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Found 194 results

  1. Take a nostalgia trip back to the heyday of the 8-bit era with Odallus: The Dark Call, an action-platformer coming to Nintendo Switch. Odallus: The Dark Call tells the story of Haggis, an aged hero who embarks on a quest to save his son and avenge the destruction of his village. Battling demons, cultists, and eldritch beings, Haggis presses onward to spare his son from becoming a dark sacrifice. Brazilian developer JoyMasher masterminded both Odallus: The Dark Call and Oniken, which will also be receiving a Switch port. The company specializes in retro game development, with Odallus covering the Metroidvania action subgenre and Oniken representing JoyMasher's take on the old-school Ninja Gaiden. They also have a game currently in development called Blazing Chrome, a 16-bit run-and-gun action-shooter in the vein of Super Contra or Metal Slug. Odallus: The Dark Call initially released in 2015 for PC, receiving mostly positive reviews for its heartfelt send up of the Castlevania of old. It includes classic 8-bit cutscenes, a large world full of secrets, and clever gameplay twists that might trick even the most veteran of players. Now, the adventures of Haggis are coming to Nintendo Switch in February as well as PlayStation 4 and Xbox One later this spring. Odallus: The Dark Call features eight levels that can be explored for more secrets when players have acquired more abilities. Levels are populated by over fifty different enemy types and offer chances to face off against colossal bosses. Players who stick through to the end will spend, at a minimum, eight hours completing the game, only to find a veteran difficulty awaiting them for added replayability. When it launches, Odallus: The Dark Call will be available digitally. However, Eastasiasoft will be offering a limited run physical edition of the game. These physical copies will work on all systems worldwide, but may have some limitations on their online features. The following will be offered physically: Odallus: The Dark Call (PS4) Oniken + Odallus Collection (PS4/Switch) Oniken + Odallus Collection: Limited Edition (Switch) Odallus: The Dark Call releases for Nintendo Switch on February 8 and will be coming to PlayStation 4 and Xbox One sometime during spring of this year. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  2. Take a nostalgia trip back to the heyday of the 8-bit era with Odallus: The Dark Call, an action-platformer coming to Nintendo Switch. Odallus: The Dark Call tells the story of Haggis, an aged hero who embarks on a quest to save his son and avenge the destruction of his village. Battling demons, cultists, and eldritch beings, Haggis presses onward to spare his son from becoming a dark sacrifice. Brazilian developer JoyMasher masterminded both Odallus: The Dark Call and Oniken, which will also be receiving a Switch port. The company specializes in retro game development, with Odallus covering the Metroidvania action subgenre and Oniken representing JoyMasher's take on the old-school Ninja Gaiden. They also have a game currently in development called Blazing Chrome, a 16-bit run-and-gun action-shooter in the vein of Super Contra or Metal Slug. Odallus: The Dark Call initially released in 2015 for PC, receiving mostly positive reviews for its heartfelt send up of the Castlevania of old. It includes classic 8-bit cutscenes, a large world full of secrets, and clever gameplay twists that might trick even the most veteran of players. Now, the adventures of Haggis are coming to Nintendo Switch in February as well as PlayStation 4 and Xbox One later this spring. Odallus: The Dark Call features eight levels that can be explored for more secrets when players have acquired more abilities. Levels are populated by over fifty different enemy types and offer chances to face off against colossal bosses. Players who stick through to the end will spend, at a minimum, eight hours completing the game, only to find a veteran difficulty awaiting them for added replayability. When it launches, Odallus: The Dark Call will be available digitally. However, Eastasiasoft will be offering a limited run physical edition of the game. These physical copies will work on all systems worldwide, but may have some limitations on their online features. The following will be offered physically: Odallus: The Dark Call (PS4) Oniken + Odallus Collection (PS4/Switch) Oniken + Odallus Collection: Limited Edition (Switch) Odallus: The Dark Call releases for Nintendo Switch on February 8 and will be coming to PlayStation 4 and Xbox One sometime during spring of this year. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  3. Bungie has issued an update on its official channels announcing that they will be splitting from the partnership with Activision that birthed the Destiny franchise. The almost decade-long deal has changed quite a bit since it was first announced, and it seems like the two companies have decided to part ways, though nothing is set in stone quite yet. Bungie initially partnered after it broke free from Microsoft in a bid to create something entirely new after years spent developing the Halo series. The developer had supposedly been working on the idea for Destiny for some time, but needed a publishing partner to make it happen. They turned to Activision to help them secure the funding necessary to make their vision a reality. However, as these things go, Activision initially envisioned Destiny and future sequels receiving yearly updates, DLC, and more. Word is that Activision was unhappy with the pace of development on Destiny and its expansions. This led to years of raised tensions between Bungie and its publisher. With that in mind, Bungie posted to the company website today that they were in the early stages of extracting themselves from the partnership they've maintained with Activision since 2010. Despite the difficulties behind-the-scenes, Bungie's announcement thanked Activision for their eight-year partnership which has led to Destiny becoming a recognizable force in the industry and public landscape. Part of the statement clarified the future of both Bungie and Activision: We have enjoyed a successful eight-year run and would like to thank Activision for their partnership on Destiny. Looking ahead, we’re excited to announce plans for Activision to transfer publishing rights for Destiny to Bungie. With our remarkable Destiny community, we are ready to publish on our own, while Activision will increase their focus on owned IP projects. The planned transition process is already underway in its early stages, with Bungie and Activision both committed to making sure the handoff is as seamless as possible. In other words, Bungie will assume full creative and publishing control of Destiny and become an independent developer. They will be able to publish whatever they please for PC platforms and will be free to work on their own with console manufacturers to get their games onto various devices. Activision, meanwhile, will be freed up to focus on its own projects. This feels like a positive move for both companies, though it does leave Activision in a strange place where its only major franchise will be Call of Duty. If popularity for that game series dips, they could be in a really tight place with such an open publishing slate. For Bungie and everyone who has followed their development history, this is an exciting and risky time. While they will be continuing to work on Destiny for the foreseeable future, their departure from Activision probably means that they will be able to work on other game concepts - and gamers should be excited to see more games from the people who brought Halo and Destiny into the world. All things come to an end, but something even better might be just around the corner. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  4. Bungie has issued an update on its official channels announcing that they will be splitting from the partnership with Activision that birthed the Destiny franchise. The almost decade-long deal has changed quite a bit since it was first announced, and it seems like the two companies have decided to part ways, though nothing is set in stone quite yet. Bungie initially partnered after it broke free from Microsoft in a bid to create something entirely new after years spent developing the Halo series. The developer had supposedly been working on the idea for Destiny for some time, but needed a publishing partner to make it happen. They turned to Activision to help them secure the funding necessary to make their vision a reality. However, as these things go, Activision initially envisioned Destiny and future sequels receiving yearly updates, DLC, and more. Word is that Activision was unhappy with the pace of development on Destiny and its expansions. This led to years of raised tensions between Bungie and its publisher. With that in mind, Bungie posted to the company website today that they were in the early stages of extracting themselves from the partnership they've maintained with Activision since 2010. Despite the difficulties behind-the-scenes, Bungie's announcement thanked Activision for their eight-year partnership which has led to Destiny becoming a recognizable force in the industry and public landscape. Part of the statement clarified the future of both Bungie and Activision: We have enjoyed a successful eight-year run and would like to thank Activision for their partnership on Destiny. Looking ahead, we’re excited to announce plans for Activision to transfer publishing rights for Destiny to Bungie. With our remarkable Destiny community, we are ready to publish on our own, while Activision will increase their focus on owned IP projects. The planned transition process is already underway in its early stages, with Bungie and Activision both committed to making sure the handoff is as seamless as possible. In other words, Bungie will assume full creative and publishing control of Destiny and become an independent developer. They will be able to publish whatever they please for PC platforms and will be free to work on their own with console manufacturers to get their games onto various devices. Activision, meanwhile, will be freed up to focus on its own projects. This feels like a positive move for both companies, though it does leave Activision in a strange place where its only major franchise will be Call of Duty. If popularity for that game series dips, they could be in a really tight place with such an open publishing slate. For Bungie and everyone who has followed their development history, this is an exciting and risky time. While they will be continuing to work on Destiny for the foreseeable future, their departure from Activision probably means that they will be able to work on other game concepts - and gamers should be excited to see more games from the people who brought Halo and Destiny into the world. All things come to an end, but something even better might be just around the corner. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  5. Have you ever wanted to run a day spa? No? What if I told you that your day spa could be run, operated, and patronized by adorable, smiling marshmallows? That's exactly the case with Marshmallow Day Spa, a new (and free!) game coming out of the Winter Jam 2019 game jam event hosted by itch.io. Winter Jam 2019 had the theme of "hot chocolate" and the event received fifteen submissions. Teams had from January 4 at 1:59am CST until January 7 at 1:59am CST to come up with an original idea for a game based on the prompt and create a working version of that idea from scratch. Game jams always bring out the strangest and most creative ideas from developers by putting them under strict time constraints. Occasionally, this leads to some brilliant ideas for games that can be fleshed out in more detail later. One of the stand outs from this year's Winter Jam event was Marshmallow Day Spa, a game that puts players in the marshy body of a mallow who just wants to run a great spa for its fellow mallows. Players have to run around the spa to see to the needs of their stressed out guests. To optimally take care of them, players need to create the perfectly warm hot chocolate hot tub for them to really let go of their anxiety. Don't forget to add the very necessary milk and toppings! Marshmallow Day Spa was developed by Ryan Pocock, Jasmin Habezai-Fekri, Megan McCurdy, and Maeve Broadbin. Pocock handled the programming and general design of Marshmallow Day Spa with Habezai-Fekri crafting the environments and pitching in with the textures. McCurdy wore many hats, working as both a 3D and texture artist, rigging and animating the world, and designing the levels. Broadbin came up with the concept art and designed the user interface. Keep in mind that all of this game was, essentially, thrown together in three days - which is pretty freakin' incredible. It even has controller support if you don't want to use a keyboard to play. You can download and play Marshmallow Day Spa for free on itch.io. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  6. Have you ever wanted to run a day spa? No? What if I told you that your day spa could be run, operated, and patronized by adorable, smiling marshmallows? That's exactly the case with Marshmallow Day Spa, a new (and free!) game coming out of the Winter Jam 2019 game jam event hosted by itch.io. Winter Jam 2019 had the theme of "hot chocolate" and the event received fifteen submissions. Teams had from January 4 at 1:59am CST until January 7 at 1:59am CST to come up with an original idea for a game based on the prompt and create a working version of that idea from scratch. Game jams always bring out the strangest and most creative ideas from developers by putting them under strict time constraints. Occasionally, this leads to some brilliant ideas for games that can be fleshed out in more detail later. One of the stand outs from this year's Winter Jam event was Marshmallow Day Spa, a game that puts players in the marshy body of a mallow who just wants to run a great spa for its fellow mallows. Players have to run around the spa to see to the needs of their stressed out guests. To optimally take care of them, players need to create the perfectly warm hot chocolate hot tub for them to really let go of their anxiety. Don't forget to add the very necessary milk and toppings! Marshmallow Day Spa was developed by Ryan Pocock, Jasmin Habezai-Fekri, Megan McCurdy, and Maeve Broadbin. Pocock handled the programming and general design of Marshmallow Day Spa with Habezai-Fekri crafting the environments and pitching in with the textures. McCurdy wore many hats, working as both a 3D and texture artist, rigging and animating the world, and designing the levels. Broadbin came up with the concept art and designed the user interface. Keep in mind that all of this game was, essentially, thrown together in three days - which is pretty freakin' incredible. It even has controller support if you don't want to use a keyboard to play. You can download and play Marshmallow Day Spa for free on itch.io. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  7. Overcooked! A game about cooking and such. Is it a best game period? Is it not? We sort of get to the bottom of it by the end of this episode. One thing is certain: It's a game about culinary delights and skills that you can shove in your friends' faces. I hear it's delightful and it even got a sequel! Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Mario Kart DS 'Tilt & Drift' by YoshiBlade (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR01108) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  8. Overcooked! A game about cooking and such. Is it a best game period? Is it not? We sort of get to the bottom of it by the end of this episode. One thing is certain: It's a game about culinary delights and skills that you can shove in your friends' faces. I hear it's delightful and it even got a sequel! Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Mario Kart DS 'Tilt & Drift' by YoshiBlade (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR01108) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  9. Vane, an upcoming indie game courtesy of developers who previously worked on The Last Guardian, thrusts players into the skin of a bird who can take the form of a young child to explore the ruins of a decrepit civilization. Created by the folks at Friend & Foe Games, players will have to delve deeper and deeper into the mystical ruins of a culture long gone (or is it?). The trailer seems to intentionally remind the viewer of minimalist titles like Ico and Journey. Vane comes to us courtesy of Friend & Foe Games, a studio founded in 2014 by several developers who have worked on titles like the previously mentioned The Last Guardian, but their pedigree also includes action-oriented games like Battlefield 3 and Killzone. Despite the impressive credentials, the studio isn't a large one. Their website only lists a team of eight who have worked on Vane. They also seem to have another project in the works; an arcade brawler titled Dangerous Men, though not much is known about it at this time. As far as the story goes, all we know is that a pile of mysterious, golden dust transforms a curious crow into a young child. Armed with curiosity and the ability to transform back into a bird form, the kid begins to explore a vast world filled with wonder, excitement, danger, and dread. Mysterious technology begins to churn to life at the child's approach, reshaping the world as they continue their journey to who-knows-where. As the journey continues, who knows what shape the barren desert might take as it awakens. If you ever wondered what Ico would be like if you could turn into a bird and were exposed to existential terror, Vane might be right up your alley. in many ways it reminds me of Rime, last year's indie game about a child exploring a strange world from Tequila Works. That's some high praise given that Rime was flippin' great. Also, the synth music buoying the action in the above trailer is just excellent. Vane will release on January 15 for the PlayStation 4. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  10. Vane, an upcoming indie game courtesy of developers who previously worked on The Last Guardian, thrusts players into the skin of a bird who can take the form of a young child to explore the ruins of a decrepit civilization. Created by the folks at Friend & Foe Games, players will have to delve deeper and deeper into the mystical ruins of a culture long gone (or is it?). The trailer seems to intentionally remind the viewer of minimalist titles like Ico and Journey. Vane comes to us courtesy of Friend & Foe Games, a studio founded in 2014 by several developers who have worked on titles like the previously mentioned The Last Guardian, but their pedigree also includes action-oriented games like Battlefield 3 and Killzone. Despite the impressive credentials, the studio isn't a large one. Their website only lists a team of eight who have worked on Vane. They also seem to have another project in the works; an arcade brawler titled Dangerous Men, though not much is known about it at this time. As far as the story goes, all we know is that a pile of mysterious, golden dust transforms a curious crow into a young child. Armed with curiosity and the ability to transform back into a bird form, the kid begins to explore a vast world filled with wonder, excitement, danger, and dread. Mysterious technology begins to churn to life at the child's approach, reshaping the world as they continue their journey to who-knows-where. As the journey continues, who knows what shape the barren desert might take as it awakens. If you ever wondered what Ico would be like if you could turn into a bird and were exposed to existential terror, Vane might be right up your alley. in many ways it reminds me of Rime, last year's indie game about a child exploring a strange world from Tequila Works. That's some high praise given that Rime was flippin' great. Also, the synth music buoying the action in the above trailer is just excellent. Vane will release on January 15 for the PlayStation 4. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  11. Back in 2015, a small, four-person team based in France launched a Kickstarter with the modest goal of raising $44,000 to create a game in the classic JRPG mold. Their pitch for their dream game wound up bringing in almost four times that amount and development on Edge of Eternity began. Three years later and a team of nine people, Midgar Studio has released the Early Access version of Edge of Eternity along with a development road map - and the game certainly looks impressive as heck. Though released to the public, the Early Access version of Edge of Eternity remains very much in its alpha stages. It only includes the first chapter of the story that will bring players on a journey through the first major area of the game built around the hub city of Herelsor. The first portion of the Edge of Eternity's Early Access includes six self-contained sidequests and a number of procedurally generated quests alongside the main story. It will also contain a portion of the soundtrack composed by Yasunori Mitsuda, the man responsible for the soundtracks of Chrono Trigger, Xenoblade, and Shadow Hearts. The actual gameplay in Edge of Eternity combines classic open world roaming with turn-based tactical battles that rely on an innovative hex system. Players will explore, level up, and unlock new abilities by using a system that seems similar to Final Fantasy X's ability grids. With each major update milestone, the gameplay systems will be expanded upon and deepened with new abilities, items, and more. Edge of Eternity takes place on the fictional world of Heryon, a planet in turmoil following an invasion of technologically superior outsiders known as the Archelites. In order to survive, the nations of Heryon banded together under an organization called the Consortium and managed to trap the invaders within their mobile fortress by turning to the powerful magic found within the crystals native to their lands. The war entered a prolonged stalemate for decades until the invaders released a new weapon: The Corrosion. The plague ripped through the cities rendering those afflicted with it to develop strange mechanical mutations while slowly going mad from the agony of the disease. In an effort to combat the incurable sickness, those who brew too close to technology or made unauthorized use of it would be labelled as criminals and sent to their deaths. Edge of Eternity follows Daryon, a soldier for the Consortium who receives a fateful letter from home telling him his mother has fallen ill with the Corrosion. That knowledge spurs Daryon down a path at odds with the forces around him. Through a twist of fate, Daryon meets the renegade Selene, a young woman on the run after being found guilty of illegal use of technology. The two will need to rely on one another to survive in a world of war and monsters. Interestingly, Midgar Studio will also be including a set of modding tools for Edge of Eternity called The Eternal Forge that will come with a built-in mod manager. I wouldn't typically think of JRPGs and extensive modding, but the possibilities mixed with the solid foundations of the game itself. Following this initial release, here's what to expect coming as free updates in the near future, bearing in mind that each major update will include new zones, sidequests, monsters, items, and abilities. The Plains of Solna - Late February 2019 - Another section of the open world with a new city named Old Herelsor, the devs describe a farm "sheltering a very, very special creature," too. The Reunion - Spring 2019 - A new segment of the open world with an entirely different environment biome, a dungeon, and a continuation of the main story The Man who survived the Corrosion - Summer 2019 - A new city with expansive quest support and a new party member (it is a JRPG after all!) “As a small indie team of nine people, making an epic JRPG adventure is a huge and work-intensive task. We believe that the labor done so far and its results are already quite an achievement, but we’re still a long way away from getting the game to where we want it to be,” said Jeremy Zeler, founder of Midgar Studio. “Following on from our successful Kickstarter campaign, launching Edge of Eternity into Early Access allows us to further involve our community through the development. It allows us to get direct feedback on new story content, new areas of the game world, the general feel of the game as we expand and build towards the full, polished release our fans and followers are expecting us to deliver.” Edge of Eternity is currently available for PC players through Steam Early Access. People who buy it now will be able to help squash bugs and offer the team suggestions to shape development as the title heads for its full release on PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  12. Back in 2015, a small, four-person team based in France launched a Kickstarter with the modest goal of raising $44,000 to create a game in the classic JRPG mold. Their pitch for their dream game wound up bringing in almost four times that amount and development on Edge of Eternity began. Three years later and a team of nine people, Midgar Studio has released the Early Access version of Edge of Eternity along with a development road map - and the game certainly looks impressive as heck. Though released to the public, the Early Access version of Edge of Eternity remains very much in its alpha stages. It only includes the first chapter of the story that will bring players on a journey through the first major area of the game built around the hub city of Herelsor. The first portion of the Edge of Eternity's Early Access includes six self-contained sidequests and a number of procedurally generated quests alongside the main story. It will also contain a portion of the soundtrack composed by Yasunori Mitsuda, the man responsible for the soundtracks of Chrono Trigger, Xenoblade, and Shadow Hearts. The actual gameplay in Edge of Eternity combines classic open world roaming with turn-based tactical battles that rely on an innovative hex system. Players will explore, level up, and unlock new abilities by using a system that seems similar to Final Fantasy X's ability grids. With each major update milestone, the gameplay systems will be expanded upon and deepened with new abilities, items, and more. Edge of Eternity takes place on the fictional world of Heryon, a planet in turmoil following an invasion of technologically superior outsiders known as the Archelites. In order to survive, the nations of Heryon banded together under an organization called the Consortium and managed to trap the invaders within their mobile fortress by turning to the powerful magic found within the crystals native to their lands. The war entered a prolonged stalemate for decades until the invaders released a new weapon: The Corrosion. The plague ripped through the cities rendering those afflicted with it to develop strange mechanical mutations while slowly going mad from the agony of the disease. In an effort to combat the incurable sickness, those who brew too close to technology or made unauthorized use of it would be labelled as criminals and sent to their deaths. Edge of Eternity follows Daryon, a soldier for the Consortium who receives a fateful letter from home telling him his mother has fallen ill with the Corrosion. That knowledge spurs Daryon down a path at odds with the forces around him. Through a twist of fate, Daryon meets the renegade Selene, a young woman on the run after being found guilty of illegal use of technology. The two will need to rely on one another to survive in a world of war and monsters. Interestingly, Midgar Studio will also be including a set of modding tools for Edge of Eternity called The Eternal Forge that will come with a built-in mod manager. I wouldn't typically think of JRPGs and extensive modding, but the possibilities mixed with the solid foundations of the game itself. Following this initial release, here's what to expect coming as free updates in the near future, bearing in mind that each major update will include new zones, sidequests, monsters, items, and abilities. The Plains of Solna - Late February 2019 - Another section of the open world with a new city named Old Herelsor, the devs describe a farm "sheltering a very, very special creature," too. The Reunion - Spring 2019 - A new segment of the open world with an entirely different environment biome, a dungeon, and a continuation of the main story The Man who survived the Corrosion - Summer 2019 - A new city with expansive quest support and a new party member (it is a JRPG after all!) “As a small indie team of nine people, making an epic JRPG adventure is a huge and work-intensive task. We believe that the labor done so far and its results are already quite an achievement, but we’re still a long way away from getting the game to where we want it to be,” said Jeremy Zeler, founder of Midgar Studio. “Following on from our successful Kickstarter campaign, launching Edge of Eternity into Early Access allows us to further involve our community through the development. It allows us to get direct feedback on new story content, new areas of the game world, the general feel of the game as we expand and build towards the full, polished release our fans and followers are expecting us to deliver.” Edge of Eternity is currently available for PC players through Steam Early Access. People who buy it now will be able to help squash bugs and offer the team suggestions to shape development as the title heads for its full release on PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  13. Tabletop gaming can sometimes be seen as the older brother of video gaming that's more set in its ways. We hear quite a bit about how indie game developers are pushing the visual medium in new directions, but there are people out there doing the same in the tabletop space. One such pioneer is Everest Pipkin, an artist, creator of a multitude of neat things, and sometimes game developer. Yesterday, Pipkin announced their latest endeavor: To create a tabletop game about building a world. In a series of tweets, the developer outlined the basic premise and goals of the game. Titled the ground itself, 2-6 players spend a few hours putting together a world and its history. It can be a fun thing to do on a whim or as part of a larger world building effort for a different tabletop like Dungeons & Dragons or Exalted or any other setting into which someone might struggle breathing life. Players make use of simple gaming tools like decks of cards, a coin, a common six-sided die, and paper to help navigate the ground itself's systems. "Fundamentally, [the ground itself] is about the echoes and traces that are left behind events- whether those traces are physical, social, emotional, or almost invisible. it is about dialing into the stories that are held in the physical memory of one single place," said Pipkin as part of their initial announcement. When exactly the ground itself might become available for people to experience remains a tricky question, though Pipkin has said they expect to release the game within the next month (maybe in time for the holidays?). The game is currently undergoing playtesting to work out the kinks, but this seems like just the thing an old-hand at world creation might want to try with some of their friends to form a fresh world full of new possibilities in the coming new year. Keep an eye on Pipkin's Twitter or Patreon for the official release date. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  14. Tabletop gaming can sometimes be seen as the older brother of video gaming that's more set in its ways. We hear quite a bit about how indie game developers are pushing the visual medium in new directions, but there are people out there doing the same in the tabletop space. One such pioneer is Everest Pipkin, an artist, creator of a multitude of neat things, and sometimes game developer. Yesterday, Pipkin announced their latest endeavor: To create a tabletop game about building a world. In a series of tweets, the developer outlined the basic premise and goals of the game. Titled the ground itself, 2-6 players spend a few hours putting together a world and its history. It can be a fun thing to do on a whim or as part of a larger world building effort for a different tabletop like Dungeons & Dragons or Exalted or any other setting into which someone might struggle breathing life. Players make use of simple gaming tools like decks of cards, a coin, a common six-sided die, and paper to help navigate the ground itself's systems. "Fundamentally, [the ground itself] is about the echoes and traces that are left behind events- whether those traces are physical, social, emotional, or almost invisible. it is about dialing into the stories that are held in the physical memory of one single place," said Pipkin as part of their initial announcement. When exactly the ground itself might become available for people to experience remains a tricky question, though Pipkin has said they expect to release the game within the next month (maybe in time for the holidays?). The game is currently undergoing playtesting to work out the kinks, but this seems like just the thing an old-hand at world creation might want to try with some of their friends to form a fresh world full of new possibilities in the coming new year. Keep an eye on Pipkin's Twitter or Patreon for the official release date. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  15. If you're in the market for a heartwarming and hilarious tale about a frog detective (and why wouldn't you be?) the latest game from Grace Bruxner and Thomas Bowker definitely delivers. The Haunted Island, a Frog Detective Game stars a detective who happens to be a frog as the trusty amphibian investigates a supposedly haunted island. No tricks, this isn't going to suddenly turn into a bloody horror fest or take a turn into uncomfortable territory like Doki Doki Literature Club. Seriously, this game's adorable. It's all about trying to figure out who or what is causing problems for a kindhearted sloth for cryin' out loud! It takes about an hour to complete and sells for $4.49 on Steam. It boasts impressive features like the following: a frog lots of new friends to meet amazing and nice original soundtrack a great time to be had If those aren't intriguing video game features then I just don't know about you anymore, Todd. The Haunted Island, a Frog Detective Game is available now for PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  16. If you're in the market for a heartwarming and hilarious tale about a frog detective (and why wouldn't you be?) the latest game from Grace Bruxner and Thomas Bowker definitely delivers. The Haunted Island, a Frog Detective Game stars a detective who happens to be a frog as the trusty amphibian investigates a supposedly haunted island. No tricks, this isn't going to suddenly turn into a bloody horror fest or take a turn into uncomfortable territory like Doki Doki Literature Club. Seriously, this game's adorable. It's all about trying to figure out who or what is causing problems for a kindhearted sloth for cryin' out loud! It takes about an hour to complete and sells for $4.49 on Steam. It boasts impressive features like the following: a frog lots of new friends to meet amazing and nice original soundtrack a great time to be had If those aren't intriguing video game features then I just don't know about you anymore, Todd. The Haunted Island, a Frog Detective Game is available now for PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  17. Jack Gardner

    Feature: Review: RimWorld

    RimWorld exists as one of those strange Steam Early Access titles that has been around for over five years but only officially released in the last couple of weeks. In an age where many Early Access games wind up in limbo forever or sitting abandoned, it's refreshing to see one emerge from development in a completed state. In a way, the condition of Early Access can be summarized neatly by RimWorld itself; full of failures, stagnation, and occasionally triumph. Ludeon Studios has put together a game that can best be described as a cross between Prison Architect and the capricious elements that would throw wrenches into the perfectly made plans of a city designer in Sim City. Players are given a number of starting scenarios on a vast variety of randomized worlds. From there, their job is simple: Survive. Players must build shelter for their stranded people, secure food, invest in decorations, provide for entertainment, and also build up defenses. Neglecting any of these risks destruction from raiders, crazed animals, or internal mental breaks. Players can win their game by escaping the planet via spaceship, but reaching the point of building or finding a ship can be a laborious process. The learning curve of RimWorld can be a bit steep when first starting out. Though a tutorial mode teaches the basics, nothing quite beats the experience of learning by doing. I went through several settlements while familiarizing myself with the nuts and bolts of the game before I managed to create a sustainable base. On one early attempt I thought I had discovered a successful blueprint for a long-term base, but in an instant it was swept away by a roaring sheet of flame from an errant lightning strike in the dead heat of summer. I could only watch as my colonists slowly succumbed to the heat from the flames they feebly attempted to control. In the end, only one colonist survived to attempt a new life in the ruins of the old base. He drifted toward death ever so slowly until a raiding party arrived and captured him, dragging him off screen to lord only knows what fate. RimWorld's emergent narrative design leads to these stories of death, but it also creates fantastic tales of perseverance. Sometimes a freak storm can light fires all over the map, potentially surrounding your base with uncontrolled flames. Other times, your most skilled colonist could find themselves dying instantly to a cave-in or a poorly constructed roof might fall on top of your best shot leaving them blind. Pressing on despite the setbacks leads to a great story, a personal story, about winning against the odds. Of course, it might not be a glorious tale of survival, but players have some degree of control over the pacing of the story when selecting the parameters of their game. Each game has a specific style of emergent storytelling depending on the AI director that players choose during colony creation. Players looking for a leisurely pace or even just a pure building game can certainly find that in RimWorld, while those seeking a story that keeps them on their toes can select the most capricious of AI narrative designers. Each colonist has a story that builds as you make progress farther into the game itself. It's a story that begins with their short bio page. These pages give some information about where the colonist came from and what sorts of personality quirks, both good and bad, they possess.The next part is, as they say, written in blood. Each colonist can take damage to various internal organs and limbs. Rough encounters can sometimes leave a colonist without a lung or missing one or more limbs. Proceeding farther along the tech tree opens possibilities for prosthetic legs or bionic eyes, allowing grievously wounded colonists a chance to regain or even surpass their previous ability. By the end of my winning run, only one out of my twenty colonists lacked scars, only a handful more weren't missing at least one limb, and my most capable shot was basically Robocop with all but one limb replaced with robotic parts and two synthetic eyes. Each day, colonists need to rest, eat, experience the outdoors, take in beautiful surroundings, and have fun. Without those things being in order, they will quickly fall into depressive funks and even experience mental breakdowns. These breakdowns can range from wandering sadly around the map to running around trying to set the base ablaze, or even attempting to murder a fellow colonist. If particularly hopeless, a colonist might just attempt to leave. Of course, players can capture them by placing them in jail alongside any captured raiders. Once confined, players can begin the recruitment process to bring a wayward colonist back into the fold. All of this comes together to form a really interesting package. Managing the temperature indoors and providing power for various spaces like freezers to keep a stockpile of food handy can be a stumbling block early on, but RimWorld has a nice escalation of problems as it progresses. Eventually food becomes less of a problem, but generating enough power to sustain devices like high-tech labs or fabrication benches becomes a huge hurdle - especially when you need to make those parts to replace limbs, build weapons of war, or create a spaceship from scratch. From start to finish, RimWorld was designed to have the player hooked with one additional goal to work toward, regardless of circumstance. Conclusion: It took me 124 hours of playing RimWorld to see the credits roll. I had a great time trying to figure out the most optimal builds for bases and clever defensive fortifications. It's not a particularly intense experience. In fact, I found it to be quite relaxing despite the insane amount of time I invested into it. That lends itself to this "one more turn" mentality, common in games like Civilization, taking hold. Hours seem to slip by as each objective slowly reaches completion. There are nitty-gritty details to nitpick about RimWorld, like how the AI sometimes doesn't seem to prioritize events or scenarios despite the finest of tuning on the colonists work priority lists. However, the only real request I had was more research options and a faster in-game speed. I played mostly on the fastest speed possible and making progress still felt slow. Overall, RimWorld is great if you are the kind of person who can sit and imagine interesting bases or are looking for a game that forces you to make your own stories by putting you through trials and tribulations. RimWorld is now available on PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  18. Jack Gardner

    Review: RimWorld

    RimWorld exists as one of those strange Steam Early Access titles that has been around for over five years but only officially released in the last couple of weeks. In an age where many Early Access games wind up in limbo forever or sitting abandoned, it's refreshing to see one emerge from development in a completed state. In a way, the condition of Early Access can be summarized neatly by RimWorld itself; full of failures, stagnation, and occasionally triumph. Ludeon Studios has put together a game that can best be described as a cross between Prison Architect and the capricious elements that would throw wrenches into the perfectly made plans of a city designer in Sim City. Players are given a number of starting scenarios on a vast variety of randomized worlds. From there, their job is simple: Survive. Players must build shelter for their stranded people, secure food, invest in decorations, provide for entertainment, and also build up defenses. Neglecting any of these risks destruction from raiders, crazed animals, or internal mental breaks. Players can win their game by escaping the planet via spaceship, but reaching the point of building or finding a ship can be a laborious process. The learning curve of RimWorld can be a bit steep when first starting out. Though a tutorial mode teaches the basics, nothing quite beats the experience of learning by doing. I went through several settlements while familiarizing myself with the nuts and bolts of the game before I managed to create a sustainable base. On one early attempt I thought I had discovered a successful blueprint for a long-term base, but in an instant it was swept away by a roaring sheet of flame from an errant lightning strike in the dead heat of summer. I could only watch as my colonists slowly succumbed to the heat from the flames they feebly attempted to control. In the end, only one colonist survived to attempt a new life in the ruins of the old base. He drifted toward death ever so slowly until a raiding party arrived and captured him, dragging him off screen to lord only knows what fate. RimWorld's emergent narrative design leads to these stories of death, but it also creates fantastic tales of perseverance. Sometimes a freak storm can light fires all over the map, potentially surrounding your base with uncontrolled flames. Other times, your most skilled colonist could find themselves dying instantly to a cave-in or a poorly constructed roof might fall on top of your best shot leaving them blind. Pressing on despite the setbacks leads to a great story, a personal story, about winning against the odds. Of course, it might not be a glorious tale of survival, but players have some degree of control over the pacing of the story when selecting the parameters of their game. Each game has a specific style of emergent storytelling depending on the AI director that players choose during colony creation. Players looking for a leisurely pace or even just a pure building game can certainly find that in RimWorld, while those seeking a story that keeps them on their toes can select the most capricious of AI narrative designers. Each colonist has a story that builds as you make progress farther into the game itself. It's a story that begins with their short bio page. These pages give some information about where the colonist came from and what sorts of personality quirks, both good and bad, they possess.The next part is, as they say, written in blood. Each colonist can take damage to various internal organs and limbs. Rough encounters can sometimes leave a colonist without a lung or missing one or more limbs. Proceeding farther along the tech tree opens possibilities for prosthetic legs or bionic eyes, allowing grievously wounded colonists a chance to regain or even surpass their previous ability. By the end of my winning run, only one out of my twenty colonists lacked scars, only a handful more weren't missing at least one limb, and my most capable shot was basically Robocop with all but one limb replaced with robotic parts and two synthetic eyes. Each day, colonists need to rest, eat, experience the outdoors, take in beautiful surroundings, and have fun. Without those things being in order, they will quickly fall into depressive funks and even experience mental breakdowns. These breakdowns can range from wandering sadly around the map to running around trying to set the base ablaze, or even attempting to murder a fellow colonist. If particularly hopeless, a colonist might just attempt to leave. Of course, players can capture them by placing them in jail alongside any captured raiders. Once confined, players can begin the recruitment process to bring a wayward colonist back into the fold. All of this comes together to form a really interesting package. Managing the temperature indoors and providing power for various spaces like freezers to keep a stockpile of food handy can be a stumbling block early on, but RimWorld has a nice escalation of problems as it progresses. Eventually food becomes less of a problem, but generating enough power to sustain devices like high-tech labs or fabrication benches becomes a huge hurdle - especially when you need to make those parts to replace limbs, build weapons of war, or create a spaceship from scratch. From start to finish, RimWorld was designed to have the player hooked with one additional goal to work toward, regardless of circumstance. Conclusion: It took me 124 hours of playing RimWorld to see the credits roll. I had a great time trying to figure out the most optimal builds for bases and clever defensive fortifications. It's not a particularly intense experience. In fact, I found it to be quite relaxing despite the insane amount of time I invested into it. That lends itself to this "one more turn" mentality, common in games like Civilization, taking hold. Hours seem to slip by as each objective slowly reaches completion. There are nitty-gritty details to nitpick about RimWorld, like how the AI sometimes doesn't seem to prioritize events or scenarios despite the finest of tuning on the colonists work priority lists. However, the only real request I had was more research options and a faster in-game speed. I played mostly on the fastest speed possible and making progress still felt slow. Overall, RimWorld is great if you are the kind of person who can sit and imagine interesting bases or are looking for a game that forces you to make your own stories by putting you through trials and tribulations. RimWorld is now available on PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  19. Edmund McMillen's The Binding of Isaac helped jump start the mainstreaming of roguelike elements in indie games that we have been seeing trickle into the AAA industry over the last few years. Mixing top-down shooting with the dungeon exploration of a classic The Legend of Zelda title, The Binding of Isaac plays pitch perfectly for what it's designed to be. The randomized elements fit together seamlessly for a gameplay experience that's never the same twice in a row. Over all of that, McMillen paints the story of Isaac, a small boy in a scary world full of horrible monsters (that still manage to seem friendly and charming despite being, you know, monsters). Should this 2011 indie hit be considered one of the best games of all-time? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Binding of Isaac 'The Clubbing of Isaac' by Big Giant Circles (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02302) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  20. Edmund McMillen's The Binding of Isaac helped jump start the mainstreaming of roguelike elements in indie games that we have been seeing trickle into the AAA industry over the last few years. Mixing top-down shooting with the dungeon exploration of a classic The Legend of Zelda title, The Binding of Isaac plays pitch perfectly for what it's designed to be. The randomized elements fit together seamlessly for a gameplay experience that's never the same twice in a row. Over all of that, McMillen paints the story of Isaac, a small boy in a scary world full of horrible monsters (that still manage to seem friendly and charming despite being, you know, monsters). Should this 2011 indie hit be considered one of the best games of all-time? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Binding of Isaac 'The Clubbing of Isaac' by Big Giant Circles (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02302) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  21. In late 2017, Davey Wreden, the creator of the comedy adventure game The Stanley Parable, released a game he developed with Ryan Roth, who worked on the music for games like Guacamelee 2, The Beginner's Guide, and Starseed Pilgrim. The result of their labors takes the form of Absolutely: A True Crime Story, a game about Keanu Reeves clearing his good name after being accused of murder. Of course, as one might expect from the person who helped bring the snark of the narrator to life in The Stanley Parable, Absolutely exists as a work of comedy. It has its crude moments, a few curse words and coarse content in the name of humor, but it makes for a great 5-10 minutes of your time that will brighten your day. After you begin the game, it becomes clear that the main hook of the game isn't actually exonerating Keanu Reeves. in fact, being Keanu Reeves is a joke largely because it presents a complete non sequitur. There's no meaning to being Keanu aside from the gentle tickling in ones brain at the idea of Keanu Reeves doing bad things. instead, players walk the streets of NoCrimesVille and convince kids to break the law. This escalates to Reeves going on a killing spree that culminates in either him evading the law or being sentenced to death for his crimes. Absolutely was made in RPG Maker and makes use of what appear to be pre-built assets and a few pictures of Keanu Reeves. Players primarily wander small environments and interact with people in a hilariously simple RPG battle system that funnels you toward the conclusion of this totally true crime story. If you're interested in playing Absolutely: A True Crime Story, you can find it for free on Ryan Roth's itch.io page. It's not a deep game and it has a sense of humor deeply rooted in nihilism; as a distraction and a deconstruction of the traditional RPG, it works really well. Check it out if you want to experience something out of left field. Note: Keanu Reeves is actually really nice and not a criminal in real life. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  22. In late 2017, Davey Wreden, the creator of the comedy adventure game The Stanley Parable, released a game he developed with Ryan Roth, who worked on the music for games like Guacamelee 2, The Beginner's Guide, and Starseed Pilgrim. The result of their labors takes the form of Absolutely: A True Crime Story, a game about Keanu Reeves clearing his good name after being accused of murder. Of course, as one might expect from the person who helped bring the snark of the narrator to life in The Stanley Parable, Absolutely exists as a work of comedy. It has its crude moments, a few curse words and coarse content in the name of humor, but it makes for a great 5-10 minutes of your time that will brighten your day. After you begin the game, it becomes clear that the main hook of the game isn't actually exonerating Keanu Reeves. in fact, being Keanu Reeves is a joke largely because it presents a complete non sequitur. There's no meaning to being Keanu aside from the gentle tickling in ones brain at the idea of Keanu Reeves doing bad things. instead, players walk the streets of NoCrimesVille and convince kids to break the law. This escalates to Reeves going on a killing spree that culminates in either him evading the law or being sentenced to death for his crimes. Absolutely was made in RPG Maker and makes use of what appear to be pre-built assets and a few pictures of Keanu Reeves. Players primarily wander small environments and interact with people in a hilariously simple RPG battle system that funnels you toward the conclusion of this totally true crime story. If you're interested in playing Absolutely: A True Crime Story, you can find it for free on Ryan Roth's itch.io page. It's not a deep game and it has a sense of humor deeply rooted in nihilism; as a distraction and a deconstruction of the traditional RPG, it works really well. Check it out if you want to experience something out of left field. Note: Keanu Reeves is actually really nice and not a criminal in real life. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  23. If you're looking for something you might have missed in the horror game genre, one of the more obscure coming out for this Halloween takes the form of The Witch's House MV, a remake of an RPG Maker game originally released in 2012. The Witch's House follows in the footsteps of Japanese RPG horror RPGs that were more common back in the 16-bit days before Resident Evil reshaped the genre forever. Expect tons of creepy puzzles, unnerving dialogue, and a more freakish tone than one might expect from an retro indie pixel affair. The Witch's House tells the story of a young girl who awakens in the middle of a forest with no memories and finds herself drawn toward the titular house. Inside, she finds many insidious and deadly traps, strange denizens, and an engaging mystery that pulls players inexorably into the inky heart of the witch's abode. Developer Frummy, who returned with a small team to remake the original work, explained the effort that went into the remake, "I’m happy to announce that we’re finally ready to release the game. The Witch’s House MV is an RPG Maker MV remake of the original game, which was released back in 2012. We remade all the graphics, including map tiles and character sprites, and worked hard to enhance the atmosphere and 2D beauty in The Witch’s House. It took us five times as many hours to create this version, but we feel like we’ve finally managed to satisfy ourselves." Those looking for more from the remake need not fear (or maybe they need fear extra?) - there's a new difficulty mode that promises to challenge even the most hardy of horror fanatics. Unlocked by reaching The Witch's House's true ending, players can go through the game again with challenges that all but assure a grueling and gruesome slog full of unexpected death and decay. Frummy also hinted that the new difficulty mode might unlock some new elements of the story for those who brave its challenges. The Witch's House MV releases October 31 for PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  24. If you're looking for something you might have missed in the horror game genre, one of the more obscure coming out for this Halloween takes the form of The Witch's House MV, a remake of an RPG Maker game originally released in 2012. The Witch's House follows in the footsteps of Japanese RPG horror RPGs that were more common back in the 16-bit days before Resident Evil reshaped the genre forever. Expect tons of creepy puzzles, unnerving dialogue, and a more freakish tone than one might expect from an retro indie pixel affair. The Witch's House tells the story of a young girl who awakens in the middle of a forest with no memories and finds herself drawn toward the titular house. Inside, she finds many insidious and deadly traps, strange denizens, and an engaging mystery that pulls players inexorably into the inky heart of the witch's abode. Developer Frummy, who returned with a small team to remake the original work, explained the effort that went into the remake, "I’m happy to announce that we’re finally ready to release the game. The Witch’s House MV is an RPG Maker MV remake of the original game, which was released back in 2012. We remade all the graphics, including map tiles and character sprites, and worked hard to enhance the atmosphere and 2D beauty in The Witch’s House. It took us five times as many hours to create this version, but we feel like we’ve finally managed to satisfy ourselves." Those looking for more from the remake need not fear (or maybe they need fear extra?) - there's a new difficulty mode that promises to challenge even the most hardy of horror fanatics. Unlocked by reaching The Witch's House's true ending, players can go through the game again with challenges that all but assure a grueling and gruesome slog full of unexpected death and decay. Frummy also hinted that the new difficulty mode might unlock some new elements of the story for those who brave its challenges. The Witch's House MV releases October 31 for PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  25. Lucas Pope, the dev behind the highly acclaimed indie title Papers, Please, brings us Return of the Obra Dinn. Enter a high seas murder mystery set in the 1807 when everything was black and white and made of pixels. As an insurance inspector armed with a mystical assessment tool, players are dispatched to investigate the Obra Dinn, a ship believed to have been lost at sea for five years. What has the ship been doing in its years at sea? What happened to the ship's company? Why has the vessel just sailed back into the port at Falmouth, seemingly under its own power without any crew? To answer all of these questions and solve the mysteries of the Obra Dinn, players have a watch-like device that has the ability to replay the scenarios surrounding an individual's death. Players will have to make clever use of the device's abilities to access new areas of the ship and, as befits an insurance investigator, identify the remains of each member of the crew, how they died, and who, if anyone, killed them. Almost four years ago, I gave my thoughts on a preview build of Return of the Obra Dinn. It wasn't a long build, but it left a lasting impression. The haunting visuals and beckoning mystery don't leave you easily. And now, Return of the Obra Dinn has silently sailed into the harbor of digital PC storefronts - check it out if you're looking for a gameplay experience like you've never had before. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
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