Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'indie'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Extra Life News
    • Extra Life Updates
    • Best Practices
    • Community Content
    • Why I Extra Life
    • Fundraising
    • Contests
  • Gaming News
  • Features
  • Podcast

Discussions

  • Extra Life Discussions
    • General Extra Life Discussion
    • Local Extra Lifers
    • Fundraising Ideas
    • Live Streaming Tips & Tricks
    • Official Extra Life Stream Team Discussion
    • Extra Life JSON Code Discussion & Sharing
    • Extra Life United
    • Extra Life Q & A
  • Articles & Extra Life Announcements
    • Announcements
  • Official Extra Life Guilds
    • Guild information and Discussion
    • Canada
    • Northeastern US
    • Southeastern US
    • Central US
    • Western US
  • Gaming Discussions
    • General Gaming Discussion
  • Other Stuff
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Recent Posts

Calendars

  • Extra Life Community Calendar
  • Extra Life Stream Team
  • Akron Guild
  • Albany Guild
  • Albuquerque Guild
  • Anchorage Guild
  • Atlanta Guild
  • Austin Guild
  • Bakersfield Guild
  • Baltimore Guild
  • Birmingham Guild
  • Boston Guild
  • Burlington Guild
  • Buffalo Guild
  • Calgary, AB Guild
  • Morgantown Guild
  • Charlottesville Guild
  • Chicago Guild
  • Cincinnati Guild
  • Cleveland Guild
  • Columbia, MO Guild
  • Columbus, OH Guild
  • Dallas Guild
  • Dayton Guild
  • Denver Guild
  • Des Moines Guild
  • Detroit Guild
  • Edmonton, AB Guild
  • Fargo-Valley City Guild
  • Fresno Guild
  • Ft. Worth Guild
  • Gainesville-Tallahassee Guild
  • Grand Rapids Guild
  • Halifax, NS Guild
  • Hamilton, ON Guild
  • Hartford Guild
  • Hershey Guild
  • Hudson Valley Guild
  • Houston Guild
  • Indianapolis Guild
  • Jacksonville Guild
  • Kansas City Guild
  • Knoxville Guild
  • Lansing Guild
  • London, ON Guild
  • Los Angeles Guild
  • Milwaukee / Madison Guild
  • Minneapolis / Twin Cities Guild
  • Montreal / Quebec City Guild
  • Nashville Guild
  • Newark Guild
  • NYC & Long Island Guild
  • Oakland / San Francisco Guild
  • Omaha Guild
  • Orange County Guild
  • Orlando Guild
  • Ottawa, ON Guild
  • Philadelphia Guild
  • Phoenix Guild
  • Pittsburgh Guild
  • Portland, OR Guild
  • Portland, ME Guild
  • Raleigh-Durham Guild
  • Richmond Guild
  • Sacramento Guild
  • Salt Lake City Guild
  • San Antonio Guild
  • San Diego Guild
  • San Juan, PR Guild
  • Saskatchewan Guild
  • Seattle Guild
  • Spokane Guild
  • Springfield-Champaign, IL Guild
  • Springfield, MA Guild
  • St. Louis Guild
  • Syracuse Guild
  • Tampa / St. Petersburg Guild
  • Toronto, ON Guild
  • Vancouver, BC Guild
  • Washington DC Guild
  • Winnipeg, MB Guild
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Events
  • Extra Life Akron's Events

Categories

  • Broadcasting Toolkit
  • Multimedia Kit
  • Extra Life Guild Tool Kit
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Files
  • Extra Life Akron's Files

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Hospital


Location


Why I "Extra Life"


Interests


Twitter


Instagram


Twitch


Mixer


Discord


Blizzard Battletag


Nintendo ID


PSN ID


Steam


Origin


Xbox Gamertag

Found 178 results

  1. Jack Gardner

    Feature: Review: RimWorld

    RimWorld exists as one of those strange Steam Early Access titles that has been around for over five years but only officially released in the last couple of weeks. In an age where many Early Access games wind up in limbo forever or sitting abandoned, it's refreshing to see one emerge from development in a completed state. In a way, the condition of Early Access can be summarized neatly by RimWorld itself; full of failures, stagnation, and occasionally triumph. Ludeon Studios has put together a game that can best be described as a cross between Prison Architect and the capricious elements that would throw wrenches into the perfectly made plans of a city designer in Sim City. Players are given a number of starting scenarios on a vast variety of randomized worlds. From there, their job is simple: Survive. Players must build shelter for their stranded people, secure food, invest in decorations, provide for entertainment, and also build up defenses. Neglecting any of these risks destruction from raiders, crazed animals, or internal mental breaks. Players can win their game by escaping the planet via spaceship, but reaching the point of building or finding a ship can be a laborious process. The learning curve of RimWorld can be a bit steep when first starting out. Though a tutorial mode teaches the basics, nothing quite beats the experience of learning by doing. I went through several settlements while familiarizing myself with the nuts and bolts of the game before I managed to create a sustainable base. On one early attempt I thought I had discovered a successful blueprint for a long-term base, but in an instant it was swept away by a roaring sheet of flame from an errant lightning strike in the dead heat of summer. I could only watch as my colonists slowly succumbed to the heat from the flames they feebly attempted to control. In the end, only one colonist survived to attempt a new life in the ruins of the old base. He drifted toward death ever so slowly until a raiding party arrived and captured him, dragging him off screen to lord only knows what fate. RimWorld's emergent narrative design leads to these stories of death, but it also creates fantastic tales of perseverance. Sometimes a freak storm can light fires all over the map, potentially surrounding your base with uncontrolled flames. Other times, your most skilled colonist could find themselves dying instantly to a cave-in or a poorly constructed roof might fall on top of your best shot leaving them blind. Pressing on despite the setbacks leads to a great story, a personal story, about winning against the odds. Of course, it might not be a glorious tale of survival, but players have some degree of control over the pacing of the story when selecting the parameters of their game. Each game has a specific style of emergent storytelling depending on the AI director that players choose during colony creation. Players looking for a leisurely pace or even just a pure building game can certainly find that in RimWorld, while those seeking a story that keeps them on their toes can select the most capricious of AI narrative designers. Each colonist has a story that builds as you make progress farther into the game itself. It's a story that begins with their short bio page. These pages give some information about where the colonist came from and what sorts of personality quirks, both good and bad, they possess.The next part is, as they say, written in blood. Each colonist can take damage to various internal organs and limbs. Rough encounters can sometimes leave a colonist without a lung or missing one or more limbs. Proceeding farther along the tech tree opens possibilities for prosthetic legs or bionic eyes, allowing grievously wounded colonists a chance to regain or even surpass their previous ability. By the end of my winning run, only one out of my twenty colonists lacked scars, only a handful more weren't missing at least one limb, and my most capable shot was basically Robocop with all but one limb replaced with robotic parts and two synthetic eyes. Each day, colonists need to rest, eat, experience the outdoors, take in beautiful surroundings, and have fun. Without those things being in order, they will quickly fall into depressive funks and even experience mental breakdowns. These breakdowns can range from wandering sadly around the map to running around trying to set the base ablaze, or even attempting to murder a fellow colonist. If particularly hopeless, a colonist might just attempt to leave. Of course, players can capture them by placing them in jail alongside any captured raiders. Once confined, players can begin the recruitment process to bring a wayward colonist back into the fold. All of this comes together to form a really interesting package. Managing the temperature indoors and providing power for various spaces like freezers to keep a stockpile of food handy can be a stumbling block early on, but RimWorld has a nice escalation of problems as it progresses. Eventually food becomes less of a problem, but generating enough power to sustain devices like high-tech labs or fabrication benches becomes a huge hurdle - especially when you need to make those parts to replace limbs, build weapons of war, or create a spaceship from scratch. From start to finish, RimWorld was designed to have the player hooked with one additional goal to work toward, regardless of circumstance. Conclusion: It took me 124 hours of playing RimWorld to see the credits roll. I had a great time trying to figure out the most optimal builds for bases and clever defensive fortifications. It's not a particularly intense experience. In fact, I found it to be quite relaxing despite the insane amount of time I invested into it. That lends itself to this "one more turn" mentality, common in games like Civilization, taking hold. Hours seem to slip by as each objective slowly reaches completion. There are nitty-gritty details to nitpick about RimWorld, like how the AI sometimes doesn't seem to prioritize events or scenarios despite the finest of tuning on the colonists work priority lists. However, the only real request I had was more research options and a faster in-game speed. I played mostly on the fastest speed possible and making progress still felt slow. Overall, RimWorld is great if you are the kind of person who can sit and imagine interesting bases or are looking for a game that forces you to make your own stories by putting you through trials and tribulations. RimWorld is now available on PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  2. Jack Gardner

    Review: RimWorld

    RimWorld exists as one of those strange Steam Early Access titles that has been around for over five years but only officially released in the last couple of weeks. In an age where many Early Access games wind up in limbo forever or sitting abandoned, it's refreshing to see one emerge from development in a completed state. In a way, the condition of Early Access can be summarized neatly by RimWorld itself; full of failures, stagnation, and occasionally triumph. Ludeon Studios has put together a game that can best be described as a cross between Prison Architect and the capricious elements that would throw wrenches into the perfectly made plans of a city designer in Sim City. Players are given a number of starting scenarios on a vast variety of randomized worlds. From there, their job is simple: Survive. Players must build shelter for their stranded people, secure food, invest in decorations, provide for entertainment, and also build up defenses. Neglecting any of these risks destruction from raiders, crazed animals, or internal mental breaks. Players can win their game by escaping the planet via spaceship, but reaching the point of building or finding a ship can be a laborious process. The learning curve of RimWorld can be a bit steep when first starting out. Though a tutorial mode teaches the basics, nothing quite beats the experience of learning by doing. I went through several settlements while familiarizing myself with the nuts and bolts of the game before I managed to create a sustainable base. On one early attempt I thought I had discovered a successful blueprint for a long-term base, but in an instant it was swept away by a roaring sheet of flame from an errant lightning strike in the dead heat of summer. I could only watch as my colonists slowly succumbed to the heat from the flames they feebly attempted to control. In the end, only one colonist survived to attempt a new life in the ruins of the old base. He drifted toward death ever so slowly until a raiding party arrived and captured him, dragging him off screen to lord only knows what fate. RimWorld's emergent narrative design leads to these stories of death, but it also creates fantastic tales of perseverance. Sometimes a freak storm can light fires all over the map, potentially surrounding your base with uncontrolled flames. Other times, your most skilled colonist could find themselves dying instantly to a cave-in or a poorly constructed roof might fall on top of your best shot leaving them blind. Pressing on despite the setbacks leads to a great story, a personal story, about winning against the odds. Of course, it might not be a glorious tale of survival, but players have some degree of control over the pacing of the story when selecting the parameters of their game. Each game has a specific style of emergent storytelling depending on the AI director that players choose during colony creation. Players looking for a leisurely pace or even just a pure building game can certainly find that in RimWorld, while those seeking a story that keeps them on their toes can select the most capricious of AI narrative designers. Each colonist has a story that builds as you make progress farther into the game itself. It's a story that begins with their short bio page. These pages give some information about where the colonist came from and what sorts of personality quirks, both good and bad, they possess.The next part is, as they say, written in blood. Each colonist can take damage to various internal organs and limbs. Rough encounters can sometimes leave a colonist without a lung or missing one or more limbs. Proceeding farther along the tech tree opens possibilities for prosthetic legs or bionic eyes, allowing grievously wounded colonists a chance to regain or even surpass their previous ability. By the end of my winning run, only one out of my twenty colonists lacked scars, only a handful more weren't missing at least one limb, and my most capable shot was basically Robocop with all but one limb replaced with robotic parts and two synthetic eyes. Each day, colonists need to rest, eat, experience the outdoors, take in beautiful surroundings, and have fun. Without those things being in order, they will quickly fall into depressive funks and even experience mental breakdowns. These breakdowns can range from wandering sadly around the map to running around trying to set the base ablaze, or even attempting to murder a fellow colonist. If particularly hopeless, a colonist might just attempt to leave. Of course, players can capture them by placing them in jail alongside any captured raiders. Once confined, players can begin the recruitment process to bring a wayward colonist back into the fold. All of this comes together to form a really interesting package. Managing the temperature indoors and providing power for various spaces like freezers to keep a stockpile of food handy can be a stumbling block early on, but RimWorld has a nice escalation of problems as it progresses. Eventually food becomes less of a problem, but generating enough power to sustain devices like high-tech labs or fabrication benches becomes a huge hurdle - especially when you need to make those parts to replace limbs, build weapons of war, or create a spaceship from scratch. From start to finish, RimWorld was designed to have the player hooked with one additional goal to work toward, regardless of circumstance. Conclusion: It took me 124 hours of playing RimWorld to see the credits roll. I had a great time trying to figure out the most optimal builds for bases and clever defensive fortifications. It's not a particularly intense experience. In fact, I found it to be quite relaxing despite the insane amount of time I invested into it. That lends itself to this "one more turn" mentality, common in games like Civilization, taking hold. Hours seem to slip by as each objective slowly reaches completion. There are nitty-gritty details to nitpick about RimWorld, like how the AI sometimes doesn't seem to prioritize events or scenarios despite the finest of tuning on the colonists work priority lists. However, the only real request I had was more research options and a faster in-game speed. I played mostly on the fastest speed possible and making progress still felt slow. Overall, RimWorld is great if you are the kind of person who can sit and imagine interesting bases or are looking for a game that forces you to make your own stories by putting you through trials and tribulations. RimWorld is now available on PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  3. Edmund McMillen's The Binding of Isaac helped jump start the mainstreaming of roguelike elements in indie games that we have been seeing trickle into the AAA industry over the last few years. Mixing top-down shooting with the dungeon exploration of a classic The Legend of Zelda title, The Binding of Isaac plays pitch perfectly for what it's designed to be. The randomized elements fit together seamlessly for a gameplay experience that's never the same twice in a row. Over all of that, McMillen paints the story of Isaac, a small boy in a scary world full of horrible monsters (that still manage to seem friendly and charming despite being, you know, monsters). Should this 2011 indie hit be considered one of the best games of all-time? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Binding of Isaac 'The Clubbing of Isaac' by Big Giant Circles (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02302) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  4. Edmund McMillen's The Binding of Isaac helped jump start the mainstreaming of roguelike elements in indie games that we have been seeing trickle into the AAA industry over the last few years. Mixing top-down shooting with the dungeon exploration of a classic The Legend of Zelda title, The Binding of Isaac plays pitch perfectly for what it's designed to be. The randomized elements fit together seamlessly for a gameplay experience that's never the same twice in a row. Over all of that, McMillen paints the story of Isaac, a small boy in a scary world full of horrible monsters (that still manage to seem friendly and charming despite being, you know, monsters). Should this 2011 indie hit be considered one of the best games of all-time? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Binding of Isaac 'The Clubbing of Isaac' by Big Giant Circles (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02302) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  5. In late 2017, Davey Wreden, the creator of the comedy adventure game The Stanley Parable, released a game he developed with Ryan Roth, who worked on the music for games like Guacamelee 2, The Beginner's Guide, and Starseed Pilgrim. The result of their labors takes the form of Absolutely: A True Crime Story, a game about Keanu Reeves clearing his good name after being accused of murder. Of course, as one might expect from the person who helped bring the snark of the narrator to life in The Stanley Parable, Absolutely exists as a work of comedy. It has its crude moments, a few curse words and coarse content in the name of humor, but it makes for a great 5-10 minutes of your time that will brighten your day. After you begin the game, it becomes clear that the main hook of the game isn't actually exonerating Keanu Reeves. in fact, being Keanu Reeves is a joke largely because it presents a complete non sequitur. There's no meaning to being Keanu aside from the gentle tickling in ones brain at the idea of Keanu Reeves doing bad things. instead, players walk the streets of NoCrimesVille and convince kids to break the law. This escalates to Reeves going on a killing spree that culminates in either him evading the law or being sentenced to death for his crimes. Absolutely was made in RPG Maker and makes use of what appear to be pre-built assets and a few pictures of Keanu Reeves. Players primarily wander small environments and interact with people in a hilariously simple RPG battle system that funnels you toward the conclusion of this totally true crime story. If you're interested in playing Absolutely: A True Crime Story, you can find it for free on Ryan Roth's itch.io page. It's not a deep game and it has a sense of humor deeply rooted in nihilism; as a distraction and a deconstruction of the traditional RPG, it works really well. Check it out if you want to experience something out of left field. Note: Keanu Reeves is actually really nice and not a criminal in real life. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  6. In late 2017, Davey Wreden, the creator of the comedy adventure game The Stanley Parable, released a game he developed with Ryan Roth, who worked on the music for games like Guacamelee 2, The Beginner's Guide, and Starseed Pilgrim. The result of their labors takes the form of Absolutely: A True Crime Story, a game about Keanu Reeves clearing his good name after being accused of murder. Of course, as one might expect from the person who helped bring the snark of the narrator to life in The Stanley Parable, Absolutely exists as a work of comedy. It has its crude moments, a few curse words and coarse content in the name of humor, but it makes for a great 5-10 minutes of your time that will brighten your day. After you begin the game, it becomes clear that the main hook of the game isn't actually exonerating Keanu Reeves. in fact, being Keanu Reeves is a joke largely because it presents a complete non sequitur. There's no meaning to being Keanu aside from the gentle tickling in ones brain at the idea of Keanu Reeves doing bad things. instead, players walk the streets of NoCrimesVille and convince kids to break the law. This escalates to Reeves going on a killing spree that culminates in either him evading the law or being sentenced to death for his crimes. Absolutely was made in RPG Maker and makes use of what appear to be pre-built assets and a few pictures of Keanu Reeves. Players primarily wander small environments and interact with people in a hilariously simple RPG battle system that funnels you toward the conclusion of this totally true crime story. If you're interested in playing Absolutely: A True Crime Story, you can find it for free on Ryan Roth's itch.io page. It's not a deep game and it has a sense of humor deeply rooted in nihilism; as a distraction and a deconstruction of the traditional RPG, it works really well. Check it out if you want to experience something out of left field. Note: Keanu Reeves is actually really nice and not a criminal in real life. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  7. If you're looking for something you might have missed in the horror game genre, one of the more obscure coming out for this Halloween takes the form of The Witch's House MV, a remake of an RPG Maker game originally released in 2012. The Witch's House follows in the footsteps of Japanese RPG horror RPGs that were more common back in the 16-bit days before Resident Evil reshaped the genre forever. Expect tons of creepy puzzles, unnerving dialogue, and a more freakish tone than one might expect from an retro indie pixel affair. The Witch's House tells the story of a young girl who awakens in the middle of a forest with no memories and finds herself drawn toward the titular house. Inside, she finds many insidious and deadly traps, strange denizens, and an engaging mystery that pulls players inexorably into the inky heart of the witch's abode. Developer Frummy, who returned with a small team to remake the original work, explained the effort that went into the remake, "I’m happy to announce that we’re finally ready to release the game. The Witch’s House MV is an RPG Maker MV remake of the original game, which was released back in 2012. We remade all the graphics, including map tiles and character sprites, and worked hard to enhance the atmosphere and 2D beauty in The Witch’s House. It took us five times as many hours to create this version, but we feel like we’ve finally managed to satisfy ourselves." Those looking for more from the remake need not fear (or maybe they need fear extra?) - there's a new difficulty mode that promises to challenge even the most hardy of horror fanatics. Unlocked by reaching The Witch's House's true ending, players can go through the game again with challenges that all but assure a grueling and gruesome slog full of unexpected death and decay. Frummy also hinted that the new difficulty mode might unlock some new elements of the story for those who brave its challenges. The Witch's House MV releases October 31 for PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  8. If you're looking for something you might have missed in the horror game genre, one of the more obscure coming out for this Halloween takes the form of The Witch's House MV, a remake of an RPG Maker game originally released in 2012. The Witch's House follows in the footsteps of Japanese RPG horror RPGs that were more common back in the 16-bit days before Resident Evil reshaped the genre forever. Expect tons of creepy puzzles, unnerving dialogue, and a more freakish tone than one might expect from an retro indie pixel affair. The Witch's House tells the story of a young girl who awakens in the middle of a forest with no memories and finds herself drawn toward the titular house. Inside, she finds many insidious and deadly traps, strange denizens, and an engaging mystery that pulls players inexorably into the inky heart of the witch's abode. Developer Frummy, who returned with a small team to remake the original work, explained the effort that went into the remake, "I’m happy to announce that we’re finally ready to release the game. The Witch’s House MV is an RPG Maker MV remake of the original game, which was released back in 2012. We remade all the graphics, including map tiles and character sprites, and worked hard to enhance the atmosphere and 2D beauty in The Witch’s House. It took us five times as many hours to create this version, but we feel like we’ve finally managed to satisfy ourselves." Those looking for more from the remake need not fear (or maybe they need fear extra?) - there's a new difficulty mode that promises to challenge even the most hardy of horror fanatics. Unlocked by reaching The Witch's House's true ending, players can go through the game again with challenges that all but assure a grueling and gruesome slog full of unexpected death and decay. Frummy also hinted that the new difficulty mode might unlock some new elements of the story for those who brave its challenges. The Witch's House MV releases October 31 for PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  9. Lucas Pope, the dev behind the highly acclaimed indie title Papers, Please, brings us Return of the Obra Dinn. Enter a high seas murder mystery set in the 1807 when everything was black and white and made of pixels. As an insurance inspector armed with a mystical assessment tool, players are dispatched to investigate the Obra Dinn, a ship believed to have been lost at sea for five years. What has the ship been doing in its years at sea? What happened to the ship's company? Why has the vessel just sailed back into the port at Falmouth, seemingly under its own power without any crew? To answer all of these questions and solve the mysteries of the Obra Dinn, players have a watch-like device that has the ability to replay the scenarios surrounding an individual's death. Players will have to make clever use of the device's abilities to access new areas of the ship and, as befits an insurance investigator, identify the remains of each member of the crew, how they died, and who, if anyone, killed them. Almost four years ago, I gave my thoughts on a preview build of Return of the Obra Dinn. It wasn't a long build, but it left a lasting impression. The haunting visuals and beckoning mystery don't leave you easily. And now, Return of the Obra Dinn has silently sailed into the harbor of digital PC storefronts - check it out if you're looking for a gameplay experience like you've never had before. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  10. Lucas Pope, the dev behind the highly acclaimed indie title Papers, Please, brings us Return of the Obra Dinn. Enter a high seas murder mystery set in the 1807 when everything was black and white and made of pixels. As an insurance inspector armed with a mystical assessment tool, players are dispatched to investigate the Obra Dinn, a ship believed to have been lost at sea for five years. What has the ship been doing in its years at sea? What happened to the ship's company? Why has the vessel just sailed back into the port at Falmouth, seemingly under its own power without any crew? To answer all of these questions and solve the mysteries of the Obra Dinn, players have a watch-like device that has the ability to replay the scenarios surrounding an individual's death. Players will have to make clever use of the device's abilities to access new areas of the ship and, as befits an insurance investigator, identify the remains of each member of the crew, how they died, and who, if anyone, killed them. Almost four years ago, I gave my thoughts on a preview build of Return of the Obra Dinn. It wasn't a long build, but it left a lasting impression. The haunting visuals and beckoning mystery don't leave you easily. And now, Return of the Obra Dinn has silently sailed into the harbor of digital PC storefronts - check it out if you're looking for a gameplay experience like you've never had before. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  11. For those of you with long memories, Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San last graced this site back in 2016 as an interesting indie game dev project struggling to be finished. Almost two years later, developer Christophe Galati (ChrisDeneos on Twitter) has entered the final stretch of game development and shared the expected release date for Save Me Mr. Tako: October 30. With the help of the Nicalis gaming company, the game will also be released that day on Nintendo Switch. Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San stars the titular Mr. Tako, a mild-mannered octopus who gets wrapped up in the bitter war between octopi and humans. However, when push comes to shove, the brave ocean creature saves a drowning human. A fairy witnesses the act of heroism and grants him the ability to survive on land. With this newfound power, Mr. Tako takes it upon himself to scour the world for a way for both sides to put aside their grievances and live in peace. Designed as a loving tribute to the glory days of the Nintendo Game Boy, Save Me Mr. Tako transports players into a 2D world constructed out of four colors and big ambition. It consists of six different worlds that hide sixteen dungeons for Mr. Tako to explore and conquer on his quest for harmony. Expect to find plenty of side quests and puzzles sprinkled throughout the game, too. Players will also be able to swap game filters for different visual flair and colors as they progress. In addition to being able to survive on land, Mr. Tako can wear up different hats to take on different powers like the ability to shoot arrows. There are fifty such outfits throughout the game, each with an adorable costume change in store for Mr. Tako. Those are on top of Mr. Tako's ability to turn enemies into platforms with his ranged ink attacks. Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San releases on October 30 for Nintendo Switch and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  12. For those of you with long memories, Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San last graced this site back in 2016 as an interesting indie game dev project struggling to be finished. Almost two years later, developer Christophe Galati (ChrisDeneos on Twitter) has entered the final stretch of game development and shared the expected release date for Save Me Mr. Tako: October 30. With the help of the Nicalis gaming company, the game will also be released that day on Nintendo Switch. Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San stars the titular Mr. Tako, a mild-mannered octopus who gets wrapped up in the bitter war between octopi and humans. However, when push comes to shove, the brave ocean creature saves a drowning human. A fairy witnesses the act of heroism and grants him the ability to survive on land. With this newfound power, Mr. Tako takes it upon himself to scour the world for a way for both sides to put aside their grievances and live in peace. Designed as a loving tribute to the glory days of the Nintendo Game Boy, Save Me Mr. Tako transports players into a 2D world constructed out of four colors and big ambition. It consists of six different worlds that hide sixteen dungeons for Mr. Tako to explore and conquer on his quest for harmony. Expect to find plenty of side quests and puzzles sprinkled throughout the game, too. Players will also be able to swap game filters for different visual flair and colors as they progress. In addition to being able to survive on land, Mr. Tako can wear up different hats to take on different powers like the ability to shoot arrows. There are fifty such outfits throughout the game, each with an adorable costume change in store for Mr. Tako. Those are on top of Mr. Tako's ability to turn enemies into platforms with his ranged ink attacks. Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San releases on October 30 for Nintendo Switch and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  13. From humble beginnings as a Kickstarter project to becoming one of the biggest indie darlings of 2016, Hyper Light Drifter has quite the history of defying expectations. Gorgeous pixel art animations and vistas, dialogue-less storytelling, and a fantastic soundtrack by Disasterpeace came together to tell a gripping tale about a lone wanderer in a sci-fi apocalypse. While all of the pieces come together for a solid game, do they gel well enough to create something considered one of the best games of all-time? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: A Link to the Past 'Chamber of the Goddess' by Disasterpeace (http://ocremix.org/album/33/25yearlegend-a-legend-of-zelda-indie-game-composer-tribute) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  14. From humble beginnings as a Kickstarter project to becoming one of the biggest indie darlings of 2016, Hyper Light Drifter has quite the history of defying expectations. Gorgeous pixel art animations and vistas, dialogue-less storytelling, and a fantastic soundtrack by Disasterpeace came together to tell a gripping tale about a lone wanderer in a sci-fi apocalypse. While all of the pieces come together for a solid game, do they gel well enough to create something considered one of the best games of all-time? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: A Link to the Past 'Chamber of the Goddess' by Disasterpeace (http://ocremix.org/album/33/25yearlegend-a-legend-of-zelda-indie-game-composer-tribute) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  15. Survival? In my zombie game? Wha- wha- whaaaaaaat? That's right, this week we are tackling State of Decay! Released in 2013 for the Xbox 360 and since released on PC and Xbox One, State of Decay garnered a cult following over the years. Developer Undead Labs' created its first game with the goal of carving out a niche in the saturated zombie game market by adding permadeath, individual survival elements, and larger, group-oriented goals. How well did they succeed at doing this? And does the game as a whole stand as one of the best games of all-time? Take a listen and share your thoughts! Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Undeadline 'Marching Towards Roshufa's Spirit' by Jorito (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03475) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  16. Survival? In my zombie game? Wha- wha- whaaaaaaat? That's right, this week we are tackling State of Decay! Released in 2013 for the Xbox 360 and since released on PC and Xbox One, State of Decay garnered a cult following over the years. Developer Undead Labs' created its first game with the goal of carving out a niche in the saturated zombie game market by adding permadeath, individual survival elements, and larger, group-oriented goals. How well did they succeed at doing this? And does the game as a whole stand as one of the best games of all-time? Take a listen and share your thoughts! Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Undeadline 'Marching Towards Roshufa's Spirit' by Jorito (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03475) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  17. If Dan Smith isn't a name you know in video games, you should fix that mistake as soon as possible. At 18 years old, Smith won a BAFTA in 2016 for his work on a game called SPECTRUM, a solo project he had been working on since age 15. Ripstone Games saw the potential in Smith's game and offered him the backing necessary to fully flesh out the title that earned him such a prestigious award. Now, two years later, SPECTRUM has been renamed The Spectrum Retreat, fleshed out with puzzles, and given a more concrete narrative. With an impending release in a matter of weeks, I sat down with Smith to talk about and play his first commercial video game. The Spectrum Retreat has something of an odd story premise. Without giving too much away, players wake up in the spacious and immaculately ordered Penrose Hotel. Slowly explore the surrounding area reveals that it's a vast complex, empty save for a number of very polite robots that handle the day-to-day maintenance of the facility. However, no matter what you do, the robotic refuse to let you leave the hotel. As this reality begins to sink in, someone contacts you over the phone, a woman who seems to know that something is going on, something bad. She begins giving instructions on how to escape. Unfortunately, the easy way out becomes impassable and she guides you to a restricted area blocked off by color coded force fields. It's here that the puzzle-solving truly begins. The core conceit of The Spectrum Retreat, based on the mechanics from SPECTRUM, revolves around color. Players are able to absorb a color and use it to walk through barriers of that color and then swap it out for a different color. It's a simple mechanic, Smith even said it was one of the first puzzle concepts he learned when he dove into programming, but it's one that has fascinated him enough to build an entire game around the complex puzzles that can be constructed with it in mind. I saw the color swapping create bridges over chasms, walls, and can easily imagine that the uses only become more complicated as crazier geometry and gating mechanisms combine in future puzzles. The opening levels slowly introduce new twists in how space and the color mechanics can be used to create more elaborate scenarios in a slow, accessible way. The goal, according to Smith, was to make a tutorial that didn't feel like a tutorial, with players discovering how to proceed on their own. This approach certainly worked for me; I enjoyed the dopamine tickle across my brain as I discovered new ways to overcome each challenge. A large part of what makes The Spectrum Retreat so interesting is how the color mechanic works with the non-euclidean space of its world, an unnerving aspect of the hotel that carries over into the puzzles. Sometimes dropping down a hole will bring you back to the beginning of a level, but it could also bring you to an almost identical version of the level with a story hint or clue to the puzzle. Certain hallways repeat endlessly, but how sure can you be that its not part of the puzzle when you turn back and find yourself in a new location? Combine this uncertainty with more concrete areas that feature maze-like layouts and the potential for some truly stimulating scenarios becomes apparent. After the demo areas were completed, my character had to return to the hotel to "keep up appearances." However, Smith told me that as the game progresses, the comforting art deco world of the Penrose Hotel will begin to merge with the strange, sterile puzzle rooms, creating an unnerving sense of dislocation. He said that the overall theme of the game would be one that grapples with the downsides of escapism, how we can run so far away from our problems that the methods used to run can actually create far more issues with which we eventually need to grapple. The Spectrum Retreat launches on July 10 for the PlayStation 4 and on July 13 for Xbox One and PC. A version for the Nintendo Switch will launch later this summer. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  18. The Binding of Isaac has released in several different versions across a staggering number of gaming devices over the years. Now, it is making the leap from digital to physical with The Binding of Isaac: Four Souls. Edmund McMillen, the developer behind The Binding of Isaac, launched the project on Kickstarter with the help of Studio 71. The game found itself fully funded in only an hour and a half. It currently sits at about $865,000, more than 17 times the base cost of creating the game. It seems like Four Souls plays somewhat like a darker, more competitive version of Munchkin. Up to four players take turns fighting monsters and gaining treasure. Occasionally, boss monsters will be pulled and players who defeat them will harvest their soul. The first player to reach four souls wins the game. Of course, other players can help or hinder the defeat of a monster, so while cooperation might dominate the early game, the final soul will be a truly tricky prize to obtain. Optional rules add in bonus souls for players who are able to save up enough money or horde enough items. McMillen stated that the game ideas came to him and to an extent some of the cards and systems are still in flux. He's been trying as best he can to translate the varied mechanics from The Binding of Isaac into a card game, no small task for a game that has seen expansion after expansion that have kept fans coming back over the past seven years. "It was really fun to take a well known item or monster from the game and think up ways to convey stuff like, How could I show that the carrion queen takes damage when you hit her butt?" said McMillen, "Or how could I represent the rng aspects of cursed floors or troll bombs only using a deck of cards?" At least part of the answer to that question seems to have involved creating a large number of cards to represent the various monsters and mechanics of the digital game. The Four Souls comes with several hundred cards, with additional character and ability cards unlocking as reward tiers are passed and backer challenges are completed. One of the most recent challenges involves nine people finishing the first boss on camera while blindfolded. Those who back the game at $35 or higher can receive an expansion pack bonus of 68 cards, pushing the number of cards close to 400. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  19. The Binding of Isaac has released in several different versions across a staggering number of gaming devices over the years. Now, it is making the leap from digital to physical with The Binding of Isaac: Four Souls. Edmund McMillen, the developer behind The Binding of Isaac, launched the project on Kickstarter with the help of Studio 71. The game found itself fully funded in only an hour and a half. It currently sits at about $865,000, more than 17 times the base cost of creating the game. It seems like Four Souls plays somewhat like a darker, more competitive version of Munchkin. Up to four players take turns fighting monsters and gaining treasure. Occasionally, boss monsters will be pulled and players who defeat them will harvest their soul. The first player to reach four souls wins the game. Of course, other players can help or hinder the defeat of a monster, so while cooperation might dominate the early game, the final soul will be a truly tricky prize to obtain. Optional rules add in bonus souls for players who are able to save up enough money or horde enough items. McMillen stated that the game ideas came to him and to an extent some of the cards and systems are still in flux. He's been trying as best he can to translate the varied mechanics from The Binding of Isaac into a card game, no small task for a game that has seen expansion after expansion that have kept fans coming back over the past seven years. "It was really fun to take a well known item or monster from the game and think up ways to convey stuff like, How could I show that the carrion queen takes damage when you hit her butt?" said McMillen, "Or how could I represent the rng aspects of cursed floors or troll bombs only using a deck of cards?" At least part of the answer to that question seems to have involved creating a large number of cards to represent the various monsters and mechanics of the digital game. The Four Souls comes with several hundred cards, with additional character and ability cards unlocking as reward tiers are passed and backer challenges are completed. One of the most recent challenges involves nine people finishing the first boss on camera while blindfolded. Those who back the game at $35 or higher can receive an expansion pack bonus of 68 cards, pushing the number of cards close to 400. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  20. If Dan Smith isn't a name you know in video games, you should fix that mistake as soon as possible. At 18 years old, Smith won a BAFTA in 2016 for his work on a game called SPECTRUM, a solo project he had been working on since age 15. Ripstone Games saw the potential in Smith's game and offered him the backing necessary to fully flesh out the title that earned him such a prestigious award. Now, two years later, SPECTRUM has been renamed The Spectrum Retreat, fleshed out with puzzles, and given a more concrete narrative. With an impending release in a matter of weeks, I sat down with Smith to talk about and play his first commercial video game. The Spectrum Retreat has something of an odd story premise. Without giving too much away, players wake up in the spacious and immaculately ordered Penrose Hotel. Slowly explore the surrounding area reveals that it's a vast complex, empty save for a number of very polite robots that handle the day-to-day maintenance of the facility. However, no matter what you do, the robotic refuse to let you leave the hotel. As this reality begins to sink in, someone contacts you over the phone, a woman who seems to know that something is going on, something bad. She begins giving instructions on how to escape. Unfortunately, the easy way out becomes impassable and she guides you to a restricted area blocked off by color coded force fields. It's here that the puzzle-solving truly begins. The core conceit of The Spectrum Retreat, based on the mechanics from SPECTRUM, revolves around color. Players are able to absorb a color and use it to walk through barriers of that color and then swap it out for a different color. It's a simple mechanic, Smith even said it was one of the first puzzle concepts he learned when he dove into programming, but it's one that has fascinated him enough to build an entire game around the complex puzzles that can be constructed with it in mind. I saw the color swapping create bridges over chasms, walls, and can easily imagine that the uses only become more complicated as crazier geometry and gating mechanisms combine in future puzzles. The opening levels slowly introduce new twists in how space and the color mechanics can be used to create more elaborate scenarios in a slow, accessible way. The goal, according to Smith, was to make a tutorial that didn't feel like a tutorial, with players discovering how to proceed on their own. This approach certainly worked for me; I enjoyed the dopamine tickle across my brain as I discovered new ways to overcome each challenge. A large part of what makes The Spectrum Retreat so interesting is how the color mechanic works with the non-euclidean space of its world, an unnerving aspect of the hotel that carries over into the puzzles. Sometimes dropping down a hole will bring you back to the beginning of a level, but it could also bring you to an almost identical version of the level with a story hint or clue to the puzzle. Certain hallways repeat endlessly, but how sure can you be that its not part of the puzzle when you turn back and find yourself in a new location? Combine this uncertainty with more concrete areas that feature maze-like layouts and the potential for some truly stimulating scenarios becomes apparent. After the demo areas were completed, my character had to return to the hotel to "keep up appearances." However, Smith told me that as the game progresses, the comforting art deco world of the Penrose Hotel will begin to merge with the strange, sterile puzzle rooms, creating an unnerving sense of dislocation. He said that the overall theme of the game would be one that grapples with the downsides of escapism, how we can run so far away from our problems that the methods used to run can actually create far more issues with which we eventually need to grapple. The Spectrum Retreat launches on July 10 for the PlayStation 4 and on July 13 for Xbox One and PC. A version for the Nintendo Switch will launch later this summer. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  21. EA has made a habit of including a few smaller scale indie projects in its E3 press events over the last few years. This year they highlighted both Unravel Two and a completely unknown game from Berlin-based studio Jo-Mei. The studio's creative director, Cornelia Geppart took to EA's stage to announce Sea of Solitude, or SoS for short. "When humans get lonely they turn into monsters - this is the core of everything you will see, hear, and feel in SoS," said Geppart as footage of Sea of Solitude rolled in the background. Alternating between cheery scenery of a flooded town and a world of shadow inhabited by horrifically mutated humanoids, SoS seems like a combination of The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker and I Am Alive (a gritty indie disaster game set after a natural apocalypse that released in 2012 - maybe this comparison wasn't great since not many people played it). The story focuses on Kay, a young woman who has begun turning into one of the monsters that surrounds her. Why is this happening to everyone? How can she reverse the process? Players will have to brave the open seas and scavenge for supplies among monster infested towns to uncover the answers. Expect to see Sea of Solitude ship out in early 2019 for PC and consoles.
  22. EA has made a habit of including a few smaller scale indie projects in its E3 press events over the last few years. This year they highlighted both Unravel Two and a completely unknown game from Berlin-based studio Jo-Mei. The studio's creative director, Cornelia Geppart took to EA's stage to announce Sea of Solitude, or SoS for short. "When humans get lonely they turn into monsters - this is the core of everything you will see, hear, and feel in SoS," said Geppart as footage of Sea of Solitude rolled in the background. Alternating between cheery scenery of a flooded town and a world of shadow inhabited by horrifically mutated humanoids, SoS seems like a combination of The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker and I Am Alive (a gritty indie disaster game set after a natural apocalypse that released in 2012 - maybe this comparison wasn't great since not many people played it). The story focuses on Kay, a young woman who has begun turning into one of the monsters that surrounds her. Why is this happening to everyone? How can she reverse the process? Players will have to brave the open seas and scavenge for supplies among monster infested towns to uncover the answers. Expect to see Sea of Solitude ship out in early 2019 for PC and consoles. View full article
  23. Let's go back to the game that kickstarted the trend of weighty indie games relying on small kids in big, scary worlds. Limbo thrilled, chilled, and grilled players around the world when it launched. As a nameless young boy in a world weaved together of monochrome shadows and a vintage filter, players embark on a journey filled with death and symbolism. Playdead's indie darling received massive praise when it released in 2010, but has that charm remained intact over time? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening 'Mysterious Gold Edition' by Rukunetsu, Anton Corazza, and Yusef Kelliebrew (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03738) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  24. Jack Gardner

    The Best Games Period - Episode 101 - Limbo

    Let's go back to the game that kickstarted the trend of weighty indie games relying on small kids in big, scary worlds. Limbo thrilled, chilled, and grilled players around the world when it launched. As a nameless young boy in a world weaved together of monochrome shadows and a vintage filter, players embark on a journey filled with death and symbolism. Playdead's indie darling received massive praise when it released in 2010, but has that charm remained intact over time? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening 'Mysterious Gold Edition' by Rukunetsu, Anton Corazza, and Yusef Kelliebrew (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03738) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  25. Take a journey with us back to the ye olden days of 2009 when the war between casual and hardcore gamers raged. While it would take many years for the conflict to settle to a low simmer, one game seemed to unite the two sides in harmony; a tower defense game with retro roots, a sunny disposition, and a quirky sense of humor. Plants vs. Zombies catapulted developer PopCap Games to indie stardom and became their fastest selling game to date, leveraging a position in the then-curated Steam store to appeal to the hardcore crowd and its inherent lightheartedness to bring in the more casually oriented gamers. Almost ten years later, should Plants vs. Zombies be considered one of the best games of all-time? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past 'Fushigina Forest' by Laura Shigihara (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02329) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
×