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Found 279 results

  1. Take a nostalgia trip back to the heyday of the 8-bit era with Odallus: The Dark Call, an action-platformer coming to Nintendo Switch. Odallus: The Dark Call tells the story of Haggis, an aged hero who embarks on a quest to save his son and avenge the destruction of his village. Battling demons, cultists, and eldritch beings, Haggis presses onward to spare his son from becoming a dark sacrifice. Brazilian developer JoyMasher masterminded both Odallus: The Dark Call and Oniken, which will also be receiving a Switch port. The company specializes in retro game development, with Odallus covering the Metroidvania action subgenre and Oniken representing JoyMasher's take on the old-school Ninja Gaiden. They also have a game currently in development called Blazing Chrome, a 16-bit run-and-gun action-shooter in the vein of Super Contra or Metal Slug. Odallus: The Dark Call initially released in 2015 for PC, receiving mostly positive reviews for its heartfelt send up of the Castlevania of old. It includes classic 8-bit cutscenes, a large world full of secrets, and clever gameplay twists that might trick even the most veteran of players. Now, the adventures of Haggis are coming to Nintendo Switch in February as well as PlayStation 4 and Xbox One later this spring. Odallus: The Dark Call features eight levels that can be explored for more secrets when players have acquired more abilities. Levels are populated by over fifty different enemy types and offer chances to face off against colossal bosses. Players who stick through to the end will spend, at a minimum, eight hours completing the game, only to find a veteran difficulty awaiting them for added replayability. When it launches, Odallus: The Dark Call will be available digitally. However, Eastasiasoft will be offering a limited run physical edition of the game. These physical copies will work on all systems worldwide, but may have some limitations on their online features. The following will be offered physically: Odallus: The Dark Call (PS4) Oniken + Odallus Collection (PS4/Switch) Oniken + Odallus Collection: Limited Edition (Switch) Odallus: The Dark Call releases for Nintendo Switch on February 8 and will be coming to PlayStation 4 and Xbox One sometime during spring of this year. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  2. Take a nostalgia trip back to the heyday of the 8-bit era with Odallus: The Dark Call, an action-platformer coming to Nintendo Switch. Odallus: The Dark Call tells the story of Haggis, an aged hero who embarks on a quest to save his son and avenge the destruction of his village. Battling demons, cultists, and eldritch beings, Haggis presses onward to spare his son from becoming a dark sacrifice. Brazilian developer JoyMasher masterminded both Odallus: The Dark Call and Oniken, which will also be receiving a Switch port. The company specializes in retro game development, with Odallus covering the Metroidvania action subgenre and Oniken representing JoyMasher's take on the old-school Ninja Gaiden. They also have a game currently in development called Blazing Chrome, a 16-bit run-and-gun action-shooter in the vein of Super Contra or Metal Slug. Odallus: The Dark Call initially released in 2015 for PC, receiving mostly positive reviews for its heartfelt send up of the Castlevania of old. It includes classic 8-bit cutscenes, a large world full of secrets, and clever gameplay twists that might trick even the most veteran of players. Now, the adventures of Haggis are coming to Nintendo Switch in February as well as PlayStation 4 and Xbox One later this spring. Odallus: The Dark Call features eight levels that can be explored for more secrets when players have acquired more abilities. Levels are populated by over fifty different enemy types and offer chances to face off against colossal bosses. Players who stick through to the end will spend, at a minimum, eight hours completing the game, only to find a veteran difficulty awaiting them for added replayability. When it launches, Odallus: The Dark Call will be available digitally. However, Eastasiasoft will be offering a limited run physical edition of the game. These physical copies will work on all systems worldwide, but may have some limitations on their online features. The following will be offered physically: Odallus: The Dark Call (PS4) Oniken + Odallus Collection (PS4/Switch) Oniken + Odallus Collection: Limited Edition (Switch) Odallus: The Dark Call releases for Nintendo Switch on February 8 and will be coming to PlayStation 4 and Xbox One sometime during spring of this year. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  3. This week we talk about Mario Party. It's a game about parties that has Mario in it. There are also other characters from Nintendo games. Sometimes when you stare into the abyss Mario Party stares back. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars 'Mario's Tropical Paradise' by Dr. Fruitcake (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR01108) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  4. This week we talk about Mario Party. It's a game about parties that has Mario in it. There are also other characters from Nintendo games. Sometimes when you stare into the abyss Mario Party stares back. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars 'Mario's Tropical Paradise' by Dr. Fruitcake (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR01108) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  5. Things were simpler in 1999. Everyone was worried about an apocalyptic computer clock error, people obsessed over Tang and talking animal movies, and video game ads could still reach a mass market via television. And so it was that Super Smash Bros. initially introduced itself to a generation of gamers - with four frolicking, bobble-headed mascots beating each other to the tune of "Happy Together" by The Turtles. The popular fighting game kicked off almost a decade of sequels with an ever expanding roster that includes the best characters not just from Nintendo but also the wider video game industry. So, let's look back on the game that started it all - is Super Smash Bros. one of the best games of all-time? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Super Smash Bros. 'FALCON PUNCH' by Benjamin Briggs (http://ocremix.org/info/CEO_2015:_Champion) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  6. Things were simpler in 1999. Everyone was worried about an apocalyptic computer clock error, people obsessed over Tang and talking animal movies, and video game ads could still reach a mass market via television. And so it was that Super Smash Bros. initially introduced itself to a generation of gamers - with four frolicking, bobble-headed mascots beating each other to the tune of "Happy Together" by The Turtles. The popular fighting game kicked off almost a decade of sequels with an ever expanding roster that includes the best characters not just from Nintendo but also the wider video game industry. So, let's look back on the game that started it all - is Super Smash Bros. one of the best games of all-time? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Super Smash Bros. 'FALCON PUNCH' by Benjamin Briggs (http://ocremix.org/info/CEO_2015:_Champion) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  7. It's truly a great time for indie games. The adventure genre was long dead, but the current state of the industry has allowed the classic style of game to experience a phoenix-like resurrection, exposing an entirely new generation of gamers to the thrill of storytelling and puzzle-solving many of the old guard of gamers were able to experience in Space Quest or even Zork. HomeBearStudio, a small Dutch game development studio has just released a beautifully illustrated adventure game, Nairi: Tower of Shirin, on both the Nintendo Switch and PC to delight both young and old gamers alike. Nairi: Tower of Shirin tells the story of Nairi, a girl from the upper crust of a society populated by both humans and animals. Losing everything she has, she winds up in the criminal underbelly of Shirin, an oasis in the middle of a vast desert. In this new, seedy life of crime, she meets Rex, a former gangster who left his old life behind to become a scholar. Together, the duo work to unravel the enigmatic mystery of the tower that sits at the center of their city. Buoyed by an adorable cast of characters all lovingly drawn and animated, players will need to use their creativity and smarts to solve puzzles in this modern take on the classic point-and-click adventure genre. The Switch version allows players to play it traditionally or take point-and-click extremely literally and point their joy-cons at the screen to interact with the game. Overall, this game looks sweet and cute beyond words - plus it retails for $9.99. Check it out if you need some more indie spice in your gaming library. Nairi: Tower of Shirin is available now for Nintendo Switch and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  8. It's truly a great time for indie games. The adventure genre was long dead, but the current state of the industry has allowed the classic style of game to experience a phoenix-like resurrection, exposing an entirely new generation of gamers to the thrill of storytelling and puzzle-solving many of the old guard of gamers were able to experience in Space Quest or even Zork. HomeBearStudio, a small Dutch game development studio has just released a beautifully illustrated adventure game, Nairi: Tower of Shirin, on both the Nintendo Switch and PC to delight both young and old gamers alike. Nairi: Tower of Shirin tells the story of Nairi, a girl from the upper crust of a society populated by both humans and animals. Losing everything she has, she winds up in the criminal underbelly of Shirin, an oasis in the middle of a vast desert. In this new, seedy life of crime, she meets Rex, a former gangster who left his old life behind to become a scholar. Together, the duo work to unravel the enigmatic mystery of the tower that sits at the center of their city. Buoyed by an adorable cast of characters all lovingly drawn and animated, players will need to use their creativity and smarts to solve puzzles in this modern take on the classic point-and-click adventure genre. The Switch version allows players to play it traditionally or take point-and-click extremely literally and point their joy-cons at the screen to interact with the game. Overall, this game looks sweet and cute beyond words - plus it retails for $9.99. Check it out if you need some more indie spice in your gaming library. Nairi: Tower of Shirin is available now for Nintendo Switch and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  9. Jack Gardner

    Nintendo Loosens Its Monetization Policies

    It appears that Nintendo will no longer be trying to shake money out of streamers and video creators. The company has announced that they are changing their policy on what is and is not acceptable use of their games on various media platforms like YouTube and Facebook. You can read the full list of changes along with a Q&A section for clarifications on the Nintendo website. "We are humbled every day by your loyalty and passion for Nintendo's games, characters and worlds, and respect that you want to be able to express yourself creatively by sharing your own original videos and images using content from our games," reads the opening of their statement on the matter. A list of the changes to Nintendo's policy with some explanations and expansions: "You may monetize your videos and channels using the monetization methods separately specified by Nintendo" - so far these include the ones included below: Facebook - Facebook Gaming Creators, Facebook Level Up Program Niconico Douga/Niconico Live - Niconico Creators Program, Niconico Channel OPENREC.tv - OPENREC Creators Program Twitch - Twitch Affiliate Program and Twitch Partner Program Twitter - Amplify Publisher Program YouTube - YouTube Partner Program. "We encourage you to create videos that include your creative input and commentary. Videos and images that contain mere copies of Nintendo Game Content without creative input or commentary are not permitted." - Basically, you can create Let's Plays, walkthroughs, and more as long as you aren't just reposting Nintendo content or silently playing through the game (though there's a strange caveat to that last point that allows people to post gameplay and screenshots if they use the built-in system features like the capture button on the Switch). "You are only permitted to use Nintendo Game Content that has been officially released, or from promotional materials officially released by Nintendo (such as product trailers or Nintendo Directs)." - DON'T SNITCH "If you want to use the intellectual property of a third party, you are responsible for obtaining any necessary third-party permissions." - Nintendo doesn't have time to secure other companies permissions for some of its products, aint no one got time for the legality of other companies. "You are not permitted to imply or state that your videos are officially affiliated with or sponsored by Nintendo." - Pretty simple. None of that, "My uncle works at Nintendo so I am sponsored by Nintendo!" malarkey. "We reserve the right to remove any content that we believe is unlawful, infringing, inappropriate, or not in line with these Guidelines." - This translates roughly to mean that they can still put copyright strikes on videos that they feel stray too far from these guidelines. Basically, the changes they announced mean that people will finally be able to stream and make videos about Nintendo games and receive the full revenue from those videos, which should be great news to all of the gaming creators out there. This represents a big change from the Big N's attempt to capitalize on their fandom by automatically monetizing video content featuring its games on YouTube and pocketing the revenue - a system it updated in 2015 with its Nintendo Creators Program that offered participants 60-70% of the revenue from their videos. It remains unclear at this time whether this means the Nintendo Creators Program will disappear entirely or evolve into something different. Honestly, this is pretty awesome. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  10. It appears that Nintendo will no longer be trying to shake money out of streamers and video creators. The company has announced that they are changing their policy on what is and is not acceptable use of their games on various media platforms like YouTube and Facebook. You can read the full list of changes along with a Q&A section for clarifications on the Nintendo website. "We are humbled every day by your loyalty and passion for Nintendo's games, characters and worlds, and respect that you want to be able to express yourself creatively by sharing your own original videos and images using content from our games," reads the opening of their statement on the matter. A list of the changes to Nintendo's policy with some explanations and expansions: "You may monetize your videos and channels using the monetization methods separately specified by Nintendo" - so far these include the ones included below: Facebook - Facebook Gaming Creators, Facebook Level Up Program Niconico Douga/Niconico Live - Niconico Creators Program, Niconico Channel OPENREC.tv - OPENREC Creators Program Twitch - Twitch Affiliate Program and Twitch Partner Program Twitter - Amplify Publisher Program YouTube - YouTube Partner Program. "We encourage you to create videos that include your creative input and commentary. Videos and images that contain mere copies of Nintendo Game Content without creative input or commentary are not permitted." - Basically, you can create Let's Plays, walkthroughs, and more as long as you aren't just reposting Nintendo content or silently playing through the game (though there's a strange caveat to that last point that allows people to post gameplay and screenshots if they use the built-in system features like the capture button on the Switch). "You are only permitted to use Nintendo Game Content that has been officially released, or from promotional materials officially released by Nintendo (such as product trailers or Nintendo Directs)." - DON'T SNITCH "If you want to use the intellectual property of a third party, you are responsible for obtaining any necessary third-party permissions." - Nintendo doesn't have time to secure other companies permissions for some of its products, aint no one got time for the legality of other companies. "You are not permitted to imply or state that your videos are officially affiliated with or sponsored by Nintendo." - Pretty simple. None of that, "My uncle works at Nintendo so I am sponsored by Nintendo!" malarkey. "We reserve the right to remove any content that we believe is unlawful, infringing, inappropriate, or not in line with these Guidelines." - This translates roughly to mean that they can still put copyright strikes on videos that they feel stray too far from these guidelines. Basically, the changes they announced mean that people will finally be able to stream and make videos about Nintendo games and receive the full revenue from those videos, which should be great news to all of the gaming creators out there. This represents a big change from the Big N's attempt to capitalize on their fandom by automatically monetizing video content featuring its games on YouTube and pocketing the revenue - a system it updated in 2015 with its Nintendo Creators Program that offered participants 60-70% of the revenue from their videos. It remains unclear at this time whether this means the Nintendo Creators Program will disappear entirely or evolve into something different. Honestly, this is pretty awesome. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  11. Wow, with all the hubbub around Pokémon Let's Go it can be easy to forget that the original Pokémon games that started it all released 20 years ago (or 22 years ago in Japan)! The phenomenon of pocket monsters continues to this day and seems to be losing very little steam. It has proven to be one of Nintendo's enduring juggernauts able to spin off into everything from disaster relief games to live-action sleuthing films. This week we invited Kevin Slackie on the show to talk about both the original Game Boy titles and their newest incarnation in Pokémon Let's Go! Also, apparently Jessie and James of Team Rocket fame are canonically 15 years old? There was a lot of weird stuff swirling around OG Pokémon. And now to pose a question to all of you Pokémon Let's Go players out there: If you could only have one and the other was erased from existence, either Pokémon Red & Blue or Pokémon Let's Go, which would you hold onto? You can (and should) follow Kevin Slackie over on Twitter: @KSlackie Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Pokémon Red 'Moondrops' by Sockpuppet (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02514) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  12. Wow, with all the hubbub around Pokémon Let's Go it can be easy to forget that the original Pokémon games that started it all released 20 years ago (or 22 years ago in Japan)! The phenomenon of pocket monsters continues to this day and seems to be losing very little steam. It has proven to be one of Nintendo's enduring juggernauts able to spin off into everything from disaster relief games to live-action sleuthing films. This week we invited Kevin Slackie on the show to talk about both the original Game Boy titles and their newest incarnation in Pokémon Let's Go! Also, apparently Jessie and James of Team Rocket fame are canonically 15 years old? There was a lot of weird stuff swirling around OG Pokémon. And now to pose a question to all of you Pokémon Let's Go players out there: If you could only have one and the other was erased from existence, either Pokémon Red & Blue or Pokémon Let's Go, which would you hold onto? You can (and should) follow Kevin Slackie over on Twitter: @KSlackie Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Pokémon Red 'Moondrops' by Sockpuppet (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02514) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  13. The big things in Pokémon right now are the dual Pokémon titles: Pokémon Let's Go Eevee and Pokémon Let's Go Pikachu. The two games are remakes of the original Red, Blue, and Yellow generation of the Pokémon franchise with modern twists that incorporate streamlined elements from the Pokémon Go mobile game that swept across the globe. Naomi Lugo offers her thoughts on the two new games while also recalling what made the original generation so great and magical for an entire world of kids. With schedules being what they are, sometimes coordinating a full episode of The Best Games Period can be difficult. When we can't have a proper discussion, we will be breaking off to do these shorter mini-casts, Honorable Mentions, to talk about fringe games that we might not otherwise be able to talk about on a full episode. Outro music: Pokémon Red/Blue/Yellow 'The Mighty Mighty Pokémon' by Level 99 (http://missingno.ocremix.org/music.html) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  14. The big things in Pokémon right now are the dual Pokémon titles: Pokémon Let's Go Eevee and Pokémon Let's Go Pikachu. The two games are remakes of the original Red, Blue, and Yellow generation of the Pokémon franchise with modern twists that incorporate streamlined elements from the Pokémon Go mobile game that swept across the globe. Naomi Lugo offers her thoughts on the two new games while also recalling what made the original generation so great and magical for an entire world of kids. With schedules being what they are, sometimes coordinating a full episode of The Best Games Period can be difficult. When we can't have a proper discussion, we will be breaking off to do these shorter mini-casts, Honorable Mentions, to talk about fringe games that we might not otherwise be able to talk about on a full episode. Outro music: Pokémon Red/Blue/Yellow 'The Mighty Mighty Pokémon' by Level 99 (http://missingno.ocremix.org/music.html) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  15. Jack Gardner

    Conversing about Collidalot with Grunka Munka

    It can be easy to lose sight of the smaller indie titles with all of the high-profile games releasing as we near the holiday season, but one in particular stands out following its release last Friday: Collidalot. Collidalot is a fast-paced hover car combat game with a heavy emphasis on local multiplayer for up to four people. Players attempt to ram one another off the map or into hazards like spike traps. These vehicles receive a speed boost by riding rails with even higher speeds gained by riding rails painted their particular color. Each vehicle comes with its own special move to help give it the edge needed to pull out a victory. Also, it has a jammin' techno soundtrack that you can listen to for free on the company's SoundCloud page. The story of Seattle-based Grunka Munka Games begins with most of the team still in college where they worked together on a project called "The Enragement Ring." Even in an unpolished state, it gained attention from professors and it wound up making a circuit around the Seattle game dev scene where it won the Audience Choice award at both Seattle Indie Game Competition and Intel Game Developer Showcase among several other nominations and distinctions. All of that buzz landed the team at Grunka Munka on Nintendo's radar and after years of work, Collidalot has finally released! I had the opportunity to ask Andrew Ward, the CEO of Grunka Munka Games, some questions about Collidalot and he was gracious enough to provide some insightful looks into the world of scrappy game dev and shipping a studio's first game. --- What were some of the ideas for games that got bounced around before landing on what would become Collidalot? Originally, the game was intended to be giant spaceships slamming into other ships and knocking them out of the “sumo ring” arena to destroy them. We also wanted the game to be a local multiplayer game. Beyond that, everything we implemented was in an effort to achieve those intentions. We found that it is really boring to fly giant, slow spaceships at each other, especially if there are no projectile weapons, which we didn’t want. We thought that might be better if the ships were small and fast, so we tried it. It was better, but it was so easy to fly out of the map into the emptiness of space. Then we thought about how to add a better sense of control, so we ended up adding energy rails to grind on. This essentially created the first iteration of Collidalot. At what moment did you feel like Collidalot had enough potential to build a gaming studio around it? People seemed to love the first version of the game even though the controls were terrible and the game was slapped together so loosely that it would be a stretch to even call it a demo. It also had a terrible name, “The Enragement Ring”. It was fun though, and definitely unique. That gave us a lot of initial momentum. Most of us were still in school at the Academy of Interactive Entertainment, Seattle, but the excitement around early versions of the game during class got the attention of the staff. The most notable staff member to take note was Peter Huff. He handled most of the event coordination for the school and invited us to join iFEST 2017. Things moved quickly from there. People were asking us if the game was out because they enjoyed it so much at iFEST, even though we didn’t have any menus in the game yet. Someone responsible for helping run another local gaming event, Power of Play, approached us at iFEST and asked us to show the game off there the very next weekend. We went to Power of Play because it was a great opportunity, but we had no idea what to expect. While there, a representative from Nintendo approached us asking if we would be interested in bringing the game to the Wii U. Remember, the game had no menus, little content, and was barely a working prototype. We were still students with more than a year left until graduation. This was the turning point for us. We took this positive momentum and ran with it. No matter how hard it got, we pushed through because we knew this game and this team was on the right track for success and we didn’t want to squander such an opportunity. There aren’t any guns in the game – how did that decision get made and what does that absence of guns bring to Collidalot? The game was supposed to be all about slamming spaceships into each other originally, although that eventually changed to slamming jet-powered hover cars into each other. If you give players guns, that opens up the option to avoid other players and to shoot at them from a distance instead, bypassing our original vision. For this reason, you could say it was initially a design choice to get people to play the game [as it was intended]. We wanted people to be in each other’s face in game and out of game since it was a local multiplayer game, and you don’t really feel that intense connection if you can play without ever going near each other. Later, we realized that having no guns is kind of a big deal for many kids and families - a large portion of our target audience. We want everyone to experience our games and that design decision makes it easier for many families to feel comfortable with Collidalot. What were some of the inspirations for the mechanics behind Collidalot? Inspirations for Collidalot come from every corner of the universe. Warhammer 40K was the biggest one in terms of the concept for the game. Towerfall Ascension is one of our favorite local multiplayer games, so we tried to sneak many of their brilliant design choices into Collidalot in subtle ways. Smash Bros, Splatoon, Mad Max, Tony Hawk, Extreme-G, Kinetica, Star Wars: Episode 1 Racer, and a ton of other sources outside of video games served as inspiration to us. Collidalot seems to have racked up a large number of awards since it began making the indie game circuit – which one has meant the most to the team? The Seattle Indie Game Competition’s People Choice Award 2017 (received at Power of Play 2017), is the award that means the most to us. It was our first major award. It was also the first award we worked towards months before receiving, and it felt incredible to earn it. Receiving that award was not just about us, either. It was about showing the people who have given us so much amazing support that we were not going to let them down; we were going to push ourselves to succeed. Collidalot is Grunka Munka’s first project, what are the biggest learning experiences you’ve had trying to ship this game? There have been so many and they are unique to each person on the team. We had to learn everything from scratch, like how to use the Unity game engine and how to make a game in general. Things that seem simple, like making a player select UI, were difficult because we hadn’t done it before. Most things took research and several iterations, so they took a while. We also had to learn how to form and run a company on top of it all, which added even more chaos into the mix. Then there were things like attending conferences to demo the game, joining competitions, and figuring out how to market the game so people would simply know it exists. Being a game developer is a learning experience that never ends. The Grunka Munka team participates in Extra Life – how did that begin? Why is it important to you all? One of our team members previously interned, and later worked, in the medical field before, during, and after undergrad. He’s always had a tremendous level of respect for the entire industry. That’s where it began. Since we work within a few blocks of Seattle Children’s Hospital (SCH), he quickly started reaching out to SCH and Extra Life about how we can get involved and help. After he joined the team, we started chatting about what we can do to help out and contribute. We all have been gamers since we were young and remember specific games that we loved both then and now. We know that hospitalized kids and their families could always use more reasons to smile and we simply couldn’t stop thinking about how to help. This drove us to get more involved with the Extra Life Seattle Guild, who immediately amplified our ability to spread some gaming happiness with SCH and beyond. We are proud to be a part of the Extra Life Seattle Guild and are incredibly excited for the work we are doing with them right now and will continue to do. What message did you want to send with Collidalot? What do you want people walking away from a session with it to be thinking about? I think everyone on the team has something different they want to say through the games we make. We all agree that moments in life are more special when you can share them with others. Collidalot aims to bring people together so that they can make and share those moments. We also want to show that there are still many amazing, unique things games can do that have never been done and that they are worth making. What sorts of projects is Grunka Munka interested in making in the future? Our goal is to create original ideas and new types of gameplay. Having just launched Collidalot, we are prototyping new ideas and deciding on our next project now. We are definitely interested in expanding concepts from Collidalot beyond its 2d/3d layout. We also have a number of completely different ideas for games we would like to work on. Our main focus will be to create something new and push ourselves creatively. Why do you believe Collidalot should succeed? What’s your best elevator pitch to someone who’s undecided? Because Collidalot is a unique take on the 4-player brawler. There are a lot of games available nowadays and it’s always exciting when there is something new and different to experience. We appreciate when people are a bit confused, yet excited by novel, unique games. Games should incite this and we feel we have captured that feeling. We pitch the game as “Collidalot is Jet-powered destruction derby crossed with high-speed rail grinding”. Basically, think Smash Bros. in jet cars. Collidalot is available now on Nintendo Switch. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  16. It can be easy to lose sight of the smaller indie titles with all of the high-profile games releasing as we near the holiday season, but one in particular stands out following its release last Friday: Collidalot. Collidalot is a fast-paced hover car combat game with a heavy emphasis on local multiplayer for up to four people. Players attempt to ram one another off the map or into hazards like spike traps. These vehicles receive a speed boost by riding rails with even higher speeds gained by riding rails painted their particular color. Each vehicle comes with its own special move to help give it the edge needed to pull out a victory. Also, it has a jammin' techno soundtrack that you can listen to for free on the company's SoundCloud page. The story of Seattle-based Grunka Munka Games begins with most of the team still in college where they worked together on a project called "The Enragement Ring." Even in an unpolished state, it gained attention from professors and it wound up making a circuit around the Seattle game dev scene where it won the Audience Choice award at both Seattle Indie Game Competition and Intel Game Developer Showcase among several other nominations and distinctions. All of that buzz landed the team at Grunka Munka on Nintendo's radar and after years of work, Collidalot has finally released! I had the opportunity to ask Andrew Ward, the CEO of Grunka Munka Games, some questions about Collidalot and he was gracious enough to provide some insightful looks into the world of scrappy game dev and shipping a studio's first game. --- What were some of the ideas for games that got bounced around before landing on what would become Collidalot? Originally, the game was intended to be giant spaceships slamming into other ships and knocking them out of the “sumo ring” arena to destroy them. We also wanted the game to be a local multiplayer game. Beyond that, everything we implemented was in an effort to achieve those intentions. We found that it is really boring to fly giant, slow spaceships at each other, especially if there are no projectile weapons, which we didn’t want. We thought that might be better if the ships were small and fast, so we tried it. It was better, but it was so easy to fly out of the map into the emptiness of space. Then we thought about how to add a better sense of control, so we ended up adding energy rails to grind on. This essentially created the first iteration of Collidalot. At what moment did you feel like Collidalot had enough potential to build a gaming studio around it? People seemed to love the first version of the game even though the controls were terrible and the game was slapped together so loosely that it would be a stretch to even call it a demo. It also had a terrible name, “The Enragement Ring”. It was fun though, and definitely unique. That gave us a lot of initial momentum. Most of us were still in school at the Academy of Interactive Entertainment, Seattle, but the excitement around early versions of the game during class got the attention of the staff. The most notable staff member to take note was Peter Huff. He handled most of the event coordination for the school and invited us to join iFEST 2017. Things moved quickly from there. People were asking us if the game was out because they enjoyed it so much at iFEST, even though we didn’t have any menus in the game yet. Someone responsible for helping run another local gaming event, Power of Play, approached us at iFEST and asked us to show the game off there the very next weekend. We went to Power of Play because it was a great opportunity, but we had no idea what to expect. While there, a representative from Nintendo approached us asking if we would be interested in bringing the game to the Wii U. Remember, the game had no menus, little content, and was barely a working prototype. We were still students with more than a year left until graduation. This was the turning point for us. We took this positive momentum and ran with it. No matter how hard it got, we pushed through because we knew this game and this team was on the right track for success and we didn’t want to squander such an opportunity. There aren’t any guns in the game – how did that decision get made and what does that absence of guns bring to Collidalot? The game was supposed to be all about slamming spaceships into each other originally, although that eventually changed to slamming jet-powered hover cars into each other. If you give players guns, that opens up the option to avoid other players and to shoot at them from a distance instead, bypassing our original vision. For this reason, you could say it was initially a design choice to get people to play the game [as it was intended]. We wanted people to be in each other’s face in game and out of game since it was a local multiplayer game, and you don’t really feel that intense connection if you can play without ever going near each other. Later, we realized that having no guns is kind of a big deal for many kids and families - a large portion of our target audience. We want everyone to experience our games and that design decision makes it easier for many families to feel comfortable with Collidalot. What were some of the inspirations for the mechanics behind Collidalot? Inspirations for Collidalot come from every corner of the universe. Warhammer 40K was the biggest one in terms of the concept for the game. Towerfall Ascension is one of our favorite local multiplayer games, so we tried to sneak many of their brilliant design choices into Collidalot in subtle ways. Smash Bros, Splatoon, Mad Max, Tony Hawk, Extreme-G, Kinetica, Star Wars: Episode 1 Racer, and a ton of other sources outside of video games served as inspiration to us. Collidalot seems to have racked up a large number of awards since it began making the indie game circuit – which one has meant the most to the team? The Seattle Indie Game Competition’s People Choice Award 2017 (received at Power of Play 2017), is the award that means the most to us. It was our first major award. It was also the first award we worked towards months before receiving, and it felt incredible to earn it. Receiving that award was not just about us, either. It was about showing the people who have given us so much amazing support that we were not going to let them down; we were going to push ourselves to succeed. Collidalot is Grunka Munka’s first project, what are the biggest learning experiences you’ve had trying to ship this game? There have been so many and they are unique to each person on the team. We had to learn everything from scratch, like how to use the Unity game engine and how to make a game in general. Things that seem simple, like making a player select UI, were difficult because we hadn’t done it before. Most things took research and several iterations, so they took a while. We also had to learn how to form and run a company on top of it all, which added even more chaos into the mix. Then there were things like attending conferences to demo the game, joining competitions, and figuring out how to market the game so people would simply know it exists. Being a game developer is a learning experience that never ends. The Grunka Munka team participates in Extra Life – how did that begin? Why is it important to you all? One of our team members previously interned, and later worked, in the medical field before, during, and after undergrad. He’s always had a tremendous level of respect for the entire industry. That’s where it began. Since we work within a few blocks of Seattle Children’s Hospital (SCH), he quickly started reaching out to SCH and Extra Life about how we can get involved and help. After he joined the team, we started chatting about what we can do to help out and contribute. We all have been gamers since we were young and remember specific games that we loved both then and now. We know that hospitalized kids and their families could always use more reasons to smile and we simply couldn’t stop thinking about how to help. This drove us to get more involved with the Extra Life Seattle Guild, who immediately amplified our ability to spread some gaming happiness with SCH and beyond. We are proud to be a part of the Extra Life Seattle Guild and are incredibly excited for the work we are doing with them right now and will continue to do. What message did you want to send with Collidalot? What do you want people walking away from a session with it to be thinking about? I think everyone on the team has something different they want to say through the games we make. We all agree that moments in life are more special when you can share them with others. Collidalot aims to bring people together so that they can make and share those moments. We also want to show that there are still many amazing, unique things games can do that have never been done and that they are worth making. What sorts of projects is Grunka Munka interested in making in the future? Our goal is to create original ideas and new types of gameplay. Having just launched Collidalot, we are prototyping new ideas and deciding on our next project now. We are definitely interested in expanding concepts from Collidalot beyond its 2d/3d layout. We also have a number of completely different ideas for games we would like to work on. Our main focus will be to create something new and push ourselves creatively. Why do you believe Collidalot should succeed? What’s your best elevator pitch to someone who’s undecided? Because Collidalot is a unique take on the 4-player brawler. There are a lot of games available nowadays and it’s always exciting when there is something new and different to experience. We appreciate when people are a bit confused, yet excited by novel, unique games. Games should incite this and we feel we have captured that feeling. We pitch the game as “Collidalot is Jet-powered destruction derby crossed with high-speed rail grinding”. Basically, think Smash Bros. in jet cars. Collidalot is available now on Nintendo Switch. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  17. The 1999 N64 release of Pokémon Snap catapulted it into instant cult classic status, a position that has only become more entrenched over time in the almost twenty years since its release. The on-rails photography game makes the case for an mechanic that still seems mysteriously underutilized today. It's a fascinating, strange, little game and it has had people wondering for over a decade why we aren't seeing more iterations on the core concept. However, is all of that uniqueness enough to make it one of the best games of all-time? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Tyrants: Fight Through Time 'The Vast Glass Orb' by Inrudiment (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03806) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  18. The 1999 N64 release of Pokémon Snap catapulted it into instant cult classic status, a position that has only become more entrenched over time in the almost twenty years since its release. The on-rails photography game makes the case for an mechanic that still seems mysteriously underutilized today. It's a fascinating, strange, little game and it has had people wondering for over a decade why we aren't seeing more iterations on the core concept. However, is all of that uniqueness enough to make it one of the best games of all-time? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Tyrants: Fight Through Time 'The Vast Glass Orb' by Inrudiment (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03806) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  19. Jack Gardner

    Bowsette Becomes a Video Game Character

    In case you've been living under a rock for the past few weeks, Bowsette is all the rage. Following an announcement from Nintendo in early September that depicted a Toadette donning a pink "super crown" and transforming into Peachette, internet comic artist Haniwa posted a fateful strip. The comic showed both Bowser and Mario facing rejection at the hands of Peach before Bowser puts on the crown and appears to become Mario's girlfriend in the final panel. Since then, the internet seems to have gone crazy for the new character. Despite the craze, which has been attributed by a bump in the stock value of Nintendo, the makers of Mario don't have much to say about the character as of yet. However, modders have now taken up the cause of bringing Bowsette into the wild world of video games. YouTuber and modder Lynard Killer, whose previous work includes modding Linkle into The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, uploaded a video of Bowsette running around in the open world Legend of Zelda game. Her now iconic black dress blows somewhat realistically in the wind and reacts to different stance changes and environments. Much like Link in the unmodded game, Bowsette can also strip down to her underwear - because it is the internet and of course she can. Overall, this is a pretty neat mod, though it's unclear if others can download it yet. Oh, and modders? Put Bowsette into Mario Odyssey because that would be freaking rad. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  20. In case you've been living under a rock for the past few weeks, Bowsette is all the rage. Following an announcement from Nintendo in early September that depicted a Toadette donning a pink "super crown" and transforming into Peachette, internet comic artist Haniwa posted a fateful strip. The comic showed both Bowser and Mario facing rejection at the hands of Peach before Bowser puts on the crown and appears to become Mario's girlfriend in the final panel. Since then, the internet seems to have gone crazy for the new character. Despite the craze, which has been attributed by a bump in the stock value of Nintendo, the makers of Mario don't have much to say about the character as of yet. However, modders have now taken up the cause of bringing Bowsette into the wild world of video games. YouTuber and modder Lynard Killer, whose previous work includes modding Linkle into The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, uploaded a video of Bowsette running around in the open world Legend of Zelda game. Her now iconic black dress blows somewhat realistically in the wind and reacts to different stance changes and environments. Much like Link in the unmodded game, Bowsette can also strip down to her underwear - because it is the internet and of course she can. Overall, this is a pretty neat mod, though it's unclear if others can download it yet. Oh, and modders? Put Bowsette into Mario Odyssey because that would be freaking rad. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  21. For those of you with long memories, Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San last graced this site back in 2016 as an interesting indie game dev project struggling to be finished. Almost two years later, developer Christophe Galati (ChrisDeneos on Twitter) has entered the final stretch of game development and shared the expected release date for Save Me Mr. Tako: October 30. With the help of the Nicalis gaming company, the game will also be released that day on Nintendo Switch. Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San stars the titular Mr. Tako, a mild-mannered octopus who gets wrapped up in the bitter war between octopi and humans. However, when push comes to shove, the brave ocean creature saves a drowning human. A fairy witnesses the act of heroism and grants him the ability to survive on land. With this newfound power, Mr. Tako takes it upon himself to scour the world for a way for both sides to put aside their grievances and live in peace. Designed as a loving tribute to the glory days of the Nintendo Game Boy, Save Me Mr. Tako transports players into a 2D world constructed out of four colors and big ambition. It consists of six different worlds that hide sixteen dungeons for Mr. Tako to explore and conquer on his quest for harmony. Expect to find plenty of side quests and puzzles sprinkled throughout the game, too. Players will also be able to swap game filters for different visual flair and colors as they progress. In addition to being able to survive on land, Mr. Tako can wear up different hats to take on different powers like the ability to shoot arrows. There are fifty such outfits throughout the game, each with an adorable costume change in store for Mr. Tako. Those are on top of Mr. Tako's ability to turn enemies into platforms with his ranged ink attacks. Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San releases on October 30 for Nintendo Switch and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  22. For those of you with long memories, Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San last graced this site back in 2016 as an interesting indie game dev project struggling to be finished. Almost two years later, developer Christophe Galati (ChrisDeneos on Twitter) has entered the final stretch of game development and shared the expected release date for Save Me Mr. Tako: October 30. With the help of the Nicalis gaming company, the game will also be released that day on Nintendo Switch. Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San stars the titular Mr. Tako, a mild-mannered octopus who gets wrapped up in the bitter war between octopi and humans. However, when push comes to shove, the brave ocean creature saves a drowning human. A fairy witnesses the act of heroism and grants him the ability to survive on land. With this newfound power, Mr. Tako takes it upon himself to scour the world for a way for both sides to put aside their grievances and live in peace. Designed as a loving tribute to the glory days of the Nintendo Game Boy, Save Me Mr. Tako transports players into a 2D world constructed out of four colors and big ambition. It consists of six different worlds that hide sixteen dungeons for Mr. Tako to explore and conquer on his quest for harmony. Expect to find plenty of side quests and puzzles sprinkled throughout the game, too. Players will also be able to swap game filters for different visual flair and colors as they progress. In addition to being able to survive on land, Mr. Tako can wear up different hats to take on different powers like the ability to shoot arrows. There are fifty such outfits throughout the game, each with an adorable costume change in store for Mr. Tako. Those are on top of Mr. Tako's ability to turn enemies into platforms with his ranged ink attacks. Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San releases on October 30 for Nintendo Switch and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  23. The GameCube launched amid a wave of enthusiasm for a next-gen Nintendo console. The star of the launch line-up of games was a quirky little title by the name of Luigi's Mansion, the first game starring Luigi since the dud Mario Is Missing. With fluid animations and a fun ghostbusting mechanic, the horror-lite game became one of the biggest hits for the system. So, does Luigi's Mansion hold up well today? Is it one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Super Mario World 'Turning Terrors' by AeroZ (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR01760) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  24. The GameCube launched amid a wave of enthusiasm for a next-gen Nintendo console. The star of the launch line-up of games was a quirky little title by the name of Luigi's Mansion, the first game starring Luigi since the dud Mario Is Missing. With fluid animations and a fun ghostbusting mechanic, the horror-lite game became one of the biggest hits for the system. So, does Luigi's Mansion hold up well today? Is it one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Super Mario World 'Turning Terrors' by AeroZ (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR01760) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  25. There's a new Super Mario game coming out in the future, though it isn't exactly sanctioned by Nintendo. Super Mario Flashback has been designed in the mold of a classic 2D Mario title, but done up in the most elaborately animated and colorful ways possible. The first thing to know about Super Mario Flashback is that, while it certainly plays like its classic counterparts, it takes many mechanics and ideas from more modern incarnations of Mario. Mario can duck and slide, wall jump, and ground pound right from the start. The Flashback team has also opted for the life meter from newer Mario games instead of having Mario switch between small and big forms based on power-ups. Each level also possesses an optional green star for players to collect. The visuals in Super Mario Flashback stand out as some of the best looking sprite work and pixel art design in recent memory. Each of Mario's movements take on a fluid energy as multiple movements play out through every animation. Even common enemies have the same attention to detail, like the lowly goombas whose aggressive waddling shifts their orientation with each step in a visually pleasing way. People who have been dying for a new 2D Mario in a style that brings Super Mario World into 2018 should find Super Mario Flashback exactly what they have been hoping for. Though the full game has yet to be released, Team Flashback released a demo over the weekend to show off their vision of what the final product will be like. The demo consists of three levels, each with their own collectible star. With Mario as the only playable character, players are given infinite lives to make their way to the end of the demo. Players can map controls to any keys they wish, though full Xbox 360 controller support is offered, too. The final game will offer so much more, however. Nine worlds consisting of multiple levels will be available at launch, each based on a classic Mario title. Super Mario Flashback will also have a wholly original soundtrack, a bit of which plays throughout the demo (it's quite good). The devs have promised over 75 power stars, which might correspond to a rough count of how many stages will be in the final game. 36 optional bonus stars will be available to discover, too. The team has also promised "tons of power-ups," which is good as the demo only includes the classic mushroom and flower power-ups. While Mario holds the honor of starring in the demo, players will actually be able to choose their character in Super Mario Flashback. Players will be able to choose between Mario, Luigi, and Toad, each with different costumes that players can unlock in-game. Of course, it wouldn't be true to classic Mario if each player didn't play a little differently. Luigi retains his high jumping and slippery walk, and Toad walks pretty fast, but takes the longest to reach sprinting speeds. Oh, and the whole thing aims to have 1080p resolution at 60FPS. Before anyone goes off on how Nintendo will shut down the project, the leader of Team Flashback, Mons, released a statement via Twitter (condensed and edited for clarity below): My mentions are literally full of people either telling me that the game is going to get taken down by Nintendo (yes, I had no idea) or getting worried about that. I think I need to clear this whole thing up. First of all no, I'm not worried about Nintendo taking down the game. That's mainly because I've noticed some trends in fangames that got taken down by Nintendo. 1) Remakes: Most of the fangames Nintendo took down are remakes or games that are close to being remakes. Super Mario 64 HD, Full Screen Mario, Super Mario ReMaker, Zelda 30 Tribute, AM2R and many others are all remakes. It makes sense for them to shut down these fangames as the original games are still being sold on the Eshop. 2) Fangames that make money: Well, it makes sense that Nintendo doesn't want others to make money with their IP. The biggest example of this I can think of is Nintendo taking down tons of fangames on Game Jolt. This was because you can actually make money there with ads. Though you really really don't earn much. I uploaded an indie game I made for a game jam there with ads and uhh... yeah.... 3) Pokemon fangames: I mean, it's a well known fact that The Pokemon Company is really protective of their IP. IIRC this was the reason why the Pokemon costumes in Mario Maker didn't have custom sounds too. So this is also kind of reasonable. Ok, well, not "reasonable" but it kind of makes sense. Anyways, there's only 1 fangame that didn't fit any of these categories and that's No Mario's Sky but... I think it also kiiiiind of makes sense when you think about it? I mean No Man's Sky was a controversial subject at the time so I'd assume that they didn't want Mario to be attached to that? I think that's really dumb but again, it kind of makes sense. And well, Flashback doesn't really fit any of these categories. It's not a remake, it doesn't make money, it has nothing to do with Pokemon and it doesn't do anything controversial with the IP. Does this mean that Flashback is 100% safe? I wish, it's impossible to know what Nintendo is going to do next. But it gives me enough confidence to share my progress with the game to the public. Oh and no, we won't turn this game into an indie game if Nintendo sends us The Letter. I'd rather make something original than a ripoff of Mario if I'm making an indie game. We might move onto a different indie game with a similar team using a similar art style, but it would most definitely be a different game. Those interested in checking out Super Mario Flashback can download the demo on the Team Flashback website.
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