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Found 22 results

  1. One of the biggest surprises of E3 2018 was the long-awaited formal reveal of the remake of Resident Evil 2. Twenty years after the launch of the original game back in 1998, and the time has come to rebuild one of the most legendary games of all time, from the ground up. In addition to a cinematic in-engine trailer, the game was also playable on the show floor. There are still a lot of questions about the game, how it feels, how it plays, and from which entries in the series' past it takes the most inspiration. After spending significant hands-on time with the game, I have some answers. Obviously, the first and most immediately apparent inspiration for this remake is the original Resident Evil 2. The E3 demo begins with Leon Kennedy in the lobby of the Raccoon City Police Station, early in the game, but after the original's explosive opening sequence on the streets of Raccoon City. Presumably, that chaotic scene will be represented in the remake, but it was not present at E3. Visually, I was surprised at how easily I recognized the iconic locations from the original game. Everything, from the lobby's maiden statue, to the white and green walls of the station's hallways, and individual rooms within the station, were all distinctly recognizable. However, rather than resting on nostalgia and being a copy-paste HD remaster of the original, the remake shifts the perspective to behind Leon's camera, as seen in Resident Evil 4, 5, 6, and the Revelations games. Don't be fooled, though: the feeling is nothing like those titles. To casual observers, RE2 looks like a slower version of Resident Evil 6, or even akin to Revelations 2, but it feels totally different, more akin to a much more recent entry in the long-running saga. In terms of tone and gameplay, this remake borrows the most from the latest entry in the series, Resident Evil VII: Biohazard. From the looks of things, RE2 is going for a full-on horror experience; even the HUD is taken straight out of RE7. While the environments are recognizable from the original game, the remake runs on the RE Engine created for RE7, and thus supports its filmic, photorealistic style. The police station is no longer well-lit; it's almost pitch black at times, meaning Leon has to make use of his flashlight to see anything more than two feet away from his face. This creates a palpable tension and an overwhelming – but welcome – sense of dread. After a section of deliberately-paced exploration, I finally came face-to-face with a zombie, and was not disappointed. My immediate, visceral reaction was one of fear, and I was surprised and how I welcomed the terror. Much has been made of Resident Evil's infamous straying from its survival horror roots. After RE7 brought things back to basics with a straightforward horror title, many fans were skeptical that RE2 would be a step backwards due to its over-the-shoulder camera lending it a superficial resemblance to Resident Evil 5 and 6. Fortunately, this is not the case. The controversial over-the-shoulder, third-person camera from the series' most divisive era returns, but it's not here to facilitate high-octane shooting action and breakneck pacing; instead, it's here to offer a cinematic perspective with kinetic movements and dynamic zooms. At first, I chose to stand my ground and fight the zombie, and was surprised by just how intense the encounter truly was. Leon's Matilda sidearm has a slow rate of fire, the undead take a ton of bullets to bring down, and Leon lacks the martial arts prowess he exhibits in later titles. Lining up headshots isn't easy, but it's certainly rewarding, even if they're not an instant kill as they often are in zombie-focused media. Zombies are an irrepressible bunch, and I ultimately wind up opting to flee, rather than fight, which brings us to another significant change from the original game: since the environments are all interconnected, rather than separated by loading screens, zombies can follow Leon throughout the police station, although it seems the main lobby area is a safe space... During the demo, at least. The slow, deliberate pacing is akin to RE7, and the combat truly feels like every bullet has value. The final game will have an ammo crafting component, though I didn't get the chance to fiddle with it during my time with the game. I did, however, get to use the combat knife. While it's unclear whether the weapon has limited durability or if there are multiple knives to collect throughout the game, this new feature combines the defensive weapons from the 2002 Resident Evil remake with the classic combat knife fans have known and loved since the beginning. The knife can be used to open objects locked with heavy duty tape, from doors to cabinets. It can also be used in combat, either RE4-style or as a defensive item. Upon being grabbed by a zombie, Leon can counter their bite by plunging the knife into his attacker's head, which looks fantastic, but leaves Leon without a knife. Fortunately, it can be recovered by killing off the zombie and retrieving the blade from their corpse. One change which some fans have not enjoyed is the new faces and voice actors for the entire cast. While Leon sports his trademark "beautiful boy bangs" hairstyle, his face is noticeably different from what we've seen in the past, although it's certainly not as drastic a change as Chris Redfield's unexpectedly svelte appearance in RE7 and its "Not a Hero" DLC. Likewise, Marvin Branagh, who had only a minor role in the original game, seems to behave more like an ill-fated mentor here, giving Leon his combat knife, dispensing advice, and acting as something of a guide during the early stages of a game... Still, he's already bitten by the time Leon finds him, and he knows he's not long for this world. A few other changes include the reworking of famous "moments" from the original game, at least for the demo. In my time with RE2, I didn't encounter a single Licker enemy, though I did see its giant claw marks, and I also crossed paths with at least two of its unlucky victims, who had been violently torn apart. There's no doubt this game will earn the decidedly family-unfriendly M for Mature rating. There's also a new item, "Wooden Boards," which Leon can use to block enemies from breaking in through the police station's windows. Likewise, the game seems to be riddled with all new puzzles, as well as new twists on familiar tasks, offering new challenges to RE2 fans who think they'll be able to breeze through the new game just because they've spent 20 years mastering the original. This new take on Resident Evil 2 is not the game you knew. To call it a remaster would be extremely reductive, but it's not a straightforward remake, either. The 2002 Gamecube version of Resident Evil added new scenarios, characters, enemies, and twists to the classic Mansion incident of the original 1996 game, but it still retained the fixed camera angles, tank controls, 2D backgrounds, and most of the basic gameplay of the original. By comparison, RE2 is aiming to be an even more radical departure from its source material than the previous Resident Evil remake. Resident Evil 2 isn't a stop-gap release meant to hold over fans until the next game. It isn't an extended piece of obligatory fan service to act as counterprogramming to RE7. No, Resident Evil 2, despite being a remake which returns to an established place on the timeline, is the next Resident Evil game. RE2 is the next evolution for the series, combining the jaw-dropping terror of RE7 with the established story of RE2, creating a whole new beast. There's certainly an element of nostalgia at play here, but RE2 is clearly aiming to an unrelenting horror masterpiece without peer. It's not "Resident Evil for a new generation," but the latest evolution for a series which is constantly growing, changing, looking back, and moving forward. We'll find out for sure when Resident Evil 2 launches, on January 29, 2019, for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  2. One of the biggest surprises of E3 2018 was the long-awaited formal reveal of the remake of Resident Evil 2. Twenty years after the launch of the original game back in 1998, and the time has come to rebuild one of the most legendary games of all time, from the ground up. In addition to a cinematic in-engine trailer, the game was also playable on the show floor. There are still a lot of questions about the game, how it feels, how it plays, and from which entries in the series' past it takes the most inspiration. After spending significant hands-on time with the game, I have some answers. Obviously, the first and most immediately apparent inspiration for this remake is the original Resident Evil 2. The E3 demo begins with Leon Kennedy in the lobby of the Raccoon City Police Station, early in the game, but after the original's explosive opening sequence on the streets of Raccoon City. Presumably, that chaotic scene will be represented in the remake, but it was not present at E3. Visually, I was surprised at how easily I recognized the iconic locations from the original game. Everything, from the lobby's maiden statue, to the white and green walls of the station's hallways, and individual rooms within the station, were all distinctly recognizable. However, rather than resting on nostalgia and being a copy-paste HD remaster of the original, the remake shifts the perspective to behind Leon's camera, as seen in Resident Evil 4, 5, 6, and the Revelations games. Don't be fooled, though: the feeling is nothing like those titles. To casual observers, RE2 looks like a slower version of Resident Evil 6, or even akin to Revelations 2, but it feels totally different, more akin to a much more recent entry in the long-running saga. In terms of tone and gameplay, this remake borrows the most from the latest entry in the series, Resident Evil VII: Biohazard. From the looks of things, RE2 is going for a full-on horror experience; even the HUD is taken straight out of RE7. While the environments are recognizable from the original game, the remake runs on the RE Engine created for RE7, and thus supports its filmic, photorealistic style. The police station is no longer well-lit; it's almost pitch black at times, meaning Leon has to make use of his flashlight to see anything more than two feet away from his face. This creates a palpable tension and an overwhelming – but welcome – sense of dread. After a section of deliberately-paced exploration, I finally came face-to-face with a zombie, and was not disappointed. My immediate, visceral reaction was one of fear, and I was surprised and how I welcomed the terror. Much has been made of Resident Evil's infamous straying from its survival horror roots. After RE7 brought things back to basics with a straightforward horror title, many fans were skeptical that RE2 would be a step backwards due to its over-the-shoulder camera lending it a superficial resemblance to Resident Evil 5 and 6. Fortunately, this is not the case. The controversial over-the-shoulder, third-person camera from the series' most divisive era returns, but it's not here to facilitate high-octane shooting action and breakneck pacing; instead, it's here to offer a cinematic perspective with kinetic movements and dynamic zooms. At first, I chose to stand my ground and fight the zombie, and was surprised by just how intense the encounter truly was. Leon's Matilda sidearm has a slow rate of fire, the undead take a ton of bullets to bring down, and Leon lacks the martial arts prowess he exhibits in later titles. Lining up headshots isn't easy, but it's certainly rewarding, even if they're not an instant kill as they often are in zombie-focused media. Zombies are an irrepressible bunch, and I ultimately wind up opting to flee, rather than fight, which brings us to another significant change from the original game: since the environments are all interconnected, rather than separated by loading screens, zombies can follow Leon throughout the police station, although it seems the main lobby area is a safe space... During the demo, at least. The slow, deliberate pacing is akin to RE7, and the combat truly feels like every bullet has value. The final game will have an ammo crafting component, though I didn't get the chance to fiddle with it during my time with the game. I did, however, get to use the combat knife. While it's unclear whether the weapon has limited durability or if there are multiple knives to collect throughout the game, this new feature combines the defensive weapons from the 2002 Resident Evil remake with the classic combat knife fans have known and loved since the beginning. The knife can be used to open objects locked with heavy duty tape, from doors to cabinets. It can also be used in combat, either RE4-style or as a defensive item. Upon being grabbed by a zombie, Leon can counter their bite by plunging the knife into his attacker's head, which looks fantastic, but leaves Leon without a knife. Fortunately, it can be recovered by killing off the zombie and retrieving the blade from their corpse. One change which some fans have not enjoyed is the new faces and voice actors for the entire cast. While Leon sports his trademark "beautiful boy bangs" hairstyle, his face is noticeably different from what we've seen in the past, although it's certainly not as drastic a change as Chris Redfield's unexpectedly svelte appearance in RE7 and its "Not a Hero" DLC. Likewise, Marvin Branagh, who had only a minor role in the original game, seems to behave more like an ill-fated mentor here, giving Leon his combat knife, dispensing advice, and acting as something of a guide during the early stages of a game... Still, he's already bitten by the time Leon finds him, and he knows he's not long for this world. A few other changes include the reworking of famous "moments" from the original game, at least for the demo. In my time with RE2, I didn't encounter a single Licker enemy, though I did see its giant claw marks, and I also crossed paths with at least two of its unlucky victims, who had been violently torn apart. There's no doubt this game will earn the decidedly family-unfriendly M for Mature rating. There's also a new item, "Wooden Boards," which Leon can use to block enemies from breaking in through the police station's windows. Likewise, the game seems to be riddled with all new puzzles, as well as new twists on familiar tasks, offering new challenges to RE2 fans who think they'll be able to breeze through the new game just because they've spent 20 years mastering the original. This new take on Resident Evil 2 is not the game you knew. To call it a remaster would be extremely reductive, but it's not a straightforward remake, either. The 2002 Gamecube version of Resident Evil added new scenarios, characters, enemies, and twists to the classic Mansion incident of the original 1996 game, but it still retained the fixed camera angles, tank controls, 2D backgrounds, and most of the basic gameplay of the original. By comparison, RE2 is aiming to be an even more radical departure from its source material than the previous Resident Evil remake. Resident Evil 2 isn't a stop-gap release meant to hold over fans until the next game. It isn't an extended piece of obligatory fan service to act as counterprogramming to RE7. No, Resident Evil 2, despite being a remake which returns to an established place on the timeline, is the next Resident Evil game. RE2 is the next evolution for the series, combining the jaw-dropping terror of RE7 with the established story of RE2, creating a whole new beast. There's certainly an element of nostalgia at play here, but RE2 is clearly aiming to an unrelenting horror masterpiece without peer. It's not "Resident Evil for a new generation," but the latest evolution for a series which is constantly growing, changing, looking back, and moving forward. We'll find out for sure when Resident Evil 2 launches, on January 29, 2019, for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  3. Jack Gardner

    Review: Shadow of the Colossus (2018)

    Time moves slowly and inexorably forward. The world changes, and we grow old telling stories together. Those stories, the ones that stick with us, communicated something important to us. As a medium, game creators have spent decades learning how to put together ever more effective stories that can offer that thing of precious importance, that moment of beauty, clarity, success, failure. In a sea of stories, Shadow of the Colossus stands out as a fairy tale in the classic sense, and the remake by Bluepoint Games serves to enhance what was already a foundational piece of video game history. Shadow of the Colossus tells the tale of a young man named Wander who travels to the Forbidden Land, a landmass sealed off from the rest of the world. Using an enchanted sword, he strikes a deal with an enigmatic entity named Dormin who agrees to bring the woman he has brought with him back from the dead if he can complete an impossible task: Defeat 16 colossal incarnations of the towering stone statues that line the temple. Armed only with his magic sword, a bow with unlimited arrows, and his trusty horse Agro, Wander sets forth into a long-abandoned world of ruins and natural wonders to battle towering behemoths the size of skyscrapers. The simple, powerful set up allows the visuals, music, and gameplay tell the vast majority of the narrative. That open approach to storytelling led a lot of people, even the marketing team for Shadow of the Colossus, to interpret the adventure as one about true, undying love. Wander, after all, goes to incredible lengths for a woman with whom he has a close connection. However, playing through the remake, a version remade after over a decade, I realized that my perception of the game has shifted to seeing it more as a tale about loss and the inability to let go being an ultimately destructive force. That flexibility and changing interpretation feels interesting. It's a reminder of how much time has passed since I played Shadow of the Colossus in 2005. Back then, the question of whether video games were capable of being art was a hotly debated topic. The internet was on fire with hot takes about what it meant to be art and whether interactivity itself negated art. Now that the question has largely been settled, it feels liberating to be able to think, "okay, it's art, so what does that mean? What does all of this, as a piece of art, mean?" Everyone will have to struggle with loss at some point in their lives. It's not pleasant. It hurts. There's the impulse to yell and scream and gnash your teeth because you would do anything to have that person back in your life. And Shadow of the Colossus asks the seductive question: What if you could throw everything to the wind and bring that person back? What price would you pay? And at first, the answer seems obvious, heroic even. But as the game progresses and one by one the beautiful, deadly colossi, who were all minding their own business before Wander showed up, begin to take their toll. The feeling of triumph and accomplishment gives way to self-doubt. Is this the right thing? That question of meaning scratches at the fundamentals of what I believe make myths and fairy tales resonate across time. Because Shadow of the Colossus is art. To some it could be a tale of love, to others it could represent a cautionary tale about obsession, and playing the remake it brought to mind loss. Shadow of the Colossus manages to have the narrative flexibility to accommodate multiple interpretations, and that's a quality that can bestow a great deal of longevity to a piece of art. I'd argue that's at least partly why we are getting a remake of a game that's two-and-a-half generations of technology behind the current PlayStation console. It's a testament to the artistry of the original PlayStation 2 release of Shadow of the Colossus that the visuals largely hold up due to its adherence to a strong minimalist aesthetic that focuses on natural beauty. The entire production possesses a washed out quality that cleverly hides some of the deficient parts of the world as Wander and Agro make their way across the quiet plains and subdued forests. With the remake, none of the world needs to be hidden by visual tricks; flowing water glitters in the sunlight, grass sways with the wind, dust motes flit through the air. The effect of the increased focus on detail afforded by the technological leap and the original style is jaw-dropping. To put it bluntly, this remake of Shadow of the Colossus stands as one of the most beautiful games I have ever played. I found myself slowing to a walk to soak in the moments of natural beauty that made yet another outing in the Forbidden Land unforgettable. With the share function on the PlayStation 4, I constantly paused the action to fiddle with the newly added photo mode in pursuit of that perfect angle to show off Bluepoint's gorgeously rendered take on Team Ico's classic. It was a compulsion to ogle the work put into everything on screen and then share that with the world. If I had to nitpick the presentation, there were a few elements that felt a bit off. The biggest would be Wander's strange lack of facial animations. The update gave him somewhat of a baby face; not a huge problem, but slightly different from the original character model. His face seems to lack some degree of animation for reacting to events, something more noticeable with a built-in photo mode. Outside of cutscenes, Wander is content to stare passively into the distance, regardless of the circumstances. Wobbling on the ledge of a colossus-sized fall? Not even the faintest recognition of his own mortality. Lastly, and this might be one of the most nitpicky things of all, one of the subtle elements of the original release of Shadow of the Colossus was the slow shift that visualized Wander's fall from grace. As each colossi met its death, he became less human. Players saw that change happen bit by bit, witnessing horns sprout from his head and his skin turn pale and black veins appear on his body. The remake seems to only gradually make his skin paler until the very end when he suddenly has horns and horrific cracked skin. It would have been nice to have a subtler touch applied to his transformation to give it more of a build-up. All of that being said, the small issues present in the Shadow of the Colossus remake are an exceedingly small price to pay for an update that's otherwise a fan or newcomer's dream come true. An updated control scheme provides people frustrated with the PS2 controls a new way to play, while also retaining the retro layout available for those who have grown used to how the original played. Small additions to the game like a series of hidden coins that can be collected for a secret reward that have been scattered across the world to reward players who poke into every nook and cranny. Additional clarification has been added to some of the colossi themselves to show what can and cannot be climbed and grabbed. The same with some parts of the environment that now have grabbable surfaces to avoid frustrating falls. The gameplay remains as harrowing, exciting, and frustrating as ever. Players who found the camera a problem in the original will find similar issues here. Agro's AI enhanced controls will prove just as frustrating (or appropriate) as it was in 2005. Running up gigantic swords, struggling to maintain a grip on a gliding stone eagle high in the sky, or outsmarting walking artillery batteries all remain exhilarating, rendered more breath-taking by Bluepoint. Kow Otani's soaring track still sends chills up the spine, playing with the player's emotions, masterfully directing the the reaction players have at any given moment. As far as I could tell, the soundtrack remained unchanged, but I might have missed a few subtle alterations. The soundscape of Shadow of the Colossus remains one of the most cohesive pieces of the whole package, bringing all of the elements together with a neat bow. Conclusion: Shadow of the Colossus was already a phenomenal game that shaped an entire generation of people and helped solidify the acceptance of video games as an art form. The remake provides a face lift from the ground up that brings forth a whole new world of beauty that enhances a timeless story. If you missed out on the original on PS2 or the HD remaster on PS3, this is the definitive edition that you owe it to yourself to play. Shadow of the Colossus is available now for PlayStation 4.
  4. Time moves slowly and inexorably forward. The world changes, and we grow old telling stories together. Those stories, the ones that stick with us, communicated something important to us. As a medium, game creators have spent decades learning how to put together ever more effective stories that can offer that thing of precious importance, that moment of beauty, clarity, success, failure. In a sea of stories, Shadow of the Colossus stands out as a fairy tale in the classic sense, and the remake by Bluepoint Games serves to enhance what was already a foundational piece of video game history. Shadow of the Colossus tells the tale of a young man named Wander who travels to the Forbidden Land, a landmass sealed off from the rest of the world. Using an enchanted sword, he strikes a deal with an enigmatic entity named Dormin who agrees to bring the woman he has brought with him back from the dead if he can complete an impossible task: Defeat 16 colossal incarnations of the towering stone statues that line the temple. Armed only with his magic sword, a bow with unlimited arrows, and his trusty horse Agro, Wander sets forth into a long-abandoned world of ruins and natural wonders to battle towering behemoths the size of skyscrapers. The simple, powerful set up allows the visuals, music, and gameplay tell the vast majority of the narrative. That open approach to storytelling led a lot of people, even the marketing team for Shadow of the Colossus, to interpret the adventure as one about true, undying love. Wander, after all, goes to incredible lengths for a woman with whom he has a close connection. However, playing through the remake, a version remade after over a decade, I realized that my perception of the game has shifted to seeing it more as a tale about loss and the inability to let go being an ultimately destructive force. That flexibility and changing interpretation feels interesting. It's a reminder of how much time has passed since I played Shadow of the Colossus in 2005. Back then, the question of whether video games were capable of being art was a hotly debated topic. The internet was on fire with hot takes about what it meant to be art and whether interactivity itself negated art. Now that the question has largely been settled, it feels liberating to be able to think, "okay, it's art, so what does that mean? What does all of this, as a piece of art, mean?" Everyone will have to struggle with loss at some point in their lives. It's not pleasant. It hurts. There's the impulse to yell and scream and gnash your teeth because you would do anything to have that person back in your life. And Shadow of the Colossus asks the seductive question: What if you could throw everything to the wind and bring that person back? What price would you pay? And at first, the answer seems obvious, heroic even. But as the game progresses and one by one the beautiful, deadly colossi, who were all minding their own business before Wander showed up, begin to take their toll. The feeling of triumph and accomplishment gives way to self-doubt. Is this the right thing? That question of meaning scratches at the fundamentals of what I believe make myths and fairy tales resonate across time. Because Shadow of the Colossus is art. To some it could be a tale of love, to others it could represent a cautionary tale about obsession, and playing the remake it brought to mind loss. Shadow of the Colossus manages to have the narrative flexibility to accommodate multiple interpretations, and that's a quality that can bestow a great deal of longevity to a piece of art. I'd argue that's at least partly why we are getting a remake of a game that's two-and-a-half generations of technology behind the current PlayStation console. It's a testament to the artistry of the original PlayStation 2 release of Shadow of the Colossus that the visuals largely hold up due to its adherence to a strong minimalist aesthetic that focuses on natural beauty. The entire production possesses a washed out quality that cleverly hides some of the deficient parts of the world as Wander and Agro make their way across the quiet plains and subdued forests. With the remake, none of the world needs to be hidden by visual tricks; flowing water glitters in the sunlight, grass sways with the wind, dust motes flit through the air. The effect of the increased focus on detail afforded by the technological leap and the original style is jaw-dropping. To put it bluntly, this remake of Shadow of the Colossus stands as one of the most beautiful games I have ever played. I found myself slowing to a walk to soak in the moments of natural beauty that made yet another outing in the Forbidden Land unforgettable. With the share function on the PlayStation 4, I constantly paused the action to fiddle with the newly added photo mode in pursuit of that perfect angle to show off Bluepoint's gorgeously rendered take on Team Ico's classic. It was a compulsion to ogle the work put into everything on screen and then share that with the world. If I had to nitpick the presentation, there were a few elements that felt a bit off. The biggest would be Wander's strange lack of facial animations. The update gave him somewhat of a baby face; not a huge problem, but slightly different from the original character model. His face seems to lack some degree of animation for reacting to events, something more noticeable with a built-in photo mode. Outside of cutscenes, Wander is content to stare passively into the distance, regardless of the circumstances. Wobbling on the ledge of a colossus-sized fall? Not even the faintest recognition of his own mortality. Lastly, and this might be one of the most nitpicky things of all, one of the subtle elements of the original release of Shadow of the Colossus was the slow shift that visualized Wander's fall from grace. As each colossi met its death, he became less human. Players saw that change happen bit by bit, witnessing horns sprout from his head and his skin turn pale and black veins appear on his body. The remake seems to only gradually make his skin paler until the very end when he suddenly has horns and horrific cracked skin. It would have been nice to have a subtler touch applied to his transformation to give it more of a build-up. All of that being said, the small issues present in the Shadow of the Colossus remake are an exceedingly small price to pay for an update that's otherwise a fan or newcomer's dream come true. An updated control scheme provides people frustrated with the PS2 controls a new way to play, while also retaining the retro layout available for those who have grown used to how the original played. Small additions to the game like a series of hidden coins that can be collected for a secret reward that have been scattered across the world to reward players who poke into every nook and cranny. Additional clarification has been added to some of the colossi themselves to show what can and cannot be climbed and grabbed. The same with some parts of the environment that now have grabbable surfaces to avoid frustrating falls. The gameplay remains as harrowing, exciting, and frustrating as ever. Players who found the camera a problem in the original will find similar issues here. Agro's AI enhanced controls will prove just as frustrating (or appropriate) as it was in 2005. Running up gigantic swords, struggling to maintain a grip on a gliding stone eagle high in the sky, or outsmarting walking artillery batteries all remain exhilarating, rendered more breath-taking by Bluepoint. Kow Otani's soaring track still sends chills up the spine, playing with the player's emotions, masterfully directing the the reaction players have at any given moment. As far as I could tell, the soundtrack remained unchanged, but I might have missed a few subtle alterations. The soundscape of Shadow of the Colossus remains one of the most cohesive pieces of the whole package, bringing all of the elements together with a neat bow. Conclusion: Shadow of the Colossus was already a phenomenal game that shaped an entire generation of people and helped solidify the acceptance of video games as an art form. The remake provides a face lift from the ground up that brings forth a whole new world of beauty that enhances a timeless story. If you missed out on the original on PS2 or the HD remaster on PS3, this is the definitive edition that you owe it to yourself to play. Shadow of the Colossus is available now for PlayStation 4. View full article
  5. Square Enix has a complete remake of one of the greatest RPGS of all-time in the works, and it's coming sooner than anyone would have expected! The reveal of Secret of Mana comes with a slew of information about what the remake changes and leaves the same, along with a hard release date. The team working on Secret of Mana has gone to great lengths to keep the classic, top-down gameplay the same while modernizing a number of other aspects. The most obvious change comes with the 3D graphics - a dramatic departure from the Super Nintendo original. The vibrant 3D might not be on par with the likes of the upcoming Final Fantasy VII remake, but it holds a charm all its own. The developers also modernized the controls for the PlayStation 4 controller and the PS Vita. As the trailer demonstrates, actors will finally give a voice to the text players could only imagine when they played Secret of Mana back in 1993. Randi, Primm, Popoi, and many of the whimsical cast of Secret of Mana will talk and feel more alive than they ever have before. To go along with the new voices, a new soundtrack has been created to fully realize the dreams of the original's composer, Hiroki Kikuta. The soundtrack pays tribute to the original while introducing complementary elements and flourishes that weren't present previously. Of course, players will still be able to play solo or with up to two friends in local co-op. For players unfamiliar with Secret of Mana, the story centers on a young man named Randi, a headband-wearing rascal who stumbles upon the Mana Sword, a powerful weapon meant to bring peace to a world in turmoil. With the blade in hand, Randi can harness the power of Mana, a force of unimaginable power and a target for nefarious evildoers throughout the world. He sets out to defeat the forces of evil and is joined along the way by Primm, a fiery noblewoman, and a sprite named Popoi. Pre-orders are now open for Secret of Mana. Those who take advantage of the offer from PSN receive PSN avatars for the three main characters as well as a moogle suit and tiger suit option for all characters at launch. Secret of Mana releases February 15, 2018 for the PlayStation 4, PS Vita, and PC. Players too excited to wait can get their hands on the title a bit earlier at PAX West September 1-4.
  6. Square Enix has a complete remake of one of the greatest RPGS of all-time in the works, and it's coming sooner than anyone would have expected! The reveal of Secret of Mana comes with a slew of information about what the remake changes and leaves the same, along with a hard release date. The team working on Secret of Mana has gone to great lengths to keep the classic, top-down gameplay the same while modernizing a number of other aspects. The most obvious change comes with the 3D graphics - a dramatic departure from the Super Nintendo original. The vibrant 3D might not be on par with the likes of the upcoming Final Fantasy VII remake, but it holds a charm all its own. The developers also modernized the controls for the PlayStation 4 controller and the PS Vita. As the trailer demonstrates, actors will finally give a voice to the text players could only imagine when they played Secret of Mana back in 1993. Randi, Primm, Popoi, and many of the whimsical cast of Secret of Mana will talk and feel more alive than they ever have before. To go along with the new voices, a new soundtrack has been created to fully realize the dreams of the original's composer, Hiroki Kikuta. The soundtrack pays tribute to the original while introducing complementary elements and flourishes that weren't present previously. Of course, players will still be able to play solo or with up to two friends in local co-op. For players unfamiliar with Secret of Mana, the story centers on a young man named Randi, a headband-wearing rascal who stumbles upon the Mana Sword, a powerful weapon meant to bring peace to a world in turmoil. With the blade in hand, Randi can harness the power of Mana, a force of unimaginable power and a target for nefarious evildoers throughout the world. He sets out to defeat the forces of evil and is joined along the way by Primm, a fiery noblewoman, and a sprite named Popoi. Pre-orders are now open for Secret of Mana. Those who take advantage of the offer from PSN receive PSN avatars for the three main characters as well as a moogle suit and tiger suit option for all characters at launch. Secret of Mana releases February 15, 2018 for the PlayStation 4, PS Vita, and PC. Players too excited to wait can get their hands on the title a bit earlier at PAX West September 1-4. View full article
  7. Square Enix announced at E3 2015 that the long-awaited Final Fantasy VII remake was finally going to become a reality over a decade after first showing footage of a remade Final Fantasy VII opening running on the PlayStation 3. Since then, more sceenshots and trailers have appeared along with details about how Square Enix would be releasing the game as an episodic series (not the way many would prefer to play FFVII, but at least the remake would finally exist). Now the director of the PlayStation 4 HD remaster of Final Fantasy XII, Final Fantasy XII: The Zodiac Age, has revealed that Square Enix might very well be expanding its remake efforts to another Final Fantasy title from the PlayStation One era, though that revelation comes with some predictable caveats. In an interview with The International Business Times - UK, Takashi Katano let some insider speculation slip, saying, "[Final Fantasy 12] is a PS2 title, and you look at the other titles in the series and technologically anything before the PS2 era is going to be quite difficult to do a modern remaster of to a suitable level of quality. That means [a future game] is far more likely to be a remake." That statement is hardly controversial - Square Enix has reimagined and remade the earliest Final Fantasy titles for mobile, PC, and Nintendo DS/3DS several times over the years. However, this news coming from a director of a major Square Enix project seems to imply that any upcoming remake would be a major, franchise undertaking, perhaps on par with their efforts to remake Final Fantasy VII. The question seems to be which Final Fantasy game would see such a complete overhaul? Final Fantasy V and VI, though originally released on the Super Nintendo, could be a contenders as both eventually made their way to the PlayStation and the current director of the Final Fantasy VII remake has expressed interest in remaking those two titles in particular. However, significant camps of support are present for Final Fantasy VIII and also Final Fantasy IX. Expanding on his statement, Katano explained that the process would be less about what any individuals within Square Enix would like to port and more about what their customers want, "I've personally been working at Square Enix for 20 years now and I've got a lot of memories from that time. I think the way that we look at it is not the game that [we] would like to remake it's really down to what the players, the fans, want to see. We really have to hear their voices on that, if they want to see a remake or a remaster of a certain game then that's more likely to be the one we go for." Anything beyond the Final Fantasy VII remake is likely still in only the very earliest stages of development, if at all, but it is certainly wonderful news to hear that the company is open to revisiting their classic line-up with more modern technology. View full article
  8. Square Enix announced at E3 2015 that the long-awaited Final Fantasy VII remake was finally going to become a reality over a decade after first showing footage of a remade Final Fantasy VII opening running on the PlayStation 3. Since then, more sceenshots and trailers have appeared along with details about how Square Enix would be releasing the game as an episodic series (not the way many would prefer to play FFVII, but at least the remake would finally exist). Now the director of the PlayStation 4 HD remaster of Final Fantasy XII, Final Fantasy XII: The Zodiac Age, has revealed that Square Enix might very well be expanding its remake efforts to another Final Fantasy title from the PlayStation One era, though that revelation comes with some predictable caveats. In an interview with The International Business Times - UK, Takashi Katano let some insider speculation slip, saying, "[Final Fantasy 12] is a PS2 title, and you look at the other titles in the series and technologically anything before the PS2 era is going to be quite difficult to do a modern remaster of to a suitable level of quality. That means [a future game] is far more likely to be a remake." That statement is hardly controversial - Square Enix has reimagined and remade the earliest Final Fantasy titles for mobile, PC, and Nintendo DS/3DS several times over the years. However, this news coming from a director of a major Square Enix project seems to imply that any upcoming remake would be a major, franchise undertaking, perhaps on par with their efforts to remake Final Fantasy VII. The question seems to be which Final Fantasy game would see such a complete overhaul? Final Fantasy V and VI, though originally released on the Super Nintendo, could be a contenders as both eventually made their way to the PlayStation and the current director of the Final Fantasy VII remake has expressed interest in remaking those two titles in particular. However, significant camps of support are present for Final Fantasy VIII and also Final Fantasy IX. Expanding on his statement, Katano explained that the process would be less about what any individuals within Square Enix would like to port and more about what their customers want, "I've personally been working at Square Enix for 20 years now and I've got a lot of memories from that time. I think the way that we look at it is not the game that [we] would like to remake it's really down to what the players, the fans, want to see. We really have to hear their voices on that, if they want to see a remake or a remaster of a certain game then that's more likely to be the one we go for." Anything beyond the Final Fantasy VII remake is likely still in only the very earliest stages of development, if at all, but it is certainly wonderful news to hear that the company is open to revisiting their classic line-up with more modern technology.
  9. Supergiant Games announced that an overhauled version of Bastion, their highly acclaimed isometric action RPG, is now available on Xbox One. The new version runs in 1080p, an improvement over the 720p resolution of the original. It also includes the Stranger's Dream DLC, which was added to Bastion post-launch and builds on Rucks' backstory. The Xbox One version isn't a mere port. Supergiant Games claims that the new iteration was built from the ground up to feel natural to the Xbox One. Since Supergiant Games is working on their 2017 title Pyre, the job of rebuilding Bastion fell to the Barcelona development studio Blitworks. If you own Bastion for Xbox 360 already, good news! The title is free on Xbox One for everyone who owns the 360 version until January 1, 2017. Those who are looking to pick up Bastion on console for the first time will have to shell out $14.99. The original Bastion launched on July 20, 2011. To date, the indie darling has sold over four million copies and garnered hundreds of awards for its art direction, music, voice work, and tight gameplay. Seriously, it might even be one of the best games of all-time. Due to its popularity, Bastion became the face of the indie game revolution for several years and made its way to almost every possible platform. View full article
  10. Supergiant Games announced that an overhauled version of Bastion, their highly acclaimed isometric action RPG, is now available on Xbox One. The new version runs in 1080p, an improvement over the 720p resolution of the original. It also includes the Stranger's Dream DLC, which was added to Bastion post-launch and builds on Rucks' backstory. The Xbox One version isn't a mere port. Supergiant Games claims that the new iteration was built from the ground up to feel natural to the Xbox One. Since Supergiant Games is working on their 2017 title Pyre, the job of rebuilding Bastion fell to the Barcelona development studio Blitworks. If you own Bastion for Xbox 360 already, good news! The title is free on Xbox One for everyone who owns the 360 version until January 1, 2017. Those who are looking to pick up Bastion on console for the first time will have to shell out $14.99. The original Bastion launched on July 20, 2011. To date, the indie darling has sold over four million copies and garnered hundreds of awards for its art direction, music, voice work, and tight gameplay. Seriously, it might even be one of the best games of all-time. Due to its popularity, Bastion became the face of the indie game revolution for several years and made its way to almost every possible platform.
  11. A South Korean news site, iNews24, published a story in which it claims multiple sources have confirmed that Blizzard will be pulling back the curtain on a high-definition remake of the original StarCraft this September during the Copa Intercontinental, a StarCraft II World Championship event held in Mexico City. Blizzard has released a statement to say that they have no announcements to make at this time, which doesn't necessarily deny that StarCraft HD is happening or that a reveal is imminent. iNews24 reports (as translated by Kotaku) that, "multiple sources with knowledge of Blizzard internal plans [have] said that Blizzard will reveal StarCraft HD to the public this September. The StarCraft HD remastered version will retain the original gameplay and is said to have improved graphics resolution and user interface (UI)." The original StarCraft and its Broodwar expansion have remained consistently among the top played games in Korea, despite being almost two decade old. Not bad for games released in 1998! Take this report with a grain of salt, but the market definitely exists for a remastered update to the beloved RTS classic, so there are few reasons to believe that Blizzard wouldn't be looking to release an HD upgrade in this era of remasters. What do you think? Would you jump back into classic StarCraft with a new coat of paint? View full article
  12. A South Korean news site, iNews24, published a story in which it claims multiple sources have confirmed that Blizzard will be pulling back the curtain on a high-definition remake of the original StarCraft this September during the Copa Intercontinental, a StarCraft II World Championship event held in Mexico City. Blizzard has released a statement to say that they have no announcements to make at this time, which doesn't necessarily deny that StarCraft HD is happening or that a reveal is imminent. iNews24 reports (as translated by Kotaku) that, "multiple sources with knowledge of Blizzard internal plans [have] said that Blizzard will reveal StarCraft HD to the public this September. The StarCraft HD remastered version will retain the original gameplay and is said to have improved graphics resolution and user interface (UI)." The original StarCraft and its Broodwar expansion have remained consistently among the top played games in Korea, despite being almost two decade old. Not bad for games released in 1998! Take this report with a grain of salt, but the market definitely exists for a remastered update to the beloved RTS classic, so there are few reasons to believe that Blizzard wouldn't be looking to release an HD upgrade in this era of remasters. What do you think? Would you jump back into classic StarCraft with a new coat of paint?
  13. Kickstarted games have been under fire recently after several high-profile Kickstarters disappeared or halted before making it to market and the somewhat anticlimactic release of the crowdfunded Mighty No. 9. Despite the bad press that these disappointments have garnered Kickstarter, Nightdive Studios has managed to attract almost 22,000 backers and $1.35 million in funds to remake the original System Shock title using the latest version of Unity. And you know what? Their vision for a reborn System Shock looks pretty fantastic. Nightdive is relatively well-known for the way it has revived and updated classic franchises to be compatible for modern technology. I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream, System Shock 1 & 2, and Turok 1 & 2 are all available in their original condition (with some compatibility updates) on modern PCs thanks to their work. Not only that, but the studio has contributed to several high-profile releases like Fallout 3, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, and BioShock Infinite. As part of generating interest in their campaign, Nightdive released a pre-alpha demo that captures the look and feel of the game they want to make, though it comes with a stipulation that pretty much every aspect of it is subject to change. you can download the demo for free on Steam, Good Old Games, and the Humble Store. It's actually happening, and it seems to be in the hands of people who know how to treat old, well-loved properties right. The System Shock remake will be available initially for PC and Xbox One, but will also be coming to Mac and Linux. Nightdive has left open the possibility of bringing the title to PlayStation 4 and VR devices. For those who still want to get in on the fundraising, Nightdive is opening up the campaign to PayPal donations (though the page on which people can donate is still under construction). Certain stretch goals from the Kickstarter will carry over into ongoing fundraising efforts, too, like VR support, a full orchestral score, and more. Those who donate during the post-Kickstarter fundraising will likely get different backer rewards that have yet to be revealed.
  14. Kickstarted games have been under fire recently after several high-profile Kickstarters disappeared or halted before making it to market and the somewhat anticlimactic release of the crowdfunded Mighty No. 9. Despite the bad press that these disappointments have garnered Kickstarter, Nightdive Studios has managed to attract almost 22,000 backers and $1.35 million in funds to remake the original System Shock title using the latest version of Unity. And you know what? Their vision for a reborn System Shock looks pretty fantastic. Nightdive is relatively well-known for the way it has revived and updated classic franchises to be compatible for modern technology. I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream, System Shock 1 & 2, and Turok 1 & 2 are all available in their original condition (with some compatibility updates) on modern PCs thanks to their work. Not only that, but the studio has contributed to several high-profile releases like Fallout 3, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, and BioShock Infinite. As part of generating interest in their campaign, Nightdive released a pre-alpha demo that captures the look and feel of the game they want to make, though it comes with a stipulation that pretty much every aspect of it is subject to change. you can download the demo for free on Steam, Good Old Games, and the Humble Store. It's actually happening, and it seems to be in the hands of people who know how to treat old, well-loved properties right. The System Shock remake will be available initially for PC and Xbox One, but will also be coming to Mac and Linux. Nightdive has left open the possibility of bringing the title to PlayStation 4 and VR devices. For those who still want to get in on the fundraising, Nightdive is opening up the campaign to PayPal donations (though the page on which people can donate is still under construction). Certain stretch goals from the Kickstarter will carry over into ongoing fundraising efforts, too, like VR support, a full orchestral score, and more. Those who donate during the post-Kickstarter fundraising will likely get different backer rewards that have yet to be revealed. View full article
  15. Konami, keeping with its pursuit of the lucrative pachinko market in Japan, revealed the existence of a Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater pachinko machine. The trailer for the device spans over seven minutes and goes into great detail regarding the mechanics and gampelay pachinko players can expect to see. However, the most intriguing parts of the reveal are the cutscenes. The scenes shown in the trailer appear to be from Metal Gear Solid 3 remade in the Fox Engine on which Metal Gear Solid 5 ran. The trailer claims that the upcoming pachinko machine houses over 124Gb of data for its gameplay and cutscenes. This would be a huge amount of time and investment for pachinko, but might make more sense as a harbinger of a full-on remake in the engine Konami has barely put to use. The cutscenes themselves seem fairly consistent with the original PlayStation 2 title, though there are a few that appear to be created specifically for pachinko mini-games. Keep in mind, this is all speculation. Looking at Konami's recent moves as a company, I think there is reason to believe a remake of Snake Eater is imminent. Konami has been showing a desire to get more out of its properties while avoiding the bloat of costs that can be associated with AAA development. They also haven't remade Metal Gear Solid 3 yet, which seems remarkable given that the entire industry is remaking pretty much everything. With Hideo Kojima gone, Konami could very well be reluctant to put out more original Metal Gear titles. Konami's impressive Fox Engine has been gathering dust, too. All of these signs point toward a willingness to move forward with a remake of Metal Gear Solid 3 for modern consoles and the pachinko machine's assets confirm that to me. There is no official word on whether Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater is being remade, but I'd be willing to bet it is in development.
  16. Konami, keeping with its pursuit of the lucrative pachinko market in Japan, revealed the existence of a Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater pachinko machine. The trailer for the device spans over seven minutes and goes into great detail regarding the mechanics and gampelay pachinko players can expect to see. However, the most intriguing parts of the reveal are the cutscenes. The scenes shown in the trailer appear to be from Metal Gear Solid 3 remade in the Fox Engine on which Metal Gear Solid 5 ran. The trailer claims that the upcoming pachinko machine houses over 124Gb of data for its gameplay and cutscenes. This would be a huge amount of time and investment for pachinko, but might make more sense as a harbinger of a full-on remake in the engine Konami has barely put to use. The cutscenes themselves seem fairly consistent with the original PlayStation 2 title, though there are a few that appear to be created specifically for pachinko mini-games. Keep in mind, this is all speculation. Looking at Konami's recent moves as a company, I think there is reason to believe a remake of Snake Eater is imminent. Konami has been showing a desire to get more out of its properties while avoiding the bloat of costs that can be associated with AAA development. They also haven't remade Metal Gear Solid 3 yet, which seems remarkable given that the entire industry is remaking pretty much everything. With Hideo Kojima gone, Konami could very well be reluctant to put out more original Metal Gear titles. Konami's impressive Fox Engine has been gathering dust, too. All of these signs point toward a willingness to move forward with a remake of Metal Gear Solid 3 for modern consoles and the pachinko machine's assets confirm that to me. There is no official word on whether Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater is being remade, but I'd be willing to bet it is in development. View full article
  17. After two years of hard work, a group of dedicated Mega Man fans have created a remake of the the two 90s Mega Man titles for PC under the title of Mega Man DOS Remake. The confusingly named DOS games Mega Man and Mega Man III (there was no Mega Man II for DOS) hold the highly odious status of being the worst Mega Man games ever created. Many people don't even know that they exist, and Capcom is probably happy with that state of affairs. Why remake games that are so universally despised? The team explains on their download page, "The few who received a floppy disk instead of a cartridge for Christmas many years ago were greeted with unfair levels, plain bosses, and silent gameplay! Be it from lack of care, or maybe lack of ability[, these] games were bad, but every game can have a second chance right?" Mega Man DOS Remake has been totally revamped in the name of giving the forgotten horrors of the originals new life and another attempt at greatness. The two PC games are now one in the remake and have been redone in the classic NES style and now actually feature music during the levels, something the originals painfully lacked. There are nine robot masters to conquer and the level design shifts depending on what order players defeat the bosses. For players who find the remake too easy, Mega Man DOS Remake comes with a level editor that players can use to create their own stages, complete with a boss AI planner to get the most out of fan-created boss battles. It also includes time-attack and challenge modes. If this seems interesting, check out Mega Man DOS Remake for free over on its Steam Workshop page. It's still a work in progress, so be aware that you might encounter glitches. If you do, the development team asks that you notify them so they can fix the problem in the future. View full article
  18. After two years of hard work, a group of dedicated Mega Man fans have created a remake of the the two 90s Mega Man titles for PC under the title of Mega Man DOS Remake. The confusingly named DOS games Mega Man and Mega Man III (there was no Mega Man II for DOS) hold the highly odious status of being the worst Mega Man games ever created. Many people don't even know that they exist, and Capcom is probably happy with that state of affairs. Why remake games that are so universally despised? The team explains on their download page, "The few who received a floppy disk instead of a cartridge for Christmas many years ago were greeted with unfair levels, plain bosses, and silent gameplay! Be it from lack of care, or maybe lack of ability[, these] games were bad, but every game can have a second chance right?" Mega Man DOS Remake has been totally revamped in the name of giving the forgotten horrors of the originals new life and another attempt at greatness. The two PC games are now one in the remake and have been redone in the classic NES style and now actually feature music during the levels, something the originals painfully lacked. There are nine robot masters to conquer and the level design shifts depending on what order players defeat the bosses. For players who find the remake too easy, Mega Man DOS Remake comes with a level editor that players can use to create their own stages, complete with a boss AI planner to get the most out of fan-created boss battles. It also includes time-attack and challenge modes. If this seems interesting, check out Mega Man DOS Remake for free over on its Steam Workshop page. It's still a work in progress, so be aware that you might encounter glitches. If you do, the development team asks that you notify them so they can fix the problem in the future.
  19. Teased way back in the days of 2013, the remake of the 1989 Amiga classic Shadow of the Beast has resurfaced. The Sony-published title puts players in control of Aarbron, a beast on a quest of bloody vengeance on a distant, magical world. However, a number of features have been outlined that weren't known before. The game touts a smooth 60 frames-per-second and the team at Heavy Spectrum is working hard to make sure that the response time allows for the most enjoyable experience. The world of Karamoon features a variety of environments (not just the desert many might remember from the teaser!) and a wide variety of creatures to fight. The remake includes a robust upgrade tree and a variety of artifacts that will allow players to gain the upper hand in combat. Matt Birch, founder of Heavy Spectrum, also talks about the challenges of managing difficulty. There are easier modes that will allow players to explore the combat system and experience the story, but Birch says the true difficulty is Beast mode. Shadow of the Beast hits the PSN for the PlayStation 4 on May 17. View full article
  20. Teased way back in the days of 2013, the remake of the 1989 Amiga classic Shadow of the Beast has resurfaced. The Sony-published title puts players in control of Aarbron, a beast on a quest of bloody vengeance on a distant, magical world. However, a number of features have been outlined that weren't known before. The game touts a smooth 60 frames-per-second and the team at Heavy Spectrum is working hard to make sure that the response time allows for the most enjoyable experience. The world of Karamoon features a variety of environments (not just the desert many might remember from the teaser!) and a wide variety of creatures to fight. The remake includes a robust upgrade tree and a variety of artifacts that will allow players to gain the upper hand in combat. Matt Birch, founder of Heavy Spectrum, also talks about the challenges of managing difficulty. There are easier modes that will allow players to explore the combat system and experience the story, but Birch says the true difficulty is Beast mode. Shadow of the Beast hits the PSN for the PlayStation 4 on May 17.
  21. Night Dive Studios revealed in a Twitter conversation that they will also be bringing remastered versions of both Turok and Turok 2 to the Xbox One. Night Dive released the remaster of the original Turok onto Steam last year, but nothing had been said about that game making it to Xbox One until the Twitter reveal. Not only that, but no one had heard that Turok 2 would be getting the remaster treatment at all. Unfortunately, the developer was a bit sketchy on when the games would be coming to Xbox One or what improvements would be made to Turok 2 in the remaster. The studio didn't discount the possibility of the titles also appearing on other platforms like PlayStation 4. Night Dive has made a name for itself over the years by preserving and improving important titles from gaming's past. They've worked on 7th Guest, Wizardy 6-8, and the enhanced editions of System Shock and System Shock 2. They are also currently working on an effort to completely overhaul the original System Shock with a modern flair, Who else is ready to fight dinosaurs on Xbox One sometime soon? View full article
  22. Night Dive Studios revealed in a Twitter conversation that they will also be bringing remastered versions of both Turok and Turok 2 to the Xbox One. Night Dive released the remaster of the original Turok onto Steam last year, but nothing had been said about that game making it to Xbox One until the Twitter reveal. Not only that, but no one had heard that Turok 2 would be getting the remaster treatment at all. Unfortunately, the developer was a bit sketchy on when the games would be coming to Xbox One or what improvements would be made to Turok 2 in the remaster. The studio didn't discount the possibility of the titles also appearing on other platforms like PlayStation 4. Night Dive has made a name for itself over the years by preserving and improving important titles from gaming's past. They've worked on 7th Guest, Wizardy 6-8, and the enhanced editions of System Shock and System Shock 2. They are also currently working on an effort to completely overhaul the original System Shock with a modern flair, Who else is ready to fight dinosaurs on Xbox One sometime soon?
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