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Found 27 results

  1. Back in 2017, Square Enix and Marvel announced their collaboration on a game based on Earth's Mightiest Heroes, The Avengers. After over two years of total silence, E3 2019 saw the debut of Marvel's Avengers, an online multiplayer co-op action game with a narrative focus and a unique take on the world of Marvel's comic book universe. Although Square Enix's presentation on Marvel's Avengers failed to show off any actual gameplay, the trailer was built using the in-game engine. The visuals look spectacular, with a realistic style clearly inspired by the MCU, but with its own unique takes on the signature heroes which will surely cause discussions within the fandom; for example, Captain America wears a tactical outfit complete with a bulky flak jacket, giving him a more brutish appearance than the Chris Evans version of the character. Marvel's Avengers tells an intriguing story which looks to set up a brand new status quo for these iconic characters. The first trailer for the game (seen below) shows the events of "A-Day," which sees the destruction of the team's custom helicarrier, causing the death of numerous civilians and – apparently – Captain America himself. Five years later, The Avengers have long since disbanded, but are forced to reassemble when a new threat presents itself. One notable mystery teased in the presentation regards the origin of the helicarrier's destruction; was it doomed by a miscalculation from Tony Stark, or sabotaged by an outside force? Despite the apparent death of Captain America, there must be more to this part of the story, since the star-spangled man remains one of five playable characters confirmed by developers Crystal Dynamics and Eidos Montreal, who had previously collaborated on 2018's Shadow of the Tomb Raider. Alongside Cap, Iron Man, Black Widow, The Hulk, and Thor round out the main cast revealed during the presentation, though a teaser at the end did suggest Hank Pym (Ant-Man) plays a role in the game, though it remains unclear if he will be a playable Avenger. As for future content updates, the team promised that playable Avengers will be free, and there will be no lootboxes or pay-to-win microtransactions. They also teased early beta access for PlayStation 4 players and further exclusive "surprises" to be revealed at a later date. Could this include a potential crossover with Marvel's Spider-Man? We can only speculate. While it's easy to get excited for Marvel's Avengers, the E3 presentation left more questions than answers. We still haven't seen gameplay, how multiplayer works compared to playing solo, and how much content will be available at launch; while the absence of lootboxes is much appreciated, the promise of an "ever-expanding" experience can't help but call to mind the veritable graveyard of "live service" titles which were lambasted for a dearth of content in the early part of their life cycles. No matter what, the promise of a big-budget Avengers video game is simply too good to ignore. More information about the ambitious title will surely trickle out as E3 2019 progresses, but perhaps the biggest and most exciting announcement regarding this mysterious game came in the form of a release date: Marvel's Avengers hits PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC, and Google Stadia on May 15, 2020. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  2. Back in 2017, Square Enix and Marvel announced their collaboration on a game based on Earth's Mightiest Heroes, The Avengers. After over two years of total silence, E3 2019 saw the debut of Marvel's Avengers, an online multiplayer co-op action game with a narrative focus and a unique take on the world of Marvel's comic book universe. Although Square Enix's presentation on Marvel's Avengers failed to show off any actual gameplay, the trailer was built using the in-game engine. The visuals look spectacular, with a realistic style clearly inspired by the MCU, but with its own unique takes on the signature heroes which will surely cause discussions within the fandom; for example, Captain America wears a tactical outfit complete with a bulky flak jacket, giving him a more brutish appearance than the Chris Evans version of the character. Marvel's Avengers tells an intriguing story which looks to set up a brand new status quo for these iconic characters. The first trailer for the game (seen below) shows the events of "A-Day," which sees the destruction of the team's custom helicarrier, causing the death of numerous civilians and – apparently – Captain America himself. Five years later, The Avengers have long since disbanded, but are forced to reassemble when a new threat presents itself. One notable mystery teased in the presentation regards the origin of the helicarrier's destruction; was it doomed by a miscalculation from Tony Stark, or sabotaged by an outside force? Despite the apparent death of Captain America, there must be more to this part of the story, since the star-spangled man remains one of five playable characters confirmed by developers Crystal Dynamics and Eidos Montreal, who had previously collaborated on 2018's Shadow of the Tomb Raider. Alongside Cap, Iron Man, Black Widow, The Hulk, and Thor round out the main cast revealed during the presentation, though a teaser at the end did suggest Hank Pym (Ant-Man) plays a role in the game, though it remains unclear if he will be a playable Avenger. As for future content updates, the team promised that playable Avengers will be free, and there will be no lootboxes or pay-to-win microtransactions. They also teased early beta access for PlayStation 4 players and further exclusive "surprises" to be revealed at a later date. Could this include a potential crossover with Marvel's Spider-Man? We can only speculate. While it's easy to get excited for Marvel's Avengers, the E3 presentation left more questions than answers. We still haven't seen gameplay, how multiplayer works compared to playing solo, and how much content will be available at launch; while the absence of lootboxes is much appreciated, the promise of an "ever-expanding" experience can't help but call to mind the veritable graveyard of "live service" titles which were lambasted for a dearth of content in the early part of their life cycles. No matter what, the promise of a big-budget Avengers video game is simply too good to ignore. More information about the ambitious title will surely trickle out as E3 2019 progresses, but perhaps the biggest and most exciting announcement regarding this mysterious game came in the form of a release date: Marvel's Avengers hits PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC, and Google Stadia on May 15, 2020. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  3. League of Legends has a long and complicated history with its own lore. Plagued by rewritten character biographies and nations whose conflicts have been wiped from existence over the years, Riot Games decided to nullify all of the game's fictional past in 2015 (even eliminating the very concept of summoner's, the very role of the players themselves). Since then, new backstories have emerged for their various characters touching on new wars, new factions, new pieces of Runeterra's history. Now, presumably with a firmer grip on the lore of the popular MOBA, Riot has teamed up with Marvel to produce a line of comics set within the League of Legends universe that highlights the origins of some of their most iconic heroes. The first in the League of Legends graphic novel series will be titled Ashe: Warmother. The comics begin to release May, 2019. Warmother tells the story of how Ashe developed her ability to shoot magic freezing arrows and leader of the icy north. The full summary reads: Raised in the savage wilds of the north, Ashe is an Iceborn, a warrior gifted with a magical connection to her frozen homeland—and burdened by her mother’s fanatical expectations. When they set out on a dangerous quest for the truth behind an ancient myth, bonds are broken, secrets come to light, and Runeterra is forever changed. Will young Ashe become the leader her people need? Or is destiny merely an empty dream? Here's hoping there aren't more retcons in store after the launch of these graphic novels. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  4. League of Legends has a long and complicated history with its own lore. Plagued by rewritten character biographies and nations whose conflicts have been wiped from existence over the years, Riot Games decided to nullify all of the game's fictional past in 2015 (even eliminating the very concept of summoner's, the very role of the players themselves). Since then, new backstories have emerged for their various characters touching on new wars, new factions, new pieces of Runeterra's history. Now, presumably with a firmer grip on the lore of the popular MOBA, Riot has teamed up with Marvel to produce a line of comics set within the League of Legends universe that highlights the origins of some of their most iconic heroes. The first in the League of Legends graphic novel series will be titled Ashe: Warmother. The comics begin to release May, 2019. Warmother tells the story of how Ashe developed her ability to shoot magic freezing arrows and leader of the icy north. The full summary reads: Raised in the savage wilds of the north, Ashe is an Iceborn, a warrior gifted with a magical connection to her frozen homeland—and burdened by her mother’s fanatical expectations. When they set out on a dangerous quest for the truth behind an ancient myth, bonds are broken, secrets come to light, and Runeterra is forever changed. Will young Ashe become the leader her people need? Or is destiny merely an empty dream? Here's hoping there aren't more retcons in store after the launch of these graphic novels. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  5. How does one make something new while retaining the weight of lore and history that comes with a premise that has been reborn again and again countless times in fiction? Marvel has certainly struggled with this question in their cinematic universe and various game developers have their own takes on classic superheroes. Often each iteration retells the heroic beginnings of the headlining hero or makes some connection with a popular continuity of said character. Insomniac Games seems to have been answered the question by skipping the iconic moments of the wall-crawler's origin story altogether in order to tackle the sophomore issues of being a hero. "With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility" - Everyone even remotely familiar with Spider-Man knows the final commandment of Uncle Ben, Peter Parker's father figure who dies early on in his origin story. Usually, when a piece of media starts off with this, we see Parker struggle with figuring out exactly how much responsibility he has to be using his power to help others. Given that Marvel's Spider-Man takes place roughly eight years after the events that made Peter Parker into a superpowered webslinger, it needs to address a different idea. There aren't any quotes delivered on the dying breath of a beloved old man, but the game tackles the issue of what happens to people who have accepted that responsibility but find forces beyond their control pushing them, perverting that sense of duty. How does someone good go on to commit brutal and evil acts despite the goodness they displayed and what does it take to stop them? When Marvel's Spider-Man roars to life with all cylinders blazing, it captures how much larger-than-life everyday struggles can feel sometimes. Clashing with the colossal force of Rhino or dodging the blasts of a villain whose on-the-nose name is "Mr. Negative" can be seen as a fight against the worst parts inside all of us. And part of what makes that resonate so much is that Peter Parker doesn't walk away unscathed. Over the course of the game, these fights take their toll. He is slashed, burned, stabbed, blasted, and crushed. At one point he has so many broken ribs that his allies tell him he shouldn't be standing. Peter, despite all the impediments thrown into his way, continues to do his best to stand by that responsibility, sacrificing himself at every turn. All of this he does while having ample opportunities to walk away and spare himself. In many ways, the way Peter fights as Spider-Man fits into the classic mold of a hero who does what is right no matter the cost to himself. If that's all one is looking for in a game about superheroes, then Marvel's Spider-Man will fulfill that desire. If, however, you're looking for a game that has things to say about the myriad of issues that those acts of heroism touch upon, Marvel's Spider-Man might fall a bit flat. For a super genius with a heart for justice, Peter Parker seems surprisingly unwoke about the systemic issues around him, focusing on the symptoms of various problems instead of the root causes themselves. All of this would be fine if this was a story about a Spider-Man just getting the hang of the hero business, but the game makes a point to show Peter has been at this for a long while now. Of course, one could argue that this version of New York is one without any systemic issues, but the text of the game indicates that's not true. The opening scene has corrupt cops attempting to murder Spider-Man (something that isn't really seen as abnormal by anyone involved); Oscorp routinely poisons the air and water in the name of profits (which Spider-Man fixes, but also doesn't report, effectively letting the billion dollar company off the hook); and both Peter and Aunt May work at a local homeless shelter. However, during all of Spider-Man's running monologues as he traverses the city, he never talks about the systemic issues that lead to those things being problems. Where are his comments about trying to reform the police in some way so as to discourage cops taking bribes? Why doesn't Spider-Man hold the billion dollar corporation responsible for being so focused on profiting that it is willing to allow people to be poisoned? How does Peter Parker not even consider the reality of income inequality staring him in the face when he moves between the world of Norman Osborne and that of FEAST, the homeless shelter at which he volunteers? The omission of any opining comments from Peter on these topics and issues certainly stems from the desire to keep Marvel's Spider-Man as uncontroversial as possible. Clearly, Peter as a character would care about all of those issues, but the game goes out of its way to avoid topics that might be touchy in the current context. Though the in-game world is presented to us as a version of New York City, you won't see Spider-Man or Peter Parker attending a rally against police corruption or breaking up a gathering of Neo-Nazis. There won't be talk about the forces that evict people out onto the street, though the game implies that rent prices are out of control and the care provided for mental health issues is inadequate. Ultimately, its desire to avoid saying anything that might be even slightly seen as controversial leaves Marvel's Spider-Man feeling a bit hollow once the dazzling feeling of swinging between skyscrappers wears off. To clarify, since this topic has become something of a sticking point for the game since its release: The decision to tiptoe around most of its relevant social issues doesn't make Marvel's Spider-Man bad. It's simply a noticeable narrative decision that might lead to its story being forgettable over time. To Insomniac's credit, that shine doesn't wear off quickly. Easily the best parts of Spider-Man are when the game leaves the player to traverse the city and do street-level hero things. Stopping a burglary in progress, disarming a bomb threat, or saving people from the wreckage of a car accident are all thrilling in their own way, but getting to the scene stands as the best part of any of these encounters. Swinging through the city, right from the beginning, feels amazing. The game knows this and has players shooting webs onto buildings within five minutes of booting up the game. As players progress along the three skill trees, new traversal abilities will unlock, making Spider-Man faster, giving him new abilities to keep up momentum, and it results in this gentle learning curve that keeps things fresh from the beginning of the game until the credits roll. However, once I hit the credits scene, complete with clips teasing what future games in this series will be about, I felt fully and totally done. The side content, while enjoyable based on the traversal mechanics alone, isn't terribly interesting. It serves as a decent distraction while going through the main game, avoiding the charge of being bloated fluff by virtue of the overall solid gameplay mechanics and the various tokens you get from doing them that can be used to upgrade gear or unlock new spider suits. However, the stories relegated to the side missions just aren't that interesting even when drawing on fun bits of lore. (Also, Insomniac, make Mysterio a proper villain, you cowards) It's a bit of a missed opportunity because one of the most intriguing decisions Insomniac made with regards to their Spider-Man game is that there are a number of missions where you take on the role of Mary Jane and Miles Morales and need to use stealth and trickery to sneak through different areas. These segments actually had a lot of potential for expansion into interesting side missions, but are only used in the main story under tightly controlled circumstances. Early on, there is a great section where Mary Jane sneaks into a facility owned by Wilson Fisk to collect some evidence and must do some sneaking and puzzle solving. It's fun and a breath of fresh air; seeing more iteration on that idea would have been really neat, maybe adding a social element to it and some more fleshed out stealth options. Miles is given some extreme hacking abilities that would make for awesome stealth gameplay, too, but that never fully pays off in any satisfying way. The little touches around the edges of Marvel's Spider-Man really give it a lot of character. Subtle musical call backs to The Avengers thrum through the most climactic moments. Gaining momentum while flipping through New York City results in a flurry of stringed instruments adding to the sense of speed and wonder. Different camera options in the obligatory photo mode (something no modern game should be without at this point) give players a lot of different options with which to play and get those perfect shots. The diverse array of suits are also really nice, and it was a great idea to tie them to specific powers that are then unlocked on every other suit. Heck, the game even has a Stan Lee guest appearance which was absolutely lovely. Conclusion: Marvel's Spider-Man might just be the best Spider-Man game ever made. It's gorgeously realized, cinematic as heck, for better and worse, and delivers a powerhouse of a final act. It also isn't perfect. Its side missions are dull, saved from mundane boredom by some rock solid traversal mechanics and adequate combat. Seriously, swinging through a city has never been as fun as it is in this particular Spider-Man game. All of that is built on a story about heroism; what it truly means to not just become a hero, but to live like one, too. While it misses the opportunity to be about a much more encompassing and larger idea of what heroes should be outside of the individual, punching-bad-guys level, that core conceit should be enough for just about anyone to enjoy Marvel's Spider-Man. Here's hoping that the sequel builds off of this simple foundation for a significantly bolder narrative that tackles some of the more grounded problems of our current times. Marvel's Spider-Man is now available on PlayStation 4. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  6. How does one make something new while retaining the weight of lore and history that comes with a premise that has been reborn again and again countless times in fiction? Marvel has certainly struggled with this question in their cinematic universe and various game developers have their own takes on classic superheroes. Often each iteration retells the heroic beginnings of the headlining hero or makes some connection with a popular continuity of said character. Insomniac Games seems to have been answered the question by skipping the iconic moments of the wall-crawler's origin story altogether in order to tackle the sophomore issues of being a hero. "With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility" - Everyone even remotely familiar with Spider-Man knows the final commandment of Uncle Ben, Peter Parker's father figure who dies early on in his origin story. Usually, when a piece of media starts off with this, we see Parker struggle with figuring out exactly how much responsibility he has to be using his power to help others. Given that Marvel's Spider-Man takes place roughly eight years after the events that made Peter Parker into a superpowered webslinger, it needs to address a different idea. There aren't any quotes delivered on the dying breath of a beloved old man, but the game tackles the issue of what happens to people who have accepted that responsibility but find forces beyond their control pushing them, perverting that sense of duty. How does someone good go on to commit brutal and evil acts despite the goodness they displayed and what does it take to stop them? When Marvel's Spider-Man roars to life with all cylinders blazing, it captures how much larger-than-life everyday struggles can feel sometimes. Clashing with the colossal force of Rhino or dodging the blasts of a villain whose on-the-nose name is "Mr. Negative" can be seen as a fight against the worst parts inside all of us. And part of what makes that resonate so much is that Peter Parker doesn't walk away unscathed. Over the course of the game, these fights take their toll. He is slashed, burned, stabbed, blasted, and crushed. At one point he has so many broken ribs that his allies tell him he shouldn't be standing. Peter, despite all the impediments thrown into his way, continues to do his best to stand by that responsibility, sacrificing himself at every turn. All of this he does while having ample opportunities to walk away and spare himself. In many ways, the way Peter fights as Spider-Man fits into the classic mold of a hero who does what is right no matter the cost to himself. If that's all one is looking for in a game about superheroes, then Marvel's Spider-Man will fulfill that desire. If, however, you're looking for a game that has things to say about the myriad of issues that those acts of heroism touch upon, Marvel's Spider-Man might fall a bit flat. For a super genius with a heart for justice, Peter Parker seems surprisingly unwoke about the systemic issues around him, focusing on the symptoms of various problems instead of the root causes themselves. All of this would be fine if this was a story about a Spider-Man just getting the hang of the hero business, but the game makes a point to show Peter has been at this for a long while now. Of course, one could argue that this version of New York is one without any systemic issues, but the text of the game indicates that's not true. The opening scene has corrupt cops attempting to murder Spider-Man (something that isn't really seen as abnormal by anyone involved); Oscorp routinely poisons the air and water in the name of profits (which Spider-Man fixes, but also doesn't report, effectively letting the billion dollar company off the hook); and both Peter and Aunt May work at a local homeless shelter. However, during all of Spider-Man's running monologues as he traverses the city, he never talks about the systemic issues that lead to those things being problems. Where are his comments about trying to reform the police in some way so as to discourage cops taking bribes? Why doesn't Spider-Man hold the billion dollar corporation responsible for being so focused on profiting that it is willing to allow people to be poisoned? How does Peter Parker not even consider the reality of income inequality staring him in the face when he moves between the world of Norman Osborne and that of FEAST, the homeless shelter at which he volunteers? The omission of any opining comments from Peter on these topics and issues certainly stems from the desire to keep Marvel's Spider-Man as uncontroversial as possible. Clearly, Peter as a character would care about all of those issues, but the game goes out of its way to avoid topics that might be touchy in the current context. Though the in-game world is presented to us as a version of New York City, you won't see Spider-Man or Peter Parker attending a rally against police corruption or breaking up a gathering of Neo-Nazis. There won't be talk about the forces that evict people out onto the street, though the game implies that rent prices are out of control and the care provided for mental health issues is inadequate. Ultimately, its desire to avoid saying anything that might be even slightly seen as controversial leaves Marvel's Spider-Man feeling a bit hollow once the dazzling feeling of swinging between skyscrappers wears off. To clarify, since this topic has become something of a sticking point for the game since its release: The decision to tiptoe around most of its relevant social issues doesn't make Marvel's Spider-Man bad. It's simply a noticeable narrative decision that might lead to its story being forgettable over time. To Insomniac's credit, that shine doesn't wear off quickly. Easily the best parts of Spider-Man are when the game leaves the player to traverse the city and do street-level hero things. Stopping a burglary in progress, disarming a bomb threat, or saving people from the wreckage of a car accident are all thrilling in their own way, but getting to the scene stands as the best part of any of these encounters. Swinging through the city, right from the beginning, feels amazing. The game knows this and has players shooting webs onto buildings within five minutes of booting up the game. As players progress along the three skill trees, new traversal abilities will unlock, making Spider-Man faster, giving him new abilities to keep up momentum, and it results in this gentle learning curve that keeps things fresh from the beginning of the game until the credits roll. However, once I hit the credits scene, complete with clips teasing what future games in this series will be about, I felt fully and totally done. The side content, while enjoyable based on the traversal mechanics alone, isn't terribly interesting. It serves as a decent distraction while going through the main game, avoiding the charge of being bloated fluff by virtue of the overall solid gameplay mechanics and the various tokens you get from doing them that can be used to upgrade gear or unlock new spider suits. However, the stories relegated to the side missions just aren't that interesting even when drawing on fun bits of lore. (Also, Insomniac, make Mysterio a proper villain, you cowards) It's a bit of a missed opportunity because one of the most intriguing decisions Insomniac made with regards to their Spider-Man game is that there are a number of missions where you take on the role of Mary Jane and Miles Morales and need to use stealth and trickery to sneak through different areas. These segments actually had a lot of potential for expansion into interesting side missions, but are only used in the main story under tightly controlled circumstances. Early on, there is a great section where Mary Jane sneaks into a facility owned by Wilson Fisk to collect some evidence and must do some sneaking and puzzle solving. It's fun and a breath of fresh air; seeing more iteration on that idea would have been really neat, maybe adding a social element to it and some more fleshed out stealth options. Miles is given some extreme hacking abilities that would make for awesome stealth gameplay, too, but that never fully pays off in any satisfying way. The little touches around the edges of Marvel's Spider-Man really give it a lot of character. Subtle musical call backs to The Avengers thrum through the most climactic moments. Gaining momentum while flipping through New York City results in a flurry of stringed instruments adding to the sense of speed and wonder. Different camera options in the obligatory photo mode (something no modern game should be without at this point) give players a lot of different options with which to play and get those perfect shots. The diverse array of suits are also really nice, and it was a great idea to tie them to specific powers that are then unlocked on every other suit. Heck, the game even has a Stan Lee guest appearance which was absolutely lovely. Conclusion: Marvel's Spider-Man might just be the best Spider-Man game ever made. It's gorgeously realized, cinematic as heck, for better and worse, and delivers a powerhouse of a final act. It also isn't perfect. Its side missions are dull, saved from mundane boredom by some rock solid traversal mechanics and adequate combat. Seriously, swinging through a city has never been as fun as it is in this particular Spider-Man game. All of that is built on a story about heroism; what it truly means to not just become a hero, but to live like one, too. While it misses the opportunity to be about a much more encompassing and larger idea of what heroes should be outside of the individual, punching-bad-guys level, that core conceit should be enough for just about anyone to enjoy Marvel's Spider-Man. Here's hoping that the sequel builds off of this simple foundation for a significantly bolder narrative that tackles some of the more grounded problems of our current times. Marvel's Spider-Man is now available on PlayStation 4. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  7. For a long time, story modes in fighting games were largely forgettable affairs that felt tacked on for the sake of checking a box off a feature list. Then Netherrealm rebooted Mortal Kombat in 2011 and implemented a cinematic story mode that was so well-received that it would appear in follow-up games, Mortal Kombat X and the Injustice series. Capcom wants to try its hand at doing the same, first with Street Fighter V and next with Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite. But after playing the 25-minute demo for the latter, the decision feels ill-conceived. For me, the main appeal of Netherrealm’s story modes is the ability to learn a character by taking them through a series of successive battles. By the time a new fighter is introduced, you have a decent handle on the previous one. Marvel vs. Capcom throws that out the window by giving you two characters at once, making it more difficult to become intimately familiar with a single combatant. It doesn’t help that MvC’s bouts are faster paced than most fighters, so it’s harder to take your time figuring out button combinations. Exacerbating things further is that the story demo forced me to use a new combination of fighters in nearly every bout. Within 25 minutes, I went through 10 characters – nearly half of the announced roster – in rapid fire fashion. Since I was hoping to get a real taste for newcomers like Captain Marvel and Mega Man X, this drove me nuts. Dialogue was incredibly lame. The script so far feels like it was written by a cheese-obsessed fan fiction writer, and the delivery isn’t much better. Iron Man teasing Arthur about his huge lance “compensating for something” nearly made me abandon the demo station in embarrassment. Some interactions felt out of character, such as Rocket asking Dante to loan him his handguns and Dante replying “For you Rocket, anything” with a cringy affection and no trace of the demon hunter’s signature snark. It didn’t help that everyone appeared to be largely familiar with each other, which took away much of the fun novelty of seeing these disparate universes collide. The story’s tone feels weirdly straight-faced. Marvel vs. Capcom is an inherently goofy premise but Infinite seems like it’s trying to tell a serious tale and make sense of that absurdity. I mean, Thor expresses actual pathos at seeing Asgard defiled by Ultron Sigma. Instead of just being a silly thing that knows how dumb it is, it seems like they’re actively trying to explain something that doesn’t require any logic. Worsening things is that the stilted cutscenes and aforementioned rough dialogue negate a lot of the weight the story is attempting to establish. One of the reasons Marvel vs Capcom works for me is that, outside of its stupidity, the character interactions are appropriately humorous but also relatively brief. They don’t draw out the joke for too long, leaving me wanting a bit more but not much. So far, Infinite feels like it may be stretching out that joke to its breaking point while also painting it in a coat of grim. You know what this story reminds me of so far? Modern day Sonic the Hedgehog plots, particularly Sonic ‘06. Then, we had talking cartoon animals in a convoluted apocalyptic narrative. Now, we've got Chris Redfield hanging out with Rocket Raccoon and they're getting mauled by a killer robot–and its no laughing matter. Some fans have fussed about Infinite’s art direction and I can’t say I’m a fan either. While the game performs well enough, the more realistic and unified design removes some of the flair that the comic style brought. Certain character models appear just…off, with Chun-Li and Gamora being the most egregious examples. Gamora has a strangely blank expression and Chun-Li looks like a slightly melted action figure in some scenes. During E3, Capcom released the Marvel vs. Capcom story demo for free on Xbox One and PlayStation 4, so you can check all of this out for yourself and see what you think. As for myself, the story mode feels like a bad move in an already divisive entry in the beloved crossover fighter. View full article
  8. For a long time, story modes in fighting games were largely forgettable affairs that felt tacked on for the sake of checking a box off a feature list. Then Netherrealm rebooted Mortal Kombat in 2011 and implemented a cinematic story mode that was so well-received that it would appear in follow-up games, Mortal Kombat X and the Injustice series. Capcom wants to try its hand at doing the same, first with Street Fighter V and next with Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite. But after playing the 25-minute demo for the latter, the decision feels ill-conceived. For me, the main appeal of Netherrealm’s story modes is the ability to learn a character by taking them through a series of successive battles. By the time a new fighter is introduced, you have a decent handle on the previous one. Marvel vs. Capcom throws that out the window by giving you two characters at once, making it more difficult to become intimately familiar with a single combatant. It doesn’t help that MvC’s bouts are faster paced than most fighters, so it’s harder to take your time figuring out button combinations. Exacerbating things further is that the story demo forced me to use a new combination of fighters in nearly every bout. Within 25 minutes, I went through 10 characters – nearly half of the announced roster – in rapid fire fashion. Since I was hoping to get a real taste for newcomers like Captain Marvel and Mega Man X, this drove me nuts. Dialogue was incredibly lame. The script so far feels like it was written by a cheese-obsessed fan fiction writer, and the delivery isn’t much better. Iron Man teasing Arthur about his huge lance “compensating for something” nearly made me abandon the demo station in embarrassment. Some interactions felt out of character, such as Rocket asking Dante to loan him his handguns and Dante replying “For you Rocket, anything” with a cringy affection and no trace of the demon hunter’s signature snark. It didn’t help that everyone appeared to be largely familiar with each other, which took away much of the fun novelty of seeing these disparate universes collide. The story’s tone feels weirdly straight-faced. Marvel vs. Capcom is an inherently goofy premise but Infinite seems like it’s trying to tell a serious tale and make sense of that absurdity. I mean, Thor expresses actual pathos at seeing Asgard defiled by Ultron Sigma. Instead of just being a silly thing that knows how dumb it is, it seems like they’re actively trying to explain something that doesn’t require any logic. Worsening things is that the stilted cutscenes and aforementioned rough dialogue negate a lot of the weight the story is attempting to establish. One of the reasons Marvel vs Capcom works for me is that, outside of its stupidity, the character interactions are appropriately humorous but also relatively brief. They don’t draw out the joke for too long, leaving me wanting a bit more but not much. So far, Infinite feels like it may be stretching out that joke to its breaking point while also painting it in a coat of grim. You know what this story reminds me of so far? Modern day Sonic the Hedgehog plots, particularly Sonic ‘06. Then, we had talking cartoon animals in a convoluted apocalyptic narrative. Now, we've got Chris Redfield hanging out with Rocket Raccoon and they're getting mauled by a killer robot–and its no laughing matter. Some fans have fussed about Infinite’s art direction and I can’t say I’m a fan either. While the game performs well enough, the more realistic and unified design removes some of the flair that the comic style brought. Certain character models appear just…off, with Chun-Li and Gamora being the most egregious examples. Gamora has a strangely blank expression and Chun-Li looks like a slightly melted action figure in some scenes. During E3, Capcom released the Marvel vs. Capcom story demo for free on Xbox One and PlayStation 4, so you can check all of this out for yourself and see what you think. As for myself, the story mode feels like a bad move in an already divisive entry in the beloved crossover fighter.
  9. Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite marks a big shake-up for the popular fighter. In addition to the reduced 2-on-2 combat, streamlined gameplay, and the Infinity Stones power-ups, Infinite looks to try its hand at presenting a cinematic story mode popularized by Mortal Kombat and Injustice. Heroes of the Marvel and Capcom universes are shown striking an uneasy deal with Thanos in exchange for the whereabouts of the Infinity Stones. The boundless power of these gems appears to be the only method of confronting the combined might of Marvel's Ultron and Mega Man X's Sigma. We're treated to a montage of "dream" team-ups, from Chun-Li and Captain America to the pairing fans of both properties have dreamed about for years: Iron Man and Nathan "RAD" Spencer. The dialogue and interactions feel incredibly silly and somewhat awkward, which may be both good and bad. You can decide for yourself by downloading a free demo of the story mode from the PlayStation and Xbox stores right now. Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite releases September 15 for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. View full article
  10. Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite marks a big shake-up for the popular fighter. In addition to the reduced 2-on-2 combat, streamlined gameplay, and the Infinity Stones power-ups, Infinite looks to try its hand at presenting a cinematic story mode popularized by Mortal Kombat and Injustice. Heroes of the Marvel and Capcom universes are shown striking an uneasy deal with Thanos in exchange for the whereabouts of the Infinity Stones. The boundless power of these gems appears to be the only method of confronting the combined might of Marvel's Ultron and Mega Man X's Sigma. We're treated to a montage of "dream" team-ups, from Chun-Li and Captain America to the pairing fans of both properties have dreamed about for years: Iron Man and Nathan "RAD" Spencer. The dialogue and interactions feel incredibly silly and somewhat awkward, which may be both good and bad. You can decide for yourself by downloading a free demo of the story mode from the PlayStation and Xbox stores right now. Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite releases September 15 for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.
  11. Insomniac's Spider-Man concluded Sony's PlayStation briefing with a bang thanks to a new gameplay video showcasing an entire mission. In it, we got a look at combat, web swinging, as well as a few appearances of Spider-Man's allies and adversaries. The demo begins with Spidey tracking the Inner Demons crime syndicate, who have been moving in on the turf of Wilson Fisk aka the Kingpin. For some reason, Spider-Man has formed an uneasy alliance with Fisk, agreeing to drive out the Demons in exchange for information on their leader. If you're a fan of Spider-Man comics, chances are you already know the identity of this enemy: Mister Negative, who appears the be the game's first confirmed villain. The trailer provides the first extensive look at gameplay, primarily combat. Spider-Man's attacks and movements are impressively fluid, and a slow-mo feature (likely representing his spider sense) allots players a small window to evade attacks and give takedowns a stylish flair. The trailer also showed off web gameplay, including using web lines to manipulate environment (like pulling a crane arm to knock down enemies) and gadgets such as a web proximity mine. A thrilling mid-air chase with a helicopter shows off the acrobatic web-swinging as well as some action-packed QTE set-pieces. Spider-Man swings to PlayStation 4 as a console exclusive sometime next year. How do feel Insomniac's take on Marvel's flagship character is shaping up thus far? View full article
  12. Insomniac's Spider-Man concluded Sony's PlayStation briefing with a bang thanks to a new gameplay video showcasing an entire mission. In it, we got a look at combat, web swinging, as well as a few appearances of Spider-Man's allies and adversaries. The demo begins with Spidey tracking the Inner Demons crime syndicate, who have been moving in on the turf of Wilson Fisk aka the Kingpin. For some reason, Spider-Man has formed an uneasy alliance with Fisk, agreeing to drive out the Demons in exchange for information on their leader. If you're a fan of Spider-Man comics, chances are you already know the identity of this enemy: Mister Negative, who appears the be the game's first confirmed villain. The trailer provides the first extensive look at gameplay, primarily combat. Spider-Man's attacks and movements are impressively fluid, and a slow-mo feature (likely representing his spider sense) allots players a small window to evade attacks and give takedowns a stylish flair. The trailer also showed off web gameplay, including using web lines to manipulate environment (like pulling a crane arm to knock down enemies) and gadgets such as a web proximity mine. A thrilling mid-air chase with a helicopter shows off the acrobatic web-swinging as well as some action-packed QTE set-pieces. Spider-Man swings to PlayStation 4 as a console exclusive sometime next year. How do feel Insomniac's take on Marvel's flagship character is shaping up thus far?
  13. Well, look at that! Telltale Games has decreed that today they would release the fully titled Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series - Episode One: Tangled Up in Blue (phew, try saying that five times fast). The first episode sees the Guardians responding to a distress call from the Nova Corps, entering ancient ruins, and doing battle with Thanos himself. While Thanos might be the biggest bad in the Marvel cinematic universe and the trailer shows the Guardians trying to fight him, he's not the main antagonist of Telltale's series. Who is it? We'll probably have to play it to find out. The first episode releases digitally today for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, PC, Mac, Android and iOS, but physical copies will be available in retail stores starting May 2.
  14. Well, look at that! Telltale Games has decreed that today they would release the fully titled Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series - Episode One: Tangled Up in Blue (phew, try saying that five times fast). The first episode sees the Guardians responding to a distress call from the Nova Corps, entering ancient ruins, and doing battle with Thanos himself. While Thanos might be the biggest bad in the Marvel cinematic universe and the trailer shows the Guardians trying to fight him, he's not the main antagonist of Telltale's series. Who is it? We'll probably have to play it to find out. The first episode releases digitally today for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, PC, Mac, Android and iOS, but physical copies will be available in retail stores starting May 2. View full article
  15. Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series made some waves when adventure game developer Telltale Games teased it at the tail end of last year. We now have a narrower release window with the series set to premiere this spring on consoles, PC, Android, and iOS. Much like Telltale's Game of Thrones, their Guardians of the Galaxy series will tell a new story set within the universe seen in the films. Familiar characters such as Star-Lord, Gamora, Drax, Rocket Raccoon, and Groot all return with a redesigned that aims to fit them in with the art style of Telltale's vision. The new tale follows the galactic group of reluctant heroes as they discover an artifact of immense power following a climactic encounter. Each member of the team has a competing interest in the item, but so does an enemy who represents the last of a dying race who will hunt the team to the ends of the galaxy to obtain it. The Guardians will be traveling to a wide number of locations including Earth, the starship Milano, the hollowed out space titan skull called Knowhere, and beyond to locations not seen in the films. Borrowing from the films (and Telltale's natural affinity for including fantastic musical accompaniments to their games), the Guardians of the Galaxy series will feature a licensed soundtrack of its own to help players slip into the retro-camp fun in store for them. today at PAX East in Boston at 6pm in the Albatross Theater, so if you are at the show be sure to stop and give it a look. Telltale Games will be hosting a panel discussing their creative process on the title. Those who can't be there in person can check it out live on Twitch. Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series premiers on March 17 at SXSW in Austin, TX at the Paramount Theater. Telltale will be hosting a Crowd Play event where attendees can help decide what decisions are made on the big screen during the live gameplay via their mobile devices. In order to attend, interested people will need to obtain either an SXSW or SXSW Gaming badge and seats will be available on a first come, first serve basis. The voices for the Guardians of the Galaxy series won't be the same as the ones from the movies. Instead, Scott Porter (Friday Night Lights, The Walking Dead: The Telltale Series) will take on the role of Star-Lord, Emily O'Brien (Middle-Earth: Shadow of Mordor) tackles Gamora, Nolan North (basically all games with voice acting, Uncharted) becomes Rocket Raccoon, Brandon Paul Eells (Watch Dogs) gives life to Drax, and Adam Harrington (The Wolf Among Us, League of Legends) groots his best as Groot. Guardians of the Galaxy 2 releases on May 5 and with a narrower release day centered on this spring, I'd be willing to bet Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series will be releasing around that same time, possibly in late April. View full article
  16. Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series made some waves when adventure game developer Telltale Games teased it at the tail end of last year. We now have a narrower release window with the series set to premiere this spring on consoles, PC, Android, and iOS. Much like Telltale's Game of Thrones, their Guardians of the Galaxy series will tell a new story set within the universe seen in the films. Familiar characters such as Star-Lord, Gamora, Drax, Rocket Raccoon, and Groot all return with a redesigned that aims to fit them in with the art style of Telltale's vision. The new tale follows the galactic group of reluctant heroes as they discover an artifact of immense power following a climactic encounter. Each member of the team has a competing interest in the item, but so does an enemy who represents the last of a dying race who will hunt the team to the ends of the galaxy to obtain it. The Guardians will be traveling to a wide number of locations including Earth, the starship Milano, the hollowed out space titan skull called Knowhere, and beyond to locations not seen in the films. Borrowing from the films (and Telltale's natural affinity for including fantastic musical accompaniments to their games), the Guardians of the Galaxy series will feature a licensed soundtrack of its own to help players slip into the retro-camp fun in store for them. today at PAX East in Boston at 6pm in the Albatross Theater, so if you are at the show be sure to stop and give it a look. Telltale Games will be hosting a panel discussing their creative process on the title. Those who can't be there in person can check it out live on Twitch. Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series premiers on March 17 at SXSW in Austin, TX at the Paramount Theater. Telltale will be hosting a Crowd Play event where attendees can help decide what decisions are made on the big screen during the live gameplay via their mobile devices. In order to attend, interested people will need to obtain either an SXSW or SXSW Gaming badge and seats will be available on a first come, first serve basis. The voices for the Guardians of the Galaxy series won't be the same as the ones from the movies. Instead, Scott Porter (Friday Night Lights, The Walking Dead: The Telltale Series) will take on the role of Star-Lord, Emily O'Brien (Middle-Earth: Shadow of Mordor) tackles Gamora, Nolan North (basically all games with voice acting, Uncharted) becomes Rocket Raccoon, Brandon Paul Eells (Watch Dogs) gives life to Drax, and Adam Harrington (The Wolf Among Us, League of Legends) groots his best as Groot. Guardians of the Galaxy 2 releases on May 5 and with a narrower release day centered on this spring, I'd be willing to bet Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series will be releasing around that same time, possibly in late April.
  17. Yesterday, Square Enix teased their followers on social media, asking people to look for a big reveal sometime today. Since Kingdom Hearts 2.8 HD released earlier this week, many assumed that this might be some lead up to long awaited details on Kingdom Hearts 3. This view gained traction when Marvel's social media team put out a similar message to their followers. We didn't get more Kingdom Hearts 3 details, but something entirely new. Marvel has partnered with Square Enix to create... something. Shockingly, Square Enix has put two of its biggest, most highly acclaimed developers on The Avengers Project, Crystal Dynamics (Tomb Raider, Rise of the Tomb Raider) and Eidos Montreal (Deus Ex: Human Revolution, Deus Ex: Mankind Divided). While the teaser certainly captures the excitement generated by Marvel's superhero juggernaut, additional details have not been forthcoming. The basics like genre, release date, and platforms are still unknown. The Avengers Project might even be a working title as far as we know. View full article
  18. Yesterday, Square Enix teased their followers on social media, asking people to look for a big reveal sometime today. Since Kingdom Hearts 2.8 HD released earlier this week, many assumed that this might be some lead up to long awaited details on Kingdom Hearts 3. This view gained traction when Marvel's social media team put out a similar message to their followers. We didn't get more Kingdom Hearts 3 details, but something entirely new. Marvel has partnered with Square Enix to create... something. Shockingly, Square Enix has put two of its biggest, most highly acclaimed developers on The Avengers Project, Crystal Dynamics (Tomb Raider, Rise of the Tomb Raider) and Eidos Montreal (Deus Ex: Human Revolution, Deus Ex: Mankind Divided). While the teaser certainly captures the excitement generated by Marvel's superhero juggernaut, additional details have not been forthcoming. The basics like genre, release date, and platforms are still unknown. The Avengers Project might even be a working title as far as we know.
  19. Telltale Games had a lot of news to drop last week at The Game Awards 2016. The long rumored Marvel-Telltale team up was revealed to be Guardians of the Galaxy with a short teaser referencing the cassette tape mixes featured in the Guardians of the Galaxy film. The series is set to premier sometime in 2017, likely around Guardians of the Galaxy 2's May 5th release date. Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series allows players to control the various members of the team as they adventure around the galaxy. Not much is known about the core story angle, but it's likely that it will tie in with the film in some capacity. "The energizing blend of humor, emotion, teamwork, and full-on sci-fi action-adventure of the Guardians provides an enormously satisfying space to explore through Telltale’s unique style of interactive storytelling," explained Kevin Bruner, Telltale Games' co-founder and CEO. Marvel's senior vice president of games and innovation, Jay Ong seems keen to reassure fans that the game won't be a rehash of one of the movies, telling fans that they should expect to be "immersed in an original, character-driven narrative."
  20. Telltale Games had a lot of news to drop last week at The Game Awards 2016. The long rumored Marvel-Telltale team up was revealed to be Guardians of the Galaxy with a short teaser referencing the cassette tape mixes featured in the Guardians of the Galaxy film. The series is set to premier sometime in 2017, likely around Guardians of the Galaxy 2's May 5th release date. Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series allows players to control the various members of the team as they adventure around the galaxy. Not much is known about the core story angle, but it's likely that it will tie in with the film in some capacity. "The energizing blend of humor, emotion, teamwork, and full-on sci-fi action-adventure of the Guardians provides an enormously satisfying space to explore through Telltale’s unique style of interactive storytelling," explained Kevin Bruner, Telltale Games' co-founder and CEO. Marvel's senior vice president of games and innovation, Jay Ong seems keen to reassure fans that the game won't be a rehash of one of the movies, telling fans that they should expect to be "immersed in an original, character-driven narrative." View full article
  21. stodd.ELBoston

    Massive Comic Con

    until
    Massive Comic Con Volunteer Schedule is below: We will be running less people at this booth dew to only getting 4 passes for the table. @PotatoTaco is the lead for the weekend on this one. Updated Volunteer Schedule SAT 9-2 David DiMare-Messier SAT 9-2 @aradiadarling Angela DiMare-Messier SAT 1-6 @themightytej SAT 1-6 @PotatoTaco SUN 9-2 @DMo2TheMax SUN 9-2 Cass Cardwell SUN 1-5 @kineticmedic SUN 1-5 @PotatoTaco
  22. North East Comic Con Event Link The Calendar Event is up and live for volunteering. Go peep it and let us know when you can be there.
  23. until
    North East Comic Con The time has come to start gettign volunteers together for NECC. Shift Schedule is below. Let us know what you can/woudl like to do: SAT 9-2 CASS CARDWELL SAT 9-2 DANIELLE STANDRING @DMo2TheMax SAT 9-2 ERIC CHI SAT 1-6 DAVID DIMARE SAT 1-6 ANGELA DIMARE @aradiadarling SAT 1-6 LUIS CARDONA @The Guat SUN 9-2 ANA RICHBURG SUN 9-2 JESSICA HOUGHTON-VELLA @SassyJ SUN 9-2 ERIC RICHBURG @PotatoTaco SUN 1-6 KERRY SELBERG @KriptiKFate SUN 1-6 ERIC CHI @Chi SUN 1-6 ERIC RICHBURG This one only allots us 4 wristbands, so we have to be a bit inventive to get everyone in. But we got it covered. However if you are planning to be there all weekend anyways and are buying a weekend pass, please do so. (Its nice to support the folks that support us.)
  24. Massive Comic Con Calendar Event Calendar event and volunteer oportunities are live. Check it out, and volunteer.
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