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Found 9 results

  1. A couple years back, we told you about how the Internet Archive had added 2,400 MS-DOS games to its collection. That number of MS-DOS titles has since grown to over 4,000, but there are actually almost double that number of gaming titles that archived from other systems and consoles. The current total number of explorable gaming software on the Archive stands at 7,700. That's a lot of games! The console collection of The Internet Archive includes a staggering number of obscure systems. Ever wondered what it was like to play a Fairchild Channel F? They have 45 games anyone can try out. Never heard of the Epoch Game Pocket Computer? You can play five of those titles. In fact, there are 27 collections of uploaded and emulated software available, including over 1,500 Sega games across four of their consoles. Below you can find a comprehensive list of the consoles, the number of games in the collection, and links to their related collections on Internet Archive: Amstrad GX-4000 - 23 APF-MP1000 - 15 Atari 2600 - 519 Atari 5200 - 43 Atari 7800 – 73 Bally Astrocade - 20 Bandai Super Vision 8000 - 7 Coleco Colecovision - 234 Emerson Arcadia – 58 Entex Adventure Vision - 4 Epoch Game Pocket Computer - 5 Epoch Super Cassette Vision - 31 The Fairchild Channel F – 45 Magnavox Odyssey 2 – 122 Mattel Aquarius - 13 Mattel Intelevision - 21 Mega Duck WG-108 - 9 Neo Geo Pocket/Pocket Color – 316 Sega Game Gear - 446 Sega Genesis - 575 Sega Master System - 563 Sega SG-1000 - 74 Socrates - 8 Shoot ‘Em Up Construction Kit games - 323 Super A’Can – 9 VTech Creativision - 17 Watara Supervision - 44 However, are all of those games worth looking into? That answer is definitely a bit hazy. While Internet Archive can successfully emulate all of these titles, the controls and responsiveness of said games leaves a lot to be desired. The ideal way to play these is definitely not on the Archive, but it stands as a useful repository of history and research for those who want to know more about gaming's past. The uploaded titles include unfinished prototypes and builds for various games, too! Just be warned - there are a lot of... eccentric titles on the Internet Archive that have been made by homebrew developers and may contain some explicit material. View full article
  2. A couple years back, we told you about how the Internet Archive had added 2,400 MS-DOS games to its collection. That number of MS-DOS titles has since grown to over 4,000, but there are actually almost double that number of gaming titles that archived from other systems and consoles. The current total number of explorable gaming software on the Archive stands at 7,700. That's a lot of games! The console collection of The Internet Archive includes a staggering number of obscure systems. Ever wondered what it was like to play a Fairchild Channel F? They have 45 games anyone can try out. Never heard of the Epoch Game Pocket Computer? You can play five of those titles. In fact, there are 27 collections of uploaded and emulated software available, including over 1,500 Sega games across four of their consoles. Below you can find a comprehensive list of the consoles, the number of games in the collection, and links to their related collections on Internet Archive: Amstrad GX-4000 - 23 APF-MP1000 - 15 Atari 2600 - 519 Atari 5200 - 43 Atari 7800 – 73 Bally Astrocade - 20 Bandai Super Vision 8000 - 7 Coleco Colecovision - 234 Emerson Arcadia – 58 Entex Adventure Vision - 4 Epoch Game Pocket Computer - 5 Epoch Super Cassette Vision - 31 The Fairchild Channel F – 45 Magnavox Odyssey 2 – 122 Mattel Aquarius - 13 Mattel Intelevision - 21 Mega Duck WG-108 - 9 Neo Geo Pocket/Pocket Color – 316 Sega Game Gear - 446 Sega Genesis - 575 Sega Master System - 563 Sega SG-1000 - 74 Socrates - 8 Shoot ‘Em Up Construction Kit games - 323 Super A’Can – 9 VTech Creativision - 17 Watara Supervision - 44 However, are all of those games worth looking into? That answer is definitely a bit hazy. While Internet Archive can successfully emulate all of these titles, the controls and responsiveness of said games leaves a lot to be desired. The ideal way to play these is definitely not on the Archive, but it stands as a useful repository of history and research for those who want to know more about gaming's past. The uploaded titles include unfinished prototypes and builds for various games, too! Just be warned - there are a lot of... eccentric titles on the Internet Archive that have been made by homebrew developers and may contain some explicit material.
  3. Nearly 150 issues of Nintendo Power were pulled from the Internet Archive after Nintendo issued a DMCA notice. The issues, which included comics, walkthroughs, tips, cheats, and more, were uploaded seemingly without the company's knowledge by digital archivist Jason Scott and have since been removed. Though a common practice for old, out of print magazines, the Nintendo felt that allowing the archive to remain in operation would hinder its ability to protect its copyright. Nintendo's official statement reads: Nintendo’s broad library of characters, products, and brands are enjoyed by people around the world, and we appreciate the passion of our fans. But just as Nintendo respects the intellectual property rights of others, we must also protect our own characters, trademarks and other content. The unapproved use of Nintendo’s intellectual property can weaken our ability to protect and preserve it, or to possibly use it for new projects. While taking down this piece of inaccessible gaming history might seem like a dirty move on Nintendo's part, the fact is that copyright law in the United States is largely incomprehensible and insane. Intellectual property doesn't enter the public domain for 70-120 years after the death of the original creator (in fact, the work of novelists who died in 1945 are only now entering public domain!). If Nintendo did allow the archive to remain up, it could open a crack in their defenses if they need to protect their copyright from profiteers in the future. For those truly sad about the archive being pulled, don't worry too much. There are over 21,000 issues of computer and gaming magazines available on the Internet Archive. View full article
  4. Nearly 150 issues of Nintendo Power were pulled from the Internet Archive after Nintendo issued a DMCA notice. The issues, which included comics, walkthroughs, tips, cheats, and more, were uploaded seemingly without the company's knowledge by digital archivist Jason Scott and have since been removed. Though a common practice for old, out of print magazines, the Nintendo felt that allowing the archive to remain in operation would hinder its ability to protect its copyright. Nintendo's official statement reads: Nintendo’s broad library of characters, products, and brands are enjoyed by people around the world, and we appreciate the passion of our fans. But just as Nintendo respects the intellectual property rights of others, we must also protect our own characters, trademarks and other content. The unapproved use of Nintendo’s intellectual property can weaken our ability to protect and preserve it, or to possibly use it for new projects. While taking down this piece of inaccessible gaming history might seem like a dirty move on Nintendo's part, the fact is that copyright law in the United States is largely incomprehensible and insane. Intellectual property doesn't enter the public domain for 70-120 years after the death of the original creator (in fact, the work of novelists who died in 1945 are only now entering public domain!). If Nintendo did allow the archive to remain up, it could open a crack in their defenses if they need to protect their copyright from profiteers in the future. For those truly sad about the archive being pulled, don't worry too much. There are over 21,000 issues of computer and gaming magazines available on the Internet Archive.
  5. The demise of Nintendo Power in 2012 was the end of an era for gaming. The magazine had been in circulation since 1988 and brought out an ocean of nostalgia from those who had cherished their time with the games detailed on its helpful pages. Many thought that the magazine was gone for good and would be relegated to the boxes in the back of closets and traded by gaming collectors for the rest of time. Nintendo, however, had different plans. They have detailed plans to release a miniature NES this holiday season and now they have also released the entire run of Nintendo Power from 1988 - 2001. The 13 year run of Nintendo Power has been made available via the Internet Archive. Each issue has been lovingly preserved by RetroMags, a website dedicated to keeping old gaming magazines around for future researchers and enthusiasts to enjoy. The 143 issues of Nintendo Power available on the Internet Archive include strategy guides for the original Final Fantasy, comic book storylines for The Legend of Zelda, Star Fox, and Metroid, and are generally fascinating to sift through. The amazing artwork alone is worth the time, even if the written contents of the magazine don't interest you. Give the legacy of Nintendo Power a look if you have the time! View full article
  6. The demise of Nintendo Power in 2012 was the end of an era for gaming. The magazine had been in circulation since 1988 and brought out an ocean of nostalgia from those who had cherished their time with the games detailed on its helpful pages. Many thought that the magazine was gone for good and would be relegated to the boxes in the back of closets and traded by gaming collectors for the rest of time. Nintendo, however, had different plans. They have detailed plans to release a miniature NES this holiday season and now they have also released the entire run of Nintendo Power from 1988 - 2001. The 13 year run of Nintendo Power has been made available via the Internet Archive. Each issue has been lovingly preserved by RetroMags, a website dedicated to keeping old gaming magazines around for future researchers and enthusiasts to enjoy. The 143 issues of Nintendo Power available on the Internet Archive include strategy guides for the original Final Fantasy, comic book storylines for The Legend of Zelda, Star Fox, and Metroid, and are generally fascinating to sift through. The amazing artwork alone is worth the time, even if the written contents of the magazine don't interest you. Give the legacy of Nintendo Power a look if you have the time!
  7. The Internet Archive added a staggering 2,388 pieces of video game history to its collection today. It has also launched the beta for its website that will make its contents more accessible and visually appealing. Jason Scott, one of the leaders of the Archive's push toward a more comprehensible website and a proponent of making these old game playable in-browser, explained in a blog post that not all of the MS-DOS games will be stable, but "on the whole, you will experience some analogue of the MS-DOS program, in your browser, instantly." And it is true! Some of the games on the Internet Archive work splendidly in-browser. There is no fiddling trying to get the programs to run on machine that can barely recognize what they are. True, some of them don't work properly, but all of them work enough to give you an idea of how they played; what they looked and sounded like. It is a really impressive feat. I highly recommend you go over and poke around the titles on stored on the Archive just to see what's out there. If you have trouble with the beta site, just switch over to the old version.
  8. The Internet Archive added a staggering 2,388 pieces of video game history to its collection today. It has also launched the beta for its website that will make its contents more accessible and visually appealing. Jason Scott, one of the leaders of the Archive's push toward a more comprehensible website and a proponent of making these old game playable in-browser, explained in a blog post that not all of the MS-DOS games will be stable, but "on the whole, you will experience some analogue of the MS-DOS program, in your browser, instantly." And it is true! Some of the games on the Internet Archive work splendidly in-browser. There is no fiddling trying to get the programs to run on machine that can barely recognize what they are. True, some of them don't work properly, but all of them work enough to give you an idea of how they played; what they looked and sounded like. It is a really impressive feat. I highly recommend you go over and poke around the titles on stored on the Archive just to see what's out there. If you have trouble with the beta site, just switch over to the old version. View full article
  9. The Internet Archive added a staggering 2,388 pieces of video game history to its collection today. It has also launched the beta for its website that will make its contents more accessible and visually appealing. Jason Scott, one of the leaders of the Archive's push toward a more comprehensible website and a proponent of making these old game playable in-browser, explained in a blog post that not all of the MS-DOS games will be stable, but "on the whole, you will experience some analogue of the MS-DOS program, in your browser, instantly." And it is true! Some of the games on the Internet Archive work splendidly in-browser. There is no fiddling trying to get the programs to run on machine that can barely recognize what they are. True, some of them don't work properly, but all of them work enough to give you an idea of how they played; what they looked and sounded like. It is a really impressive feat. I highly recommend you go over and poke around the titles on stored on the Archive just to see what's out there. If you have trouble with the beta site, just switch over to the old version. View full article
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