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Found 72 results

  1. Players can now get their hands on 2084 a new first-person shooter with horror elements from the newly formed Feardemic development studio. The game follows the exploits of junior researcher Laura Lofi as she navigates an ever more deadly maze of horrors at the behest of her employer, Chiron Incorporated. Laura relies on hacking, gunplay, and her wits to stay one step ahead of the crazed hordes of infected civilians looking to nibble on the surviving members of society. Imprisoned by Chiron, possibly for her own safety, Laura will have to overcome the world of 2084 for a chance to see the outside world once again. 2084 delivers an aggressively bleak vision of the future. Set in the Fifth Polish Republic, a horrible plague has swept through the country and decimated the population. Even worse, the infected become violent killers willing to sacrifice their own lives just to rip apart those still untainted with the disease. The futuristic cyber enhancements the majority of the population has installed in their bodies compounds the issue, making modified humans even more dangerous in their delirious state. With Cyberpunk 2077 looming on the horizon, the dystopian techno-future has become all the rage. Feardmic's FPS, only now entering Steam's Early Access development phase, hopes to capitalize on that trend with a slick action experience and psychedelic, beautifully messy imagery. The team expects to fully release the commercial version sometime in 2020. That might seem like a long way, but the Feardemic will regularly update the game with more content, story, and gameplay expansions in the time between now and final release. The title will be discounted 15% for a limited time to encourage people to give it a shot during this Early Access period. Feardemic burst onto the scene last year and exists as a wholly owned property of Bloober Team SA, the company behind the critically well received Observer and Layers of Fear. The studio initially developed 2084 as part of a 72-hour game jam held within the company. The central hacking mechanic captured the team's attention since it forced players to think quickly and react when given the small window to gain the upperhand while blasting away at the zombified masses. The CEO of Feardemic, Martin Kawa, made a case for how far the game has come and where it will go saying, "The Early Access version of the game is fully functioning and we have been receiving great feedback from players on both the story mode and on Chiron’s endless training arena mode. In the latter, foes are numerous and ammunition is scarce, forcing players to hone their shooting skills and reaction times to gain an advantage and climb up the leaderboard.” The television-headed zombie-like enemies, the hacking in-combat mechanics, and the presentation of the story scenes in the Steam Early Access trailer all come across as incredibly compelling. Those touches put 2084 on an elevated playing field compared with the conga line of arena shooters that have released onto the Steam store over the years. There's effort and skill on display, though whether that pays off in a refined gameplay experience and cohesive narrative remains to be seen until the final release. Until then, Feardemic seems to have a solid grasp on a vision for 2084 and have added yet another worthwhile digital game to 2018's amazing year of video games. 2084 is available on PC through Steam Early Acce- oh, 2084! Like 1984, but a century ahead! I get it now! Neat. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  2. Players can now get their hands on 2084 a new first-person shooter with horror elements from the newly formed Feardemic development studio. The game follows the exploits of junior researcher Laura Lofi as she navigates an ever more deadly maze of horrors at the behest of her employer, Chiron Incorporated. Laura relies on hacking, gunplay, and her wits to stay one step ahead of the crazed hordes of infected civilians looking to nibble on the surviving members of society. Imprisoned by Chiron, possibly for her own safety, Laura will have to overcome the world of 2084 for a chance to see the outside world once again. 2084 delivers an aggressively bleak vision of the future. Set in the Fifth Polish Republic, a horrible plague has swept through the country and decimated the population. Even worse, the infected become violent killers willing to sacrifice their own lives just to rip apart those still untainted with the disease. The futuristic cyber enhancements the majority of the population has installed in their bodies compounds the issue, making modified humans even more dangerous in their delirious state. With Cyberpunk 2077 looming on the horizon, the dystopian techno-future has become all the rage. Feardmic's FPS, only now entering Steam's Early Access development phase, hopes to capitalize on that trend with a slick action experience and psychedelic, beautifully messy imagery. The team expects to fully release the commercial version sometime in 2020. That might seem like a long way, but the Feardemic will regularly update the game with more content, story, and gameplay expansions in the time between now and final release. The title will be discounted 15% for a limited time to encourage people to give it a shot during this Early Access period. Feardemic burst onto the scene last year and exists as a wholly owned property of Bloober Team SA, the company behind the critically well received Observer and Layers of Fear. The studio initially developed 2084 as part of a 72-hour game jam held within the company. The central hacking mechanic captured the team's attention since it forced players to think quickly and react when given the small window to gain the upperhand while blasting away at the zombified masses. The CEO of Feardemic, Martin Kawa, made a case for how far the game has come and where it will go saying, "The Early Access version of the game is fully functioning and we have been receiving great feedback from players on both the story mode and on Chiron’s endless training arena mode. In the latter, foes are numerous and ammunition is scarce, forcing players to hone their shooting skills and reaction times to gain an advantage and climb up the leaderboard.” The television-headed zombie-like enemies, the hacking in-combat mechanics, and the presentation of the story scenes in the Steam Early Access trailer all come across as incredibly compelling. Those touches put 2084 on an elevated playing field compared with the conga line of arena shooters that have released onto the Steam store over the years. There's effort and skill on display, though whether that pays off in a refined gameplay experience and cohesive narrative remains to be seen until the final release. Until then, Feardemic seems to have a solid grasp on a vision for 2084 and have added yet another worthwhile digital game to 2018's amazing year of video games. 2084 is available on PC through Steam Early Acce- oh, 2084! Like 1984, but a century ahead! I get it now! Neat. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  3. Night City is the setting for the upcoming game from CD Projekt Red, Cyberpunk 2077. The game is based on the tabletop role-playing games Cyberpunk and Cyberpunk 2020 by Mike Pondsmith Once shrouded in mystery but still able to garner a ton of hype, we finally have a concrete vision of CD Projekt Red's latest IP, Cyberpunk 2077. This past August, CD Projekt Red released a much-anticipated gameplay reveal trailer. The trailer generously showed a 48-minute walkthrough of early-story content. This same content (likely with some differences) made its debut earlier for a select crowd at E3 2018. I got a first-hand look at this hype when I was able to snag one of the coveted spots to see this much talked about footage. Cyberpunk 2077 easily had the biggest hype behind it during E3. Press, industry, and gamers crowded the long halls leading to the private showing area just for the mere chance to be squeezed in for one of the nearly 50-minute gameplay demos. The CD Projekt Red team, hoping to spare disappointment and save time, came out periodically to tell those hopefuls that they were overbooked. I stood in that line for about two and a half hours, fighting off waves of hopelessness and persevering through pure stubbornness. About three people were let in every hour, and sometimes less. One developer came out and firmly said that absolutely no extra spots were available while another said he'd see what he can do. With a bit of luck, I managed to get in, and oh man, was all that angst worth it. Level Designer Miles Tost served as our guide through the demo. We entered the character creator first. Tost formally introduced us to a mercenary named V, our fully customizable protagonist who made a brief appearance in the official E3 trailer. V can be either female or male and has various cosmetic settings to go through; the usual sliders and color options one might expect. The class system, however, had me interested since it offered a fluid experience that changes as you play the game. The different classes aren't meant to be set in stone, allowing the player to switch between them. V can then adapt to each player's individualized playstyle while progressing through the game. For the live demo, the team chose a female V. After setting up, it was time to get immersed in Night City. Jackie Wells is a fellow assassin that accompanies V during the course of the 50-minute demo shown at E3 Located in coastal California, Night City contains six seamless districts. The city reminded me of a hybrid between Blade Runner (but with sunshine) and Fifth Element. My not-so-bold prediction pins Night City as the main setting for the majority of the game. Towering mega-buildings scatter the landscape. In one of these giant structures, we met the aforementioned V and her mercenary partner Jackie Welles. The duo work as freelance guns-for-hire, taking jobs and recognizing opportunity when it presents itself. The demo began with the duo on a mission to retrieve a high priority target, the victim of kidnapping and implant harvesting. Obtaining implants, no matter how grisly the method of acquisition, proves a lucrative business in the dark future of Cyberpunk. With this introduction to Night City, V got a bit of action hunting down organ scavengers in a cramped and dingy apartment complex. They made their way through rooms, taking out enemies until stumbling upon the female target unconscious alongside another body in an iced tub. As you've most likely read/heard by now, Cyberpunk 2077's gameplay takes place from a first-person viewpoint. This fact seemed to generate some degree of frustration from fans of CD Projekt RED who have been accustomed to The Witcher series' third-person perspective. Personally, that didn't impair the experience as a viewer. Actually, the way combat functions, first-person seems to be the optimal way to play. Combat lets the player use a combo of high-tech weapons, cybernetic abilities, stealth, good ol' fashioned head bashing, and I'm sure loads more that we haven't seen yet. It definitely ventures away from what we've seen in the Witcher series. Upon securing the iced and unconscious woman, V and Jackie pointedly ignored the other person. They'd only been hired to save one life that day. V inserted an implant behind the woman’s ear to get a reading on her vitals. Twitching and iced over, the woman clung to life. The two mercenaries quickly moved outside of the apartment to a balcony. The exterior of the tiny complex exposed a massive but crowded world. Across from the giant building that V and Jackie find themselves in stands another equally massive construction. Apparently, a lot of buildings in Night City share this form and, since they're so massive, function almost like their own cities. No good deed goes unpunished, and our two heroes quickly found themselves surrounded by aggressive armed people in matching blue uniforms with a red symbol. The interlopers demanded that the two mercenaries hand over the woman. V explained that they are hired help, but these soldiers weren’t the listening types. As quickly as they had arrived, they disappeared with the woman in a helicopter. From what Tost told us, these soldiers represent a high-end medical company. Think of them as insurance for rich people. The icy, dying woman V and Jackie retrieved happens to be a client of theirs. In the world of Cyberpunk 2077, corporations run everything and this merc'ed up medical company is just another one of them. These soldiers represent a medical corporation The stress of the job proved to be worth the trouble for V, her paycheck earning her enough to go off on a three-day bender off-screen. The action resumed with an NSFW scene featuring a half-naked V in bed next to an equally half-naked stranger. Tost jumped in to say that this game contains mature content, definitely not a first for CD Projekt Red. He also revealed that Night City contains many inhabitants, a large amount of which V can interact with. These types of interactions could vary between random encounters with enemies to new partners with which V can bring on missions and likely a lot of things in-between. After her wild series of days, V needed to get back to work. Luckily, Jackie called with an exciting lead: A new client that could launch their careers into the stratosphere. The client, Dexter DeShaw, had a request for the two mercenaries, the details relayed via a shard that V plugged into her head. After downloading the mission info, V and Jackie left to prepare for the job. V followed Jackie through the streets of Night City. At street level, the space seemed overwhelming. The cityscape loomed overhead with skyscrapers taking up every scrap of sky. Life kept moving around V as she walked with Jackie. NPC's interacted with each other apparently leading their own lives, according to the devs, within Cyberpunk 2077. This makes the fact that V can interact with all of the NPCs that she dodged around certainly impressive. The NPCs themselves all had labels above their heads, giving a bit more characterization to the world. Pressing on through the mass of humanity, V and Jackie entered into the lair of the ripperdoc, a purveyor of especially interesting technological artifacts. This is a Ripperdoc - specializing in cyberwear, some docs deal in legal upgrades, but some supply less than legal tech The ripperdoc sells mechanical upgrades. In a corner of his shop, for example, the mantis blades from Cyberpunk's original teaser trailer can be seen. Shortly after her arrival, V settled into the doc's chair. He then proceeded to surgically remove her eyes, rendering our protagonist sightless. Darkness for a few seconds and then light. Those same eyes began transmitting images again, and V can see herself across the room for a short, surreal moment. The upgrade V had installed allows her to zoom in her vision to scan objects, useful for analyzing threats and concocting strategies. Some docs provide legal upgrades, others, not so much. The upgrades that V equips throughout the game depend on your playstyle. This leaves a ton of room to customize the game even further. After V finished getting fancy with new tech, Jackie returned with a vehicle in tow. Shady characters hung out by Jackie’s new baby, definitely looking ready to start some trouble. This understandably sounded some alarms for our mercenary friends. At this point, Tost jumped in to say that in this living world, random encounters can happen at any time. V and Jackie read the danger of their situation and took off in their ride, triggering a car chase. Speaking of vehicles, I only saw a few during the demo, but Tost said that a variety more exist in the game. 2077 is dominated by corporations and Meredith Stout is a top executive of one of them. In the demo, she uses V and Jackie to get what she wants. After some tense shooting and gadgetry take care of their pursuers, V and Jackie arrived at the rendezvous point to find a corporate woman waiting for them surrounded by armed guards and vehicles. It turns out she's Meredith Stout, a higher-up with the megacorporation Militech. Stout explained that she feels as if there are hidden schemes going on at Militech and wants in on the mysterious plans. She believes that V and Jackie are in on some key details that she needs. As a sassy, tough as nails mercenary, V won't willingly hand over all of the answers that Stout wants. Fully prepared for this scenario, the ruthless businesswoman hacked into V’s mind, forcing lie detector tech into her subconscious. In this future, not even your thoughts are safe. Through this interaction, branching narrative paths form that affect not only the upcoming gameplay, but the story overall. V could decide to try to fight her way out or comply with various dialogue options. After shaping the situation to her liking, Stout released V to complete the job by stealing a specialized piece of military hardware currently in the possession of a ruthless gang. This last act really got into the meat of Cyberpunk’s combat. The mission focused on retrieving a spider-like mech guarded by a well-armed gang holed up within an abandoned meat fortress. The newly acquired eye enhancements came in handy, as V used her techno peepers to spot nearby targets and plan her assault. Players can decide to go in guns and cyberwear blazing or sneak around the compound performing stealth takedowns. Or perhaps a more diplomatic solution could be reached? In the demo I saw, V negotiated for the prize. One of the fine people that V and Jackie are sent to negotiate within a fortified gang fortress. Their target this time is the piece of tech beside him. In Cyberpunk 2077, it’s not uncommon to see mechanical pieces on people. Some of these enhancements featured pretty prominently n the E3 trailer. The members of this gang don't mind the metal and wires; some have completely swapped their fleshy faces for a full-tech look. V met up with one such person to see the highly sought-after piece of military-grade equipment. The drone resembled a spider with all its limbs. Many in dangerous lines of work value its adaptive and versatile nature in all sorts of combat situations. Payment for this metallic creature resided on one of the chips seen throughout the demo. One of the gang members inserted this into their bases’ system and things go immediately awry. The woman from Millitech sabotaged the system with a virus. Bullets began to fly. V then hacked into one of the fallen enemies to gain access to the layout of the building, gaining an immediate advantage and a plan to get out. Pictured is the female V, very closely resembling how she looked in the demo. Her jacket not only looks rad, but it's also a key piece of gear called the samurai jacket that is connected to a street cred system. Combat in Cyberpunk contains both smooth movements and chaotic destruction. V slid around corners to catch targets unaware, bounced bullets off of walls to catch those hidden around corners, and utilized slow-mo to jump and shoot. It all looked fun as hell, and from what I saw and heard, the CD Projekt Red team hopes that their combat system will form around each individual players style. Escaping the fortress signaled the end of the demo. Coming out of seeing Cyberpunk 2077 firsthand, I felt a surge of enthusiasm. Night City included so many elements that I wanted to explore and questions I wanted to answer. What do interactions with NPCs really look like? What will the different game styles play like? Will the story form around this world, or around V? Will I like V? Am I supposed to? How sick will those cybernetic upgrades feel? Why do I feel so much hype from this game? Then the gameplay trailer launched to the public, and the hype grew even more. The reaction seemed fitting since we have had to wait six years since the game's announcement in 2012. Even now, we only saw the tip of the iceberg in the hour demo. It included enough to fuel my fascination with the game. However, the skeptic in me knows that some caution is healthy. Hype this big can be dangerous. Cyberpunk 2077 will either hugely benefit from following the Witcher 3 or it could lead to undeserved expectations. We saw this with Mass Effect: Andromeda which followed the hugely acclaimed Mass Effect Trilogy. The game needed to pretty much reach a level of perfection for its fans that it inevitably fell under the pressure and rushed development cycles. However, CD Projekt Red has a different way of doing things. The studio has built a rapport with its fans that we don't see very often. Fans trust the company completely as it has delivered time and time again on ever increasing expectations. CD Projekt Red has not given us a timeline for the game. Cyberpunk is available on Amazon for pre-order with a placeholder release date of December 28, 2018. Even so, it's likely we won't see the game's release this or even next year. Whenever it does reach the public, it will be playable on Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  4. Naomi N. Lugo

    What Can We Expect from Cyberpunk 2077?

    Night City is the setting for the upcoming game from CD Projekt Red, Cyberpunk 2077. The game is based on the tabletop role-playing games Cyberpunk and Cyberpunk 2020 by Mike Pondsmith Once shrouded in mystery but still able to garner a ton of hype, we finally have a concrete vision of CD Projekt Red's latest IP, Cyberpunk 2077. This past August, CD Projekt Red released a much-anticipated gameplay reveal trailer. The trailer generously showed a 48-minute walkthrough of early-story content. This same content (likely with some differences) made its debut earlier for a select crowd at E3 2018. I got a first-hand look at this hype when I was able to snag one of the coveted spots to see this much talked about footage. Cyberpunk 2077 easily had the biggest hype behind it during E3. Press, industry, and gamers crowded the long halls leading to the private showing area just for the mere chance to be squeezed in for one of the nearly 50-minute gameplay demos. The CD Projekt Red team, hoping to spare disappointment and save time, came out periodically to tell those hopefuls that they were overbooked. I stood in that line for about two and a half hours, fighting off waves of hopelessness and persevering through pure stubbornness. About three people were let in every hour, and sometimes less. One developer came out and firmly said that absolutely no extra spots were available while another said he'd see what he can do. With a bit of luck, I managed to get in, and oh man, was all that angst worth it. Level Designer Miles Tost served as our guide through the demo. We entered the character creator first. Tost formally introduced us to a mercenary named V, our fully customizable protagonist who made a brief appearance in the official E3 trailer. V can be either female or male and has various cosmetic settings to go through; the usual sliders and color options one might expect. The class system, however, had me interested since it offered a fluid experience that changes as you play the game. The different classes aren't meant to be set in stone, allowing the player to switch between them. V can then adapt to each player's individualized playstyle while progressing through the game. For the live demo, the team chose a female V. After setting up, it was time to get immersed in Night City. Jackie Wells is a fellow assassin that accompanies V during the course of the 50-minute demo shown at E3 Located in coastal California, Night City contains six seamless districts. The city reminded me of a hybrid between Blade Runner (but with sunshine) and Fifth Element. My not-so-bold prediction pins Night City as the main setting for the majority of the game. Towering mega-buildings scatter the landscape. In one of these giant structures, we met the aforementioned V and her mercenary partner Jackie Welles. The duo work as freelance guns-for-hire, taking jobs and recognizing opportunity when it presents itself. The demo began with the duo on a mission to retrieve a high priority target, the victim of kidnapping and implant harvesting. Obtaining implants, no matter how grisly the method of acquisition, proves a lucrative business in the dark future of Cyberpunk. With this introduction to Night City, V got a bit of action hunting down organ scavengers in a cramped and dingy apartment complex. They made their way through rooms, taking out enemies until stumbling upon the female target unconscious alongside another body in an iced tub. As you've most likely read/heard by now, Cyberpunk 2077's gameplay takes place from a first-person viewpoint. This fact seemed to generate some degree of frustration from fans of CD Projekt RED who have been accustomed to The Witcher series' third-person perspective. Personally, that didn't impair the experience as a viewer. Actually, the way combat functions, first-person seems to be the optimal way to play. Combat lets the player use a combo of high-tech weapons, cybernetic abilities, stealth, good ol' fashioned head bashing, and I'm sure loads more that we haven't seen yet. It definitely ventures away from what we've seen in the Witcher series. Upon securing the iced and unconscious woman, V and Jackie pointedly ignored the other person. They'd only been hired to save one life that day. V inserted an implant behind the woman’s ear to get a reading on her vitals. Twitching and iced over, the woman clung to life. The two mercenaries quickly moved outside of the apartment to a balcony. The exterior of the tiny complex exposed a massive but crowded world. Across from the giant building that V and Jackie find themselves in stands another equally massive construction. Apparently, a lot of buildings in Night City share this form and, since they're so massive, function almost like their own cities. No good deed goes unpunished, and our two heroes quickly found themselves surrounded by aggressive armed people in matching blue uniforms with a red symbol. The interlopers demanded that the two mercenaries hand over the woman. V explained that they are hired help, but these soldiers weren’t the listening types. As quickly as they had arrived, they disappeared with the woman in a helicopter. From what Tost told us, these soldiers represent a high-end medical company. Think of them as insurance for rich people. The icy, dying woman V and Jackie retrieved happens to be a client of theirs. In the world of Cyberpunk 2077, corporations run everything and this merc'ed up medical company is just another one of them. These soldiers represent a medical corporation The stress of the job proved to be worth the trouble for V, her paycheck earning her enough to go off on a three-day bender off-screen. The action resumed with an NSFW scene featuring a half-naked V in bed next to an equally half-naked stranger. Tost jumped in to say that this game contains mature content, definitely not a first for CD Projekt Red. He also revealed that Night City contains many inhabitants, a large amount of which V can interact with. These types of interactions could vary between random encounters with enemies to new partners with which V can bring on missions and likely a lot of things in-between. After her wild series of days, V needed to get back to work. Luckily, Jackie called with an exciting lead: A new client that could launch their careers into the stratosphere. The client, Dexter DeShaw, had a request for the two mercenaries, the details relayed via a shard that V plugged into her head. After downloading the mission info, V and Jackie left to prepare for the job. V followed Jackie through the streets of Night City. At street level, the space seemed overwhelming. The cityscape loomed overhead with skyscrapers taking up every scrap of sky. Life kept moving around V as she walked with Jackie. NPC's interacted with each other apparently leading their own lives, according to the devs, within Cyberpunk 2077. This makes the fact that V can interact with all of the NPCs that she dodged around certainly impressive. The NPCs themselves all had labels above their heads, giving a bit more characterization to the world. Pressing on through the mass of humanity, V and Jackie entered into the lair of the ripperdoc, a purveyor of especially interesting technological artifacts. This is a Ripperdoc - specializing in cyberwear, some docs deal in legal upgrades, but some supply less than legal tech The ripperdoc sells mechanical upgrades. In a corner of his shop, for example, the mantis blades from Cyberpunk's original teaser trailer can be seen. Shortly after her arrival, V settled into the doc's chair. He then proceeded to surgically remove her eyes, rendering our protagonist sightless. Darkness for a few seconds and then light. Those same eyes began transmitting images again, and V can see herself across the room for a short, surreal moment. The upgrade V had installed allows her to zoom in her vision to scan objects, useful for analyzing threats and concocting strategies. Some docs provide legal upgrades, others, not so much. The upgrades that V equips throughout the game depend on your playstyle. This leaves a ton of room to customize the game even further. After V finished getting fancy with new tech, Jackie returned with a vehicle in tow. Shady characters hung out by Jackie’s new baby, definitely looking ready to start some trouble. This understandably sounded some alarms for our mercenary friends. At this point, Tost jumped in to say that in this living world, random encounters can happen at any time. V and Jackie read the danger of their situation and took off in their ride, triggering a car chase. Speaking of vehicles, I only saw a few during the demo, but Tost said that a variety more exist in the game. 2077 is dominated by corporations and Meredith Stout is a top executive of one of them. In the demo, she uses V and Jackie to get what she wants. After some tense shooting and gadgetry take care of their pursuers, V and Jackie arrived at the rendezvous point to find a corporate woman waiting for them surrounded by armed guards and vehicles. It turns out she's Meredith Stout, a higher-up with the megacorporation Militech. Stout explained that she feels as if there are hidden schemes going on at Militech and wants in on the mysterious plans. She believes that V and Jackie are in on some key details that she needs. As a sassy, tough as nails mercenary, V won't willingly hand over all of the answers that Stout wants. Fully prepared for this scenario, the ruthless businesswoman hacked into V’s mind, forcing lie detector tech into her subconscious. In this future, not even your thoughts are safe. Through this interaction, branching narrative paths form that affect not only the upcoming gameplay, but the story overall. V could decide to try to fight her way out or comply with various dialogue options. After shaping the situation to her liking, Stout released V to complete the job by stealing a specialized piece of military hardware currently in the possession of a ruthless gang. This last act really got into the meat of Cyberpunk’s combat. The mission focused on retrieving a spider-like mech guarded by a well-armed gang holed up within an abandoned meat fortress. The newly acquired eye enhancements came in handy, as V used her techno peepers to spot nearby targets and plan her assault. Players can decide to go in guns and cyberwear blazing or sneak around the compound performing stealth takedowns. Or perhaps a more diplomatic solution could be reached? In the demo I saw, V negotiated for the prize. One of the fine people that V and Jackie are sent to negotiate within a fortified gang fortress. Their target this time is the piece of tech beside him. In Cyberpunk 2077, it’s not uncommon to see mechanical pieces on people. Some of these enhancements featured pretty prominently n the E3 trailer. The members of this gang don't mind the metal and wires; some have completely swapped their fleshy faces for a full-tech look. V met up with one such person to see the highly sought-after piece of military-grade equipment. The drone resembled a spider with all its limbs. Many in dangerous lines of work value its adaptive and versatile nature in all sorts of combat situations. Payment for this metallic creature resided on one of the chips seen throughout the demo. One of the gang members inserted this into their bases’ system and things go immediately awry. The woman from Millitech sabotaged the system with a virus. Bullets began to fly. V then hacked into one of the fallen enemies to gain access to the layout of the building, gaining an immediate advantage and a plan to get out. Pictured is the female V, very closely resembling how she looked in the demo. Her jacket not only looks rad, but it's also a key piece of gear called the samurai jacket that is connected to a street cred system. Combat in Cyberpunk contains both smooth movements and chaotic destruction. V slid around corners to catch targets unaware, bounced bullets off of walls to catch those hidden around corners, and utilized slow-mo to jump and shoot. It all looked fun as hell, and from what I saw and heard, the CD Projekt Red team hopes that their combat system will form around each individual players style. Escaping the fortress signaled the end of the demo. Coming out of seeing Cyberpunk 2077 firsthand, I felt a surge of enthusiasm. Night City included so many elements that I wanted to explore and questions I wanted to answer. What do interactions with NPCs really look like? What will the different game styles play like? Will the story form around this world, or around V? Will I like V? Am I supposed to? How sick will those cybernetic upgrades feel? Why do I feel so much hype from this game? Then the gameplay trailer launched to the public, and the hype grew even more. The reaction seemed fitting since we have had to wait six years since the game's announcement in 2012. Even now, we only saw the tip of the iceberg in the hour demo. It included enough to fuel my fascination with the game. However, the skeptic in me knows that some caution is healthy. Hype this big can be dangerous. Cyberpunk 2077 will either hugely benefit from following the Witcher 3 or it could lead to undeserved expectations. We saw this with Mass Effect: Andromeda which followed the hugely acclaimed Mass Effect Trilogy. The game needed to pretty much reach a level of perfection for its fans that it inevitably fell under the pressure and rushed development cycles. However, CD Projekt Red has a different way of doing things. The studio has built a rapport with its fans that we don't see very often. Fans trust the company completely as it has delivered time and time again on ever increasing expectations. CD Projekt Red has not given us a timeline for the game. Cyberpunk is available on Amazon for pre-order with a placeholder release date of December 28, 2018. Even so, it's likely we won't see the game's release this or even next year. Whenever it does reach the public, it will be playable on Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  5. With a new Western-themed animated short, Blizzard introduced the world to Ashe, McCree's former flame and lawless renegade. Ashe runs Deadlock, a band of outlaws that McCree interrupts in the middle of the train heist players have seen the aftermath of on the map Route 66. Blizzard also released a trailer teasing Ashe's gameplay abilities. She appears to have the ability to launch herself in a given direction with a well placed shotgun blast and possesses a mid-range rifle that can be used in a more aggressive sniping style. The trailer shows her able to throw a bundle of dynamite and shoot it to detonate the explosives and take out enemies. Her ultimate move has her summon her trusty robot sidekick Bob to knock up enemies in a line and act as a kind of turret, blasting the people he knocked up while Ashe continues to rain havoc on her foes. Ashe is cool and a great addition to the OverWatch cast. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  6. With a new Western-themed animated short, Blizzard introduced the world to Ashe, McCree's former flame and lawless renegade. Ashe runs Deadlock, a band of outlaws that McCree interrupts in the middle of the train heist players have seen the aftermath of on the map Route 66. Blizzard also released a trailer teasing Ashe's gameplay abilities. She appears to have the ability to launch herself in a given direction with a well placed shotgun blast and possesses a mid-range rifle that can be used in a more aggressive sniping style. The trailer shows her able to throw a bundle of dynamite and shoot it to detonate the explosives and take out enemies. Her ultimate move has her summon her trusty robot sidekick Bob to knock up enemies in a line and act as a kind of turret, blasting the people he knocked up while Ashe continues to rain havoc on her foes. Ashe is cool and a great addition to the OverWatch cast. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  7. A PC adaptation of a Wii on-rails shooter that shifted the shooting mechanic into a typing mechanic in homage to a surreal 90s Dreamcast title doesn't sound like something that would turn out well. However, Typing of the Dead: Overkill inexplicably works. The quirky game asks players to improve their typing skills while also playing through a grindhouse schlock-fest of gore and f-bombs. Despite the educational nature of its mechanics, kids should definitely not play Typing of the Dead: Overkill. We can't stress that enough. But adults? You make your own choices and decide whether this C-tier romp through zombies and low-budget film cliches might just secretly be one of the best games of all-time. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Undertale 'Gaster's Legacy' by DS (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03761) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  8. A PC adaptation of a Wii on-rails shooter that shifted the shooting mechanic into a typing mechanic in homage to a surreal 90s Dreamcast title doesn't sound like something that would turn out well. However, Typing of the Dead: Overkill inexplicably works. The quirky game asks players to improve their typing skills while also playing through a grindhouse schlock-fest of gore and f-bombs. Despite the educational nature of its mechanics, kids should definitely not play Typing of the Dead: Overkill. We can't stress that enough. But adults? You make your own choices and decide whether this C-tier romp through zombies and low-budget film cliches might just secretly be one of the best games of all-time. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Undertale 'Gaster's Legacy' by DS (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03761) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  9. In The Division 2, life has moved on. Civilians and military forces have begun rebuilding and consolidation power. With that reconstruction comes new life and the spark of hope, as well as new systems of oppression. The sequel to the 2016 online scavenge-craft-n-shoot hopes to offer players a more nuanced narrative about overcoming authoritarianism in a post-apocalyptic future version of Washington DC. The trailer takes viewers through a seemingly thriving community being rebuilt in the middle of Washington DC. The community grows food, pursues music and art, and everyone seems to be contributing to the greater good. However, only a block away scavengers kill a man in the streets while innocents hide in the nearby ruins of society. Nearby, we are shown a large, makeshift graveyard that slowly melts into an execution square hung 'round with tattered American flags. Someone in a position of authority lectures struggling prisoners about breaking the rules before the camera turns away and a gunshot sounds. Amid all of this, a little girl runs through the settlement, seemingly playing. She throws a paper airplane that's glimpsed throughout the trailer. Its flight finally comes to its end at the feet of characters bearing the emblems of The Division. On the paper is written one word: "Help." Though the single player experience was strongly implied to be more robust than in the first game, Ubisoft was careful to make sure everyone knows that they plan to support The Division 2 for years to come. Specifically, finishing the main campaign will unlock the ability to specialize into one of three classes and pick a unique weapon. These roles will come with new abilities that will unlock as players progress through the endgame. And, oh boy, does Ubisoft plan on paving the road to endgame content. Following The Division 2's release next year, Ubisoft will release three separate content packs to all players for free that will add all manner of new things to the game. On top of that, players who reach the endgame will be able to participate in raids that team up to eight players together to tackle challenging encounters unlike anything else in the game up until that point. The Division 2 releases March 15, 2019 for PlayStaiton 4, Xbox One, and PC. Players who want a head start on the action can register for the beta on The Division website. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  10. In The Division 2, life has moved on. Civilians and military forces have begun rebuilding and consolidation power. With that reconstruction comes new life and the spark of hope, as well as new systems of oppression. The sequel to the 2016 online scavenge-craft-n-shoot hopes to offer players a more nuanced narrative about overcoming authoritarianism in a post-apocalyptic future version of Washington DC. The trailer takes viewers through a seemingly thriving community being rebuilt in the middle of Washington DC. The community grows food, pursues music and art, and everyone seems to be contributing to the greater good. However, only a block away scavengers kill a man in the streets while innocents hide in the nearby ruins of society. Nearby, we are shown a large, makeshift graveyard that slowly melts into an execution square hung 'round with tattered American flags. Someone in a position of authority lectures struggling prisoners about breaking the rules before the camera turns away and a gunshot sounds. Amid all of this, a little girl runs through the settlement, seemingly playing. She throws a paper airplane that's glimpsed throughout the trailer. Its flight finally comes to its end at the feet of characters bearing the emblems of The Division. On the paper is written one word: "Help." Though the single player experience was strongly implied to be more robust than in the first game, Ubisoft was careful to make sure everyone knows that they plan to support The Division 2 for years to come. Specifically, finishing the main campaign will unlock the ability to specialize into one of three classes and pick a unique weapon. These roles will come with new abilities that will unlock as players progress through the endgame. And, oh boy, does Ubisoft plan on paving the road to endgame content. Following The Division 2's release next year, Ubisoft will release three separate content packs to all players for free that will add all manner of new things to the game. On top of that, players who reach the endgame will be able to participate in raids that team up to eight players together to tackle challenging encounters unlike anything else in the game up until that point. The Division 2 releases March 15, 2019 for PlayStaiton 4, Xbox One, and PC. Players who want a head start on the action can register for the beta on The Division website. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  11. We Happy Few turned a lot of heads when it debuted in 2015. Its intriguing premise of a drug-fueled utopia, combined with the Bioshock-esque presentation and gameplay, gave the impression of narrative-focused shooter on-par with Ken Levine’s work. That excitement turned to disappointment when the game’s multiplayer entered early beta in 2016. Even though developer Compulsion Games promised a single-player component from the beginning, an off-put player base didn’t react kindly to this first offering. They weren’t alone. My own enthusiasm for We Happy Few waned significantly in light of this direction. Fast-forward months later, and Compulsion has found a publisher in Gearbox Software. The financial backing of a triple-A publisher has allowed the developer to expand the project’s scope–particularly its single-player. After spending an hour with We Happy Few’s revamped story campaign, I can confidently say that it feels like the experience people wanted from the get-go. On a personal note, I fell in love with the project all over again. To quickly recap the game’s premise, We Happy Few takes place in the retrofuturistic city of Wellington Wells. Set in an alternate 1960’s Britain, citizens live their lives constantly hopped up on a drug called Joy. As the name suggests, the drug basically brainwashes them into a creepy, forced happiness, causing hallucinations and general insanity. Those who don’t take their Joy get labeled as Downers, and become exiled as enemies. The demo I played picked up immediately after the conclusion of the game’s E3 2016 trailer. Protagonist Arthur Hastings, a newspaper censor, (and one of three available characters) was outed as a Downer and narrowly evaded capture by the authorities. We last saw him enter the sewers where I continued his escape. I immediately felt the Bioshock vibes, from the quirky writing (though We Happy Few leans harder into black comedy territory) to the the exaggerated characters. Logs and books filling in the world’s lore littered environments for the player’s reading pleasure. Every piece of furniture, as well as bodies, can be searched for supplies. And search for supplies you should because We Happy Few focuses heavily on crafting and survival. Food, medical supplies, tools, and even clothing must be whipped up using random parts. Additionally, players can discover blueprints to make other items. As someone who enjoys picking up junk to create not-junk, I felt that unexplainable but familiar satisfaction of hoarding everything in sight and got excited for every new blueprint. Player’s maintain Arthur’s hunger and thirst by devouring food and water. Most of the food I found barely qualified as edible, so I needed to craft food poisoning remedies to keep on hand at all times. Maintaining Arthur’s statuses seemed like a potential burden, but these meters depleted slowly. I also frequently found food (albeit decayed), which left me to enjoy myself without stopping every few minutes to stuff Arthur’s face. The map’s enormous scale stood out as I roamed the scenic British countryside. In fact, my lengthy trek only uncovered a relatively small portion of it. Furthermore, the area I occupied only represented one of around five or six zones players explore. Needless to say, We Happy Few seems poised to offer plenty of game to across its roughly 20 hour campaign. A huge world needs plenty of side activities. We Happy Few features traditional NPC side-quests as well as extra objectives. I found maps that revealed dig spots where I unearthed buried treasure. Discovering certain ingredients opened up crafting quests which essentially acted as tutorials for assembling a new recipe. It remains to be seen just how much We Happy Few has to offer outside of the critical path, but the diversions I found left me feeling optimistic on that front. I eventually reached my objective: a dilapidated, poverty-stricken town. Its population appeared to consist of sullen Wellington Wells outcasts. Since they resented their former home, they didn’t take kindly to Arthur’s fancy city garb and proceeded to band together and give chase. I fled into a nearby church. Inside, I met a character recommending I tear up my clothing to appear more downtrodden. Blending into the surroundings is another crucial element of We Happy Few. That could involve posing as a exile on the outside or maintaining the illusion of Joy-fueled cheerfulness within Wellington Wells. After crafting a crappier version of my outfit, I stepped outside to greet the unruly mob. Upon noticing my new digs, they instantly shrugged and dissipated in a somewhat comedic moment. I could now freely explore the town. Citizen interactions have an Elder Scrolls-like flavor. For example, intruding into homes uninvited or getting caught stealing possessions can cause residents to violently retaliate. Now that I’ve successfully assimilated myself into the local populace, crossing a bridge to reach the next region became my next goal. I reached the gentleman guarding the bridge gate; however, it turned out a local gang swiped his precious war medals and he wouldn’t let me pass until I recovered them. Furthermore, I also needed to find a necessary power cell. To recover the medals, I had to locate and infiltrate the gang’s stronghold. Despite sneaking through a back opening undetected (one of multiple routes), the gang were prepared for intruders all along and captured me when I rode their elevator. The reason behind their setup: to lure potential competitors to battle to the death in their popular fighting arena. After stripping me of my belongings, the thugs led me into their battlefield. I met my opponent: a former associate of Arthur’s who blamed him for not publishing one of his articles in the newspaper. Arthur explained that the man’s piece blatantly plagiarized Arthur’s own work, but the man still swore revenge in a humorous exchange. I had the option of choosing to use non-lethal or deadly force. I went with the non-fatal pipe wrapped in padding. My adversary swiftly opted for a deadlier weapon, much to Arthur’s chagrin. Despite having this choice, We Happy Few doesn’t feature a morality mechanic. When I asked Compulsion’s Narrative Director Alex Epstein about this, he told me he’d rather players feel the consequences themselves rather than gamify it. Judging by this response, I wouldn't expect any horns to sprout on Arthur's head if you opt for a bloodier approach. Combat resembled the style of BioShock or Dishonored. The right shoulder button initiated attacks while the left shoulder button blocked. Players can also perform a guard-breaking shove. Picking up downed bodies and hurling them at opponents became my favorite offensive move for its silliness. After incapacitating the writer, more enemies entered the fray. I found it easy to drop foes by backing them into a corner and wailing on them, though I had to remain mindful of Arthur’s stamina meter. After finally beating my challengers, the gang allowed me to walk free, but I had no intention of leaving without accomplishing my mission. I snuck my way into the underbelly of the hideout. Navigating unseen, I creeped up behind unsuspecting foes and choked them out. To distract others, I lobbed glass bottles. These mechanics won’t surprise stealth fans, but players can access more abilities by unlocking them in the skill tree. I eventually found the gatekeeper’s medals, along with a power cell and my stolen inventory, and chose to escape without making a ruckus. After returning the medals to the grateful veteran, I passed through the gate and took a train to the next area. Unfortunately, I had to end things there before I could see what lay ahead. Had I not had to hoof it to another appointment, I’d have gladly kept playing. We Happy Few’s strange world begs to be explored, and I got hooked on gathering as many resources to make Arthur as capable as possible. With a world this large, We Happy Few will live or die based on the number of interesting things to do. Ultimately, I’m relieved to have substantial single-player component to sink my teeth into as the idea of the multiplayer doesn’t excite me in the same way. The wait for We Happy Few won’t last much longer, thankfully. It launches August 10 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  12. Marcus Stewart

    We Happy Few's E3 Demo Made Me A Believer Again

    We Happy Few turned a lot of heads when it debuted in 2015. Its intriguing premise of a drug-fueled utopia, combined with the Bioshock-esque presentation and gameplay, gave the impression of narrative-focused shooter on-par with Ken Levine’s work. That excitement turned to disappointment when the game’s multiplayer entered early beta in 2016. Even though developer Compulsion Games promised a single-player component from the beginning, an off-put player base didn’t react kindly to this first offering. They weren’t alone. My own enthusiasm for We Happy Few waned significantly in light of this direction. Fast-forward months later, and Compulsion has found a publisher in Gearbox Software. The financial backing of a triple-A publisher has allowed the developer to expand the project’s scope–particularly its single-player. After spending an hour with We Happy Few’s revamped story campaign, I can confidently say that it feels like the experience people wanted from the get-go. On a personal note, I fell in love with the project all over again. To quickly recap the game’s premise, We Happy Few takes place in the retrofuturistic city of Wellington Wells. Set in an alternate 1960’s Britain, citizens live their lives constantly hopped up on a drug called Joy. As the name suggests, the drug basically brainwashes them into a creepy, forced happiness, causing hallucinations and general insanity. Those who don’t take their Joy get labeled as Downers, and become exiled as enemies. The demo I played picked up immediately after the conclusion of the game’s E3 2016 trailer. Protagonist Arthur Hastings, a newspaper censor, (and one of three available characters) was outed as a Downer and narrowly evaded capture by the authorities. We last saw him enter the sewers where I continued his escape. I immediately felt the Bioshock vibes, from the quirky writing (though We Happy Few leans harder into black comedy territory) to the the exaggerated characters. Logs and books filling in the world’s lore littered environments for the player’s reading pleasure. Every piece of furniture, as well as bodies, can be searched for supplies. And search for supplies you should because We Happy Few focuses heavily on crafting and survival. Food, medical supplies, tools, and even clothing must be whipped up using random parts. Additionally, players can discover blueprints to make other items. As someone who enjoys picking up junk to create not-junk, I felt that unexplainable but familiar satisfaction of hoarding everything in sight and got excited for every new blueprint. Player’s maintain Arthur’s hunger and thirst by devouring food and water. Most of the food I found barely qualified as edible, so I needed to craft food poisoning remedies to keep on hand at all times. Maintaining Arthur’s statuses seemed like a potential burden, but these meters depleted slowly. I also frequently found food (albeit decayed), which left me to enjoy myself without stopping every few minutes to stuff Arthur’s face. The map’s enormous scale stood out as I roamed the scenic British countryside. In fact, my lengthy trek only uncovered a relatively small portion of it. Furthermore, the area I occupied only represented one of around five or six zones players explore. Needless to say, We Happy Few seems poised to offer plenty of game to across its roughly 20 hour campaign. A huge world needs plenty of side activities. We Happy Few features traditional NPC side-quests as well as extra objectives. I found maps that revealed dig spots where I unearthed buried treasure. Discovering certain ingredients opened up crafting quests which essentially acted as tutorials for assembling a new recipe. It remains to be seen just how much We Happy Few has to offer outside of the critical path, but the diversions I found left me feeling optimistic on that front. I eventually reached my objective: a dilapidated, poverty-stricken town. Its population appeared to consist of sullen Wellington Wells outcasts. Since they resented their former home, they didn’t take kindly to Arthur’s fancy city garb and proceeded to band together and give chase. I fled into a nearby church. Inside, I met a character recommending I tear up my clothing to appear more downtrodden. Blending into the surroundings is another crucial element of We Happy Few. That could involve posing as a exile on the outside or maintaining the illusion of Joy-fueled cheerfulness within Wellington Wells. After crafting a crappier version of my outfit, I stepped outside to greet the unruly mob. Upon noticing my new digs, they instantly shrugged and dissipated in a somewhat comedic moment. I could now freely explore the town. Citizen interactions have an Elder Scrolls-like flavor. For example, intruding into homes uninvited or getting caught stealing possessions can cause residents to violently retaliate. Now that I’ve successfully assimilated myself into the local populace, crossing a bridge to reach the next region became my next goal. I reached the gentleman guarding the bridge gate; however, it turned out a local gang swiped his precious war medals and he wouldn’t let me pass until I recovered them. Furthermore, I also needed to find a necessary power cell. To recover the medals, I had to locate and infiltrate the gang’s stronghold. Despite sneaking through a back opening undetected (one of multiple routes), the gang were prepared for intruders all along and captured me when I rode their elevator. The reason behind their setup: to lure potential competitors to battle to the death in their popular fighting arena. After stripping me of my belongings, the thugs led me into their battlefield. I met my opponent: a former associate of Arthur’s who blamed him for not publishing one of his articles in the newspaper. Arthur explained that the man’s piece blatantly plagiarized Arthur’s own work, but the man still swore revenge in a humorous exchange. I had the option of choosing to use non-lethal or deadly force. I went with the non-fatal pipe wrapped in padding. My adversary swiftly opted for a deadlier weapon, much to Arthur’s chagrin. Despite having this choice, We Happy Few doesn’t feature a morality mechanic. When I asked Compulsion’s Narrative Director Alex Epstein about this, he told me he’d rather players feel the consequences themselves rather than gamify it. Judging by this response, I wouldn't expect any horns to sprout on Arthur's head if you opt for a bloodier approach. Combat resembled the style of BioShock or Dishonored. The right shoulder button initiated attacks while the left shoulder button blocked. Players can also perform a guard-breaking shove. Picking up downed bodies and hurling them at opponents became my favorite offensive move for its silliness. After incapacitating the writer, more enemies entered the fray. I found it easy to drop foes by backing them into a corner and wailing on them, though I had to remain mindful of Arthur’s stamina meter. After finally beating my challengers, the gang allowed me to walk free, but I had no intention of leaving without accomplishing my mission. I snuck my way into the underbelly of the hideout. Navigating unseen, I creeped up behind unsuspecting foes and choked them out. To distract others, I lobbed glass bottles. These mechanics won’t surprise stealth fans, but players can access more abilities by unlocking them in the skill tree. I eventually found the gatekeeper’s medals, along with a power cell and my stolen inventory, and chose to escape without making a ruckus. After returning the medals to the grateful veteran, I passed through the gate and took a train to the next area. Unfortunately, I had to end things there before I could see what lay ahead. Had I not had to hoof it to another appointment, I’d have gladly kept playing. We Happy Few’s strange world begs to be explored, and I got hooked on gathering as many resources to make Arthur as capable as possible. With a world this large, We Happy Few will live or die based on the number of interesting things to do. Ultimately, I’m relieved to have substantial single-player component to sink my teeth into as the idea of the multiplayer doesn’t excite me in the same way. The wait for We Happy Few won’t last much longer, thankfully. It launches August 10 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  13. This tease seemed to come out of nowhere. Russian developer Mundfish announced a very slick looking game called Atomic Heart earlier this week. Players will explore a research lab/military base (that might also double as a theme park?) during the height of the Soviet Union. Dr. Stockhausen has been conducting unholy experiments in the heart of the facility that have had an effect on both machines and the bodies of the dead that they have left in their wake. What exactly the nature of those experiments might have been remains a mystery for players to uncover as they delve into the secrets of Atomic Heart. The name seems to reference a bit of lore teased by the team back in March - a picture of two human hearts hooked to machines and a cryptic message about the love of two employees in Facility #3826. Players get drawn into this alternate history version of the Soviet Union as investigator P-3 who has been dispatched to investigate 3826. They find the facility in a state of decay and chaos as a wide variety of machines run amok alongside resurrected soldiers, some of whom have been creepily painted as clowns. As players explore, they'll find a variety of insane, mind-bending experiments still in progress, like people made of blood or strange, seemingly sentient pockets of air under water. Beware of making too much of a scene, though. Drawing the attention of the rampaging machines by running afoul of their patrol drones can lead to a quick, messy death. Atomic Heart seems to have an in-depth crafting system for weapons that will allow players to gear up as they progress and make weapons that suit their playstyle. While the trailer doesn't hint at an official release date, Mundfish expects to release Atomic Heart sometime this year for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One.
  14. This tease seemed to come out of nowhere. Russian developer Mundfish announced a very slick looking game called Atomic Heart earlier this week. Players will explore a research lab/military base (that might also double as a theme park?) during the height of the Soviet Union. Dr. Stockhausen has been conducting unholy experiments in the heart of the facility that have had an effect on both machines and the bodies of the dead that they have left in their wake. What exactly the nature of those experiments might have been remains a mystery for players to uncover as they delve into the secrets of Atomic Heart. The name seems to reference a bit of lore teased by the team back in March - a picture of two human hearts hooked to machines and a cryptic message about the love of two employees in Facility #3826. Players get drawn into this alternate history version of the Soviet Union as investigator P-3 who has been dispatched to investigate 3826. They find the facility in a state of decay and chaos as a wide variety of machines run amok alongside resurrected soldiers, some of whom have been creepily painted as clowns. As players explore, they'll find a variety of insane, mind-bending experiments still in progress, like people made of blood or strange, seemingly sentient pockets of air under water. Beware of making too much of a scene, though. Drawing the attention of the rampaging machines by running afoul of their patrol drones can lead to a quick, messy death. Atomic Heart seems to have an in-depth crafting system for weapons that will allow players to gear up as they progress and make weapons that suit their playstyle. While the trailer doesn't hint at an official release date, Mundfish expects to release Atomic Heart sometime this year for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. View full article
  15. It's hard out there for a new development studio. You need to really stand out from the crowd. When The Astronauts debuted their first game, The Vanishing of Ethan Carter, back in 2014 they managed to do that with a thoroughly surreal journey and fantastic visuals. It was a thoughtful, mysterious adventure game that involved unraveling a series of murders and uncovering strange, seemingly occult puzzles. Witchfire completely bucks expectations and draws upon the team's roots in shooters - many of The Astronauts worked on projects like Bulletstorm and Painkiller. The result of that pooled experience thrusts players into the world of a dark fantasy FPS very reminiscent of Painkiller. The protagonist struggles against skeletal enemies powered by mystical forces in gorgeously gothic locations. The jaw-dropping environments and enemies have been constructed using advanced photogrammetry tech that allows the team to scan real-world objects and use them as assets. The technique is scaleable to assets the size of buildings, so whatever the team is planning will be big. Adrian Chmielarz, one of the co-founders of The Astronauts, gave a bit more context for the mysterious teaser saying, "[Witchfire] is still a long way from release and we are not announcing any other platforms than PC/Steam. The reason we’re launching the teaser so early is simply to let everyone know that we’re alive and kicking, and how radically different this new project of ours is compared to our previous game, The Vanishing of Ethan Carter. [...] While Witchfire is also a shooter, we’re aiming to make a game unlike anything we have done in the past, both in tone and in game mechanics." We don't know much more than that, though there are some hints that 2018 might hold more information as production on Witchfire continues and The Astronauts finalizes more features and builds up the world of Witchfire. Until then, imagine the possibilities presented by a spiritual successor to Painkiller mixed with the narrative sensibilities The Astronauts have demonstrated thus far.
  16. It's hard out there for a new development studio. You need to really stand out from the crowd. When The Astronauts debuted their first game, The Vanishing of Ethan Carter, back in 2014 they managed to do that with a thoroughly surreal journey and fantastic visuals. It was a thoughtful, mysterious adventure game that involved unraveling a series of murders and uncovering strange, seemingly occult puzzles. Witchfire completely bucks expectations and draws upon the team's roots in shooters - many of The Astronauts worked on projects like Bulletstorm and Painkiller. The result of that pooled experience thrusts players into the world of a dark fantasy FPS very reminiscent of Painkiller. The protagonist struggles against skeletal enemies powered by mystical forces in gorgeously gothic locations. The jaw-dropping environments and enemies have been constructed using advanced photogrammetry tech that allows the team to scan real-world objects and use them as assets. The technique is scaleable to assets the size of buildings, so whatever the team is planning will be big. Adrian Chmielarz, one of the co-founders of The Astronauts, gave a bit more context for the mysterious teaser saying, "[Witchfire] is still a long way from release and we are not announcing any other platforms than PC/Steam. The reason we’re launching the teaser so early is simply to let everyone know that we’re alive and kicking, and how radically different this new project of ours is compared to our previous game, The Vanishing of Ethan Carter. [...] While Witchfire is also a shooter, we’re aiming to make a game unlike anything we have done in the past, both in tone and in game mechanics." We don't know much more than that, though there are some hints that 2018 might hold more information as production on Witchfire continues and The Astronauts finalizes more features and builds up the world of Witchfire. Until then, imagine the possibilities presented by a spiritual successor to Painkiller mixed with the narrative sensibilities The Astronauts have demonstrated thus far. View full article
  17. After a poorly received attempt to revive the Wolfenstein franchise in 2009, many expected the franchise to wither away into obscurity. That is, until MachineGames, a developer formed from ex-members of Starbreeze Studios, took charge of the series and attempted to breathe life into the series one more time in 2014. They succeeded and created the adrenaline-fueled game (with a surprisingly tender heart) about a brain damaged soldier kicking off a new resistance movement against the Nazis in an alternate timeline where the Nazis were able to conquer the world. Is Wolfenstein: The New Order one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Wolfenstein 3D 'My Loved Ones Are Gone' by Psycho Crusher (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02508) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  18. After a poorly received attempt to revive the Wolfenstein franchise in 2009, many expected the franchise to wither away into obscurity. That is, until MachineGames, a developer formed from ex-members of Starbreeze Studios, took charge of the series and attempted to breathe life into the series one more time in 2014. They succeeded and created the adrenaline-fueled game (with a surprisingly tender heart) about a brain damaged soldier kicking off a new resistance movement against the Nazis in an alternate timeline where the Nazis were able to conquer the world. Is Wolfenstein: The New Order one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Wolfenstein 3D 'My Loved Ones Are Gone' by Psycho Crusher (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02508) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  19. This week we play a cruel trick: Doom (1993) or Doom (2016) which game should be inducted into the canon of The Best Games Period? Doom has changed the face of gaming arguably moreso than any other shooter in video game history, but does the original hold up in the face of its modern refinement? Which one wins out in this winner-take-all debate to the death!? This battle for the ages finds itself argued by Daniel Jones and special guest Joseph Lopes. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Also, due to some technical hiccups, Daniel sounds like he is wearing a scuba suit this week. We'll have it sorted by next week! Outro music: Doom 'Army Worthy of Phobos' by HeavenWraith (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03433) You can follow Joe on Twitter @pixelsnthoughts and give him grief for his opinions! You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  20. This week we play a cruel trick: Doom (1993) or Doom (2016) which game should be inducted into the canon of The Best Games Period? Doom has changed the face of gaming arguably moreso than any other shooter in video game history, but does the original hold up in the face of its modern refinement? Which one wins out in this winner-take-all debate to the death!? This battle for the ages finds itself argued by Daniel Jones and special guest Joseph Lopes. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Also, due to some technical hiccups, Daniel sounds like he is wearing a scuba suit this week. We'll have it sorted by next week! Outro music: Doom 'Army Worthy of Phobos' by HeavenWraith (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03433) You can follow Joe on Twitter @pixelsnthoughts and give him grief for his opinions! You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  21. First Person Shooters have a certain ability. They can raise our blood pressure, help us invent new ways to flip tables, but most of all they have the ability to bring us together. Aww. This is a phenomenon that the creators of the new Call of Duty entry WWII seem to be well aware of and made the center of their new trailer "“Reassemble!” which launched on October 15. In it, we see a tropey but self-aware story using the plotline of the gang getting back together for one more hit, but this time it's for the return of the game. "Haven't you heard? Call of Duty is going back to World War II baby," the inciting member says to a squad member, "we gotta get the guys back together," he replies. The ensuing scenes include the gathering of the squad through various settings. It's endearing and seems to be translating well for fans, at least so far. As of publishing this article, the like/dislike ratio sits at 17,000 likes to 1,000 dislikes. Significantly better than Call of Duty trailers have faired in the past. The Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare Reveal Trailer currently has a bitter ratio of 581,000 likes to 3 million dislikes. Ouch. The WWII launch trailer is at 1 million likes to 97,000 dislikes, by the way, possibly showing tempered expectations. Call of Duty: World War II launches November 3 to PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC. How do you feel about Call of Duty returning to WWII? Are your hopes high for the latest installment? Let us know in the comments below.
  22. First Person Shooters have a certain ability. They can raise our blood pressure, help us invent new ways to flip tables, but most of all they have the ability to bring us together. Aww. This is a phenomenon that the creators of the new Call of Duty entry WWII seem to be well aware of and made the center of their new trailer "“Reassemble!” which launched on October 15. In it, we see a tropey but self-aware story using the plotline of the gang getting back together for one more hit, but this time it's for the return of the game. "Haven't you heard? Call of Duty is going back to World War II baby," the inciting member says to a squad member, "we gotta get the guys back together," he replies. The ensuing scenes include the gathering of the squad through various settings. It's endearing and seems to be translating well for fans, at least so far. As of publishing this article, the like/dislike ratio sits at 17,000 likes to 1,000 dislikes. Significantly better than Call of Duty trailers have faired in the past. The Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare Reveal Trailer currently has a bitter ratio of 581,000 likes to 3 million dislikes. Ouch. The WWII launch trailer is at 1 million likes to 97,000 dislikes, by the way, possibly showing tempered expectations. Call of Duty: World War II launches November 3 to PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC. How do you feel about Call of Duty returning to WWII? Are your hopes high for the latest installment? Let us know in the comments below. View full article
  23. Earth has been destroyed. The century following the apocalypse saw to a massive shift in the planet's ecosystem as the world grew cold and dark. What remained of humanity entered into a new ice age known as the Great Freeze. To survive, humans retreated to the narrow equatorial band around the planet and set up remote colonies over highly valuable resources outside of the habitable zone. ARKTIKA.1 focuses on a mercenary sent to defend one of those colonies in the ruins of old Russia. Known as ARKTIKA.1, the colony finds itself besieged by raiders, robots, and horrifying creatures that have adapted to the harsh climate. Players must use tactics, quick reflexes, and an array of customizable weaponry to combat those threats and discover what happened to ARKTIKA.1. This VR title comes to us courtesy of 4A Games, the developers of the Metro series. They've developed a new engine for use with VR tech that they tout will have "some of the most impressive visuals ever seen in VR." They've taken steps into the VR world while also working on the upcoming Metro Exodus slated for release next year. ARKTIKA.1 releases on October 10 for the Oculus Touch. It will be accompanied by a simultaneously released ebook titled ARKTIKA.1: My Name is Viktoria. View full article
  24. Earth has been destroyed. The century following the apocalypse saw to a massive shift in the planet's ecosystem as the world grew cold and dark. What remained of humanity entered into a new ice age known as the Great Freeze. To survive, humans retreated to the narrow equatorial band around the planet and set up remote colonies over highly valuable resources outside of the habitable zone. ARKTIKA.1 focuses on a mercenary sent to defend one of those colonies in the ruins of old Russia. Known as ARKTIKA.1, the colony finds itself besieged by raiders, robots, and horrifying creatures that have adapted to the harsh climate. Players must use tactics, quick reflexes, and an array of customizable weaponry to combat those threats and discover what happened to ARKTIKA.1. This VR title comes to us courtesy of 4A Games, the developers of the Metro series. They've developed a new engine for use with VR tech that they tout will have "some of the most impressive visuals ever seen in VR." They've taken steps into the VR world while also working on the upcoming Metro Exodus slated for release next year. ARKTIKA.1 releases on October 10 for the Oculus Touch. It will be accompanied by a simultaneously released ebook titled ARKTIKA.1: My Name is Viktoria.
  25. After Bungie concluded their work on Halo: Reach, they turned their eyes toward a game that a small segment of the company had been fleshing out for years. That game would eventually become Destiny after overcoming numerous development challenges. Destiny's devs had to contend with a malicious engine that required obscene amounts of time to load changes, stratospheric expectations, a rough split with its long-time composer, and the decision to scrap the entire story with less than a year left of development time. The stakes were high. But when Destiny released to the public, Bungie thought they had a winner on their hands - Destiny was, after all, the most pre-ordered game in history! Unfortunately, the critical reception was mixed. Despite this, Destiny certainly accrued a huge following over the years, which led to Jason Pfitzer from Northern Heart Games, this week's guest, to nominate Bungie's FPS MMO hybrid. Looking at Destiny several years after its launch and subsequent revisions - is it one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Destiny 'Hope Rising' by Jillian Aversa and zircon (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03002) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can follow Jason on Twitter, @JasonPfitzer, and be sure to check out the game he has been working on at Northern Heart Games! Pinbrawl is a competitive, four-player pinball melee. Having played it at multiple stages in its development, I can confirm that it's very fun. If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
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