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Found 16 results

  1. A new VR game releasing today that pits players against a horde of increasingly silly zombies. Your only weapons? Your bare hands and anything else that might possibly be thrown as a projectile. Players will have to defend themselves by throwing items at the encroaching zombie horde - hopefully driving them back from a variety of ridiculous locations. In Throw Anything, players are able to grab items in their environment to appropriate them as thrown weapons. Of course, players might run short on throwables and might be forced to resort to breaking apart large items in their vicinity, or even use the NPCs around them in a pinch! The Early Access game launching on Steam today will include five levels for players to master. These levels are filled with zombies, four mid bosses, and five intimidating main bosses to overcome. Kalev Jung, the CEO of developer VisualLight released a statement saying, “Throw Anything is not for the faint of heart. Action tower defense takes on a whole new meaning in VR! Suddenly, the threat is right in front of you – and you need to be quick on your feet to avoid getting your face eaten.” Throw Anything will be available for HTC Vive starting today via Steam Early Access with PSVR and Oculus Rift support coming later this year. View full article
  2. A new VR game releasing today that pits players against a horde of increasingly silly zombies. Your only weapons? Your bare hands and anything else that might possibly be thrown as a projectile. Players will have to defend themselves by throwing items at the encroaching zombie horde - hopefully driving them back from a variety of ridiculous locations. In Throw Anything, players are able to grab items in their environment to appropriate them as thrown weapons. Of course, players might run short on throwables and might be forced to resort to breaking apart large items in their vicinity, or even use the NPCs around them in a pinch! The Early Access game launching on Steam today will include five levels for players to master. These levels are filled with zombies, four mid bosses, and five intimidating main bosses to overcome. Kalev Jung, the CEO of developer VisualLight released a statement saying, “Throw Anything is not for the faint of heart. Action tower defense takes on a whole new meaning in VR! Suddenly, the threat is right in front of you – and you need to be quick on your feet to avoid getting your face eaten.” Throw Anything will be available for HTC Vive starting today via Steam Early Access with PSVR and Oculus Rift support coming later this year.
  3. First-person puzzler/philosophical journey The Talos Principle received acclaim when it first released on PC in late 2014. After being ported to console and mobile, the game makes the next logical leap: virtual reality. The Talos Principle VR is available now on Steam for Oculus Rift and HTC Vive. According to developer Croteam, the game has been entirely redesigned for VR and features fully customizable controls. This version runs for $39.99 but owners of the original game receive a 25% discount (knocking it down to around $29.99). Additionally, the four-episode Road to Gehenna expansion is included with The Talos Principle VR. Any of you Oculus or Vive users plan on to taking a look at The Talos Principle?
  4. First-person puzzler/philosophical journey The Talos Principle received acclaim when it first released on PC in late 2014. After being ported to console and mobile, the game makes the next logical leap: virtual reality. The Talos Principle VR is available now on Steam for Oculus Rift and HTC Vive. According to developer Croteam, the game has been entirely redesigned for VR and features fully customizable controls. This version runs for $39.99 but owners of the original game receive a 25% discount (knocking it down to around $29.99). Additionally, the four-episode Road to Gehenna expansion is included with The Talos Principle VR. Any of you Oculus or Vive users plan on to taking a look at The Talos Principle? View full article
  5. The sky-high price tag for VR has been one of the primary barriers keeping a majority of gamers away from the technology. At Oculus' Connect 4 event earlier today, Facebook announced plans to remedy that situation by dropping the price of its original headset as well as introducing a significantly cheaper model. In with the new first. Oculus Go is a standalone, "all-in-one" headset retailing for $199. Similar Samsung Gear VR, no PC (or phone) is required; just strap it on and play using the Wii nunchuck-esque single palm controller. Oculus Go arrives in early 2018. As of today, you can purchase the standard Oculus Rift model for $399.That package includes two touch controllers, two sensors, and seven free games. That's one whole Benjamin down from the $500 price that went into effect earlier this year, which in itself was a cut from $600 launch tag. If you've been eyeing VR but haven't taken the plunge yet, are these announcements enough to entice you? Does VR interest you at all? View full article
  6. The sky-high price tag for VR has been one of the primary barriers keeping a majority of gamers away from the technology. At Oculus' Connect 4 event earlier today, Facebook announced plans to remedy that situation by dropping the price of its original headset as well as introducing a significantly cheaper model. In with the new first. Oculus Go is a standalone, "all-in-one" headset retailing for $199. Similar Samsung Gear VR, no PC (or phone) is required; just strap it on and play using the Wii nunchuck-esque single palm controller. Oculus Go arrives in early 2018. As of today, you can purchase the standard Oculus Rift model for $399.That package includes two touch controllers, two sensors, and seven free games. That's one whole Benjamin down from the $500 price that went into effect earlier this year, which in itself was a cut from $600 launch tag. If you've been eyeing VR but haven't taken the plunge yet, are these announcements enough to entice you? Does VR interest you at all?
  7. Though I’ve only dabbled in virtual reality since it hit the market, I haven’t played or seen much to get me truly enthused with the concept. That was until I gave Blasters of the Universe a go during E3. The project began as a game jam between an artist and developer at studio Secret Location before larger vision focused on bringing the challenging and reflex-focused bullet hell genre to first-person VR. So far, I believe Secret Location is one the right track. Blasters of the Universe got my adrenaline racing like few VR experiences I’ve encountered. Playing with the Oculus Rift and Touch controllers, I held a gun in my right hand and a shield in my left. One of two loadouts were available. One was big, powerful gun paired with a durable shield and a missile barrage special attack. The other was a smaller gun with faster firing rate that can split into a pair of firearms as a special attack. It also came with a smaller shield that deflects bullets back at enemies. I opted for the former. The full experience will boast full weapon customization with players outfitting arms with a selection of parts (like a laser sight) and modifier, such as bullets that rebound off walls. Shields also come in different types, such as one that can be split into three static barriers to take cover behind. Soon after I plunged into the neon-tinted techno world, a squad of robots and weird floating heads converged upon me from all sides and opened fire. The player’s head is the only area that receives damage, so identifying gaps in the elaborate bullet patterns and aligning your noggin so that it slips through is crucial. Shields block a limited number of attacks before it has to recharge, meaning players must be mindful of when to block and when to dodge. The opening minutes saw me getting wailed on from above and blindsided elsewhere since I kept focusing only on what was in front of me. After taking a rain of bullets to the face, I learned to fully scout my surroundings. Before long, I found a nice rhythm of bobbing and weaving around bullets, throwing up my shield to catch incoming attacks, and blasting enemies into oblivion. I even crossed my arms at points for maximum style points. The sensation felt extremely cool and empowering–it really felt like my entire being against the world, and I licked my chops at each new wave that dared to challenge me. Taking damage and interrupting a great groove feels devastating in traditional bullet hell games and it’s even more jarring here with bullets hitting you square in the face and halting everything for about a second. However, this only got my blood pumping more as I immediately wanted revenge against my polygonal transgressors. This was my first time using the Touch controllers, and they felt comfortable and sported great responsiveness. The level’s boss was a large, teleporting robot that unloaded missiles like no tomorrow. My defensive skills got a serious run for their money, and the boss' constant warping between positions made it a challenging foe to take down. I eventually toppled it with the help of my handy missile barrages. Once I took off the headset and returned to reality, I needed to catch a breather but wanted nothing more than to jack back in and keep blasting. Blasters of the Universe will feature four campaign levels, each with their own endless version for players to return to and fight for bragging rights across the cross-platform leaderboard rankings. Per the norm with bullet hell games, the challenge raises exponentially as the game progresses (to my surprise, difficulty was scaled back in my decidedly tough demo). Despite the difficulty, I had a very fun time with Blasters of the Universe. If you want to try it for yourself, the game is available now on Steam Early Access for Oculus Rift and Vive. The full release is slated for later this year.
  8. Though I’ve only dabbled in virtual reality since it hit the market, I haven’t played or seen much to get me truly enthused with the concept. That was until I gave Blasters of the Universe a go during E3. The project began as a game jam between an artist and developer at studio Secret Location before larger vision focused on bringing the challenging and reflex-focused bullet hell genre to first-person VR. So far, I believe Secret Location is one the right track. Blasters of the Universe got my adrenaline racing like few VR experiences I’ve encountered. Playing with the Oculus Rift and Touch controllers, I held a gun in my right hand and a shield in my left. One of two loadouts were available. One was big, powerful gun paired with a durable shield and a missile barrage special attack. The other was a smaller gun with faster firing rate that can split into a pair of firearms as a special attack. It also came with a smaller shield that deflects bullets back at enemies. I opted for the former. The full experience will boast full weapon customization with players outfitting arms with a selection of parts (like a laser sight) and modifier, such as bullets that rebound off walls. Shields also come in different types, such as one that can be split into three static barriers to take cover behind. Soon after I plunged into the neon-tinted techno world, a squad of robots and weird floating heads converged upon me from all sides and opened fire. The player’s head is the only area that receives damage, so identifying gaps in the elaborate bullet patterns and aligning your noggin so that it slips through is crucial. Shields block a limited number of attacks before it has to recharge, meaning players must be mindful of when to block and when to dodge. The opening minutes saw me getting wailed on from above and blindsided elsewhere since I kept focusing only on what was in front of me. After taking a rain of bullets to the face, I learned to fully scout my surroundings. Before long, I found a nice rhythm of bobbing and weaving around bullets, throwing up my shield to catch incoming attacks, and blasting enemies into oblivion. I even crossed my arms at points for maximum style points. The sensation felt extremely cool and empowering–it really felt like my entire being against the world, and I licked my chops at each new wave that dared to challenge me. Taking damage and interrupting a great groove feels devastating in traditional bullet hell games and it’s even more jarring here with bullets hitting you square in the face and halting everything for about a second. However, this only got my blood pumping more as I immediately wanted revenge against my polygonal transgressors. This was my first time using the Touch controllers, and they felt comfortable and sported great responsiveness. The level’s boss was a large, teleporting robot that unloaded missiles like no tomorrow. My defensive skills got a serious run for their money, and the boss' constant warping between positions made it a challenging foe to take down. I eventually toppled it with the help of my handy missile barrages. Once I took off the headset and returned to reality, I needed to catch a breather but wanted nothing more than to jack back in and keep blasting. Blasters of the Universe will feature four campaign levels, each with their own endless version for players to return to and fight for bragging rights across the cross-platform leaderboard rankings. Per the norm with bullet hell games, the challenge raises exponentially as the game progresses (to my surprise, difficulty was scaled back in my decidedly tough demo). Despite the difficulty, I had a very fun time with Blasters of the Universe. If you want to try it for yourself, the game is available now on Steam Early Access for Oculus Rift and Vive. The full release is slated for later this year. View full article
  9. At this year’s E3, I had the pleasure of using an Oculus Rift to participate in a 2v2 virtual reality space dogfight. I have never felt more like I was in the future. I arrived at my appointment with developer CCP with a small degree of nervous anticipation. I had been told about a month previously that I would be able to demo the latest build of Valkyrie; the build that they had recently updated to Unreal Engine 4. A month is more than enough time to read about and hear about the colorful variations of simulation sickness that have been cropping up since the advent of virtual reality technology. Along with the excitement I was feeling, I hoped that I wouldn’t get nauseated in a professional setting. However, CCP is a big company and I knew that they’d want to talk EVE Online and Dust 514 before we got down to their VR project. Not that I was complaining. I love me some sci-fi MMOs/Shooters. Past a reception desk and through a delightfully cool and dim waiting lounge, I met CCP’s product manager Ryan Geddes along with two other media members who hailed from the United Kingdom. He told us about the player-driven world of EVE Online and about a few of the newsworthy battles that have taken place there over the last year. In particular Geddes focused on the Battle of B-R5RB, which was a galactic kerfuffle of unprecedented proportions. Though not one of the largest battles in EVE history, it was by far the costliest. Over 75 titan-class ships were destroyed; Titans take over two months of real-world time to build. It is estimated that the in-game damages totaled over 11 trillion ISK. 11 TRILLION. This battle was so catastrophic that it has its own sizable Wikipedia page. Geddes wanted to emphasize how much of the EVE Online universe is driven by player interactions. Going forward, CCP wants to be able to respond more fluidly to their shifting game world. To that end, CCP will be releasing around ten smaller expansions every year instead of one or two larger expansions. The first of these micro-expansions released on June 3. It was dubbed Kronos and added new ships for pirate factions. The second will be released on July 22 and will be the first overhaul to how industry works in EVE Online. All items, ships, ammo, etc. are created by more industrial-minded players; the overhaul should make pursuing industry a more enjoyable path to riches and power for those with a shrewd mind for business. We were then given a brief overview of the history behind EVE Valkyrie. How it began as an after-hours project created by a few developers messing around with the Oculus Rift prototype in the office and grew into a popular attraction at CCP’s Fanfest events. It was originally developed on Unreal Engine 3, but has since been moved over to Unreal Engine 4. The single-player experience will center on the story of Round, one of the first Valkyrie pilots. Round will be voiced by Katie Sackhoff of Battlestar Galactica fame. Project Legion was fleetingly mentioned as well. It began as an attempt to port Dust 514 to the PC, but ended up growing in unexpected and divergent ways from the PlayStation 3 title. Currently it is still a prototype and more details will be released later. However, Geddes wanted to reassure fans, subscribers, and players that they are leaving indelible footprints in the EVE universe. Every kill or death that they’ve experienced in EVE Online, Dust 514, and soon EVE Valkyrie, is cataloged and has an impact, no matter how small, on the larger universe. The end goal of CCP, the very long-term goal, is to unite all of their games on one platform where gamers can switch between Valkyrie, EVE Online, and Legion on the fly. However, that dream is still a long way off. The meeting concluded and I finally heard the long awaited words: “Would you like to try EVE Valkyrie?” Yes. Very much. Inwardly I exploded in eagerness. We were led over to an alcove in their lounge where four large chairs had been set up with Xbox 360 controllers and Oculus Rift headsets. Not quite knowing what to expect, I picked up the Oculus and found it to be surprisingly light. One of the British journalists to my left was about to take off his glasses when Geddes told him that he could keep them on. Newer models of the Rift can be used with glasses, apparently. And with that, I strapped the Oculus Rift onto my face. It is a curious sensation, stepping into someone else’s head. As soon as I had placed the Oculus Rift over my eyes, it felt like I had fallen through some sort of dimensional chasm and found myself in the cockpit of a spacecraft. Never mind that a small part of me knew that I was still seated in the cool, dim comfort of the CCP E3 lounge, the rest of my mind was thoroughly convinced that I was elsewhere. Even my brain was unconsciously duped by the Rift’s illusion. I know this because after a couple minutes I had the strange sensation of not knowing spatially where my arms were. I had to look down at the digital in-game arms that grasped the Valkyrie flight controls for the feeling to recede. Just writing that previous sentence was magical. The amount of difference being able to turn your head makes when playing a game is almost absurd, but it tricks your brain into thinking that you are physically present. I was able to turn my head and remain ensconced within this digital cockpit and fly through an asteroid belt as I attempted to gun down one of the enemy space journalists. It takes some getting used to, that looking around with your head business, but Valkyrie provides a great way to acclimate players to this new form of digital space. Targeting missiles is done by moving your head along with your target until you get a lock. After achieving a lock, you can fire your payload. The experience felt alien to me, but in the best possible ways. The Rift is an amazing bit of technology that is equal parts artifice and magic. I found myself unconsciously trying to shift my “camera” by using the right analog stick on the controller. Of course that didn’t actually work, but it speaks to how deeply current gameplay methods are ingrained into our gaming psyches. My time with Valkyrie was short and sweet. If you have the opportunity to sit down and play with it, I highly recommend that you do so. It is like having a small glimpse of the future. Virtual reality is coming and it is going to drastically change the landscape of gaming. View full article
  10. At this year’s E3, I had the pleasure of using an Oculus Rift to participate in a 2v2 virtual reality space dogfight. I have never felt more like I was in the future. I arrived at my appointment with developer CCP with a small degree of nervous anticipation. I had been told about a month previously that I would be able to demo the latest build of Valkyrie; the build that they had recently updated to Unreal Engine 4. A month is more than enough time to read about and hear about the colorful variations of simulation sickness that have been cropping up since the advent of virtual reality technology. Along with the excitement I was feeling, I hoped that I wouldn’t get nauseated in a professional setting. However, CCP is a big company and I knew that they’d want to talk EVE Online and Dust 514 before we got down to their VR project. Not that I was complaining. I love me some sci-fi MMOs/Shooters. Past a reception desk and through a delightfully cool and dim waiting lounge, I met CCP’s product manager Ryan Geddes along with two other media members who hailed from the United Kingdom. He told us about the player-driven world of EVE Online and about a few of the newsworthy battles that have taken place there over the last year. In particular Geddes focused on the Battle of B-R5RB, which was a galactic kerfuffle of unprecedented proportions. Though not one of the largest battles in EVE history, it was by far the costliest. Over 75 titan-class ships were destroyed; Titans take over two months of real-world time to build. It is estimated that the in-game damages totaled over 11 trillion ISK. 11 TRILLION. This battle was so catastrophic that it has its own sizable Wikipedia page. Geddes wanted to emphasize how much of the EVE Online universe is driven by player interactions. Going forward, CCP wants to be able to respond more fluidly to their shifting game world. To that end, CCP will be releasing around ten smaller expansions every year instead of one or two larger expansions. The first of these micro-expansions released on June 3. It was dubbed Kronos and added new ships for pirate factions. The second will be released on July 22 and will be the first overhaul to how industry works in EVE Online. All items, ships, ammo, etc. are created by more industrial-minded players; the overhaul should make pursuing industry a more enjoyable path to riches and power for those with a shrewd mind for business. We were then given a brief overview of the history behind EVE Valkyrie. How it began as an after-hours project created by a few developers messing around with the Oculus Rift prototype in the office and grew into a popular attraction at CCP’s Fanfest events. It was originally developed on Unreal Engine 3, but has since been moved over to Unreal Engine 4. The single-player experience will center on the story of Round, one of the first Valkyrie pilots. Round will be voiced by Katie Sackhoff of Battlestar Galactica fame. Project Legion was fleetingly mentioned as well. It began as an attempt to port Dust 514 to the PC, but ended up growing in unexpected and divergent ways from the PlayStation 3 title. Currently it is still a prototype and more details will be released later. However, Geddes wanted to reassure fans, subscribers, and players that they are leaving indelible footprints in the EVE universe. Every kill or death that they’ve experienced in EVE Online, Dust 514, and soon EVE Valkyrie, is cataloged and has an impact, no matter how small, on the larger universe. The end goal of CCP, the very long-term goal, is to unite all of their games on one platform where gamers can switch between Valkyrie, EVE Online, and Legion on the fly. However, that dream is still a long way off. The meeting concluded and I finally heard the long awaited words: “Would you like to try EVE Valkyrie?” Yes. Very much. Inwardly I exploded in eagerness. We were led over to an alcove in their lounge where four large chairs had been set up with Xbox 360 controllers and Oculus Rift headsets. Not quite knowing what to expect, I picked up the Oculus and found it to be surprisingly light. One of the British journalists to my left was about to take off his glasses when Geddes told him that he could keep them on. Newer models of the Rift can be used with glasses, apparently. And with that, I strapped the Oculus Rift onto my face. It is a curious sensation, stepping into someone else’s head. As soon as I had placed the Oculus Rift over my eyes, it felt like I had fallen through some sort of dimensional chasm and found myself in the cockpit of a spacecraft. Never mind that a small part of me knew that I was still seated in the cool, dim comfort of the CCP E3 lounge, the rest of my mind was thoroughly convinced that I was elsewhere. Even my brain was unconsciously duped by the Rift’s illusion. I know this because after a couple minutes I had the strange sensation of not knowing spatially where my arms were. I had to look down at the digital in-game arms that grasped the Valkyrie flight controls for the feeling to recede. Just writing that previous sentence was magical. The amount of difference being able to turn your head makes when playing a game is almost absurd, but it tricks your brain into thinking that you are physically present. I was able to turn my head and remain ensconced within this digital cockpit and fly through an asteroid belt as I attempted to gun down one of the enemy space journalists. It takes some getting used to, that looking around with your head business, but Valkyrie provides a great way to acclimate players to this new form of digital space. Targeting missiles is done by moving your head along with your target until you get a lock. After achieving a lock, you can fire your payload. The experience felt alien to me, but in the best possible ways. The Rift is an amazing bit of technology that is equal parts artifice and magic. I found myself unconsciously trying to shift my “camera” by using the right analog stick on the controller. Of course that didn’t actually work, but it speaks to how deeply current gameplay methods are ingrained into our gaming psyches. My time with Valkyrie was short and sweet. If you have the opportunity to sit down and play with it, I highly recommend that you do so. It is like having a small glimpse of the future. Virtual reality is coming and it is going to drastically change the landscape of gaming.
  11. Wow, well, Facebook has decided to back the Oculus Rift by straight up buying the company with a mountain of money. Going from a very successful Kickstarter that raised nearly $2.5 million to being a company that was bought out for $400 million, plus $1.6 billion in Facebook stock is probably the biggest financial gain to come out of the Kickstarter video game revolution. Those are staggering numbers, even if you factor in the substantial private support that Oculus Rift VR had received. It would appear that people, or at the very least people in places of authority at companies like Sony and Facebook, think that the world is ready for virtual reality. "Mobile is the platform of today, and now we're also getting ready for the platforms of tomorrow," said Facebook founder and CEO, Mark Zuckerberg. "Oculus has the chance to create the most social platform ever, and change the way we work, play and communicate." "We are excited to work with Mark and the Facebook team to deliver the very best virtual reality platform in the world," said Brendan Iribe, co-founder and CEO of Oculus VR. "We believe virtual reality will be heavily defined by social experiences that connect people in magical, new ways. It is a transformative and disruptive technology, that enables the world to experience the impossible, and it's only just the beginning." The next generation of video games has only just begun and already the industry has thrown a huge curve ball at us. Who would have guessed even a few weeks ago that the biggest impending rivalry wouldn't be between likes of Nintendo, Microsoft, and Sony, but would instead pit Sony against the social gaming juggernaut of Facebook? With titles like EVE: Valkyrie already slated for Oculus and an upcoming competitor with Sony's Project Morpheus, what do you all think of this turn of events for the VR landscape?
  12. Wow, well, Facebook has decided to back the Oculus Rift by straight up buying the company with a mountain of money. Going from a very successful Kickstarter that raised nearly $2.5 million to being a company that was bought out for $400 million, plus $1.6 billion in Facebook stock is probably the biggest financial gain to come out of the Kickstarter video game revolution. Those are staggering numbers, even if you factor in the substantial private support that Oculus Rift VR had received. It would appear that people, or at the very least people in places of authority at companies like Sony and Facebook, think that the world is ready for virtual reality. "Mobile is the platform of today, and now we're also getting ready for the platforms of tomorrow," said Facebook founder and CEO, Mark Zuckerberg. "Oculus has the chance to create the most social platform ever, and change the way we work, play and communicate." "We are excited to work with Mark and the Facebook team to deliver the very best virtual reality platform in the world," said Brendan Iribe, co-founder and CEO of Oculus VR. "We believe virtual reality will be heavily defined by social experiences that connect people in magical, new ways. It is a transformative and disruptive technology, that enables the world to experience the impossible, and it's only just the beginning." The next generation of video games has only just begun and already the industry has thrown a huge curve ball at us. Who would have guessed even a few weeks ago that the biggest impending rivalry wouldn't be between likes of Nintendo, Microsoft, and Sony, but would instead pit Sony against the social gaming juggernaut of Facebook? With titles like EVE: Valkyrie already slated for Oculus and an upcoming competitor with Sony's Project Morpheus, what do you all think of this turn of events for the VR landscape? View full article
  13. In the wake of building enthusiasm for the successfully kickstarted Oculus Rift, Sony chose GDC 2014 to reveal its own virtual reality headset for the PS4. Details about this new piece of technology are scarce, but what we do know is pretty interesting. The headset will function similarly to the Oculus Rift with a head-mounted display at 1080p resolution with a slightly smaller field of view at 90o instead of the Oculus' 100o. Both the Oculus Rift and Morpheus have numerous built-in accelerometers and gyroscopes to accurately track head movements and translate that into in-game camera moves. So far, the biggest difference between the two peripherals is that the Rift will use a built-in camera to track head orientation and movement, while Morpheus will be making use of the PlayStation camera. Shuhei Yoshida, the president of Sony Computer Entertainment, confirmed that the PlayStation camera will be a requirement for Morpheus to function properly. The trade-off for this is that Sony is planning to have Morpheus fully compatible with all PlayStation controllers, even the PS Move (remember that thing?). No price point or release date has been announced as Morpheus is still an early prototype. however, it is a functional prototype and it will be available for demoing at GDC and possibly other events throughout the year. With Oculus and Morpheus heading toward a clash in the untested waters of VR technology, this could be one of the most interesting business battles in the video game industry for quite some time. Is VR the future of video game technology or is it just another fad that will fade away like 3D?
  14. In the wake of building enthusiasm for the successfully kickstarted Oculus Rift, Sony chose GDC 2014 to reveal its own virtual reality headset for the PS4. Details about this new piece of technology are scarce, but what we do know is pretty interesting. The headset will function similarly to the Oculus Rift with a head-mounted display at 1080p resolution with a slightly smaller field of view at 90o instead of the Oculus' 100o. Both the Oculus Rift and Morpheus have numerous built-in accelerometers and gyroscopes to accurately track head movements and translate that into in-game camera moves. So far, the biggest difference between the two peripherals is that the Rift will use a built-in camera to track head orientation and movement, while Morpheus will be making use of the PlayStation camera. Shuhei Yoshida, the president of Sony Computer Entertainment, confirmed that the PlayStation camera will be a requirement for Morpheus to function properly. The trade-off for this is that Sony is planning to have Morpheus fully compatible with all PlayStation controllers, even the PS Move (remember that thing?). No price point or release date has been announced as Morpheus is still an early prototype. however, it is a functional prototype and it will be available for demoing at GDC and possibly other events throughout the year. With Oculus and Morpheus heading toward a clash in the untested waters of VR technology, this could be one of the most interesting business battles in the video game industry for quite some time. Is VR the future of video game technology or is it just another fad that will fade away like 3D? View full article
  15. Ever wonder what it would be like to hop into the cockpit of a spaceship and dogfight your way across the cosmos able to look every which way without using a controller? EVE: Valkyrie from CCP will let you do just that. EVE: Valkyrie began as a passion project between a small group of friends within EVE Online developer CCP. Using the Oculus Rift, a set of virtual reality goggles that have yet to hit the market, the team created a basic multiplayer game pitting two players against each other in a virtual space. They showed it off at the MMO's Fanfest event to give dedicated EVE players a chance to feel what it would be like to pilot space fighters into combat. The higher-ups in the company caught wind of the project and were so impressed by the game and the reaction from fans that they green lit a fully-fledged release title. So, in case you didn't quite catch it: We are getting a virtual reality space combat simulator (aka the thing everyone has wanted to do since seeing Star Wars for the first time). We. Get. To. Play. That. View full article
  16. Ever wonder what it would be like to hop into the cockpit of a spaceship and dogfight your way across the cosmos able to look every which way without using a controller? EVE: Valkyrie from CCP will let you do just that. EVE: Valkyrie began as a passion project between a small group of friends within EVE Online developer CCP. Using the Oculus Rift, a set of virtual reality goggles that have yet to hit the market, the team created a basic multiplayer game pitting two players against each other in a virtual space. They showed it off at the MMO's Fanfest event to give dedicated EVE players a chance to feel what it would be like to pilot space fighters into combat. The higher-ups in the company caught wind of the project and were so impressed by the game and the reaction from fans that they green lit a fully-fledged release title. So, in case you didn't quite catch it: We are getting a virtual reality space combat simulator (aka the thing everyone has wanted to do since seeing Star Wars for the first time). We. Get. To. Play. That.
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