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Found 40 results

  1. During the Square Enix 2018 E3 conference, it was announced that Monster Hunter would crossover into the Final Fantasy XIV universe. In the trailer, we see a super stoked Palico approach a character who appears to be Auron from Final Fantasy. We then see that it is indeed another character dressed up as such and eventually zoom to an entire lineup of characters dressed in get-ups from various points in the franchise gearing up to take on a Rathalos. The rest of the trailer showed off content and revealed the patch Under the Moonlight. The collaboration and content will come to the game later this summer. View full article
  2. During the Square Enix 2018 E3 conference, it was announced that Monster Hunter would crossover into the Final Fantasy XIV universe. In the trailer, we see a super stoked Palico approach a character who appears to be Auron from Final Fantasy. We then see that it is indeed another character dressed up as such and eventually zoom to an entire lineup of characters dressed in get-ups from various points in the franchise gearing up to take on a Rathalos. The rest of the trailer showed off content and revealed the patch Under the Moonlight. The collaboration and content will come to the game later this summer.
  3. Ashes of Creation began as one of 2017's most successful Kickstarter projects. Asking for a whopping $750,000, the prospective MMO managed to raise over $3.25 million from interested parties won over by its pitch. Since then, more details about the game's design have been coming out in various updates on Intrepid Studios' blog and social media channels. For those unfamiliar with Ashes of Creation, the premise is that players take on the role of pioneers on a world that hasn't seen civilization for millennia. Players will be able to build communities and cities while exploring to uncover the secrets of the fallen world. Of course, that which can be built can also be destroyed, so player populations are expected to grow around cities, leading to the potential of organic, in-game wars to topple rival settlements. The goal is to create an organic MMO experience that forges a genuine world history for players and locations with something new always on the horizon. Ashes of Creation will be a subscription-based game with a cash shop that offers additional customizations for characters beyond the basics found in character creation. When creating a character, players will have eight playable races to chose from as well as a combination of two archetypes. Those can be combined to create up to 64 unique classes for players to choose from. The choices players make will supposedly have far-ranging consequences. The more player activity done in a certain area, the closer that area becomes to developing a settlement. Where a settlement is placed will have an effect on the surrounding monster populations as it grows. Quests will appear or disappear depending on how players choose to interact with the world. The focus of a settlement could wind up playing a huge role in the game for years to come. The effect players have on the world also means that no server running Ashes of Creation will ever be the same as another, presenting the opportunity for new adventures on other servers. The economy of the world will also be driven by players. Trading can be an incredibly lucrative venture, but players will have to create and defend caravans to successfully pull off a trading mission. That might necessitate hiring other players to defend a caravan from other players looking to loot a fat trade mission. These caravans will determine what kinds of goods and services a settlement, village, or metropolis might be able to provide. While the economy certainly lies players to cities and settlements, there are other mechanics in place that encourage players to invest time and effort into building up their home. When a player purchases a house in a new village, they can hold onto that property. If the village grows into a city, their house also grows. If that city turns into a metropolis, they will be in possession of a mansion. Owning property in a city grants citizenship, further tying a player to their homeland. Alternatively, players can settle far from cities and carve out their own existence in the wilderness. Of course, there are more conventional activities aside from literal worldbuilding. Players who yearn for the thrill of questing will be able to explore the world to find new locations for a prospective settlement or uncover the entrance to a new dungeon of the old world. Intrepid Studios aims to make these hostile, dangerous, and slightly frightening places to venture into - making it a choice with benefits and drawbacks for players to weigh when considering an adventure of that nature. Who knows what lurks beneath the surface of a monster-infested world? On the technical end of things, Ashes of Creation uses Unreal Engine 4 and will be optimized for PC hardware released within the last several years. There will be options for the game to be scaled up and down as needed. The team working on Ashes of Creation has an extreme level of pedigree, with members that have worked on games like Everquest 1, Ever Quest 2, Everquest Next, Star Wars Galaxies, BioShock, Gears of War, Planetside 2, XCOM, and many other projects. One thing that might give some people pause when looking into Ashes of Creation is the past of Steven Sharif, the creative director and CEO of Intrepid Studios. During the Kickstarter, some people noted that prior to making his fortune in real estate, he was involved with a company called XanGo, which is known for its multi-level marketing practices. Multi-level marketing involves recruiting unpaid people who sell a company's products with their recruiter earning a slice of the sale. While technically legal, this strategy typically brings unfavorable comparisons to pyramid schemes. Sharif being involved and profiting from his participation in such a company wasn't seen in a positive light (for reference, studies have estimated that about 990-999 out of every 1000 participants in a multi-level marketing company wind up losing money). Sharif gave an interview to Massively Overpowered to help clear the air. It turns out that he was recruited at 18 to sell XanGo's fruit shakes and vitamins. He managed to create a successful online store to sell these products and made money off of the sales that allowed him to go into real estate. He insists that while there are many companies that use the tactic in disreputable ways, there others like Avon, Marykay, and XanGo that operate on the level with a focus on selling products rather than recruiting people. All of that being said, Sharif's intention to create an MMORPG that's different than anything currently on the market seems genuine. As a long-time MMO gamer, he sees himself in a financial position that enables him to create a game that bridges the gap between open-world, consequential titles and the MMO genre, which has traditionally seen more static worlds. The overall impression of Ashes of Creation is positive. It possesses a vision of an interesting, vibrant world full of player-driven and reactive experiences. The possibility of a world built and governed by players certainly intrigues me.It leaves open the possibility for dramatic confrontations with a certain degree of real history and stakes that few games might be able to provide. The closest comparison I can think of is in EVE Online, where player controlled superweapons and battleships that take years to be built can all be wiped away by a colossal, coordinated raid. Applying that same mindset to cities built and maintained by players opens up a lot of possibilities. While the exact release date of Ashes of Creation remains nebulous, expect to see the closed alpha begin later this year, possibly in December, and a full release either in late 2019 or early 2020. View full article
  4. Ashes of Creation began as one of 2017's most successful Kickstarter projects. Asking for a whopping $750,000, the prospective MMO managed to raise over $3.25 million from interested parties won over by its pitch. Since then, more details about the game's design have been coming out in various updates on Intrepid Studios' blog and social media channels. For those unfamiliar with Ashes of Creation, the premise is that players take on the role of pioneers on a world that hasn't seen civilization for millennia. Players will be able to build communities and cities while exploring to uncover the secrets of the fallen world. Of course, that which can be built can also be destroyed, so player populations are expected to grow around cities, leading to the potential of organic, in-game wars to topple rival settlements. The goal is to create an organic MMO experience that forges a genuine world history for players and locations with something new always on the horizon. Ashes of Creation will be a subscription-based game with a cash shop that offers additional customizations for characters beyond the basics found in character creation. When creating a character, players will have eight playable races to chose from as well as a combination of two archetypes. Those can be combined to create up to 64 unique classes for players to choose from. The choices players make will supposedly have far-ranging consequences. The more player activity done in a certain area, the closer that area becomes to developing a settlement. Where a settlement is placed will have an effect on the surrounding monster populations as it grows. Quests will appear or disappear depending on how players choose to interact with the world. The focus of a settlement could wind up playing a huge role in the game for years to come. The effect players have on the world also means that no server running Ashes of Creation will ever be the same as another, presenting the opportunity for new adventures on other servers. The economy of the world will also be driven by players. Trading can be an incredibly lucrative venture, but players will have to create and defend caravans to successfully pull off a trading mission. That might necessitate hiring other players to defend a caravan from other players looking to loot a fat trade mission. These caravans will determine what kinds of goods and services a settlement, village, or metropolis might be able to provide. While the economy certainly lies players to cities and settlements, there are other mechanics in place that encourage players to invest time and effort into building up their home. When a player purchases a house in a new village, they can hold onto that property. If the village grows into a city, their house also grows. If that city turns into a metropolis, they will be in possession of a mansion. Owning property in a city grants citizenship, further tying a player to their homeland. Alternatively, players can settle far from cities and carve out their own existence in the wilderness. Of course, there are more conventional activities aside from literal worldbuilding. Players who yearn for the thrill of questing will be able to explore the world to find new locations for a prospective settlement or uncover the entrance to a new dungeon of the old world. Intrepid Studios aims to make these hostile, dangerous, and slightly frightening places to venture into - making it a choice with benefits and drawbacks for players to weigh when considering an adventure of that nature. Who knows what lurks beneath the surface of a monster-infested world? On the technical end of things, Ashes of Creation uses Unreal Engine 4 and will be optimized for PC hardware released within the last several years. There will be options for the game to be scaled up and down as needed. The team working on Ashes of Creation has an extreme level of pedigree, with members that have worked on games like Everquest 1, Ever Quest 2, Everquest Next, Star Wars Galaxies, BioShock, Gears of War, Planetside 2, XCOM, and many other projects. One thing that might give some people pause when looking into Ashes of Creation is the past of Steven Sharif, the creative director and CEO of Intrepid Studios. During the Kickstarter, some people noted that prior to making his fortune in real estate, he was involved with a company called XanGo, which is known for its multi-level marketing practices. Multi-level marketing involves recruiting unpaid people who sell a company's products with their recruiter earning a slice of the sale. While technically legal, this strategy typically brings unfavorable comparisons to pyramid schemes. Sharif being involved and profiting from his participation in such a company wasn't seen in a positive light (for reference, studies have estimated that about 990-999 out of every 1000 participants in a multi-level marketing company wind up losing money). Sharif gave an interview to Massively Overpowered to help clear the air. It turns out that he was recruited at 18 to sell XanGo's fruit shakes and vitamins. He managed to create a successful online store to sell these products and made money off of the sales that allowed him to go into real estate. He insists that while there are many companies that use the tactic in disreputable ways, there others like Avon, Marykay, and XanGo that operate on the level with a focus on selling products rather than recruiting people. All of that being said, Sharif's intention to create an MMORPG that's different than anything currently on the market seems genuine. As a long-time MMO gamer, he sees himself in a financial position that enables him to create a game that bridges the gap between open-world, consequential titles and the MMO genre, which has traditionally seen more static worlds. The overall impression of Ashes of Creation is positive. It possesses a vision of an interesting, vibrant world full of player-driven and reactive experiences. The possibility of a world built and governed by players certainly intrigues me.It leaves open the possibility for dramatic confrontations with a certain degree of real history and stakes that few games might be able to provide. The closest comparison I can think of is in EVE Online, where player controlled superweapons and battleships that take years to be built can all be wiped away by a colossal, coordinated raid. Applying that same mindset to cities built and maintained by players opens up a lot of possibilities. While the exact release date of Ashes of Creation remains nebulous, expect to see the closed alpha begin later this year, possibly in December, and a full release either in late 2019 or early 2020.
  5. Roberts Space Industries has been working on Star Citizen since the success of their Kickstarter campaign back in 2012. After five years, the framework of their ambitious space MMO seems to be falling into place. For the better part of the past year, Star Citizen has been sitting in alpha version 2.6, which allowed for limited travel around a space station testing ground that laid out some of the core principles that would be present in the final game. 3.0 drastically expands the scope to include a collection of moons and a planetoid with various outposts, wrecks, and space ports along with more mechanics and opportunities out in the 'verse. The 3.0 update introduces trade as a functional mechanic that was impossible in 2.6. Players can now purchase goods that are physically stored in their ship and transport them to different locations in to try to corner the market. Of course, that also opens up the opportunity for less scrupulous players to become the fledgling universe's first space pirates. Outside of habitable settlements, where weapons are disabled, anything goes. The final vision of Star Citizen will offer players the chance to become bounty hunters to track and capture or kill lawbreakers, which will hopefully balance out piracy. Of course, if players are making money then they need something to spend it on. Players can buy new parts for their ships, fancy handheld guns, snazzy new jumpsuits, or new casual clothes. All of that relies on 3.0's new shopping system that allows all of those goods to be purchased for the first time. The addition of navigable moons represents the first public steps of Star Citizen toward its end goal of a universe full of planets to explore. The moons are each distinct, offering different environments, locations, and opportunities. For the first time, players will be able to set foot on the surface of an alien world and perhaps find ruins worth scavenging or missions to complete. These locations consist of Cellin, the moon of dormant volcanoes, Daymar, a desert-like moon, and Yela, an icy rock floating in the black. A new landing zone has been added on the planetoid of Delamar called Levski, a ramshackle, converted mining colony teased in previous Star Citizen promotional videos. That doesn't mean 3.0's launch has been smooth. The patch caused many players to struggle with the game's memory requirements, rendering it unplayable for some who had found 2.6 to be manageable. The game is certainly still in an alpha state so, while it shows a lot of promise and has become one of the largest crowdfunding operations in history, take all of its potential with some grains of salt and temper your expectations. 3.0 is not even close to what the final version of Star Citizen will be - you can just see some of the foundations being laid. A lot of optimization still needs to be done. 3.0 stands as the first of Roberts Space Industries' scheduled quarterly releases. From now on, the game will be updated at the end of every quarter of the year with new features, ships, and locations. The latest version comes with a new launcher that allows future updates to be downloaded without downloading the entire game over again, streamlining the updating process for Star Citizen's space-faring fans. A lot of other minor improvements are included with 3.0 and you can read about them in the full change log on Star Citizen's website. There's no solid release date for when to expect Star Citizen to exit development, so the final product is likely still years away from completion. That being said, it's pretty amazing to see a project so ambitious to keep making progress. Who knows what surprises Roberts Space Industries has in store once the basic mechanics and universal building blocks are finally settled into place? View full article
  6. Jack Gardner

    Star Citizen's Alpha Enters 3.0

    Roberts Space Industries has been working on Star Citizen since the success of their Kickstarter campaign back in 2012. After five years, the framework of their ambitious space MMO seems to be falling into place. For the better part of the past year, Star Citizen has been sitting in alpha version 2.6, which allowed for limited travel around a space station testing ground that laid out some of the core principles that would be present in the final game. 3.0 drastically expands the scope to include a collection of moons and a planetoid with various outposts, wrecks, and space ports along with more mechanics and opportunities out in the 'verse. The 3.0 update introduces trade as a functional mechanic that was impossible in 2.6. Players can now purchase goods that are physically stored in their ship and transport them to different locations in to try to corner the market. Of course, that also opens up the opportunity for less scrupulous players to become the fledgling universe's first space pirates. Outside of habitable settlements, where weapons are disabled, anything goes. The final vision of Star Citizen will offer players the chance to become bounty hunters to track and capture or kill lawbreakers, which will hopefully balance out piracy. Of course, if players are making money then they need something to spend it on. Players can buy new parts for their ships, fancy handheld guns, snazzy new jumpsuits, or new casual clothes. All of that relies on 3.0's new shopping system that allows all of those goods to be purchased for the first time. The addition of navigable moons represents the first public steps of Star Citizen toward its end goal of a universe full of planets to explore. The moons are each distinct, offering different environments, locations, and opportunities. For the first time, players will be able to set foot on the surface of an alien world and perhaps find ruins worth scavenging or missions to complete. These locations consist of Cellin, the moon of dormant volcanoes, Daymar, a desert-like moon, and Yela, an icy rock floating in the black. A new landing zone has been added on the planetoid of Delamar called Levski, a ramshackle, converted mining colony teased in previous Star Citizen promotional videos. That doesn't mean 3.0's launch has been smooth. The patch caused many players to struggle with the game's memory requirements, rendering it unplayable for some who had found 2.6 to be manageable. The game is certainly still in an alpha state so, while it shows a lot of promise and has become one of the largest crowdfunding operations in history, take all of its potential with some grains of salt and temper your expectations. 3.0 is not even close to what the final version of Star Citizen will be - you can just see some of the foundations being laid. A lot of optimization still needs to be done. 3.0 stands as the first of Roberts Space Industries' scheduled quarterly releases. From now on, the game will be updated at the end of every quarter of the year with new features, ships, and locations. The latest version comes with a new launcher that allows future updates to be downloaded without downloading the entire game over again, streamlining the updating process for Star Citizen's space-faring fans. A lot of other minor improvements are included with 3.0 and you can read about them in the full change log on Star Citizen's website. There's no solid release date for when to expect Star Citizen to exit development, so the final product is likely still years away from completion. That being said, it's pretty amazing to see a project so ambitious to keep making progress. Who knows what surprises Roberts Space Industries has in store once the basic mechanics and universal building blocks are finally settled into place?
  7. Bluehole Studios announced a new MMORPG today during the G-Star media showcase in Busan, South Korea. The upcoming MMO will be developed by Kakao Games, a subsidiary of Bluehole, as well as published by Bluehole, which made a name for itself with Tera and the stratospheric rise of PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds. Their new title goes by the name Ascent: Infinite Realm (A:IR) and offers a world of fantasy mixed with steampunk with a heavy emphasis on vehicular combat. One of the selling points of A:IR definitely seems to be the ability players will have to board massive flying ships to traverse the world and wage war in the Realm vs. Realm combat, A:IR's take on PvP. Players can rely on their vessels or take to the ground in hulking fantasy mechs to continue an offensive or perhaps defend their territory using anti-aircraft weapons. In order to prevails, players will have to use cunning strategies and equipment like mines, hand-to-hand fighting (players can board enemy ships by using jet packs), or cannons. While the aerial combat and mechanical take on fantasy are clearly angled to be the main draw of A:IR, customization and building will also be a focus for the MMO. Each airship can be customized to change its type, color, appearance, and performance. Players will be able to construct bases to share with their friends, opening up different professions, like cooking or alchemy. Kakao Games hopes that allowing players to create quests, change game difficulty on the fly, and basically just giving players the flexibility to play how they want will allow players to have a good time regardless of where their interests lie within the scope of the MMO. Minsung Kim, CEO of Kakao Games gave a statement as part of the announcement saying, “All of us at Kakao Games are very proud to be able to work with the remarkable talent at Bluehole and bring their new AAA MMORPG to Western audiences. We are confident that we can localize their creative vision effectively and help make A:IR into a massive global success.” Ascent: Infinite Realm will see a worldwide release, and people interested in checking out the upcoming beta test scheduled for the first half of 2018 can enter to win a spot by signing up for the A:IR newsletter on the official website. No official release date has been announced.
  8. Bluehole Studios announced a new MMORPG today during the G-Star media showcase in Busan, South Korea. The upcoming MMO will be developed by Kakao Games, a subsidiary of Bluehole, as well as published by Bluehole, which made a name for itself with Tera and the stratospheric rise of PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds. Their new title goes by the name Ascent: Infinite Realm (A:IR) and offers a world of fantasy mixed with steampunk with a heavy emphasis on vehicular combat. One of the selling points of A:IR definitely seems to be the ability players will have to board massive flying ships to traverse the world and wage war in the Realm vs. Realm combat, A:IR's take on PvP. Players can rely on their vessels or take to the ground in hulking fantasy mechs to continue an offensive or perhaps defend their territory using anti-aircraft weapons. In order to prevails, players will have to use cunning strategies and equipment like mines, hand-to-hand fighting (players can board enemy ships by using jet packs), or cannons. While the aerial combat and mechanical take on fantasy are clearly angled to be the main draw of A:IR, customization and building will also be a focus for the MMO. Each airship can be customized to change its type, color, appearance, and performance. Players will be able to construct bases to share with their friends, opening up different professions, like cooking or alchemy. Kakao Games hopes that allowing players to create quests, change game difficulty on the fly, and basically just giving players the flexibility to play how they want will allow players to have a good time regardless of where their interests lie within the scope of the MMO. Minsung Kim, CEO of Kakao Games gave a statement as part of the announcement saying, “All of us at Kakao Games are very proud to be able to work with the remarkable talent at Bluehole and bring their new AAA MMORPG to Western audiences. We are confident that we can localize their creative vision effectively and help make A:IR into a massive global success.” Ascent: Infinite Realm will see a worldwide release, and people interested in checking out the upcoming beta test scheduled for the first half of 2018 can enter to win a spot by signing up for the A:IR newsletter on the official website. No official release date has been announced. View full article
  9. After Bungie concluded their work on Halo: Reach, they turned their eyes toward a game that a small segment of the company had been fleshing out for years. That game would eventually become Destiny after overcoming numerous development challenges. Destiny's devs had to contend with a malicious engine that required obscene amounts of time to load changes, stratospheric expectations, a rough split with its long-time composer, and the decision to scrap the entire story with less than a year left of development time. The stakes were high. But when Destiny released to the public, Bungie thought they had a winner on their hands - Destiny was, after all, the most pre-ordered game in history! Unfortunately, the critical reception was mixed. Despite this, Destiny certainly accrued a huge following over the years, which led to Jason Pfitzer from Northern Heart Games, this week's guest, to nominate Bungie's FPS MMO hybrid. Looking at Destiny several years after its launch and subsequent revisions - is it one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Destiny 'Hope Rising' by Jillian Aversa and zircon (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03002) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can follow Jason on Twitter, @JasonPfitzer, and be sure to check out the game he has been working on at Northern Heart Games! Pinbrawl is a competitive, four-player pinball melee. Having played it at multiple stages in its development, I can confirm that it's very fun. If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  10. After Bungie concluded their work on Halo: Reach, they turned their eyes toward a game that a small segment of the company had been fleshing out for years. That game would eventually become Destiny after overcoming numerous development challenges. Destiny's devs had to contend with a malicious engine that required obscene amounts of time to load changes, stratospheric expectations, a rough split with its long-time composer, and the decision to scrap the entire story with less than a year left of development time. The stakes were high. But when Destiny released to the public, Bungie thought they had a winner on their hands - Destiny was, after all, the most pre-ordered game in history! Unfortunately, the critical reception was mixed. Despite this, Destiny certainly accrued a huge following over the years, which led to Jason Pfitzer from Northern Heart Games, this week's guest, to nominate Bungie's FPS MMO hybrid. Looking at Destiny several years after its launch and subsequent revisions - is it one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Destiny 'Hope Rising' by Jillian Aversa and zircon (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03002) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can follow Jason on Twitter, @JasonPfitzer, and be sure to check out the game he has been working on at Northern Heart Games! Pinbrawl is a competitive, four-player pinball melee. Having played it at multiple stages in its development, I can confirm that it's very fun. If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  11. The Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment (MADE) has announced today that they will be officially resurrecting Habitat, the first graphical massively multiplayer game. Created in 1986 by Lucasfilm Games for the Commodore 64, Habitat proved to be popular, but costly, leading to its discontinuation in 1988. Nearly 30 years later, MADE has overcome the technical challenges and will be reopening Habitat to the public tomorrow. While there had been online games with thriving communities prior to Habitat, they had all been in the world of MUDs, Multi-User Dungeons, games where interaction and visuals were entirely handled by reading and inputting text. Habitat brought games from text into a functional graphics-based format. It also originated the word avatar as used for a digital representation of a player. Players could contract disease, commit murder, rob strangers, and own homes. The game world ran on its own player-driven economy and was also governed by the players. This apparently led to chaos in the early days of Habitat before laws and rules of etiquette were established. Cosmetic items and accessories became an obsession for many in the community - 30 years might be a long time, but gamers still loved looking cool back in the first graphical MMO. “Habitat was so far ahead of its time, it was never able to reach even a tenth of the potential of its capabilities due to the future having not been evenly distributed enough at the time,” said Alex Handy, founder and director of the MADE. “Today, we think of thousands of players being in a single world at once as normal, but Habitat built this type of environment 30 years ago with the digital equivalent of sticks and stones.” As an interesting sidenote: Habitat ran on a Commodore 64 online service named Quantum Link, the predecessor of America Online. This is part of what made making Habitat compatible with modern systems difficult. The architecture of the Commodore 64 and modern computers aren't super compatible, to say nothing of the server-side issues. Restoring Habitat took MADE four years and that was with the help of the original programmers, like Chip Morningstar and Randy Farmer, beta testers, and online contributions from retro enthusiasts and leaders in the tech industry. Fujitsu, the company that purchased the rights to Habitat in order to release it in Japan, Dolby, Sony, and Stratus all contributed to the restoration efforts, too. Randy Farmer was the original C64 client programmer and the first Oracle, one of the administrator gods of Habitat. He also took the lead role in restoring the Habitat software and service. Said Farmer, “We couldn’t have pulled off the small miracle of this game, then or now, without a lot of collaborators: some original team members returned to help out, like original lead Chip Morningstar, myself, and a few of the 500 1986 Habitat Beta testers (who built much of the online world you can see today). Also, many fans of the worlds/MMOs descended from Habitat and contributors from the vibrant C64 retro gaming community. Our contributors are around the world – and include various tech CEOs, CTOs and VPs! We’d all like to thank the MADE for making this project possible: to restore the first MMO, Lucasfilm’s Habitat.” The server hosting the restored alpha version of Habitat will go live to the general public on June 2 at 6pm PT. There will be a local kick-off event at the MADE's Oakland, California location. Players around the world who want to check out the revival of Habitat can do so for free. There will be some fiddling with a C64 emulator and connection to the server, but you can find simple instructions on NeoHabitat.org.
  12. The Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment (MADE) has announced today that they will be officially resurrecting Habitat, the first graphical massively multiplayer game. Created in 1986 by Lucasfilm Games for the Commodore 64, Habitat proved to be popular, but costly, leading to its discontinuation in 1988. Nearly 30 years later, MADE has overcome the technical challenges and will be reopening Habitat to the public tomorrow. While there had been online games with thriving communities prior to Habitat, they had all been in the world of MUDs, Multi-User Dungeons, games where interaction and visuals were entirely handled by reading and inputting text. Habitat brought games from text into a functional graphics-based format. It also originated the word avatar as used for a digital representation of a player. Players could contract disease, commit murder, rob strangers, and own homes. The game world ran on its own player-driven economy and was also governed by the players. This apparently led to chaos in the early days of Habitat before laws and rules of etiquette were established. Cosmetic items and accessories became an obsession for many in the community - 30 years might be a long time, but gamers still loved looking cool back in the first graphical MMO. “Habitat was so far ahead of its time, it was never able to reach even a tenth of the potential of its capabilities due to the future having not been evenly distributed enough at the time,” said Alex Handy, founder and director of the MADE. “Today, we think of thousands of players being in a single world at once as normal, but Habitat built this type of environment 30 years ago with the digital equivalent of sticks and stones.” As an interesting sidenote: Habitat ran on a Commodore 64 online service named Quantum Link, the predecessor of America Online. This is part of what made making Habitat compatible with modern systems difficult. The architecture of the Commodore 64 and modern computers aren't super compatible, to say nothing of the server-side issues. Restoring Habitat took MADE four years and that was with the help of the original programmers, like Chip Morningstar and Randy Farmer, beta testers, and online contributions from retro enthusiasts and leaders in the tech industry. Fujitsu, the company that purchased the rights to Habitat in order to release it in Japan, Dolby, Sony, and Stratus all contributed to the restoration efforts, too. Randy Farmer was the original C64 client programmer and the first Oracle, one of the administrator gods of Habitat. He also took the lead role in restoring the Habitat software and service. Said Farmer, “We couldn’t have pulled off the small miracle of this game, then or now, without a lot of collaborators: some original team members returned to help out, like original lead Chip Morningstar, myself, and a few of the 500 1986 Habitat Beta testers (who built much of the online world you can see today). Also, many fans of the worlds/MMOs descended from Habitat and contributors from the vibrant C64 retro gaming community. Our contributors are around the world – and include various tech CEOs, CTOs and VPs! We’d all like to thank the MADE for making this project possible: to restore the first MMO, Lucasfilm’s Habitat.” The server hosting the restored alpha version of Habitat will go live to the general public on June 2 at 6pm PT. There will be a local kick-off event at the MADE's Oakland, California location. Players around the world who want to check out the revival of Habitat can do so for free. There will be some fiddling with a C64 emulator and connection to the server, but you can find simple instructions on NeoHabitat.org. View full article
  13. The early days of turn-of-the-millennium internet held a lot of weird, experimental treasures. In early 2003, one of those corners was born out of game designer Zack Johnson's hand-drawn stick figures and a week of fevered madness. It was meant to be more of a joke than a game, a small effort to get something, anything, done. A year later Johnson's slapdash, slapstick, slapsilly game, an online, browser-based RPG called Kingdom of Loathing, had captured the attention of a pre-YouTube internet and over 300,000 accounts had been created. If you think that perhaps those numbers were a mere flash in the pan, you'd be wrong as Kingdom of Loathing retained a strong 100,000 - 150,000 players as of 2008. Johnson and his small team at Asymmetric Publications pumped out regular updates to the game and to this day keep new jokes and content flowing into the Kingdom of Loathing. The game has always been free and boasts no ads, but players can donate $10 to support the game and receive an in-game item called a Mr. Accessory that acts as an item on its own or can be traded for other powerful items at the Mr. Store. Over the years Mr. items developed their own economy among the player-base that has actually been studied by economists. After working on Kingdom of Loathing for over a decade, the team released their second game, Word Realms. The unique PC RPG tasks players with wielding words a weapons by way of a Scrabble-meets-Boggle combat system. The 2013 release went over well for fans, but seemed to generate little buzz in the more mainstream gaming world. Now, the year is 2016 and a mysterious little teaser has popped up for West of Loathing, a comedy RPG set in the tumbleweed drenched West of the Loathing universe. West of Loathing has already been greenlit on Steam Greenlight and Asymmetric Publications boasts that the RPG will hold a lot of content for players. The branching narrative will take place in an expansive world filled with turn-based tactical combat. The devs describe it as "basically a stick-figure Skyrim with beans and big hats." Players can choose from one of three starting classes to do battle with goblins, skeletons, snakes, and ghost accountants: Cow Puncher, Beanslinger, or Snake Oiler. Though many players still call the multiplayer community around Kingdom of Loathing home, West of Loathing doesn't appear to be a replacement for the MMORPG. The upcoming RPG will be single-player and that doesn't seem to be changing anytime soon. West of Loathing is slated for an early 2017 release on PC, Mac, and Linux.
  14. The early days of turn-of-the-millennium internet held a lot of weird, experimental treasures. In early 2003, one of those corners was born out of game designer Zack Johnson's hand-drawn stick figures and a week of fevered madness. It was meant to be more of a joke than a game, a small effort to get something, anything, done. A year later Johnson's slapdash, slapstick, slapsilly game, an online, browser-based RPG called Kingdom of Loathing, had captured the attention of a pre-YouTube internet and over 300,000 accounts had been created. If you think that perhaps those numbers were a mere flash in the pan, you'd be wrong as Kingdom of Loathing retained a strong 100,000 - 150,000 players as of 2008. Johnson and his small team at Asymmetric Publications pumped out regular updates to the game and to this day keep new jokes and content flowing into the Kingdom of Loathing. The game has always been free and boasts no ads, but players can donate $10 to support the game and receive an in-game item called a Mr. Accessory that acts as an item on its own or can be traded for other powerful items at the Mr. Store. Over the years Mr. items developed their own economy among the player-base that has actually been studied by economists. After working on Kingdom of Loathing for over a decade, the team released their second game, Word Realms. The unique PC RPG tasks players with wielding words a weapons by way of a Scrabble-meets-Boggle combat system. The 2013 release went over well for fans, but seemed to generate little buzz in the more mainstream gaming world. Now, the year is 2016 and a mysterious little teaser has popped up for West of Loathing, a comedy RPG set in the tumbleweed drenched West of the Loathing universe. West of Loathing has already been greenlit on Steam Greenlight and Asymmetric Publications boasts that the RPG will hold a lot of content for players. The branching narrative will take place in an expansive world filled with turn-based tactical combat. The devs describe it as "basically a stick-figure Skyrim with beans and big hats." Players can choose from one of three starting classes to do battle with goblins, skeletons, snakes, and ghost accountants: Cow Puncher, Beanslinger, or Snake Oiler. Though many players still call the multiplayer community around Kingdom of Loathing home, West of Loathing doesn't appear to be a replacement for the MMORPG. The upcoming RPG will be single-player and that doesn't seem to be changing anytime soon. West of Loathing is slated for an early 2017 release on PC, Mac, and Linux. View full article
  15. herobyclicking

    Tree of Savior

    Hello friends! I know this game has received mixed reviews, but golly it tickles the nostalgia I have for Ragnarok Online. And I love the art. It's not a great game, it's definitely grindy, by it's free to play and I imagine it will go into my rotation of games I half-heartedly play on a regular basis. Anyone else?
  16. herobyclicking

    Black Desert Online

    Okay friends, Who is playing this? Thoughts? My brother-in-law mentioned he was playing it and really is enjoying it. I looks a lot like Guild Wars 2 to me for some reason. I would love to hear other impressions.
  17. Developer Fronteir Development hopes that spinning off the popular PvP aspect of Elite Dangerous into its own mode will expose more people to their burgeoning space MMO at a drastically reduced price. For $7.49, players can enter the CQC tournament and battle one another in deadly space combat, a bit less expensive than the $59.99 core game. Those who buy the Arena beforehand and choose to opt into the full game later will have the cost of Arena deducted from their purchase. Four ships are available in the standalone Arena: The Federal fighter, Imperial fighter, the Sidewinder, and the Eagle. Each ship has its own advantages and drawbacks. Different tactical loadouts become available as players rank up through combat. Four arenas will be available at launch: a large citadel tower, a mining facility, a cavernous space station, and a frozen asteroid belt. Arena features three modes for commanders to test their skills against other players: Eight-player free-for-all, team deathmatch, and capture the flag. “Elite Dangerous: Arena is a different kind of multi-player shooter, offering competitive gamers the chance to jump into thrilling space combat and challenge the world,” Frontier CEO David Braben said. “We showcase CQC to players at events around the world, and it’s a hit wherever it’s played.” All Elite Dangerous: Arena and Elite Dangerous CQC players are eligible to enter Frontier’s $100,000 Close Quarter Combat Championships tournament. Players can participate in a series of heats throughout the coming spring and summer. Winners will be invited to the grand final (held at a secret location) that will be streamed online later this year. Elite Dangerous: Arena is available now for PC View full article
  18. Developer Fronteir Development hopes that spinning off the popular PvP aspect of Elite Dangerous into its own mode will expose more people to their burgeoning space MMO at a drastically reduced price. For $7.49, players can enter the CQC tournament and battle one another in deadly space combat, a bit less expensive than the $59.99 core game. Those who buy the Arena beforehand and choose to opt into the full game later will have the cost of Arena deducted from their purchase. Four ships are available in the standalone Arena: The Federal fighter, Imperial fighter, the Sidewinder, and the Eagle. Each ship has its own advantages and drawbacks. Different tactical loadouts become available as players rank up through combat. Four arenas will be available at launch: a large citadel tower, a mining facility, a cavernous space station, and a frozen asteroid belt. Arena features three modes for commanders to test their skills against other players: Eight-player free-for-all, team deathmatch, and capture the flag. “Elite Dangerous: Arena is a different kind of multi-player shooter, offering competitive gamers the chance to jump into thrilling space combat and challenge the world,” Frontier CEO David Braben said. “We showcase CQC to players at events around the world, and it’s a hit wherever it’s played.” All Elite Dangerous: Arena and Elite Dangerous CQC players are eligible to enter Frontier’s $100,000 Close Quarter Combat Championships tournament. Players can participate in a series of heats throughout the coming spring and summer. Winners will be invited to the grand final (held at a secret location) that will be streamed online later this year. Elite Dangerous: Arena is available now for PC
  19. Less than a year after the release of Warlords of Draenor, Blizzard has begun teasing the next update to their flagship MMORPG. Legion will center around the return of the Burning Legion and their efforts to resurrect the dark titan Sargeras, Ravager of Worlds. Heroes from every corner of Azeroth will need to band together to thwart the invasion and their insidious goals. In order to do so, a journey must be undertaken to the fabled Broken Isles, a land of myth and cataclysm. There, players will have to obtain and wield artifacts from the dawn of the world the hold enough power to bring low the oncoming legion with the aid of Illiden the Betrayer. Legion will offer a number of improvements and additions to the existing game. First, the level cap will be increased from 100 to 110. Players who want to jump right into the action can instantly boost one character to 100 if they wish. Second, and most excitingly for lore hounds, players will be able to play as a Demon Hunter for the first time in the MMO's history. The Demon Hunter uses speed and transformations to deliver powerful melee attacks and crippling damage. Demon Hunters also begin their adventures at higher levels than normal classes and have a unique starting experience separate from previous classes. The Broken Isles represent an entirely new continent full of adventures for players to explore. Legion will also introduce the Order Hall, a place where players can command NPC followers in your class' order to undertake missions. A new honor system for PvP in Arena and Battlegrounds will yield a slew of PvP-specific powers. Artifact weapons will play a big role in both the story and mechanics of the new expansion. Each character that faces the Burning Legion will be given a class-specific legendary weapon that can be customized in depth. These weapons have been whispered about in the lore of Azeroth for millennia and when players wield them, they will grow in power, gaining perks, abilities, and visual enhancements. With World of Warcraft subscriptions dropping recently, are the features Legion aims to introduce enough to entice you to return? View full article
  20. Less than a year after the release of Warlords of Draenor, Blizzard has begun teasing the next update to their flagship MMORPG. Legion will center around the return of the Burning Legion and their efforts to resurrect the dark titan Sargeras, Ravager of Worlds. Heroes from every corner of Azeroth will need to band together to thwart the invasion and their insidious goals. In order to do so, a journey must be undertaken to the fabled Broken Isles, a land of myth and cataclysm. There, players will have to obtain and wield artifacts from the dawn of the world the hold enough power to bring low the oncoming legion with the aid of Illiden the Betrayer. Legion will offer a number of improvements and additions to the existing game. First, the level cap will be increased from 100 to 110. Players who want to jump right into the action can instantly boost one character to 100 if they wish. Second, and most excitingly for lore hounds, players will be able to play as a Demon Hunter for the first time in the MMO's history. The Demon Hunter uses speed and transformations to deliver powerful melee attacks and crippling damage. Demon Hunters also begin their adventures at higher levels than normal classes and have a unique starting experience separate from previous classes. The Broken Isles represent an entirely new continent full of adventures for players to explore. Legion will also introduce the Order Hall, a place where players can command NPC followers in your class' order to undertake missions. A new honor system for PvP in Arena and Battlegrounds will yield a slew of PvP-specific powers. Artifact weapons will play a big role in both the story and mechanics of the new expansion. Each character that faces the Burning Legion will be given a class-specific legendary weapon that can be customized in depth. These weapons have been whispered about in the lore of Azeroth for millennia and when players wield them, they will grow in power, gaining perks, abilities, and visual enhancements. With World of Warcraft subscriptions dropping recently, are the features Legion aims to introduce enough to entice you to return?
  21. After seven years in and out of development, Blizzard has decided to pull the plug on its MMO project Titan. Polygon broke the story today after publishing quotes from an interview with Blizzard CEO Mike Morhaine and Chris Metzen, the vice president of story and franchise development. The cancellation of Titan doesn't come as a huge shock in the wake of news that surfaced last year that Blizzard was going back to the drawing board yet again to reevaluate its investment into the new MMO. What does this move mean for Blizzard? Well, not a whole lot. Technically, Blizzard never announced Titan. We don't even know if Titan was going to be the name of the finished game. For Blizzard, the cancellation of project Titan means a lot of wasted resources and time, but it also means the company can refocus on their other projects. As for the public, we won't be seeing another MMO from Blizzard anytime soon, though World of Warcraft 2 is rumored to be in development. We might also expect to see games from different genres or entirely new IPs coming out of the studio. Though the death of Titan might be disappointing, it just means that Blizzard has something even more amazing up its sleeve. View full article
  22. After seven years in and out of development, Blizzard has decided to pull the plug on its MMO project Titan. Polygon broke the story today after publishing quotes from an interview with Blizzard CEO Mike Morhaine and Chris Metzen, the vice president of story and franchise development. The cancellation of Titan doesn't come as a huge shock in the wake of news that surfaced last year that Blizzard was going back to the drawing board yet again to reevaluate its investment into the new MMO. What does this move mean for Blizzard? Well, not a whole lot. Technically, Blizzard never announced Titan. We don't even know if Titan was going to be the name of the finished game. For Blizzard, the cancellation of project Titan means a lot of wasted resources and time, but it also means the company can refocus on their other projects. As for the public, we won't be seeing another MMO from Blizzard anytime soon, though World of Warcraft 2 is rumored to be in development. We might also expect to see games from different genres or entirely new IPs coming out of the studio. Though the death of Titan might be disappointing, it just means that Blizzard has something even more amazing up its sleeve.
  23. Anyone with an early copy of the upcoming sci-fi shooter should be able to play it before the official launch. The servers have been up since 6AM CST this morning to allow members of the press and anyone fortunate enough to get their hands on a full-release copy a head start on Destiny's content. Expect to see social media going bananas over the next twelve hours as we close in on the official launch of Bungie's next first-person shooter. According to Activision, Destiny's launch has taken on historic proportions by becoming the most pre-ordered new video game IP ever. This isn't terribly surprising since over 4.6 million players participated in the Destiny beta, setting a high bar for future betas this generation. "Destiny is the game we've always wanted to make," said Bungie's president, Harold Ryan. "We've dreamt of this universe for years, so we couldn't be more thrilled to swing open the doors and let fans shape this experience as they tell their unique stories in the game. For us, the next generation of games is all about allowing players to collide and interact with each other as they take on epic, action-packed adventures all their own." Destiny releases September 9 for PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, and Xbox One.
  24. Anyone with an early copy of the upcoming sci-fi shooter should be able to play it before the official launch. The servers have been up since 6AM CST this morning to allow members of the press and anyone fortunate enough to get their hands on a full-release copy a head start on Destiny's content. Expect to see social media going bananas over the next twelve hours as we close in on the official launch of Bungie's next first-person shooter. According to Activision, Destiny's launch has taken on historic proportions by becoming the most pre-ordered new video game IP ever. This isn't terribly surprising since over 4.6 million players participated in the Destiny beta, setting a high bar for future betas this generation. "Destiny is the game we've always wanted to make," said Bungie's president, Harold Ryan. "We've dreamt of this universe for years, so we couldn't be more thrilled to swing open the doors and let fans shape this experience as they tell their unique stories in the game. For us, the next generation of games is all about allowing players to collide and interact with each other as they take on epic, action-packed adventures all their own." Destiny releases September 9 for PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, and Xbox One. View full article
  25. Publisher Perfect World Entertainment and developer Cryptic Studios have announced that their MMO set within the Forgotten Realms Dungeons and Dragons universe will be appearing on consoles early next year. Not many details are readily available about the console version of Neverwinter at this time. However, it should include all of the content that appears on PC, including the upcoming fourth expansion that releases on August 14 called Tyranny of Dragons. "Neverwinter is our premier title to bring to console players,” said Perfect World Entertainment CEO, Alan Chen. “Consoles are a perfect fit for action-oriented MMORPGs like Neverwinter, and we are thrilled to be one of the first publishers to bring premium free-to-play titles to leading next-gen platforms. Being able to bring Neverwinter to the Xbox One is a critical achievement for Perfect World. It is our first step taking our games beyond the PC market.” It is important to note that while Neverwinter will be free, it does require an Xbox Live Gold subscription. Neverwinter will release on Xbox One sometime during the first half of 2015. View full article
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