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Found 4 results

  1. Quite a bit changed over the year since I last saw Insurgency: Sandstorm. Creative Director Andrew Spearin (who I interviewed at E3 last year) departed New World Interactive. Its highly-touted story mode has been cancelled. New World narrowed the focus to double-down on what brought Insurgency to the dance: its brutally realistic multiplayer. I had a chance to play a few rounds of multiplayer alongside seven other teammates. Our objective was to secure a checkpoint, but that was easier said than done. Insurgency’s focus on realism means taking one or two good shots ends the player’s life. The intelligent AI regularly flanked and swarmed us when we least expected it. Teamwork became a necessity; lone wolves rarely lasted long trying to reach the objective on their own. Although the game was rough around the edge, fans of the original Insurgency should be glad to know that Sandstorm, thus far, continues the series’ reputation as a grounded, skill-based shooter. After my session concluded I had the opportunity to speak with Insurgency’s lead designer, Michael Tsaroushas. We chatted about the various changes and roadblocks to hit the project in the last year, translating the PC experience to consoles, and the reason behind the story mode’s cancellation. Run through what's changed with Insurgency since I saw you guys last year. Michael: As you know we cancelled our story mode that was going to be for release. That is something we're going to reconsider after launch. We're focusing on a multiplayer experience, which includes cooperative multiplayer, 5v5 competitive matchmaking, adversarial traditional multiplayer, which is 16v16. Included in that are a lot of different improvements, a lot of new stuff since Insurgency, our previous game; new fire support mechanics, calling in helicopters, airstrikes, artillery, vaulting, door breaching, improved ballistic system. It's a hybrid between hit-scan and simulated ballistics depending on the distance of the bullet. Vehicles, character customization, a lot of different things we've been working on the last year. How was it designing that AI? I just finished playing a few rounds of the 8-player squad against a team of bots to try and capture an objective, and that AI is rough. I'm glad you feel that way. That's what we're going for [laughs]. In Insurgency, we had cooperative modes. We started out way back in the day with an adversarial game, but we explored all this cooperative play, and it ended up working really well. So, we dedicate a lot of resources in making sure our cooperative experience is just as fun as our adversarial- just as fun as our competitive experience. And you can see just in Checkpoint Mode, which is what we played today, [the AI] come at you, they’re very aggressive. They die just as fast as you, and I think when you have that, a high lethality game, the stakes are really high and you need to be really careful. And that's what make it fun. Are they especially reactive? I noticed I would kill one and then all of a sudden I would turn a corner and there's five of them just coming at me. Yeah, it's that kind of intensity that we want. That kind of fear, that kind of tension that we want. Like, “oh no, I have to be careful”. Have you guys added any new vehicles? I know last year you guys specifically mentioned jeeps and other vehicles. But you guys were also stressing that you weren't trying to be like Battlefield. Correct. We don't have tanks, we don't have any heavy vehicles. All of our vehicles are light. Trucks with machine guns on them. They're really interesting to play with because they're kind of like mobile turrets in a way. Not a lot of games do their vehicles that way but we found that that works pretty well for us. You have a shield for your turret. If you place it in the right position and watch, then you can screw them up, mess their day up real bad. We also have the fire support vehicles I was talking about. Those you don't drive, though. The trucks you drive. It's like when 2-player classes come together they can call in an airstrike, they can call in a helicopter. Has anything changed in the last year in terms of looking at other shooters and trends that have arisen–battle royale specifically? [laughs] It's hot right now. You know, we've talked about it in the past on our team. "Hey, I think we could do a cool battle royale". But it's not really what we want to do right now. It's not important to us at the moment. I don't think it's important to our community either. So maybe we'll explore post-release, but right now we don't have any plans for that. We'll see. As far as other trends go, I think we've been pretty solid with our vision for the past year. Since we cancelled the story mode for release we've been really focused on polishing and refining the multiplayer experience and expanding too. Can you talk about what brought about the cancellation of that story mode? When did that decision happen? It was still, at least this time last year, very much a thing. I watched a big trailer for it. What happened with that? Well frankly, we bit off more than we chew. We are a small studio. We're doing a lot of new stuff here [with a] new engine. We worked on Source, which came out in 2003. We're on Unreal Engine 4, which came out very recently, and we had to account for that. We had to account for the fact that we want to be on console. We had to account for the fact that we were really building a whole new platform, and we're a small team. There's like 36 of us, and we're spread all around the world. We have a couple different studios in Denver, Amsterdam, and we came to a realization that if we really want to deliver the experience people know us for, we should focus on it. And that led us to the decision. And you said it’s not a totally done thing? It could return in the future? After release we're going to reconsider it. At the moment we're just focused on the multiplayer. How's it been working on consoles for the first time? It's been interesting. It's been a challenge, of course. We don't have any experience on consoles. There's TRC's, there's certifications that you need to know, and that's been interesting to learn. That console release is also going to be split. That's going to come out in 2019. PC is going to be September, and that has helped us to make sure we focus on one thing at a time. Let me ask you in regards to the shooting. I think last year one of the devs described it as "The Dark Souls of shooters" I like that. It is a good way to describe it, at least in the brutality. The unforgivingness. Yeah, or the realism to a degree. It plays well with mouse and keyboard, but for a controller, have you guys had to pull back on that a little bit for a controller? How has that been translating that control setup? We definitely maintain the experience. Nothing changes [when] you play with a controller. Honestly, people play Insurgency right now with a controller. We have partial controller support for the Source version of Insurgency. I played it with a controller. It feels pretty good, right? It an experience that you can't have on a controller, and by doing that, seeing that in the original Insurgency, that led us to believe “hey, this could work for console.” So we don't really change much from that. We're obviously refining it, we obviously have to take into account key binding space and stuff, maybe do some aim dampening when you analog over something. Other than that, the experience is very similar. And we want that, we don't want to sacrifice our gunplay. It's kind of your identity as well. Exactly. Insurgency: Sandstorm is available now for pre-order on Steam. Doing so gains access to a future beta. To try it out even earlier, New World Interactive is currently taking sign-ups for an upcoming closed alpha. The game arrives in September for PC and comes to consoles in 2019. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  2. Quite a bit changed over the year since I last saw Insurgency: Sandstorm. Creative Director Andrew Spearin (who I interviewed at E3 last year) departed New World Interactive. Its highly-touted story mode has been cancelled. New World narrowed the focus to double-down on what brought Insurgency to the dance: its brutally realistic multiplayer. I had a chance to play a few rounds of multiplayer alongside seven other teammates. Our objective was to secure a checkpoint, but that was easier said than done. Insurgency’s focus on realism means taking one or two good shots ends the player’s life. The intelligent AI regularly flanked and swarmed us when we least expected it. Teamwork became a necessity; lone wolves rarely lasted long trying to reach the objective on their own. Although the game was rough around the edge, fans of the original Insurgency should be glad to know that Sandstorm, thus far, continues the series’ reputation as a grounded, skill-based shooter. After my session concluded I had the opportunity to speak with Insurgency’s lead designer, Michael Tsaroushas. We chatted about the various changes and roadblocks to hit the project in the last year, translating the PC experience to consoles, and the reason behind the story mode’s cancellation. Run through what's changed with Insurgency since I saw you guys last year. Michael: As you know we cancelled our story mode that was going to be for release. That is something we're going to reconsider after launch. We're focusing on a multiplayer experience, which includes cooperative multiplayer, 5v5 competitive matchmaking, adversarial traditional multiplayer, which is 16v16. Included in that are a lot of different improvements, a lot of new stuff since Insurgency, our previous game; new fire support mechanics, calling in helicopters, airstrikes, artillery, vaulting, door breaching, improved ballistic system. It's a hybrid between hit-scan and simulated ballistics depending on the distance of the bullet. Vehicles, character customization, a lot of different things we've been working on the last year. How was it designing that AI? I just finished playing a few rounds of the 8-player squad against a team of bots to try and capture an objective, and that AI is rough. I'm glad you feel that way. That's what we're going for [laughs]. In Insurgency, we had cooperative modes. We started out way back in the day with an adversarial game, but we explored all this cooperative play, and it ended up working really well. So, we dedicate a lot of resources in making sure our cooperative experience is just as fun as our adversarial- just as fun as our competitive experience. And you can see just in Checkpoint Mode, which is what we played today, [the AI] come at you, they’re very aggressive. They die just as fast as you, and I think when you have that, a high lethality game, the stakes are really high and you need to be really careful. And that's what make it fun. Are they especially reactive? I noticed I would kill one and then all of a sudden I would turn a corner and there's five of them just coming at me. Yeah, it's that kind of intensity that we want. That kind of fear, that kind of tension that we want. Like, “oh no, I have to be careful”. Have you guys added any new vehicles? I know last year you guys specifically mentioned jeeps and other vehicles. But you guys were also stressing that you weren't trying to be like Battlefield. Correct. We don't have tanks, we don't have any heavy vehicles. All of our vehicles are light. Trucks with machine guns on them. They're really interesting to play with because they're kind of like mobile turrets in a way. Not a lot of games do their vehicles that way but we found that that works pretty well for us. You have a shield for your turret. If you place it in the right position and watch, then you can screw them up, mess their day up real bad. We also have the fire support vehicles I was talking about. Those you don't drive, though. The trucks you drive. It's like when 2-player classes come together they can call in an airstrike, they can call in a helicopter. Has anything changed in the last year in terms of looking at other shooters and trends that have arisen–battle royale specifically? [laughs] It's hot right now. You know, we've talked about it in the past on our team. "Hey, I think we could do a cool battle royale". But it's not really what we want to do right now. It's not important to us at the moment. I don't think it's important to our community either. So maybe we'll explore post-release, but right now we don't have any plans for that. We'll see. As far as other trends go, I think we've been pretty solid with our vision for the past year. Since we cancelled the story mode for release we've been really focused on polishing and refining the multiplayer experience and expanding too. Can you talk about what brought about the cancellation of that story mode? When did that decision happen? It was still, at least this time last year, very much a thing. I watched a big trailer for it. What happened with that? Well frankly, we bit off more than we chew. We are a small studio. We're doing a lot of new stuff here [with a] new engine. We worked on Source, which came out in 2003. We're on Unreal Engine 4, which came out very recently, and we had to account for that. We had to account for the fact that we want to be on console. We had to account for the fact that we were really building a whole new platform, and we're a small team. There's like 36 of us, and we're spread all around the world. We have a couple different studios in Denver, Amsterdam, and we came to a realization that if we really want to deliver the experience people know us for, we should focus on it. And that led us to the decision. And you said it’s not a totally done thing? It could return in the future? After release we're going to reconsider it. At the moment we're just focused on the multiplayer. How's it been working on consoles for the first time? It's been interesting. It's been a challenge, of course. We don't have any experience on consoles. There's TRC's, there's certifications that you need to know, and that's been interesting to learn. That console release is also going to be split. That's going to come out in 2019. PC is going to be September, and that has helped us to make sure we focus on one thing at a time. Let me ask you in regards to the shooting. I think last year one of the devs described it as "The Dark Souls of shooters" I like that. It is a good way to describe it, at least in the brutality. The unforgivingness. Yeah, or the realism to a degree. It plays well with mouse and keyboard, but for a controller, have you guys had to pull back on that a little bit for a controller? How has that been translating that control setup? We definitely maintain the experience. Nothing changes [when] you play with a controller. Honestly, people play Insurgency right now with a controller. We have partial controller support for the Source version of Insurgency. I played it with a controller. It feels pretty good, right? It an experience that you can't have on a controller, and by doing that, seeing that in the original Insurgency, that led us to believe “hey, this could work for console.” So we don't really change much from that. We're obviously refining it, we obviously have to take into account key binding space and stuff, maybe do some aim dampening when you analog over something. Other than that, the experience is very similar. And we want that, we don't want to sacrifice our gunplay. It's kind of your identity as well. Exactly. Insurgency: Sandstorm is available now for pre-order on Steam. Doing so gains access to a future beta. To try it out even earlier, New World Interactive is currently taking sign-ups for an upcoming closed alpha. The game arrives in September for PC and comes to consoles in 2019. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  3. Insurgency: Modern Infantry Combat was something of a pioneer for modern tactical shooters when it first arrived as a Half-Life 2 mod a decade ago. Conceived by Canadian Army veteran Andrew Spearin and supported by Red Orchestra mod founder Jeremy Blum, Insurgency: MIC made a name for itself by focusing on hardcore realism and infantry warfare. Elements such as a lack of crosshairs and deadlier gun behavior (players could die in one or two shots) resonated with a segment of the first-person shooter crowd, giving rise to a passionate following. A sequel to the mod, simply titled Insurgency, was one of the earliest Steam Early Access titles when it became available in March 2013. The game exited Early Access and launched in early 2014 going on to sell over three million copies. With strong sales, the opening of a new Amsterdam studio, and a growing staff, developer New World Interactive channeled all of their talent and resources into crafting an ambitious sequel, Insurgency: Sandstorm. Sandstorm aims to improve on the aspects that brought Insurgency to the dance while diversifying the experience to reach new players. I had a chance to speak with Spearin, creative director on the project, about the new features coming to Insurgency: Sandstorm and how it differentiates itself from the original game. Same Hardcore Approach, New Twists Insurgency: Sandstorm retains the realistic gunplay that made the series into, as Spearin jokingly described, the “Dark Souls of shooters.” He went on to elaborate on what he meant, saying, “We're keeping the same recipe that we've established. So it'll be the same weapon handling that Insurgency has, which means that there's no cross-hair. There's a free aim area where you can point your weapon within, so you can't just put a dot on your screen and hit the [trigger] consistently. You have to rely on your weapon sights to aim accurately and control your recoil, that sort of stuff.” A new ballistic system introduces realistic bullet drop, travel time, and ricochet. Sandstorm also adds environmental interactions such as ladder climbing, vaulting, and door breaching. One example is that players can shoot the hinges off doors and kick them down. New World also plans to incorporate features from its other title, Day of Infamy, such as fire support which allows players to call in bombers for artillery support. A progression system that bestows cosmetic items to players as they climb the ranks is also planned. And, of course, mod support will continue to exist in the PC version of Sandstorm. “Restarting our mod roots, it's very important for us, and we want to grow the next generation of indie devs through our platform,” said Spearin. Adjusting To The Console Audience In addition to PC, Insurgency: Sandstorm is coming to Xbox One and PlayStation 4. This marks the series’ first appearance on consoles. When I asked about the potential difficulty of translating the franchise’s hardcore controls to a console layout, Spearin told me that the team is mindful of the challenge and aims to adjust the controls without losing Insurgency’s signature realism. “We're looking to auto-aim and the typical shooter console features that are wired to make it a little easier for a controller. “Spearin stated firmly before going on to affirm that the series would not lose its signature style, “But at the same time, Insurgency benefits from minimalism, and in its design that kind of heightens the realism and intensity, not necessarily an overcomplexity. So if you look at a game like ARMA where yeah, every key on the keyboard does something. But when you play Insurgency, it's still very basic controls. So we want to maintain that simplicity in our approach to the design. That's what makes it easier to translate over to the consoles.” A Graphics Overhaul Being a Half-Life 2 mod means both Insurgency and its mod predecessor were developed using the Source Engine, which limited the scope of the maps. For Sandstorm, New World Interactive has switched to Unreal Engine 4, with the team citing the graphical difference as “night and day” compared to the earlier titles. Unreal 4’s tech granted designers the horsepower to craft more visually impressive maps that are also more spacious than Insurgency's compact arenas. Players Won’t Have To Only Get Around On Foot Over the years, a segment of fans have requested that vehicles be added to Insurgency. However, the limitations of Source Engine made it impossible to do so. Sandstorm finally grants this wish, but if you’re a purist concerned about the game going the route of Battlefield, take solace in the fact that players won’t be obliterating buildings with tanks or flying around in helicopters. “We are still focused on that infantry combat, kind of close quarters but it's going to be a little wider. Spearin explained. “It's going to be primarily pick-up trucks with mounted machine guns and transportation trucks, that kind of thing.” Sandstorm is being designed with vehicles in mind, with appropriate game modes such as a convoy ambush. Enriching Competitive Play Spearin assures that multiplayer will maintain the same tweaks and balancing the team has spent years perfecting. Like the current Insurgency, Sandstorm’s online multiplayer supports up to 32 players. The game also features a competitive 5v5 mode and a separate co-op focused mode that will support up to eight players. New World Interactive has taken the popularity of eSports into account, with Spearin stating “Our own community with Insurgency has been very demanding about a lot of features over the years. Like matchmaking, ranks and leaderboards. So we are investing that effort into Sandstorm for that competitive crowd.” Weaving A Thoughtful Narrative A cinematic story campaign is Sandstorm’s most significant addition. Played alone or with up to four players cooperatively, Sandstorm tells the tale of a female paramilitary soldier who, as a child, was enslaved by radical insurgents along with her sister and best friend. When a skirmish erupted during a violent sandstorm, the wall to their prison was blown open by fire, which allowed the girls to escape. However, the protagonist and her sister became separated in the disorienting storm. Fast forward to present day, the protagonist and her best friend now fight against the forces that once oppressed them. One day the women uncover vital information that drives them to break away from their squad and set off on their own journey. Joining them is a former US veteran of the Iraq War who volunteers with the rebel force, and an adventure-seeking French citizen with zero combat experience. Spearin describes their quest as a “road trip across the desert,” where they’ll encounter a variety of people and locations and bond through the hardships the journey brings. Spearin stated the story drew inspiration from several different sources, including current events unfolding in present-day Iraq and the Iraqi war documentary Peshmerga. New World Interactive’s goal is to ditch the mindless nature of shooters and help players to understand who they’re pointing a gun at and why. “We wanted to highlight [the conflict in Iraq] because in the news you hear like oh, U.S. and NATO are supporting the Kurds, and not many people really understand what that means, who these people are and why.” Spearin continued, “In a way, that's what people want: to immerse themselves in a mindless time period with games. But when you come out of it, you can look at the real world and think ‘Oh wow, I have a better understanding of what's going on now’ or ‘I want to start learning more.’” New World Interactive hopes to hold a closed alpha for Insurgency: Sandstorm later this year, with a full release scheduled for sometime in 2018. With the move to consoles and the addition of a cinematic story mode, it’ll be interesting to see if the game can find a new player base in the ultra-saturated shooter market. Spearin feels confident that Sandstorm’s more grounded, thoughtful take on the genre will not only help it stand out, but provide a welcome change from the norm. “In order to stand out you have to do something innovative. You need to catch people's attention in a different way. I think when a saturated market exists, fans are looking for something different. They get tired of the same old franchise regenerating the same old gameplay with a different skin on top, right? They want somebody who is taking the challenge and the risk to come up with something new. Now it's like ‘let's bring that to more people.’” View full article
  4. Insurgency: Modern Infantry Combat was something of a pioneer for modern tactical shooters when it first arrived as a Half-Life 2 mod a decade ago. Conceived by Canadian Army veteran Andrew Spearin and supported by Red Orchestra mod founder Jeremy Blum, Insurgency: MIC made a name for itself by focusing on hardcore realism and infantry warfare. Elements such as a lack of crosshairs and deadlier gun behavior (players could die in one or two shots) resonated with a segment of the first-person shooter crowd, giving rise to a passionate following. A sequel to the mod, simply titled Insurgency, was one of the earliest Steam Early Access titles when it became available in March 2013. The game exited Early Access and launched in early 2014 going on to sell over three million copies. With strong sales, the opening of a new Amsterdam studio, and a growing staff, developer New World Interactive channeled all of their talent and resources into crafting an ambitious sequel, Insurgency: Sandstorm. Sandstorm aims to improve on the aspects that brought Insurgency to the dance while diversifying the experience to reach new players. I had a chance to speak with Spearin, creative director on the project, about the new features coming to Insurgency: Sandstorm and how it differentiates itself from the original game. Same Hardcore Approach, New Twists Insurgency: Sandstorm retains the realistic gunplay that made the series into, as Spearin jokingly described, the “Dark Souls of shooters.” He went on to elaborate on what he meant, saying, “We're keeping the same recipe that we've established. So it'll be the same weapon handling that Insurgency has, which means that there's no cross-hair. There's a free aim area where you can point your weapon within, so you can't just put a dot on your screen and hit the [trigger] consistently. You have to rely on your weapon sights to aim accurately and control your recoil, that sort of stuff.” A new ballistic system introduces realistic bullet drop, travel time, and ricochet. Sandstorm also adds environmental interactions such as ladder climbing, vaulting, and door breaching. One example is that players can shoot the hinges off doors and kick them down. New World also plans to incorporate features from its other title, Day of Infamy, such as fire support which allows players to call in bombers for artillery support. A progression system that bestows cosmetic items to players as they climb the ranks is also planned. And, of course, mod support will continue to exist in the PC version of Sandstorm. “Restarting our mod roots, it's very important for us, and we want to grow the next generation of indie devs through our platform,” said Spearin. Adjusting To The Console Audience In addition to PC, Insurgency: Sandstorm is coming to Xbox One and PlayStation 4. This marks the series’ first appearance on consoles. When I asked about the potential difficulty of translating the franchise’s hardcore controls to a console layout, Spearin told me that the team is mindful of the challenge and aims to adjust the controls without losing Insurgency’s signature realism. “We're looking to auto-aim and the typical shooter console features that are wired to make it a little easier for a controller. “Spearin stated firmly before going on to affirm that the series would not lose its signature style, “But at the same time, Insurgency benefits from minimalism, and in its design that kind of heightens the realism and intensity, not necessarily an overcomplexity. So if you look at a game like ARMA where yeah, every key on the keyboard does something. But when you play Insurgency, it's still very basic controls. So we want to maintain that simplicity in our approach to the design. That's what makes it easier to translate over to the consoles.” A Graphics Overhaul Being a Half-Life 2 mod means both Insurgency and its mod predecessor were developed using the Source Engine, which limited the scope of the maps. For Sandstorm, New World Interactive has switched to Unreal Engine 4, with the team citing the graphical difference as “night and day” compared to the earlier titles. Unreal 4’s tech granted designers the horsepower to craft more visually impressive maps that are also more spacious than Insurgency's compact arenas. Players Won’t Have To Only Get Around On Foot Over the years, a segment of fans have requested that vehicles be added to Insurgency. However, the limitations of Source Engine made it impossible to do so. Sandstorm finally grants this wish, but if you’re a purist concerned about the game going the route of Battlefield, take solace in the fact that players won’t be obliterating buildings with tanks or flying around in helicopters. “We are still focused on that infantry combat, kind of close quarters but it's going to be a little wider. Spearin explained. “It's going to be primarily pick-up trucks with mounted machine guns and transportation trucks, that kind of thing.” Sandstorm is being designed with vehicles in mind, with appropriate game modes such as a convoy ambush. Enriching Competitive Play Spearin assures that multiplayer will maintain the same tweaks and balancing the team has spent years perfecting. Like the current Insurgency, Sandstorm’s online multiplayer supports up to 32 players. The game also features a competitive 5v5 mode and a separate co-op focused mode that will support up to eight players. New World Interactive has taken the popularity of eSports into account, with Spearin stating “Our own community with Insurgency has been very demanding about a lot of features over the years. Like matchmaking, ranks and leaderboards. So we are investing that effort into Sandstorm for that competitive crowd.” Weaving A Thoughtful Narrative A cinematic story campaign is Sandstorm’s most significant addition. Played alone or with up to four players cooperatively, Sandstorm tells the tale of a female paramilitary soldier who, as a child, was enslaved by radical insurgents along with her sister and best friend. When a skirmish erupted during a violent sandstorm, the wall to their prison was blown open by fire, which allowed the girls to escape. However, the protagonist and her sister became separated in the disorienting storm. Fast forward to present day, the protagonist and her best friend now fight against the forces that once oppressed them. One day the women uncover vital information that drives them to break away from their squad and set off on their own journey. Joining them is a former US veteran of the Iraq War who volunteers with the rebel force, and an adventure-seeking French citizen with zero combat experience. Spearin describes their quest as a “road trip across the desert,” where they’ll encounter a variety of people and locations and bond through the hardships the journey brings. Spearin stated the story drew inspiration from several different sources, including current events unfolding in present-day Iraq and the Iraqi war documentary Peshmerga. New World Interactive’s goal is to ditch the mindless nature of shooters and help players to understand who they’re pointing a gun at and why. “We wanted to highlight [the conflict in Iraq] because in the news you hear like oh, U.S. and NATO are supporting the Kurds, and not many people really understand what that means, who these people are and why.” Spearin continued, “In a way, that's what people want: to immerse themselves in a mindless time period with games. But when you come out of it, you can look at the real world and think ‘Oh wow, I have a better understanding of what's going on now’ or ‘I want to start learning more.’” New World Interactive hopes to hold a closed alpha for Insurgency: Sandstorm later this year, with a full release scheduled for sometime in 2018. With the move to consoles and the addition of a cinematic story mode, it’ll be interesting to see if the game can find a new player base in the ultra-saturated shooter market. Spearin feels confident that Sandstorm’s more grounded, thoughtful take on the genre will not only help it stand out, but provide a welcome change from the norm. “In order to stand out you have to do something innovative. You need to catch people's attention in a different way. I think when a saturated market exists, fans are looking for something different. They get tired of the same old franchise regenerating the same old gameplay with a different skin on top, right? They want somebody who is taking the challenge and the risk to come up with something new. Now it's like ‘let's bring that to more people.’”
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