RIME, which will be coming to PlayStation 4. Personally, this is one of my most anticipated indie games on the horizon. What are some of the games on your watch list, PS4 or otherwise?
  11. People are busy and sometimes they just don’t have two hours to sit down and watch video game PR people talk about new releases and gizmos. Thankfully, you have us. Sony kicked off their press event by debuting the user interface of the PlayStation 4. The UI looked very similar to the PS3’s current mode of operation. Without some hands-on operation, it is difficult to pinpoint the exact differences. The addition Sony wanted to direct the majority of attention to was the ability to hop into live online games on the fly with friends. Sony’s president of worldwide studios, Shuhei Yoshida, demonstrated the speed of the new UI by jumping into the final minute of a Killzone: Shadow Fall multiplayer match. Following the user interface demonstration, the show’s main presenter, Jim Ryan, took the stage to show off a new trailer for Grand Turismo 6. Polyphony will be introducing the latest concept cars from various manufacturers that will only be appearing in GT6. The new Grand Turismo title will be dropping December 6. Ryan also announced that Polyphony is working with Sony Pictures to develop a feature film based on the Grand Turismo Academy from GT6. Next, Sony presented a new, free-to-play collection of creation tools and games in the form of LittleBigPlanet Hub. Players will have access to tons of free content and will be able to purchase other digital items and tools as they see fit. At Grand Theft Auto V’s launch on Sept 17, there will be a PS3 bundle available as well as an elite headset. Starting today, any gamer that pre-orders GTA V will receive 75% off other Rockstar games. Sony, proving that they firmly believe in the Vita’s future, announced several titles that are being ported to the handheld including: Batman: Arkham Origins, Lego Marvel, Football Manager Classic 2014, and Borderlands 2. They also announced that several major indie games would be making their way to the device such as Starbound, Fez, and Velocity 2X. These three titles will also be coming to PS4. The Vita will be receiving a price drop to $199 as well as significant reductions to memory card prices. Following these announcements, several new titles were announced for Vita. First, Ovosonico’s Murasaki Baby tasks players with leading a child safely through a nightmare fantasy world that looks like Tim Burton and the animators behind The Yellow Submarine got together. Using touch controls, players will quite literally take the child by the hand and lead them through the various dangers like nose monsters and thunderstorms. BigFest, a music management game, is another title coming to Vita. Tasking gamers with throwing the best music festival ever, players will design the festival and organize the music to be as successful as possible. In a unique twist, all of the music players can promote is written and performed by real, unsigned bands and Big Fest could actually influence their careers depending on how well you manage your festivals. The game also has co-op and competitive modes, but we aren’t sure yet how they function. In addition to these two new titles, the PC indie hit Rogue Legacy will make its way to PS4 and Vita next year along with Edmund McMillain’s The Binding of Isaac: Rebirth next spring. PlayStation Plus subscribers get The Binding of Isaac: Rebirth for free. N++ will make its debut on PS4 sometime soon. Exclusively on PS4 this winter, the creator of Thomas Was Alone, will be bringing his next game, Volume, to PS4 and Vita. Guns of Icarus Online is also coming to PS4 next year. Vlambeer, the developer behind Ridiculous Fishing, is bringing their self-described “Rogue-like-like” title Wasteland Kings to PS4 and Vita next year. Hotline Miami 2: Wrong Number will be a console exclusive for the PS4 and Vita next year. Several new exclusive titles were announced for PlayStation 4. The Chinese Room’s mysterious Everybody’s Gone to The Rapture made its debut with a new trailer. Tequila Works’ Rime also surfaced, looking like Ico crossed with a Miyazaki film. Hell Divers, a new game from Arrowhead, is coming to PS4, PS3, and Vita. It appears to feature co-operative alien fighting gameplay mildly reminiscent of what the team achieved with Magicka. A reimagined version of an Amiga game of the same name, Shadow of the Beast, will be making its way to PS4. The Playroom, a suite of mini-games and interactive toys, will be pre-installed on every PS4. Playroom uses the DualShock 4 and PlayStation camera to provide party games and gimmicky fun. A new InFamous: Second Son trailer was shown, as well as new multiplayer footage of Killzone: Shadow Fall. In a bit of a surprise announcement, Twitch.tv will be coming to PS4, presumably in the form of an app similar to what you can find on the Xbox 360. However, it will probably not function as an alternative to the built-in Ustream in-game streaming. Music Unlimited will allow gamers to listen to music while playing games. And easily control their music selection with the DualShock 4 controller. European internet access can sometimes be insufficient to play online. However, Sony is partnering with some of Europe’s leading ISPs to offer broadband packages that give attractive bonuses for gamers. It is unknown if similar packages will be available in North American markets. Additional details on these offers will be coming in the near future. Ubisoft showed off the Vita’s remote gameplay capabilities with a PS4 copy of Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag. We are really hoping that remote play works as well as it appears on stage (something that has historically been spotty at best). A new Watch_Dogs trailer was shown and Ubisoft announced that a film based on Watch_Dogs is in the works. Unsurprisingly, Minecraft will be available on PS4 at launch, marking the moment when you will be able to play Minecraft on literally every single electronic device ever constructed. The final game announced was War Thunder from Gaijin (not to be confused with Gaijin Games). War Thunder is a free-to-play, next-gen, WWII combat MMO with literally hundreds of aircraft, ground vehicles, over 100,000 km2 of battle area, co-op modes, a mission editor, and five nations with unique weapons battling for world domination. The closing bullet points of Sony’s conference were more like bombshells. First, the 12GB PS3 price will be dropped to $199. Second, players who buy the PS3 versions of Battlefield 4, Assassin’s Creed IV, Call of Duty Ghosts, or Watch_Dogs will be able to buy their PS4 counterparts at “a significantly discounted price.” Third, players were reminded that all PS4 games playable via remote play on Vita. Finally, priced at $399, the PlayStation 4 will be launching in 32 countries and available in North America on November 15. If you are interested, you can view the official stream of the conference for yourself. What do you think about the PS4 and its launch line-up? Pre-ordering? No? Let us know what you think! View full article
  12. People are busy and sometimes they just don’t have two hours to sit down and watch video game PR people talk about new releases and gizmos. Thankfully, you have us. Sony kicked off their press event by debuting the user interface of the PlayStation 4. The UI looked very similar to the PS3’s current mode of operation. Without some hands-on operation, it is difficult to pinpoint the exact differences. The addition Sony wanted to direct the majority of attention to was the ability to hop into live online games on the fly with friends. Sony’s president of worldwide studios, Shuhei Yoshida, demonstrated the speed of the new UI by jumping into the final minute of a Killzone: Shadow Fall multiplayer match. Following the user interface demonstration, the show’s main presenter, Jim Ryan, took the stage to show off a new trailer for Grand Turismo 6. Polyphony will be introducing the latest concept cars from various manufacturers that will only be appearing in GT6. The new Grand Turismo title will be dropping December 6. Ryan also announced that Polyphony is working with Sony Pictures to develop a feature film based on the Grand Turismo Academy from GT6. Next, Sony presented a new, free-to-play collection of creation tools and games in the form of LittleBigPlanet Hub. Players will have access to tons of free content and will be able to purchase other digital items and tools as they see fit. At Grand Theft Auto V’s launch on Sept 17, there will be a PS3 bundle available as well as an elite headset. Starting today, any gamer that pre-orders GTA V will receive 75% off other Rockstar games. Sony, proving that they firmly believe in the Vita’s future, announced several titles that are being ported to the handheld including: Batman: Arkham Origins, Lego Marvel, Football Manager Classic 2014, and Borderlands 2. They also announced that several major indie games would be making their way to the device such as Starbound, Fez, and Velocity 2X. These three titles will also be coming to PS4. The Vita will be receiving a price drop to $199 as well as significant reductions to memory card prices. Following these announcements, several new titles were announced for Vita. First, Ovosonico’s Murasaki Baby tasks players with leading a child safely through a nightmare fantasy world that looks like Tim Burton and the animators behind The Yellow Submarine got together. Using touch controls, players will quite literally take the child by the hand and lead them through the various dangers like nose monsters and thunderstorms. BigFest, a music management game, is another title coming to Vita. Tasking gamers with throwing the best music festival ever, players will design the festival and organize the music to be as successful as possible. In a unique twist, all of the music players can promote is written and performed by real, unsigned bands and Big Fest could actually influence their careers depending on how well you manage your festivals. The game also has co-op and competitive modes, but we aren’t sure yet how they function. In addition to these two new titles, the PC indie hit Rogue Legacy will make its way to PS4 and Vita next year along with Edmund McMillain’s The Binding of Isaac: Rebirth next spring. PlayStation Plus subscribers get The Binding of Isaac: Rebirth for free. N++ will make its debut on PS4 sometime soon. Exclusively on PS4 this winter, the creator of Thomas Was Alone, will be bringing his next game, Volume, to PS4 and Vita. Guns of Icarus Online is also coming to PS4 next year. Vlambeer, the developer behind Ridiculous Fishing, is bringing their self-described “Rogue-like-like” title Wasteland Kings to PS4 and Vita next year. Hotline Miami 2: Wrong Number will be a console exclusive for the PS4 and Vita next year. Several new exclusive titles were announced for PlayStation 4. The Chinese Room’s mysterious Everybody’s Gone to The Rapture made its debut with a new trailer. Tequila Works’ Rime also surfaced, looking like Ico crossed with a Miyazaki film. Hell Divers, a new game from Arrowhead, is coming to PS4, PS3, and Vita. It appears to feature co-operative alien fighting gameplay mildly reminiscent of what the team achieved with Magicka. A reimagined version of an Amiga game of the same name, Shadow of the Beast, will be making its way to PS4. The Playroom, a suite of mini-games and interactive toys, will be pre-installed on every PS4. Playroom uses the DualShock 4 and PlayStation camera to provide party games and gimmicky fun. A new InFamous: Second Son trailer was shown, as well as new multiplayer footage of Killzone: Shadow Fall. In a bit of a surprise announcement, Twitch.tv will be coming to PS4, presumably in the form of an app similar to what you can find on the Xbox 360. However, it will probably not function as an alternative to the built-in Ustream in-game streaming. Music Unlimited will allow gamers to listen to music while playing games. And easily control their music selection with the DualShock 4 controller. European internet access can sometimes be insufficient to play online. However, Sony is partnering with some of Europe’s leading ISPs to offer broadband packages that give attractive bonuses for gamers. It is unknown if similar packages will be available in North American markets. Additional details on these offers will be coming in the near future. Ubisoft showed off the Vita’s remote gameplay capabilities with a PS4 copy of Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag. We are really hoping that remote play works as well as it appears on stage (something that has historically been spotty at best). A new Watch_Dogs trailer was shown and Ubisoft announced that a film based on Watch_Dogs is in the works. Unsurprisingly, Minecraft will be available on PS4 at launch, marking the moment when you will be able to play Minecraft on literally every single electronic device ever constructed. The final game announced was War Thunder from Gaijin (not to be confused with Gaijin Games). War Thunder is a free-to-play, next-gen, WWII combat MMO with literally hundreds of aircraft, ground vehicles, over 100,000 km2 of battle area, co-op modes, a mission editor, and five nations with unique weapons battling for world domination. The closing bullet points of Sony’s conference were more like bombshells. First, the 12GB PS3 price will be dropped to $199. Second, players who buy the PS3 versions of Battlefield 4, Assassin’s Creed IV, Call of Duty Ghosts, or Watch_Dogs will be able to buy their PS4 counterparts at “a significantly discounted price.” Third, players were reminded that all PS4 games playable via remote play on Vita. Finally, priced at $399, the PlayStation 4 will be launching in 32 countries and available in North America on November 15. If you are interested, you can view the official stream of the conference for yourself. What do you think about the PS4 and its launch line-up? Pre-ordering? No? Let us know what you think!
×