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Found 89 results

  1. Jack Gardner

    A New N64 Game Releasing in September

    Kickstarter is a wonderful thing for niche projects and it doesn't get more niche in video games than bringing a cancelled N64 game back from the dead for a fresh release. Piko Interactive is a small company that focuses on bringing obscure homebrew titles to retro consoles and resurrecting cancelled games. They've set their sights on bringing the action-adventure game 40 Winks to the Nintendo 64, a goal which would make it the first game released for the console since it was discontinued in 2003! If you've been hungry for a new N64 adventure for the past 15 years, then this one goes out to you. If the name 40 Winks sounds familiar to you, that's because the title actually did see a release on the original PlayStation. A port to the N64 had been planned, but was ultimately scrapped due to financial problems that plagued its development. The game is about a cranky old man named Nitecap who curses the magical winks, making them into hoodwinks. Two kids, Ruff and Tumble, embark on a quest to rescue the winks and free themselves of the horrible nightmares that have plagued them since Nitecap's curse. Ruff and Tumble have to journey through several different worlds made up of fantastic dreamscapes inhabited by various monsters and peppered with dangers. Luckily, they have the help of a wide array of transformations that give them various abilities. They can become monsters, superheroes, ninjas, among other forms. Unique to the N64 version will be a two player co-op mode that never materialized on the original PlayStation version. The Kickstarter set out with a goal of $20,000 and has currently amassed over $40,000 with almost a month left for the campaign to continue raising funds. If they manage to reach $60,000, a distinct possibility, Piko Interactive will put together a 40 Winks controller that backers of the special edition tier or above will receive for free. Two additional stretch goals remain a mystery. It's always really amazing to see so many people get passionate about old and forgotten games. Are there any cancelled games you'd like to see come out on their original console?
  2. Kickstarter is a wonderful thing for niche projects and it doesn't get more niche in video games than bringing a cancelled N64 game back from the dead for a fresh release. Piko Interactive is a small company that focuses on bringing obscure homebrew titles to retro consoles and resurrecting cancelled games. They've set their sights on bringing the action-adventure game 40 Winks to the Nintendo 64, a goal which would make it the first game released for the console since it was discontinued in 2003! If you've been hungry for a new N64 adventure for the past 15 years, then this one goes out to you. If the name 40 Winks sounds familiar to you, that's because the title actually did see a release on the original PlayStation. A port to the N64 had been planned, but was ultimately scrapped due to financial problems that plagued its development. The game is about a cranky old man named Nitecap who curses the magical winks, making them into hoodwinks. Two kids, Ruff and Tumble, embark on a quest to rescue the winks and free themselves of the horrible nightmares that have plagued them since Nitecap's curse. Ruff and Tumble have to journey through several different worlds made up of fantastic dreamscapes inhabited by various monsters and peppered with dangers. Luckily, they have the help of a wide array of transformations that give them various abilities. They can become monsters, superheroes, ninjas, among other forms. Unique to the N64 version will be a two player co-op mode that never materialized on the original PlayStation version. The Kickstarter set out with a goal of $20,000 and has currently amassed over $40,000 with almost a month left for the campaign to continue raising funds. If they manage to reach $60,000, a distinct possibility, Piko Interactive will put together a 40 Winks controller that backers of the special edition tier or above will receive for free. Two additional stretch goals remain a mystery. It's always really amazing to see so many people get passionate about old and forgotten games. Are there any cancelled games you'd like to see come out on their original console? View full article
  3. Ashes of Creation began as one of 2017's most successful Kickstarter projects. Asking for a whopping $750,000, the prospective MMO managed to raise over $3.25 million from interested parties won over by its pitch. Since then, more details about the game's design have been coming out in various updates on Intrepid Studios' blog and social media channels. For those unfamiliar with Ashes of Creation, the premise is that players take on the role of pioneers on a world that hasn't seen civilization for millennia. Players will be able to build communities and cities while exploring to uncover the secrets of the fallen world. Of course, that which can be built can also be destroyed, so player populations are expected to grow around cities, leading to the potential of organic, in-game wars to topple rival settlements. The goal is to create an organic MMO experience that forges a genuine world history for players and locations with something new always on the horizon. Ashes of Creation will be a subscription-based game with a cash shop that offers additional customizations for characters beyond the basics found in character creation. When creating a character, players will have eight playable races to chose from as well as a combination of two archetypes. Those can be combined to create up to 64 unique classes for players to choose from. The choices players make will supposedly have far-ranging consequences. The more player activity done in a certain area, the closer that area becomes to developing a settlement. Where a settlement is placed will have an effect on the surrounding monster populations as it grows. Quests will appear or disappear depending on how players choose to interact with the world. The focus of a settlement could wind up playing a huge role in the game for years to come. The effect players have on the world also means that no server running Ashes of Creation will ever be the same as another, presenting the opportunity for new adventures on other servers. The economy of the world will also be driven by players. Trading can be an incredibly lucrative venture, but players will have to create and defend caravans to successfully pull off a trading mission. That might necessitate hiring other players to defend a caravan from other players looking to loot a fat trade mission. These caravans will determine what kinds of goods and services a settlement, village, or metropolis might be able to provide. While the economy certainly lies players to cities and settlements, there are other mechanics in place that encourage players to invest time and effort into building up their home. When a player purchases a house in a new village, they can hold onto that property. If the village grows into a city, their house also grows. If that city turns into a metropolis, they will be in possession of a mansion. Owning property in a city grants citizenship, further tying a player to their homeland. Alternatively, players can settle far from cities and carve out their own existence in the wilderness. Of course, there are more conventional activities aside from literal worldbuilding. Players who yearn for the thrill of questing will be able to explore the world to find new locations for a prospective settlement or uncover the entrance to a new dungeon of the old world. Intrepid Studios aims to make these hostile, dangerous, and slightly frightening places to venture into - making it a choice with benefits and drawbacks for players to weigh when considering an adventure of that nature. Who knows what lurks beneath the surface of a monster-infested world? On the technical end of things, Ashes of Creation uses Unreal Engine 4 and will be optimized for PC hardware released within the last several years. There will be options for the game to be scaled up and down as needed. The team working on Ashes of Creation has an extreme level of pedigree, with members that have worked on games like Everquest 1, Ever Quest 2, Everquest Next, Star Wars Galaxies, BioShock, Gears of War, Planetside 2, XCOM, and many other projects. One thing that might give some people pause when looking into Ashes of Creation is the past of Steven Sharif, the creative director and CEO of Intrepid Studios. During the Kickstarter, some people noted that prior to making his fortune in real estate, he was involved with a company called XanGo, which is known for its multi-level marketing practices. Multi-level marketing involves recruiting unpaid people who sell a company's products with their recruiter earning a slice of the sale. While technically legal, this strategy typically brings unfavorable comparisons to pyramid schemes. Sharif being involved and profiting from his participation in such a company wasn't seen in a positive light (for reference, studies have estimated that about 990-999 out of every 1000 participants in a multi-level marketing company wind up losing money). Sharif gave an interview to Massively Overpowered to help clear the air. It turns out that he was recruited at 18 to sell XanGo's fruit shakes and vitamins. He managed to create a successful online store to sell these products and made money off of the sales that allowed him to go into real estate. He insists that while there are many companies that use the tactic in disreputable ways, there others like Avon, Marykay, and XanGo that operate on the level with a focus on selling products rather than recruiting people. All of that being said, Sharif's intention to create an MMORPG that's different than anything currently on the market seems genuine. As a long-time MMO gamer, he sees himself in a financial position that enables him to create a game that bridges the gap between open-world, consequential titles and the MMO genre, which has traditionally seen more static worlds. The overall impression of Ashes of Creation is positive. It possesses a vision of an interesting, vibrant world full of player-driven and reactive experiences. The possibility of a world built and governed by players certainly intrigues me.It leaves open the possibility for dramatic confrontations with a certain degree of real history and stakes that few games might be able to provide. The closest comparison I can think of is in EVE Online, where player controlled superweapons and battleships that take years to be built can all be wiped away by a colossal, coordinated raid. Applying that same mindset to cities built and maintained by players opens up a lot of possibilities. While the exact release date of Ashes of Creation remains nebulous, expect to see the closed alpha begin later this year, possibly in December, and a full release either in late 2019 or early 2020. View full article
  4. Ashes of Creation began as one of 2017's most successful Kickstarter projects. Asking for a whopping $750,000, the prospective MMO managed to raise over $3.25 million from interested parties won over by its pitch. Since then, more details about the game's design have been coming out in various updates on Intrepid Studios' blog and social media channels. For those unfamiliar with Ashes of Creation, the premise is that players take on the role of pioneers on a world that hasn't seen civilization for millennia. Players will be able to build communities and cities while exploring to uncover the secrets of the fallen world. Of course, that which can be built can also be destroyed, so player populations are expected to grow around cities, leading to the potential of organic, in-game wars to topple rival settlements. The goal is to create an organic MMO experience that forges a genuine world history for players and locations with something new always on the horizon. Ashes of Creation will be a subscription-based game with a cash shop that offers additional customizations for characters beyond the basics found in character creation. When creating a character, players will have eight playable races to chose from as well as a combination of two archetypes. Those can be combined to create up to 64 unique classes for players to choose from. The choices players make will supposedly have far-ranging consequences. The more player activity done in a certain area, the closer that area becomes to developing a settlement. Where a settlement is placed will have an effect on the surrounding monster populations as it grows. Quests will appear or disappear depending on how players choose to interact with the world. The focus of a settlement could wind up playing a huge role in the game for years to come. The effect players have on the world also means that no server running Ashes of Creation will ever be the same as another, presenting the opportunity for new adventures on other servers. The economy of the world will also be driven by players. Trading can be an incredibly lucrative venture, but players will have to create and defend caravans to successfully pull off a trading mission. That might necessitate hiring other players to defend a caravan from other players looking to loot a fat trade mission. These caravans will determine what kinds of goods and services a settlement, village, or metropolis might be able to provide. While the economy certainly lies players to cities and settlements, there are other mechanics in place that encourage players to invest time and effort into building up their home. When a player purchases a house in a new village, they can hold onto that property. If the village grows into a city, their house also grows. If that city turns into a metropolis, they will be in possession of a mansion. Owning property in a city grants citizenship, further tying a player to their homeland. Alternatively, players can settle far from cities and carve out their own existence in the wilderness. Of course, there are more conventional activities aside from literal worldbuilding. Players who yearn for the thrill of questing will be able to explore the world to find new locations for a prospective settlement or uncover the entrance to a new dungeon of the old world. Intrepid Studios aims to make these hostile, dangerous, and slightly frightening places to venture into - making it a choice with benefits and drawbacks for players to weigh when considering an adventure of that nature. Who knows what lurks beneath the surface of a monster-infested world? On the technical end of things, Ashes of Creation uses Unreal Engine 4 and will be optimized for PC hardware released within the last several years. There will be options for the game to be scaled up and down as needed. The team working on Ashes of Creation has an extreme level of pedigree, with members that have worked on games like Everquest 1, Ever Quest 2, Everquest Next, Star Wars Galaxies, BioShock, Gears of War, Planetside 2, XCOM, and many other projects. One thing that might give some people pause when looking into Ashes of Creation is the past of Steven Sharif, the creative director and CEO of Intrepid Studios. During the Kickstarter, some people noted that prior to making his fortune in real estate, he was involved with a company called XanGo, which is known for its multi-level marketing practices. Multi-level marketing involves recruiting unpaid people who sell a company's products with their recruiter earning a slice of the sale. While technically legal, this strategy typically brings unfavorable comparisons to pyramid schemes. Sharif being involved and profiting from his participation in such a company wasn't seen in a positive light (for reference, studies have estimated that about 990-999 out of every 1000 participants in a multi-level marketing company wind up losing money). Sharif gave an interview to Massively Overpowered to help clear the air. It turns out that he was recruited at 18 to sell XanGo's fruit shakes and vitamins. He managed to create a successful online store to sell these products and made money off of the sales that allowed him to go into real estate. He insists that while there are many companies that use the tactic in disreputable ways, there others like Avon, Marykay, and XanGo that operate on the level with a focus on selling products rather than recruiting people. All of that being said, Sharif's intention to create an MMORPG that's different than anything currently on the market seems genuine. As a long-time MMO gamer, he sees himself in a financial position that enables him to create a game that bridges the gap between open-world, consequential titles and the MMO genre, which has traditionally seen more static worlds. The overall impression of Ashes of Creation is positive. It possesses a vision of an interesting, vibrant world full of player-driven and reactive experiences. The possibility of a world built and governed by players certainly intrigues me.It leaves open the possibility for dramatic confrontations with a certain degree of real history and stakes that few games might be able to provide. The closest comparison I can think of is in EVE Online, where player controlled superweapons and battleships that take years to be built can all be wiped away by a colossal, coordinated raid. Applying that same mindset to cities built and maintained by players opens up a lot of possibilities. While the exact release date of Ashes of Creation remains nebulous, expect to see the closed alpha begin later this year, possibly in December, and a full release either in late 2019 or early 2020.
  5. The Onus Helm made its debut in a humble Kickstarter campaign that looks to secure $5,500 to finish development. The roguelike dungeon crawler stars an enigmatic character who awakens to find themselves in a mysterious, seemingly endless labyrinth with a burdensome, irremovable helmet placed on their head. To uncover the secrets of the helm and find freedom, players will have to navigate the dangers of the deadly maze and defeat the evils that have taken up residence in its ever shifting halls. The demo put out by developer B-Cubed Labs puts a full level on display. It takes the randomly generated room approach found in The Binding of Isaac and puts its own unique spin on the formula, something that could certainly intrigue fans in the retro-indie community. Players make their way through the dungeon room by room. Each room can hold enemies, secrets, items, or upgrades. Players will need to explore as much as possible to be prepared for the boss, a maniacal shadow that can summon floating swords. Each trip through the demo proves to be different. On one occasion, I was able to find a room in which an NPC played a flute on a tree stump. On another, I found a thief-like creature who gave me more insight into the surreal world of The Onus Helm where every character has been cursed with a similar helmet that they can't remove. Should you fall in battle, the next playthrough mixes up the dungeon, shifting the rooms in new and interesting ways. A small array of weapons can drastically how one approaches the enemies in-game. Players start out with a sword and an infinite ammo slingshot. However, there are many other treasures to be found or bought that can help the player survive. A larger sword upgrade can be obtained that makes melee combat much easier, a powerful bow with limited ammo or a boomerang can replace the slingshot, and bombs prove to be a necessity for both secrets and strategic combat. Potions, health upgrades, and other non-weapons can be uncovered, too. The look of B-Cubed Labs indie project is certainly arresting. Mixed with a more retro throwback aesthetic, a lot of influence from the original Legend of Zelda appears readily apparent. It manages to straddle the line between homage and novelty really well in a way that feels both familiar and different. The final version of The Onus Helm is planned to include simply more stuff than is in the demo. More rooms, enemies, items, weapons, NPCs, and bosses will offer a more fully rounded experience. The planned PC release will offer both keyboard and controller support and a built-in speedrun clock for those who feel the need for speed. The core game has been mostly finished so even if the Kickstarter fails The Onus Helm will likely see the light of day. The Kickstarter seems to be for funding additional assets and mechanics with stretch goals for even more stuff like more music, co-op, a console release, and a larger development team to add even more stuff into the roguelike generation system B-Cubed has set up. Overall, my impression of The Onus Helm was that it's a game worthy of time and attention. I hope it meets its goal in the next nine days and I encourage everyone to check out the Kickstarter and demo. It should release sometime later this year. View full article
  6. The Onus Helm made its debut in a humble Kickstarter campaign that looks to secure $5,500 to finish development. The roguelike dungeon crawler stars an enigmatic character who awakens to find themselves in a mysterious, seemingly endless labyrinth with a burdensome, irremovable helmet placed on their head. To uncover the secrets of the helm and find freedom, players will have to navigate the dangers of the deadly maze and defeat the evils that have taken up residence in its ever shifting halls. The demo put out by developer B-Cubed Labs puts a full level on display. It takes the randomly generated room approach found in The Binding of Isaac and puts its own unique spin on the formula, something that could certainly intrigue fans in the retro-indie community. Players make their way through the dungeon room by room. Each room can hold enemies, secrets, items, or upgrades. Players will need to explore as much as possible to be prepared for the boss, a maniacal shadow that can summon floating swords. Each trip through the demo proves to be different. On one occasion, I was able to find a room in which an NPC played a flute on a tree stump. On another, I found a thief-like creature who gave me more insight into the surreal world of The Onus Helm where every character has been cursed with a similar helmet that they can't remove. Should you fall in battle, the next playthrough mixes up the dungeon, shifting the rooms in new and interesting ways. A small array of weapons can drastically how one approaches the enemies in-game. Players start out with a sword and an infinite ammo slingshot. However, there are many other treasures to be found or bought that can help the player survive. A larger sword upgrade can be obtained that makes melee combat much easier, a powerful bow with limited ammo or a boomerang can replace the slingshot, and bombs prove to be a necessity for both secrets and strategic combat. Potions, health upgrades, and other non-weapons can be uncovered, too. The look of B-Cubed Labs indie project is certainly arresting. Mixed with a more retro throwback aesthetic, a lot of influence from the original Legend of Zelda appears readily apparent. It manages to straddle the line between homage and novelty really well in a way that feels both familiar and different. The final version of The Onus Helm is planned to include simply more stuff than is in the demo. More rooms, enemies, items, weapons, NPCs, and bosses will offer a more fully rounded experience. The planned PC release will offer both keyboard and controller support and a built-in speedrun clock for those who feel the need for speed. The core game has been mostly finished so even if the Kickstarter fails The Onus Helm will likely see the light of day. The Kickstarter seems to be for funding additional assets and mechanics with stretch goals for even more stuff like more music, co-op, a console release, and a larger development team to add even more stuff into the roguelike generation system B-Cubed has set up. Overall, my impression of The Onus Helm was that it's a game worthy of time and attention. I hope it meets its goal in the next nine days and I encourage everyone to check out the Kickstarter and demo. It should release sometime later this year.
  7. After almost a year and a half of development, Slipgate Studios will be bringing their adult-oriented action-platformer to the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, as well as updating the PC release with a host of finalized content. The release marks the culmination of promises made during the late 2016 Kickstarter campaign that introduced the world to Rad Rodgers. Conceived as a project to pay homage to the platformers of the late 80s and mid 90s, Rad Rodgers stars a child bearing the titular moniker who finds himself sucked into a video game world. With the help of Dusty, Rad's out-dated console which now has a face and a foul-mouth (voiced by Duke Nukem voice actor Jon St. John), Rad Rodgers becomes involved in a mission to save the First World, a jungle suffering from a corrupting disease. The first chapter of Rad Rodger's adventures comes with over five weapons that allow Rad and Dusty to blast, punch, and blaze their way through the First World. Explosions and hot platforming action are accompanied by a fresh take on retro platforming soundtracks composed by Andrew Hulshult, complete with synthesizers and a driving pace. Occasional glitches might occur in-game, which give Dusty a time to shine. The aged gaming console can then enter a mind-bending area behind the scenes called the Pixelverse where he can attempt to repair the glitch. While Rad Rodgers will be appearing on consoles for the first time, the PC version has been out since the tail-end of 2016. Those who already own Rad Rodgers will see an update that adds a huge collection of new stuff to the core game. Several new levels will be added along with new boss encounters, four new enemies, and redesigned puzzles. Players will be able to unlock hats as they progress throughout Rodger's adventures, meaning players will be able to customize Rad with over twenty different hats. Leaderboards will allow players around the world to strive to achieve the high scores on each level. Slipgate Studios have also added the Excalibat, a weapon previously seen in Rise of the Triad. As it does have a decidedly adult sense of humor, the game presents the option to bleep out objectionable language and replace the copious amounts of blood generated in-game with purple goop. The PC update releases alongside the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One versions of Rad Rodgers on February 21. View full article
  8. After almost a year and a half of development, Slipgate Studios will be bringing their adult-oriented action-platformer to the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, as well as updating the PC release with a host of finalized content. The release marks the culmination of promises made during the late 2016 Kickstarter campaign that introduced the world to Rad Rodgers. Conceived as a project to pay homage to the platformers of the late 80s and mid 90s, Rad Rodgers stars a child bearing the titular moniker who finds himself sucked into a video game world. With the help of Dusty, Rad's out-dated console which now has a face and a foul-mouth (voiced by Duke Nukem voice actor Jon St. John), Rad Rodgers becomes involved in a mission to save the First World, a jungle suffering from a corrupting disease. The first chapter of Rad Rodger's adventures comes with over five weapons that allow Rad and Dusty to blast, punch, and blaze their way through the First World. Explosions and hot platforming action are accompanied by a fresh take on retro platforming soundtracks composed by Andrew Hulshult, complete with synthesizers and a driving pace. Occasional glitches might occur in-game, which give Dusty a time to shine. The aged gaming console can then enter a mind-bending area behind the scenes called the Pixelverse where he can attempt to repair the glitch. While Rad Rodgers will be appearing on consoles for the first time, the PC version has been out since the tail-end of 2016. Those who already own Rad Rodgers will see an update that adds a huge collection of new stuff to the core game. Several new levels will be added along with new boss encounters, four new enemies, and redesigned puzzles. Players will be able to unlock hats as they progress throughout Rodger's adventures, meaning players will be able to customize Rad with over twenty different hats. Leaderboards will allow players around the world to strive to achieve the high scores on each level. Slipgate Studios have also added the Excalibat, a weapon previously seen in Rise of the Triad. As it does have a decidedly adult sense of humor, the game presents the option to bleep out objectionable language and replace the copious amounts of blood generated in-game with purple goop. The PC update releases alongside the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One versions of Rad Rodgers on February 21.
  9. The Kickstarter for Chronicle X is in the process of winding down. The tactical board game currently sits at a little over $450,000, more than ten times its initial goal of $40,000. The project captured the imagination of board game enthusiasts with its gripping conflict between a group of players controlling branches of the Chronicle X military organization and the Overmind, an alien overlord controlling the forces bent on conquering Earth. Archon Studio heads the development on Chronicle X, making this Kickstarter the second game they've produced. Their previous game, Vanguard of War, a relatively well-received tabletop that also found crowdfunding success. Gameplay revolves around players controlling heroes who have access to special abilities and equipment. Players take turns trying to outsmart the opposing side. As the heroes take damage, their other capabilities will decrease, making every action and reaction count and placing a great deal of importance to characters capable of healing. combat takes place on a map composed of four tiles that offer different terrain and features that control the flow of battle. The Overmind player controls the various aliens that populate each of the tiles, working to destroy Chronicle X. Players will be able to work together between missions to build a base with different upgrades that can be used both between and during missions. The turn-based board game offers an impressive array of miniatures made of a specialized material that maximizes quality and comes in a single piece to avoid assembly mishaps. To give you a sense of scale, the miniatures generally stand 32mm tall with some reaching 80mm. The folks at Archon Studio have even offered a money-back guarantee for Chronicle X - if players don't enjoy their time with the game, they are prepared to refund. If the change of heart happens within 60 days of the crowdfunding campaign coming to a close, the company will refund in full. If it takes longer to feel unhappy with the game, but before the game ships out, they'll refund the amount pledged minus Kickstarter's processing fees. After it ships, if players are not satisfied within 14 days of receiving Chronicle X, Archon Studio will still refund the pledge. Overall, Chronicle X looks like a really fun tabletop game for a decently sized group of friends. You can back the Kickstarter until tomorrow to nab some nifty bonuses. What do you think? Is this a game you'd be interested in playing?
  10. The Kickstarter for Chronicle X is in the process of winding down. The tactical board game currently sits at a little over $450,000, more than ten times its initial goal of $40,000. The project captured the imagination of board game enthusiasts with its gripping conflict between a group of players controlling branches of the Chronicle X military organization and the Overmind, an alien overlord controlling the forces bent on conquering Earth. Archon Studio heads the development on Chronicle X, making this Kickstarter the second game they've produced. Their previous game, Vanguard of War, a relatively well-received tabletop that also found crowdfunding success. Gameplay revolves around players controlling heroes who have access to special abilities and equipment. Players take turns trying to outsmart the opposing side. As the heroes take damage, their other capabilities will decrease, making every action and reaction count and placing a great deal of importance to characters capable of healing. combat takes place on a map composed of four tiles that offer different terrain and features that control the flow of battle. The Overmind player controls the various aliens that populate each of the tiles, working to destroy Chronicle X. Players will be able to work together between missions to build a base with different upgrades that can be used both between and during missions. The turn-based board game offers an impressive array of miniatures made of a specialized material that maximizes quality and comes in a single piece to avoid assembly mishaps. To give you a sense of scale, the miniatures generally stand 32mm tall with some reaching 80mm. The folks at Archon Studio have even offered a money-back guarantee for Chronicle X - if players don't enjoy their time with the game, they are prepared to refund. If the change of heart happens within 60 days of the crowdfunding campaign coming to a close, the company will refund in full. If it takes longer to feel unhappy with the game, but before the game ships out, they'll refund the amount pledged minus Kickstarter's processing fees. After it ships, if players are not satisfied within 14 days of receiving Chronicle X, Archon Studio will still refund the pledge. Overall, Chronicle X looks like a really fun tabletop game for a decently sized group of friends. You can back the Kickstarter until tomorrow to nab some nifty bonuses. What do you think? Is this a game you'd be interested in playing? View full article
  11. The fine folks at crea-ture Studios have been hard at work for the past month managing a Kickstarter campaign that aims to help them finish their skating simulator Session. Session has managed to succeed, cresting its fundraising goal and surging toward the various milestones set for it that would unlock additional features in the final game. The basic goal crea-ture Studios has for Session is to create as fluid a skating experience as possible. To that end, it employs a novel dual stick control system with each stick controlling a different leg. This allows for the performance of smooth and skillful tricks that rely on players understanding how to shift their weight between each foot. The mastery of this control scheme not only affects how players pull off tricks, but also how they maintain them. Shifting weight will have effects on the duration of tricks, making them either failures or flawless successes. In a major departure from previous skating games, Session won't have a scoring system. Tricks will be performed for their own merit with the option of filming and sharing them on social media. This combines with the in-game cameraman. Players can choose from various filters and angles to capture their tricks in the most flattering light before editing them in-game to share with friends and strangers alike. Inspired by the golden era of skateboarding, the early 90s and early 2000, Session's primary goal is to make you experience what skateboarding really is; an incredible sport where there are no other goals other than expressing your creativity and achieving success through hard work, perseverance and bits of madness for no one else other than yourself. Still, some people might find the lack of positive reinforcement via a points system perplexing, given the history of the genre. Crea-ture Studios explains it well in their Kickstarter saying: The main purpose of the game is to live the sport in its entirety. Feel what it is to be a talented street skater. Explore and tame the concrete, film yourself, your friends and share your footage on the internet with the worldwide skateboarding community. Session focuses on the authenticity of skating, both in the way the game feels and is presented to the player. Based on this philosophy, each feature makes the game even more innovative, fun and respectful to the skateboarding culture. There's still a week remaining on Session's crowdfunding campaign. The next stretch goal is solidly in sight CA$155,000 and the total raised so far sits at a little over CA$137,000. Beyond that, Session will have online multiplayer if the campaign can raise CA$255,000. If you aren't quite sold on the premise, but are interested in checking out Session to see if it might be interesting, the Kickstarter has put out a demo, which can be downloaded here. What do you think? Are you craving a successor to Tony Hawk's skateboarding throne?
  12. The fine folks at crea-ture Studios have been hard at work for the past month managing a Kickstarter campaign that aims to help them finish their skating simulator Session. Session has managed to succeed, cresting its fundraising goal and surging toward the various milestones set for it that would unlock additional features in the final game. The basic goal crea-ture Studios has for Session is to create as fluid a skating experience as possible. To that end, it employs a novel dual stick control system with each stick controlling a different leg. This allows for the performance of smooth and skillful tricks that rely on players understanding how to shift their weight between each foot. The mastery of this control scheme not only affects how players pull off tricks, but also how they maintain them. Shifting weight will have effects on the duration of tricks, making them either failures or flawless successes. In a major departure from previous skating games, Session won't have a scoring system. Tricks will be performed for their own merit with the option of filming and sharing them on social media. This combines with the in-game cameraman. Players can choose from various filters and angles to capture their tricks in the most flattering light before editing them in-game to share with friends and strangers alike. Inspired by the golden era of skateboarding, the early 90s and early 2000, Session's primary goal is to make you experience what skateboarding really is; an incredible sport where there are no other goals other than expressing your creativity and achieving success through hard work, perseverance and bits of madness for no one else other than yourself. Still, some people might find the lack of positive reinforcement via a points system perplexing, given the history of the genre. Crea-ture Studios explains it well in their Kickstarter saying: The main purpose of the game is to live the sport in its entirety. Feel what it is to be a talented street skater. Explore and tame the concrete, film yourself, your friends and share your footage on the internet with the worldwide skateboarding community. Session focuses on the authenticity of skating, both in the way the game feels and is presented to the player. Based on this philosophy, each feature makes the game even more innovative, fun and respectful to the skateboarding culture. There's still a week remaining on Session's crowdfunding campaign. The next stretch goal is solidly in sight CA$155,000 and the total raised so far sits at a little over CA$137,000. Beyond that, Session will have online multiplayer if the campaign can raise CA$255,000. If you aren't quite sold on the premise, but are interested in checking out Session to see if it might be interesting, the Kickstarter has put out a demo, which can be downloaded here. What do you think? Are you craving a successor to Tony Hawk's skateboarding throne? View full article
  13. An isle shrouded in mystery and fire, a fearsome idol guarding a famous jewel, and a team of bumbling, backstabbing treasure hunters all converge upon a 3D game board. Fireball Island released to the world in the mid 1980s and has become something of a cult tabletop game. In 1986 Milton Bradley published a game designed around the idea of dimensionality. The prolific game publisher had been releasing a large number of different game concepts over the several previous years. They were attempting to enter the video game market through the acquisition of Good Consumer Electronic following the success of their electronic game, Simon. However, board games remained their major calling as they attempted to innovate the established gaming medium. To that end, designers Bruce Lund and Chuck Kennedy created a three dimensional map, one that modeled the rough topography of an island in the middle of an ocean. This was the beginning of Fireball Island. The simple addition of verticality captured the public's attention. Over 30 years later, people still remember the rage of Vul-Kar and the backstabbery of their companions. Fireball Island presents a very stylish aesthetic. Rolling hills and roaring river canyons, all lorded over by bubbling flows of magma that constantly present a threat of fireballs to the players. Atop the island's central peak stands a massive idol known as Vul-Kar. The idol houses a spirit that players can harness to set back their competitors with a well-placed stream of fire. Vul-Kar also guards an incredible jewel coveted by the rogue adventurers who have journeyed to the isle. As far as board games go, Fireball Island doesn't make any huge leaps in terms of gameplay. Players roll a six-sided die to move around the trails of the island and are able to move both forwards and backwards to suit their purpose. Each player can also play cards earned by landing on darkened parts of the trail. These cards possess powerful abilities that can tip the tide of the game at any given moment - and they can be played at any point on anyone else's turn. This leads to a real back and forth of players clawing their way to dominance over one another with dastardly maneuvers. Players jostle back and forth to be the first player to reach the docks on the other side of the island - with Vul-Kar's jewel in hand. Each time a player passes someone holding the jewel, they can steal the gem for their own. This can be prevented by a handful of cards or the clever use of fireballs. Every time a player rolls a one on the die or plays a fireball card, a fireball can be aimed toward someone on the island. These red marbles are placed at strategic points across the island's map and follow determined routes with the exception of Vul-Kar's fireball, which can be aimed along multiple paths. Being hit by a fireball brings a player back to the nearest smoldering pit down the path and also removes the jewel from their possession. The movement of the fireballs down the track represents the real reason for the 3D map - allowing gravity to operate on the fireballs to set them rolling down the various paths of the island. One of the things that surprised me when I revisited the treacherous Fireball Island was how simple it seemed. I remembered it as this larger than life game; a complex ecosystem of betrayal and fire. Of course, as soon as I opened the box, I realized the nostalgia I had for the game had altered my memory of it. The set up was far easier than I remembered or what the uninitiated might assume from the bulky box. A handful of tokens, two plastic bridges, the idol, a few marbles, a deck of cards, and a pair of dice make for a set up that only takes a couple minutes. Fireball Island itself remains fun, but it's one of those games that relies on the other players around the table. A good group of people can lead to a riotous time of backstabbing fun with the simple rules and unique setting. Now, it might seem strange that I've been talking about a game I enjoyed in my childhood that many might not even remember. However, I discovered that a small, but interested community has grown around the shared nostalgia of Fireball Island. After it's retail run, Fireball Island fell out of print, which has led to it becoming a sought after title. Obtaining a copy on eBay can cost several hundred dollars. However, the enthusiasm of the community seems to have begun a resurrection of sorts for Fireball Island. Rising like a phoenix from the ashes of a recently rolled fireball, there are several efforts to revive the spirit of Vul-Kar. Justin Jacobson and Rob Daviau (known for his work on Pandemic Legacy: Season One) founded Restoration Games with the express mission of restoring old games to give them a second chance at success. To date, they've revived Stop Thief!, Down Force, and Indulgence. Now they are in the process of bringing Fireball Island to a new generation. However, Restoration Games doesn't simply repackage and release the original games completely intact; part of their founding mission is to modernize those forgotten gems while also addressing some of the deep flaws that might have prevented them from catching on with a wide audience. To that end, their vision of Fireball Island, fully titled Fireball Island: The Curse of Vul-Kar, imagines itself as a sequel taking place thirty years after the events of the first game. Players must contend with a dark curse while attempting to accomplish a number of different adventurous tasks. New dangers await even the most experienced Fireball Island players. The restored board game will be funded by an upcoming Kickstarter campaign that has yet to be announced. Interested parties can sign up for Restoration Games' mailing list to keep an eye on when the crowdfunding campaign launches. However, Fireball Island: The Curse of Vul-Kar isn't the only spiritual successor to the original Fireball Island in the works. A second project titled Yeti Mountain made its debut on Kickstarter back in March of this year. Yeti Mountain takes the same concept of Fireball Island and places the game world in the icy Himalayas with one angry cryptid. The crowdfunding attempt fell short of its target goal of $28,500, but the creators, Elementary Industries, are gearing up to relaunch the Kickstarter in the near future with new art and possibly a more refined prototype board. It feels a bit surreal to see so much enthusiasm for a game that I had always felt alone in enjoying. I've never met anyone else in person who remembers Fireball Island. That being said - if you find an old copy of this game sitting around at a garage sale or a thrift store or hiding in an attic somewhere, grab a few friends and get ready to shout at one another as you pass around a coveted plastic gem. I promise it will be a good time. I hope to see some revamped versions of Fireball Island or a spiritual successor coming to a game store close to me in the near future. To close out - look at this adorable snake painted on the mountainside of Fireball Island.
  14. An isle shrouded in mystery and fire, a fearsome idol guarding a famous jewel, and a team of bumbling, backstabbing treasure hunters all converge upon a 3D game board. Fireball Island released to the world in the mid 1980s and has become something of a cult tabletop game. In 1986 Milton Bradley published a game designed around the idea of dimensionality. The prolific game publisher had been releasing a large number of different game concepts over the several previous years. They were attempting to enter the video game market through the acquisition of Good Consumer Electronic following the success of their electronic game, Simon. However, board games remained their major calling as they attempted to innovate the established gaming medium. To that end, designers Bruce Lund and Chuck Kennedy created a three dimensional map, one that modeled the rough topography of an island in the middle of an ocean. This was the beginning of Fireball Island. The simple addition of verticality captured the public's attention. Over 30 years later, people still remember the rage of Vul-Kar and the backstabbery of their companions. Fireball Island presents a very stylish aesthetic. Rolling hills and roaring river canyons, all lorded over by bubbling flows of magma that constantly present a threat of fireballs to the players. Atop the island's central peak stands a massive idol known as Vul-Kar. The idol houses a spirit that players can harness to set back their competitors with a well-placed stream of fire. Vul-Kar also guards an incredible jewel coveted by the rogue adventurers who have journeyed to the isle. As far as board games go, Fireball Island doesn't make any huge leaps in terms of gameplay. Players roll a six-sided die to move around the trails of the island and are able to move both forwards and backwards to suit their purpose. Each player can also play cards earned by landing on darkened parts of the trail. These cards possess powerful abilities that can tip the tide of the game at any given moment - and they can be played at any point on anyone else's turn. This leads to a real back and forth of players clawing their way to dominance over one another with dastardly maneuvers. Players jostle back and forth to be the first player to reach the docks on the other side of the island - with Vul-Kar's jewel in hand. Each time a player passes someone holding the jewel, they can steal the gem for their own. This can be prevented by a handful of cards or the clever use of fireballs. Every time a player rolls a one on the die or plays a fireball card, a fireball can be aimed toward someone on the island. These red marbles are placed at strategic points across the island's map and follow determined routes with the exception of Vul-Kar's fireball, which can be aimed along multiple paths. Being hit by a fireball brings a player back to the nearest smoldering pit down the path and also removes the jewel from their possession. The movement of the fireballs down the track represents the real reason for the 3D map - allowing gravity to operate on the fireballs to set them rolling down the various paths of the island. One of the things that surprised me when I revisited the treacherous Fireball Island was how simple it seemed. I remembered it as this larger than life game; a complex ecosystem of betrayal and fire. Of course, as soon as I opened the box, I realized the nostalgia I had for the game had altered my memory of it. The set up was far easier than I remembered or what the uninitiated might assume from the bulky box. A handful of tokens, two plastic bridges, the idol, a few marbles, a deck of cards, and a pair of dice make for a set up that only takes a couple minutes. Fireball Island itself remains fun, but it's one of those games that relies on the other players around the table. A good group of people can lead to a riotous time of backstabbing fun with the simple rules and unique setting. Now, it might seem strange that I've been talking about a game I enjoyed in my childhood that many might not even remember. However, I discovered that a small, but interested community has grown around the shared nostalgia of Fireball Island. After it's retail run, Fireball Island fell out of print, which has led to it becoming a sought after title. Obtaining a copy on eBay can cost several hundred dollars. However, the enthusiasm of the community seems to have begun a resurrection of sorts for Fireball Island. Rising like a phoenix from the ashes of a recently rolled fireball, there are several efforts to revive the spirit of Vul-Kar. Justin Jacobson and Rob Daviau (known for his work on Pandemic Legacy: Season One) founded Restoration Games with the express mission of restoring old games to give them a second chance at success. To date, they've revived Stop Thief!, Down Force, and Indulgence. Now they are in the process of bringing Fireball Island to a new generation. However, Restoration Games doesn't simply repackage and release the original games completely intact; part of their founding mission is to modernize those forgotten gems while also addressing some of the deep flaws that might have prevented them from catching on with a wide audience. To that end, their vision of Fireball Island, fully titled Fireball Island: The Curse of Vul-Kar, imagines itself as a sequel taking place thirty years after the events of the first game. Players must contend with a dark curse while attempting to accomplish a number of different adventurous tasks. New dangers await even the most experienced Fireball Island players. The restored board game will be funded by an upcoming Kickstarter campaign that has yet to be announced. Interested parties can sign up for Restoration Games' mailing list to keep an eye on when the crowdfunding campaign launches. However, Fireball Island: The Curse of Vul-Kar isn't the only spiritual successor to the original Fireball Island in the works. A second project titled Yeti Mountain made its debut on Kickstarter back in March of this year. Yeti Mountain takes the same concept of Fireball Island and places the game world in the icy Himalayas with one angry cryptid. The crowdfunding attempt fell short of its target goal of $28,500, but the creators, Elementary Industries, are gearing up to relaunch the Kickstarter in the near future with new art and possibly a more refined prototype board. It feels a bit surreal to see so much enthusiasm for a game that I had always felt alone in enjoying. I've never met anyone else in person who remembers Fireball Island. That being said - if you find an old copy of this game sitting around at a garage sale or a thrift store or hiding in an attic somewhere, grab a few friends and get ready to shout at one another as you pass around a coveted plastic gem. I promise it will be a good time. I hope to see some revamped versions of Fireball Island or a spiritual successor coming to a game store close to me in the near future. To close out - look at this adorable snake painted on the mountainside of Fireball Island. View full article
  15. Afterthought Games, an indie game studio based in Michigan, recently launched a Kickstarter for their upcoming Violent Sol Worlds. The two-man indie studio is looking to raise $5,000 to complete development, with the goal of completing the title by December of this year. Violent Sol Worlds is a top-down shooter where players are stranded on an alien world to send supplies back to the core worlds while surviving in the rough and tumble wilds. Players must scour the world for resources to craft defenses and upgrades while also shipping supplies home to get the support of the Aviro Corporation. At the heart of Violent Sol Worlds is an AI director to help make sure that there are always new events and stories happening around the procedurally generated world. This AI ensures that players will feel consistently challenged, avoiding that pesky feeling of power creep in the later stages of open world games that leads to action feeling more routine. Players will clash with alien monsters and sentient beings, some good, some bad, all at the whim of the AI director. Players can find vehicles and use them to explore the world. Exploration will unveil stories of ancient alien races and previous settlers sent by Aviro Corp. While Aviro might not care much for its settlers, those who provide the company with enough resources gain access to its space station and 3D printing technologies to make new weapons and gear. Regardless of whether Violent Sol Worlds meets its modest goal, the developers have sworn that it will be finished. However, they can't guarantee that it will be finished by the end of December 2017 if they don't meet their $5,000 target. "This game is getting made one way or the other," Afterthought Games' statement reads, "it will just be better with your help. The only risk is that it could be delayed. We are shooting for a Christmas release, but as life happens delays are possible. We are pretty good about digging in and getting the job done in the time frame set in front of us, so we are not too worried about delays." One of the really cool parts about Violent Sol Worlds lies in its connection to Extra Life. Phillip Brossia, one of Afterthought Games' co-founders, also volunteers as the Extra Life Guild president in Grand Rapids, Michigan and has been participating in Extra Life for the past four years. He shared Violent Sol Worlds in the forums and announced a plan to give 5% of the Kickstarter earnings to Extra Life! I have been with Extra Life for 4 years now and I am the President of the Grand Rapids guild. So this isn't spam. My little company Afterthought Games is going to be doing a Kickstarter campaign next week for a game we are making called Violent Sol Worlds. We're not allowed to advertise it on the Kickstarter (which is ridiculous) but our plan is to give 5% of our earnings to Extra Life, 10% if we are funded in the first 24 hours. Violent Sol Worlds will be coming to PC (hopefully) later this year. Afterthought plans to launch the final game with modding in mind - players should be able to pick up Violent Sol Worlds and find it easy to mod, both for veteran modders and beginners alike.
  16. Afterthought Games, an indie game studio based in Michigan, recently launched a Kickstarter for their upcoming Violent Sol Worlds. The two-man indie studio is looking to raise $5,000 to complete development, with the goal of completing the title by December of this year. Violent Sol Worlds is a top-down shooter where players are stranded on an alien world to send supplies back to the core worlds while surviving in the rough and tumble wilds. Players must scour the world for resources to craft defenses and upgrades while also shipping supplies home to get the support of the Aviro Corporation. At the heart of Violent Sol Worlds is an AI director to help make sure that there are always new events and stories happening around the procedurally generated world. This AI ensures that players will feel consistently challenged, avoiding that pesky feeling of power creep in the later stages of open world games that leads to action feeling more routine. Players will clash with alien monsters and sentient beings, some good, some bad, all at the whim of the AI director. Players can find vehicles and use them to explore the world. Exploration will unveil stories of ancient alien races and previous settlers sent by Aviro Corp. While Aviro might not care much for its settlers, those who provide the company with enough resources gain access to its space station and 3D printing technologies to make new weapons and gear. Regardless of whether Violent Sol Worlds meets its modest goal, the developers have sworn that it will be finished. However, they can't guarantee that it will be finished by the end of December 2017 if they don't meet their $5,000 target. "This game is getting made one way or the other," Afterthought Games' statement reads, "it will just be better with your help. The only risk is that it could be delayed. We are shooting for a Christmas release, but as life happens delays are possible. We are pretty good about digging in and getting the job done in the time frame set in front of us, so we are not too worried about delays." One of the really cool parts about Violent Sol Worlds lies in its connection to Extra Life. Phillip Brossia, one of Afterthought Games' co-founders, also volunteers as the Extra Life Guild president in Grand Rapids, Michigan and has been participating in Extra Life for the past four years. He shared Violent Sol Worlds in the forums and announced a plan to give 5% of the Kickstarter earnings to Extra Life! I have been with Extra Life for 4 years now and I am the President of the Grand Rapids guild. So this isn't spam. My little company Afterthought Games is going to be doing a Kickstarter campaign next week for a game we are making called Violent Sol Worlds. We're not allowed to advertise it on the Kickstarter (which is ridiculous) but our plan is to give 5% of our earnings to Extra Life, 10% if we are funded in the first 24 hours. Violent Sol Worlds will be coming to PC (hopefully) later this year. Afterthought plans to launch the final game with modding in mind - players should be able to pick up Violent Sol Worlds and find it easy to mod, both for veteran modders and beginners alike. View full article
  17. Hey guys, I have been with Extra Life for 4 years now and I am the President of the Grand Rapids guild. So this isn't spam. My little company Afterthought Games is going to be doing a Kickstarter campaign next week for a game we are making called Violent Sol Worlds. We're not allowed to advertise it on the Kickstarter (which is ridiculous) but our plan is to give 5% of our earnings to Extra Life, 10% if we are funded in the first 24 hours. We are also launching a game called Cornflower Corbin the day before and we are going to be promoting both of them at the Maker Faire in our city next weekend. Anyway, I just wanted to post about both here to try to get the word out. I will post again when they both are live. Below are the relevant links if anyone is interested. Violent Sol Kickstarter: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/651297750/1491401610?ref=328434&token=4afc02f2 Cornflower Corbin on Steam: http://store.steampowered.com/app/624780/Cornflower_Corbin/ Thanks in advance for checking them out.
  18. From Kickstarter to the big screen, We Happy Few has come a long way from its humble origins - and it isn't even fully released yet! Variety has reported that We Happy Few developer Compulsion Games has inked a deal with Gold Circle Entertainment and dj2 Entertainment to give them the rights to a We Happy Few film. We Happy Few might prove to be a difficult story to adapt as the game relies on procedural generation. However, the setting and imagery is undeniably rife with opportunities for adaptation. The game takes place in an alternate version of 1960s England where the population has become controlled via a system that ensures every citizen is under the influence of sedative medication that keeps them from seeing reality. One citizen, the player protagonist, manages to buck the medicine and embarks on an attempt to uncover the seedy truth behind the aggressively sterile control of their town. How exactly this will translate onto film remains to be seen, but Gold Circle and dj2 are in the market for writers able to tackle a video game adaptation. Gold Circle made a name for itself as the production company behind films like My Big Fat Greek Wedding and Pitch Perfect. Meanwhile dj2 Entertainment has been handling work on the Donnie Yen vehicle Sleeping Dogs movie and the Sonic the Hedgehog adaptation. The real question I have is how a game that hasn't had a full commercial release as a finished product already got picked up for a movie deal. That's a crazy fast turnaround that makes me nervous, but I wish the best for all involved.
  19. From Kickstarter to the big screen, We Happy Few has come a long way from its humble origins - and it isn't even fully released yet! Variety has reported that We Happy Few developer Compulsion Games has inked a deal with Gold Circle Entertainment and dj2 Entertainment to give them the rights to a We Happy Few film. We Happy Few might prove to be a difficult story to adapt as the game relies on procedural generation. However, the setting and imagery is undeniably rife with opportunities for adaptation. The game takes place in an alternate version of 1960s England where the population has become controlled via a system that ensures every citizen is under the influence of sedative medication that keeps them from seeing reality. One citizen, the player protagonist, manages to buck the medicine and embarks on an attempt to uncover the seedy truth behind the aggressively sterile control of their town. How exactly this will translate onto film remains to be seen, but Gold Circle and dj2 are in the market for writers able to tackle a video game adaptation. Gold Circle made a name for itself as the production company behind films like My Big Fat Greek Wedding and Pitch Perfect. Meanwhile dj2 Entertainment has been handling work on the Donnie Yen vehicle Sleeping Dogs movie and the Sonic the Hedgehog adaptation. The real question I have is how a game that hasn't had a full commercial release as a finished product already got picked up for a movie deal. That's a crazy fast turnaround that makes me nervous, but I wish the best for all involved. View full article
  20. An adorable roguelike is on its way toward becoming a reality as Pixel Princess Blitz reached its funding goal on Kickstarter yesterday. The indie project cleared its €77,700 goal with a whopping €102,418. The money will be used by the Hamburg-based indie group to create the PC version of their sandbox action RPG with a crazy endearing art style. The indie devs plan to port the title to PlayStation 4, PS Vita, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch after the PC version of Pixel Princess Blitz releases mid 2018. Pixel Princess Blitz has huge ambitions to present an open world spread out over a grid that is explored in turn-based form. Encounters and dungeons are tackled in real-time with special attacks, reactive AI, and fluid action. Players will need to use the resources they discover to survive, outfitting themselves with upgradable items. Players who aren't careful could see themselves fall victim to permadeath, a system the devs describe as tough, but fair. Multiple factions inhabit the world and how players interact with them shapes how the story unfolds. In fact, every NPC that players encounter has a backstory and motivations that they pursue - that might even include a romantic relationship with the protagonist, Kuruna. Strengthening ties to NPCs can yield a slew of benefits, like combat companions and perhaps even the chance that they will show up to save your from the brink of death itself! Players take on the role of Kuruna, a young adventurer who travels the kingdom of Verad to help those in need. Some strange activities have been reported in the province of Hummingwoods, so Kuruna begins a patrol of the area that quickly becomes much more than she ever imagined. Keep an eye out for Pixel Princess Blitz sometime next year on PC. View full article
  21. An adorable roguelike is on its way toward becoming a reality as Pixel Princess Blitz reached its funding goal on Kickstarter yesterday. The indie project cleared its €77,700 goal with a whopping €102,418. The money will be used by the Hamburg-based indie group to create the PC version of their sandbox action RPG with a crazy endearing art style. The indie devs plan to port the title to PlayStation 4, PS Vita, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch after the PC version of Pixel Princess Blitz releases mid 2018. Pixel Princess Blitz has huge ambitions to present an open world spread out over a grid that is explored in turn-based form. Encounters and dungeons are tackled in real-time with special attacks, reactive AI, and fluid action. Players will need to use the resources they discover to survive, outfitting themselves with upgradable items. Players who aren't careful could see themselves fall victim to permadeath, a system the devs describe as tough, but fair. Multiple factions inhabit the world and how players interact with them shapes how the story unfolds. In fact, every NPC that players encounter has a backstory and motivations that they pursue - that might even include a romantic relationship with the protagonist, Kuruna. Strengthening ties to NPCs can yield a slew of benefits, like combat companions and perhaps even the chance that they will show up to save your from the brink of death itself! Players take on the role of Kuruna, a young adventurer who travels the kingdom of Verad to help those in need. Some strange activities have been reported in the province of Hummingwoods, so Kuruna begins a patrol of the area that quickly becomes much more than she ever imagined. Keep an eye out for Pixel Princess Blitz sometime next year on PC.
  22. Stoic Games, the team of ex-BioWare developers who crafted 2014's The Banner Saga, have returned to Kickstarter to fund the final installment in their turn-based tactical trilogy. The original Banner Saga was initially funded via a highly successful Kickstarter campaign back in 2012 that raised a whopping $700,000 - seven times more than the original goal of $100,000. That surplus of funds allowed Stoic to push the initial game much farther than they had originally envisioned and also develop the sequel, Banner Saga 2. It might seem odd that Stoic has returned to crowdfund their third game, but the studio has an answer for those scratching their heads. "We’re still solidly indie," says the studio, "[We're] not accepting any investor funding, so Kickstarter is still a great way to rally the community to show support for the game, while letting us call the shots on the games we make. We’re paying for most of the game ourselves, but the funds we’re asking for will enable us to take the time we need and bring the band back together one more time!" Stoic seeks to raise $200,000 for The Banner Saga. Given the success of the first campaign and how praise enjoyed by the previous two Banner Saga games, it is likely that the campaign will exceed $200,000 easily. Over $100,000 had been raised less than 24 hours after launching its campaign. No stretch goals have been announced yet. The Banner Saga 3 will see a number of the contributors that helped bring the previous games alive. Austin Wintory, one of the best composers working in games today, will be lending his talent to the series once again. The animation studio responsible for the trilogy's breathtaking hand-drawn aesthetic, Powerhouse Animation, will supposedly return as well. Stoic has also tapped into Icelandic vocal recording outfit Studio Syrland to capture the essence of the Norse-Viking vibe that The Banner Saga taps into. The Banner Saga series focuses on a story about the end of the world from the perspective of those who live in it. It's a tale of survival against a hostile world full of environmental dangers and the unsavory attentions of predatory enemies. Obscure occult powers, monstrous creatures, and dead gods litter a world which trembles and cracks at their passing. Tough decisions await players as they guild a growing (or shrinking) band of survivors through the perils of a dying planet in an almost Oregon Trail-like fashion. Those choices can change the fate of who lives and dies on the long journey to what will hopefully be safety. Life or death struggles over supplies might break out among the survivors or villainous forces could attack, the player must always e ready to step up and fight. A brutal, unique take on turn-based combat makes up the meat of the Banner Saga series. Equal parts Fire Emblem and XCOM, players must use the unique abilities of their companions to fend off death for just one or two more days. Always one or two more days. Those who back The Banner Saga 3 will have the option of purchasing both The Banner Saga 1 and 2 for $20 on top of their original pledge once the campaign closes. View full article
  23. Jack Gardner

    The Banner Saga 3 Launched on Kickstarter

    Stoic Games, the team of ex-BioWare developers who crafted 2014's The Banner Saga, have returned to Kickstarter to fund the final installment in their turn-based tactical trilogy. The original Banner Saga was initially funded via a highly successful Kickstarter campaign back in 2012 that raised a whopping $700,000 - seven times more than the original goal of $100,000. That surplus of funds allowed Stoic to push the initial game much farther than they had originally envisioned and also develop the sequel, Banner Saga 2. It might seem odd that Stoic has returned to crowdfund their third game, but the studio has an answer for those scratching their heads. "We’re still solidly indie," says the studio, "[We're] not accepting any investor funding, so Kickstarter is still a great way to rally the community to show support for the game, while letting us call the shots on the games we make. We’re paying for most of the game ourselves, but the funds we’re asking for will enable us to take the time we need and bring the band back together one more time!" Stoic seeks to raise $200,000 for The Banner Saga. Given the success of the first campaign and how praise enjoyed by the previous two Banner Saga games, it is likely that the campaign will exceed $200,000 easily. Over $100,000 had been raised less than 24 hours after launching its campaign. No stretch goals have been announced yet. The Banner Saga 3 will see a number of the contributors that helped bring the previous games alive. Austin Wintory, one of the best composers working in games today, will be lending his talent to the series once again. The animation studio responsible for the trilogy's breathtaking hand-drawn aesthetic, Powerhouse Animation, will supposedly return as well. Stoic has also tapped into Icelandic vocal recording outfit Studio Syrland to capture the essence of the Norse-Viking vibe that The Banner Saga taps into. The Banner Saga series focuses on a story about the end of the world from the perspective of those who live in it. It's a tale of survival against a hostile world full of environmental dangers and the unsavory attentions of predatory enemies. Obscure occult powers, monstrous creatures, and dead gods litter a world which trembles and cracks at their passing. Tough decisions await players as they guild a growing (or shrinking) band of survivors through the perils of a dying planet in an almost Oregon Trail-like fashion. Those choices can change the fate of who lives and dies on the long journey to what will hopefully be safety. Life or death struggles over supplies might break out among the survivors or villainous forces could attack, the player must always e ready to step up and fight. A brutal, unique take on turn-based combat makes up the meat of the Banner Saga series. Equal parts Fire Emblem and XCOM, players must use the unique abilities of their companions to fend off death for just one or two more days. Always one or two more days. Those who back The Banner Saga 3 will have the option of purchasing both The Banner Saga 1 and 2 for $20 on top of their original pledge once the campaign closes.
  24. Yesterday, the developers at Ice-Pick Lodge posted a small vignette to YouTube, teasing a location from their upcoming reimagining of their classic PC game, Pathologic. This first teaser panned around a cathedral in the middle of a misty city while a murder of crows caw, circling above it. The building oozes a creepiness very much in line with the spirit of the original 2005 PC title, though Ice-Pick Lodge has stressed that its new Pathologic should not be viewed as a remake or sequel. The Russian developer uploaded another vignette to their channel today. The video, which shows an incredibly short glimpse of a location called "The Workshop," lasts only a handful of seconds. It zooms in through a building, presumably the titular workshop, and through a window into a shadowed forested area. The two vignettes don't reveal a whole lot, but it is interesting to final be seeing what Ice-Pick Lodge has in store two years after Kickstarting their spiritual successor to Pathologic. For those who never had an opportunity to play the 2005 release, Ice-Pick Lodge recently revamped the title in HD while ironing out some old bugs. The core concept is that the player controls one of several different characters chosen at the beginning and must find a way to stop a mysterious, deadly plague from consuming an isolated, rural town. Pathologic reacted to player choice and decisions in interesting, sometimes unpredictable ways and had some of the most interesting game design at the time. It also had a decidedly unnerving, horror element that still holds up to this day. Ice-Pick Lodge is taking that same central premise of plague and reactive game design and cranking it up to 11 for their upcoming release of the new Pathologic. It will definitely be interesting to see where their vision takes them. View full article
  25. Yesterday, the developers at Ice-Pick Lodge posted a small vignette to YouTube, teasing a location from their upcoming reimagining of their classic PC game, Pathologic. This first teaser panned around a cathedral in the middle of a misty city while a murder of crows caw, circling above it. The building oozes a creepiness very much in line with the spirit of the original 2005 PC title, though Ice-Pick Lodge has stressed that its new Pathologic should not be viewed as a remake or sequel. The Russian developer uploaded another vignette to their channel today. The video, which shows an incredibly short glimpse of a location called "The Workshop," lasts only a handful of seconds. It zooms in through a building, presumably the titular workshop, and through a window into a shadowed forested area. The two vignettes don't reveal a whole lot, but it is interesting to final be seeing what Ice-Pick Lodge has in store two years after Kickstarting their spiritual successor to Pathologic. For those who never had an opportunity to play the 2005 release, Ice-Pick Lodge recently revamped the title in HD while ironing out some old bugs. The core concept is that the player controls one of several different characters chosen at the beginning and must find a way to stop a mysterious, deadly plague from consuming an isolated, rural town. Pathologic reacted to player choice and decisions in interesting, sometimes unpredictable ways and had some of the most interesting game design at the time. It also had a decidedly unnerving, horror element that still holds up to this day. Ice-Pick Lodge is taking that same central premise of plague and reactive game design and cranking it up to 11 for their upcoming release of the new Pathologic. It will definitely be interesting to see where their vision takes them.
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