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Found 14 results

  1. For those of you with long memories, Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San last graced this site back in 2016 as an interesting indie game dev project struggling to be finished. Almost two years later, developer Christophe Galati (ChrisDeneos on Twitter) has entered the final stretch of game development and shared the expected release date for Save Me Mr. Tako: October 30. With the help of the Nicalis gaming company, the game will also be released that day on Nintendo Switch. Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San stars the titular Mr. Tako, a mild-mannered octopus who gets wrapped up in the bitter war between octopi and humans. However, when push comes to shove, the brave ocean creature saves a drowning human. A fairy witnesses the act of heroism and grants him the ability to survive on land. With this newfound power, Mr. Tako takes it upon himself to scour the world for a way for both sides to put aside their grievances and live in peace. Designed as a loving tribute to the glory days of the Nintendo Game Boy, Save Me Mr. Tako transports players into a 2D world constructed out of four colors and big ambition. It consists of six different worlds that hide sixteen dungeons for Mr. Tako to explore and conquer on his quest for harmony. Expect to find plenty of side quests and puzzles sprinkled throughout the game, too. Players will also be able to swap game filters for different visual flair and colors as they progress. In addition to being able to survive on land, Mr. Tako can wear up different hats to take on different powers like the ability to shoot arrows. There are fifty such outfits throughout the game, each with an adorable costume change in store for Mr. Tako. Those are on top of Mr. Tako's ability to turn enemies into platforms with his ranged ink attacks. Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San releases on October 30 for Nintendo Switch and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  2. For those of you with long memories, Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San last graced this site back in 2016 as an interesting indie game dev project struggling to be finished. Almost two years later, developer Christophe Galati (ChrisDeneos on Twitter) has entered the final stretch of game development and shared the expected release date for Save Me Mr. Tako: October 30. With the help of the Nicalis gaming company, the game will also be released that day on Nintendo Switch. Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San stars the titular Mr. Tako, a mild-mannered octopus who gets wrapped up in the bitter war between octopi and humans. However, when push comes to shove, the brave ocean creature saves a drowning human. A fairy witnesses the act of heroism and grants him the ability to survive on land. With this newfound power, Mr. Tako takes it upon himself to scour the world for a way for both sides to put aside their grievances and live in peace. Designed as a loving tribute to the glory days of the Nintendo Game Boy, Save Me Mr. Tako transports players into a 2D world constructed out of four colors and big ambition. It consists of six different worlds that hide sixteen dungeons for Mr. Tako to explore and conquer on his quest for harmony. Expect to find plenty of side quests and puzzles sprinkled throughout the game, too. Players will also be able to swap game filters for different visual flair and colors as they progress. In addition to being able to survive on land, Mr. Tako can wear up different hats to take on different powers like the ability to shoot arrows. There are fifty such outfits throughout the game, each with an adorable costume change in store for Mr. Tako. Those are on top of Mr. Tako's ability to turn enemies into platforms with his ranged ink attacks. Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San releases on October 30 for Nintendo Switch and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  3. Announced last year prior to its E3 debut, Extinction is a game about protecting humanity from the titular event at the hands of an army of gigantic, ravenous ogres known as the Ravenii. Players take on the role of Avil, an inhumanly dexterous magical swordsman known as a Sentinel who seems to be the only one capable of defeating the Ravenii. Using magic, cunning, and brute force, players will have to use the environment to gain the upper hand while dispatching the ogres and their minions. Now we finally know when Extinction will release. April 10, mark it on your calendars. Iron Galaxy and Mobus Games are hoping that fans of action games and Attack on Titan will spur Extinction to success. It will release as a full $60 game with a deluxe edition that includes a season pass for $70. Those who want a season pass at a later date will be looking at $15. There are also pre-order bonuses (because of course there are). Those who pre-order at Gamestop will receive two trials titled Last Legs and Heads, You Win. Best Buy offers the Short Fuse trial. PSN is offering the Double Trouble trial. Finally, Microsoft has the Brightsteel City trial. Get started on saving humanity on April 10 when Extinction launches on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. View full article
  4. Announced last year prior to its E3 debut, Extinction is a game about protecting humanity from the titular event at the hands of an army of gigantic, ravenous ogres known as the Ravenii. Players take on the role of Avil, an inhumanly dexterous magical swordsman known as a Sentinel who seems to be the only one capable of defeating the Ravenii. Using magic, cunning, and brute force, players will have to use the environment to gain the upper hand while dispatching the ogres and their minions. Now we finally know when Extinction will release. April 10, mark it on your calendars. Iron Galaxy and Mobus Games are hoping that fans of action games and Attack on Titan will spur Extinction to success. It will release as a full $60 game with a deluxe edition that includes a season pass for $70. Those who want a season pass at a later date will be looking at $15. There are also pre-order bonuses (because of course there are). Those who pre-order at Gamestop will receive two trials titled Last Legs and Heads, You Win. Best Buy offers the Short Fuse trial. PSN is offering the Double Trouble trial. Finally, Microsoft has the Brightsteel City trial. Get started on saving humanity on April 10 when Extinction launches on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.
  5. After almost a year and a half of development, Slipgate Studios will be bringing their adult-oriented action-platformer to the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, as well as updating the PC release with a host of finalized content. The release marks the culmination of promises made during the late 2016 Kickstarter campaign that introduced the world to Rad Rodgers. Conceived as a project to pay homage to the platformers of the late 80s and mid 90s, Rad Rodgers stars a child bearing the titular moniker who finds himself sucked into a video game world. With the help of Dusty, Rad's out-dated console which now has a face and a foul-mouth (voiced by Duke Nukem voice actor Jon St. John), Rad Rodgers becomes involved in a mission to save the First World, a jungle suffering from a corrupting disease. The first chapter of Rad Rodger's adventures comes with over five weapons that allow Rad and Dusty to blast, punch, and blaze their way through the First World. Explosions and hot platforming action are accompanied by a fresh take on retro platforming soundtracks composed by Andrew Hulshult, complete with synthesizers and a driving pace. Occasional glitches might occur in-game, which give Dusty a time to shine. The aged gaming console can then enter a mind-bending area behind the scenes called the Pixelverse where he can attempt to repair the glitch. While Rad Rodgers will be appearing on consoles for the first time, the PC version has been out since the tail-end of 2016. Those who already own Rad Rodgers will see an update that adds a huge collection of new stuff to the core game. Several new levels will be added along with new boss encounters, four new enemies, and redesigned puzzles. Players will be able to unlock hats as they progress throughout Rodger's adventures, meaning players will be able to customize Rad with over twenty different hats. Leaderboards will allow players around the world to strive to achieve the high scores on each level. Slipgate Studios have also added the Excalibat, a weapon previously seen in Rise of the Triad. As it does have a decidedly adult sense of humor, the game presents the option to bleep out objectionable language and replace the copious amounts of blood generated in-game with purple goop. The PC update releases alongside the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One versions of Rad Rodgers on February 21. View full article
  6. After almost a year and a half of development, Slipgate Studios will be bringing their adult-oriented action-platformer to the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, as well as updating the PC release with a host of finalized content. The release marks the culmination of promises made during the late 2016 Kickstarter campaign that introduced the world to Rad Rodgers. Conceived as a project to pay homage to the platformers of the late 80s and mid 90s, Rad Rodgers stars a child bearing the titular moniker who finds himself sucked into a video game world. With the help of Dusty, Rad's out-dated console which now has a face and a foul-mouth (voiced by Duke Nukem voice actor Jon St. John), Rad Rodgers becomes involved in a mission to save the First World, a jungle suffering from a corrupting disease. The first chapter of Rad Rodger's adventures comes with over five weapons that allow Rad and Dusty to blast, punch, and blaze their way through the First World. Explosions and hot platforming action are accompanied by a fresh take on retro platforming soundtracks composed by Andrew Hulshult, complete with synthesizers and a driving pace. Occasional glitches might occur in-game, which give Dusty a time to shine. The aged gaming console can then enter a mind-bending area behind the scenes called the Pixelverse where he can attempt to repair the glitch. While Rad Rodgers will be appearing on consoles for the first time, the PC version has been out since the tail-end of 2016. Those who already own Rad Rodgers will see an update that adds a huge collection of new stuff to the core game. Several new levels will be added along with new boss encounters, four new enemies, and redesigned puzzles. Players will be able to unlock hats as they progress throughout Rodger's adventures, meaning players will be able to customize Rad with over twenty different hats. Leaderboards will allow players around the world to strive to achieve the high scores on each level. Slipgate Studios have also added the Excalibat, a weapon previously seen in Rise of the Triad. As it does have a decidedly adult sense of humor, the game presents the option to bleep out objectionable language and replace the copious amounts of blood generated in-game with purple goop. The PC update releases alongside the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One versions of Rad Rodgers on February 21.
  7. There's a lot of weird, experimental things happening in VR these days *cough* VRChat *cough*. One game on the horizon seems like it might be attempting to find more conventional success - with a bit of a twist. Playful Corp has been hard at work on Star Child, a game exclusive to PlayStation VR, following the release of Super Lucky's Tale for Xbox One and PC. Star Child offers up a narrative focused platformer with a cinematic edge. It follows a woman named Spectra on a mission of utmost importance that crashes her on a hostile planet, uncovering a threat to the entire universe. Interestingly enough for a game dedicated to VR, Star Child isn't a first-person game. Instead, it embraces the perspective offered by side-scrolling platformers. How exactly that will translate into a unique virtual reality experience remains to be seen, but Playful Corp has teased that their use of virtual reality will shine a new light on the familiar genre and interact with Spectra's evolving abilities in novel ways. Paul Bettner, the CEO and founder of Playful Corp, explained in a recent blog post how the developer has approached their project: With Star Child, we were drawn to the elegant simplicity of the side-scrolling platformer genre, which can convey an incredible amount of narrative through non-traditional means. There’s a subtle power to telling a story through continuously changing environments and cinematic visuals, as well as character animations, especially the way players can move Spectra forward and learn to master their surroundings through gameplay. Enhanced by the magic of virtual reality, these elements take on a new dimension as Spectra’s powers grow and she pushes deeper into a strange, immersive world full of dark secrets. Inspired by countless science fiction adventure classics across games, books and movies, Star Child is at its heart both a mystery and journey of self-discovery. Star Child launches some time this year for the PlayStation 4's VR setup. View full article
  8. There's a lot of weird, experimental things happening in VR these days *cough* VRChat *cough*. One game on the horizon seems like it might be attempting to find more conventional success - with a bit of a twist. Playful Corp has been hard at work on Star Child, a game exclusive to PlayStation VR, following the release of Super Lucky's Tale for Xbox One and PC. Star Child offers up a narrative focused platformer with a cinematic edge. It follows a woman named Spectra on a mission of utmost importance that crashes her on a hostile planet, uncovering a threat to the entire universe. Interestingly enough for a game dedicated to VR, Star Child isn't a first-person game. Instead, it embraces the perspective offered by side-scrolling platformers. How exactly that will translate into a unique virtual reality experience remains to be seen, but Playful Corp has teased that their use of virtual reality will shine a new light on the familiar genre and interact with Spectra's evolving abilities in novel ways. Paul Bettner, the CEO and founder of Playful Corp, explained in a recent blog post how the developer has approached their project: With Star Child, we were drawn to the elegant simplicity of the side-scrolling platformer genre, which can convey an incredible amount of narrative through non-traditional means. There’s a subtle power to telling a story through continuously changing environments and cinematic visuals, as well as character animations, especially the way players can move Spectra forward and learn to master their surroundings through gameplay. Enhanced by the magic of virtual reality, these elements take on a new dimension as Spectra’s powers grow and she pushes deeper into a strange, immersive world full of dark secrets. Inspired by countless science fiction adventure classics across games, books and movies, Star Child is at its heart both a mystery and journey of self-discovery. Star Child launches some time this year for the PlayStation 4's VR setup.
  9. Rime has been a long time coming. Developer Tequila Works began work on the project nearly four years ago. Originally slated as a PlayStation 4 exclusive, the game is now coming to multiple platforms. Rime centers around a young boy who, after getting shipwrecked during a storm, awakens on a mysterious, uninhabited island. A giant tower at the center of the island beckons the boy. With the help and guidance of a small fox and equipped with a strange, magical voice, the boy must reach the tower and uncover the island’s secrets. At this year’s PAX South, I sat down with Tequila Works Creative Director Raul Rubio and picked his brain about Rime’s development. During our talk, I uncovered several intriguing, lesser known facts about the highly-anticipated puzzle-platformer. Zelda and Ico Were Not Direct Influences “Ico meets Wind Waker” has been one of Rime’s go-to descriptors since the game debuted. Though an understandable comparison, Link’s seafaring adventure had zero impact on Rime’s conception. “I'm disappointed to say no, we didn't look into the Wind Waker.” Rubio confirmed. Tequila Works drew inspiration elsewhere, including films such as the animated works of Studio Ghibli. Raul stated one of the team’s main starting points was Journey. “Not the gameplay of Journey–the experience of Journey. In the sense that in Journey, the important thing was the journey.” Another, more surprising, influence has been the Jak & Daxter series. “In Jak & Daxter 2, you have this combination of platforming, open-world exploration, and, more importantly, you have this relationship between Jak and Daxter.” Rubio explained. “So in this game you have a relationship with the fox and he's your companion, your guide.” The Witness Connection While discussing Rime’s influences, I remarked about how Rime’s color palette and island setting reminded me more of The Witness than of Wind Waker. To my surprise, Raul revealed a relationship between the development of Rime and The Witness dating back to the 2013 Game Developer’s Conference. Both games had presentations at the event centered on their respective art styles: “And the thing is we both attended the other's talks because we were curious, and they found the same challenges we found, sometimes [similar] solutions, but other times we took totally different paths because we have different goals.” Rubio recalled. “And I remember that Jonathan Blow, they asked him literally this: ‘Oh have you seen Rime? Did they take inspirations from The Witness?’ I believe he said ‘Well, you should ask them.’ So now we can say, no, we didn't take inspiration [from] The Witness.” Raul said that until just a couple of months ago, he and his team hadn’t played The Witness. The reason? An employee rule to not play any other puzzle games during Rime’s development. Raul stated this was done to prevent Rime’s puzzle design from becoming “contaminated” by existing ideas and trends. Tequila Works could follow their unique vision rather than fall into the creative trap of only catering to player expectations. Legit Animation Chops One of Rime’s smaller but impressive elements is the boy’s animations. Subtle mannerisms and a satisfying sense of weight when jumping and climbing made me assume motion-capture was responsible. Raul revealed the boy was entirely hand-animated by a three-person team led by veteran animator Sandra Christensen. Prior to Rime, Christensen’s animation credits include LucasArts titles including the Star Wars: Force Unleashed games and Monkey Island, as well as other titles such as Psychonauts. She also had a tenure at Pixar, having worked on A Bug’s Life. A Blend of Cultural and Artistic Influences Creating a game that meshes aspects of different cultures is important to Tequila Works. The small team consists of a melting pot of nationalities, religious backgrounds, and artistic tastes. Rime’s aesthetic blends the individual artistic tastes and influences of the team members into a cohesive package. Raul explained, “Our art director was obsessed with The Master of Light, who is a 20th century Spanish painter. For other people it was Giorgio de Chirico who is the Italian architectural surrealist artist who inspired Team Ico. For other people, it was more like the surrealism of Dali and the negative space that he created. So in the end everything is mixed together.” The architecture and color palette of the Mediterranean coast heavily influenced Rime’s presentation. “It's like going on holiday to Spain or Greece” said Rubio. While such sights are relatively common for the Madrid-based studio, Raul revealed that he hopes Rime will make what seems relatively ordinary to him and the team extraordinary to the rest of the world. Childhood Experiences Drive Everything Rime stars an adolescent boy, and Tequila Works is committed to capturing the whimsy that comes from experiencing life from the perspective of a child. Raul stated that one thing every person has in common is that we were all kids at one point. “So the key to understand Rime is trying to see the world with the eyes of a kid.” Rubio explained. “And you are a child again, you can do things that you did very naturally when you were a child that you forgot when you became an adult.” Raul said he believes that one of those forgotten traits is the ability to be amazed by your surroundings without overanalyzing them the way an adult likely would. Capturing that same sense of wonder when players explore the remnants of the island’s ancient civilization has been one of the team’s key goals. To help realize that vision, Tequila Works studied videos of children playing in parks as a reference for how kids boldly attempt new challenges (especially when adults aren’t watching). Raul elaborated “You try to climb a tree now [you think], ‘Well if I try, I'm going to fall and [I’m] probably going to harm my hip, etc.’ But when you're a kid, you were not aware of the dangers of the world, right? Climbing a tree was something fun, not dangerous. That's the kind of inspiration for us.” Nearly every visible area in Rime can be reached by platforming, so Raul said he hopes that players channel that same child-like boldness when romping around the island. Rime’s controls and animation has been influenced by the protagonist’s young age as well. Raul explained that the balance of making the boy feel “fragile, but not literally helpless” was a balance the animation team was challenged to pull off. Every action needed to feel the way an 8-year old would, which Raul described as being “simple and complicated at the same time." I took Rime for a spin in a hands-on session and came away itching to play more. The puzzles I encountered, which involved using the boy’s voice to activate statues, were enjoyable and fairly inventive. Tequila Works promised increasingly diverse and complex conundrums throughout the experience. Platforming felt great and offers an enjoyable physical challenge on top of the mental aspect. Most of all, Rime’s ambient soundtrack and calm atmosphere make it a genuinely relaxing journey. By the time I finished, I wanted nothing more than to melt away and continue knocking out puzzles at my leisure. If the full experience continues to evolve in exciting ways, Rime has the potential to be one of the year’s premier titles. Rime launches this May for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC.
  10. Rime has been a long time coming. Developer Tequila Works began work on the project nearly four years ago. Originally slated as a PlayStation 4 exclusive, the game is now coming to multiple platforms. Rime centers around a young boy who, after getting shipwrecked during a storm, awakens on a mysterious, uninhabited island. A giant tower at the center of the island beckons the boy. With the help and guidance of a small fox and equipped with a strange, magical voice, the boy must reach the tower and uncover the island’s secrets. At this year’s PAX South, I sat down with Tequila Works Creative Director Raul Rubio and picked his brain about Rime’s development. During our talk, I uncovered several intriguing, lesser known facts about the highly-anticipated puzzle-platformer. Zelda and Ico Were Not Direct Influences “Ico meets Wind Waker” has been one of Rime’s go-to descriptors since the game debuted. Though an understandable comparison, Link’s seafaring adventure had zero impact on Rime’s conception. “I'm disappointed to say no, we didn't look into the Wind Waker.” Rubio confirmed. Tequila Works drew inspiration elsewhere, including films such as the animated works of Studio Ghibli. Raul stated one of the team’s main starting points was Journey. “Not the gameplay of Journey–the experience of Journey. In the sense that in Journey, the important thing was the journey.” Another, more surprising, influence has been the Jak & Daxter series. “In Jak & Daxter 2, you have this combination of platforming, open-world exploration, and, more importantly, you have this relationship between Jak and Daxter.” Rubio explained. “So in this game you have a relationship with the fox and he's your companion, your guide.” The Witness Connection While discussing Rime’s influences, I remarked about how Rime’s color palette and island setting reminded me more of The Witness than of Wind Waker. To my surprise, Raul revealed a relationship between the development of Rime and The Witness dating back to the 2013 Game Developer’s Conference. Both games had presentations at the event centered on their respective art styles: “And the thing is we both attended the other's talks because we were curious, and they found the same challenges we found, sometimes [similar] solutions, but other times we took totally different paths because we have different goals.” Rubio recalled. “And I remember that Jonathan Blow, they asked him literally this: ‘Oh have you seen Rime? Did they take inspirations from The Witness?’ I believe he said ‘Well, you should ask them.’ So now we can say, no, we didn't take inspiration [from] The Witness.” Raul said that until just a couple of months ago, he and his team hadn’t played The Witness. The reason? An employee rule to not play any other puzzle games during Rime’s development. Raul stated this was done to prevent Rime’s puzzle design from becoming “contaminated” by existing ideas and trends. Tequila Works could follow their unique vision rather than fall into the creative trap of only catering to player expectations. Legit Animation Chops One of Rime’s smaller but impressive elements is the boy’s animations. Subtle mannerisms and a satisfying sense of weight when jumping and climbing made me assume motion-capture was responsible. Raul revealed the boy was entirely hand-animated by a three-person team led by veteran animator Sandra Christensen. Prior to Rime, Christensen’s animation credits include LucasArts titles including the Star Wars: Force Unleashed games and Monkey Island, as well as other titles such as Psychonauts. She also had a tenure at Pixar, having worked on A Bug’s Life. A Blend of Cultural and Artistic Influences Creating a game that meshes aspects of different cultures is important to Tequila Works. The small team consists of a melting pot of nationalities, religious backgrounds, and artistic tastes. Rime’s aesthetic blends the individual artistic tastes and influences of the team members into a cohesive package. Raul explained, “Our art director was obsessed with The Master of Light, who is a 20th century Spanish painter. For other people it was Giorgio de Chirico who is the Italian architectural surrealist artist who inspired Team Ico. For other people, it was more like the surrealism of Dali and the negative space that he created. So in the end everything is mixed together.” The architecture and color palette of the Mediterranean coast heavily influenced Rime’s presentation. “It's like going on holiday to Spain or Greece” said Rubio. While such sights are relatively common for the Madrid-based studio, Raul revealed that he hopes Rime will make what seems relatively ordinary to him and the team extraordinary to the rest of the world. Childhood Experiences Drive Everything Rime stars an adolescent boy, and Tequila Works is committed to capturing the whimsy that comes from experiencing life from the perspective of a child. Raul stated that one thing every person has in common is that we were all kids at one point. “So the key to understand Rime is trying to see the world with the eyes of a kid.” Rubio explained. “And you are a child again, you can do things that you did very naturally when you were a child that you forgot when you became an adult.” Raul said he believes that one of those forgotten traits is the ability to be amazed by your surroundings without overanalyzing them the way an adult likely would. Capturing that same sense of wonder when players explore the remnants of the island’s ancient civilization has been one of the team’s key goals. To help realize that vision, Tequila Works studied videos of children playing in parks as a reference for how kids boldly attempt new challenges (especially when adults aren’t watching). Raul elaborated “You try to climb a tree now [you think], ‘Well if I try, I'm going to fall and [I’m] probably going to harm my hip, etc.’ But when you're a kid, you were not aware of the dangers of the world, right? Climbing a tree was something fun, not dangerous. That's the kind of inspiration for us.” Nearly every visible area in Rime can be reached by platforming, so Raul said he hopes that players channel that same child-like boldness when romping around the island. Rime’s controls and animation has been influenced by the protagonist’s young age as well. Raul explained that the balance of making the boy feel “fragile, but not literally helpless” was a balance the animation team was challenged to pull off. Every action needed to feel the way an 8-year old would, which Raul described as being “simple and complicated at the same time." I took Rime for a spin in a hands-on session and came away itching to play more. The puzzles I encountered, which involved using the boy’s voice to activate statues, were enjoyable and fairly inventive. Tequila Works promised increasingly diverse and complex conundrums throughout the experience. Platforming felt great and offers an enjoyable physical challenge on top of the mental aspect. Most of all, Rime’s ambient soundtrack and calm atmosphere make it a genuinely relaxing journey. By the time I finished, I wanted nothing more than to melt away and continue knocking out puzzles at my leisure. If the full experience continues to evolve in exciting ways, Rime has the potential to be one of the year’s premier titles. Rime launches this May for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC. View full article
  11. From Croatian developer Pine Studio, Seum: Speedrunners from Hell puts players in the shoes of Marty, a man who has just had a very bad day. Demons invaded during breakfast, ripped off his arm, and stole his precious limited edition Walrus Ale. Naturally, he ripped off a demon's arm and went to Hell to get his beer back. As Marty, players must navigate over a hundred flaming death traps on their quest to retrieve beer from the bowels of Hell itself. The developer describes each levels as a combination of Quake 3, Portal, and Super Meat Boy. Players will need to solve puzzles on the fly and should expect to die... a lot. As players progress, they'll learn how to harness new abilities, like time reversal or gravity manipulation. Seum: Speedrunners from Hell will be available this July on PC. View full article
  12. From Croatian developer Pine Studio, Seum: Speedrunners from Hell puts players in the shoes of Marty, a man who has just had a very bad day. Demons invaded during breakfast, ripped off his arm, and stole his precious limited edition Walrus Ale. Naturally, he ripped off a demon's arm and went to Hell to get his beer back. As Marty, players must navigate over a hundred flaming death traps on their quest to retrieve beer from the bowels of Hell itself. The developer describes each levels as a combination of Quake 3, Portal, and Super Meat Boy. Players will need to solve puzzles on the fly and should expect to die... a lot. As players progress, they'll learn how to harness new abilities, like time reversal or gravity manipulation. Seum: Speedrunners from Hell will be available this July on PC.
  13. The remake/re-imagining of Insomniac Games' 2002 PlayStation 2 platformer Ratchet & Clank will be releasing tomorrow with a movie on its heels later this month. What better way to commemorate those releases than to talk about the game that inspired it all? The 2002 Ratchet & Clank released at a pivotal time for the platforming genre and helped bridge the gap between early 3D platforming and more modern ideas of what platforming could be. Does that make Ratchet & Clank one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod Outro music: Spyro - Year of the Dragon 'Acoustic Fields' by Arceace (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03033) New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  14. The remake/re-imagining of Insomniac Games' 2002 PlayStation 2 platformer Ratchet & Clank will be releasing tomorrow with a movie on its heels later this month. What better way to commemorate those releases than to talk about the game that inspired it all? The 2002 Ratchet & Clank released at a pivotal time for the platforming genre and helped bridge the gap between early 3D platforming and more modern ideas of what platforming could be. Does that make Ratchet & Clank one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod Outro music: Spyro - Year of the Dragon 'Acoustic Fields' by Arceace (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03033) New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
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