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Found 64 results

  1. In The Division 2, life has moved on. Civilians and military forces have begun rebuilding and consolidation power. With that reconstruction comes new life and the spark of hope, as well as new systems of oppression. The sequel to the 2016 online scavenge-craft-n-shoot hopes to offer players a more nuanced narrative about overcoming authoritarianism in a post-apocalyptic future version of Washington DC. The trailer takes viewers through a seemingly thriving community being rebuilt in the middle of Washington DC. The community grows food, pursues music and art, and everyone seems to be contributing to the greater good. However, only a block away scavengers kill a man in the streets while innocents hide in the nearby ruins of society. Nearby, we are shown a large, makeshift graveyard that slowly melts into an execution square hung 'round with tattered American flags. Someone in a position of authority lectures struggling prisoners about breaking the rules before the camera turns away and a gunshot sounds. Amid all of this, a little girl runs through the settlement, seemingly playing. She throws a paper airplane that's glimpsed throughout the trailer. Its flight finally comes to its end at the feet of characters bearing the emblems of The Division. On the paper is written one word: "Help." Though the single player experience was strongly implied to be more robust than in the first game, Ubisoft was careful to make sure everyone knows that they plan to support The Division 2 for years to come. Specifically, finishing the main campaign will unlock the ability to specialize into one of three classes and pick a unique weapon. These roles will come with new abilities that will unlock as players progress through the endgame. And, oh boy, does Ubisoft plan on paving the road to endgame content. Following The Division 2's release next year, Ubisoft will release three separate content packs to all players for free that will add all manner of new things to the game. On top of that, players who reach the endgame will be able to participate in raids that team up to eight players together to tackle challenging encounters unlike anything else in the game up until that point. The Division 2 releases March 15, 2019 for PlayStaiton 4, Xbox One, and PC. Players who want a head start on the action can register for the beta on The Division website. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  2. In The Division 2, life has moved on. Civilians and military forces have begun rebuilding and consolidation power. With that reconstruction comes new life and the spark of hope, as well as new systems of oppression. The sequel to the 2016 online scavenge-craft-n-shoot hopes to offer players a more nuanced narrative about overcoming authoritarianism in a post-apocalyptic future version of Washington DC. The trailer takes viewers through a seemingly thriving community being rebuilt in the middle of Washington DC. The community grows food, pursues music and art, and everyone seems to be contributing to the greater good. However, only a block away scavengers kill a man in the streets while innocents hide in the nearby ruins of society. Nearby, we are shown a large, makeshift graveyard that slowly melts into an execution square hung 'round with tattered American flags. Someone in a position of authority lectures struggling prisoners about breaking the rules before the camera turns away and a gunshot sounds. Amid all of this, a little girl runs through the settlement, seemingly playing. She throws a paper airplane that's glimpsed throughout the trailer. Its flight finally comes to its end at the feet of characters bearing the emblems of The Division. On the paper is written one word: "Help." Though the single player experience was strongly implied to be more robust than in the first game, Ubisoft was careful to make sure everyone knows that they plan to support The Division 2 for years to come. Specifically, finishing the main campaign will unlock the ability to specialize into one of three classes and pick a unique weapon. These roles will come with new abilities that will unlock as players progress through the endgame. And, oh boy, does Ubisoft plan on paving the road to endgame content. Following The Division 2's release next year, Ubisoft will release three separate content packs to all players for free that will add all manner of new things to the game. On top of that, players who reach the endgame will be able to participate in raids that team up to eight players together to tackle challenging encounters unlike anything else in the game up until that point. The Division 2 releases March 15, 2019 for PlayStaiton 4, Xbox One, and PC. Players who want a head start on the action can register for the beta on The Division website. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  3. We Happy Few turned a lot of heads when it debuted in 2015. Its intriguing premise of a drug-fueled utopia, combined with the Bioshock-esque presentation and gameplay, gave the impression of narrative-focused shooter on-par with Ken Levine’s work. That excitement turned to disappointment when the game’s multiplayer entered early beta in 2016. Even though developer Compulsion Games promised a single-player component from the beginning, an off-put player base didn’t react kindly to this first offering. They weren’t alone. My own enthusiasm for We Happy Few waned significantly in light of this direction. Fast-forward months later, and Compulsion has found a publisher in Gearbox Software. The financial backing of a triple-A publisher has allowed the developer to expand the project’s scope–particularly its single-player. After spending an hour with We Happy Few’s revamped story campaign, I can confidently say that it feels like the experience people wanted from the get-go. On a personal note, I fell in love with the project all over again. To quickly recap the game’s premise, We Happy Few takes place in the retrofuturistic city of Wellington Wells. Set in an alternate 1960’s Britain, citizens live their lives constantly hopped up on a drug called Joy. As the name suggests, the drug basically brainwashes them into a creepy, forced happiness, causing hallucinations and general insanity. Those who don’t take their Joy get labeled as Downers, and become exiled as enemies. The demo I played picked up immediately after the conclusion of the game’s E3 2016 trailer. Protagonist Arthur Hastings, a newspaper censor, (and one of three available characters) was outed as a Downer and narrowly evaded capture by the authorities. We last saw him enter the sewers where I continued his escape. I immediately felt the Bioshock vibes, from the quirky writing (though We Happy Few leans harder into black comedy territory) to the the exaggerated characters. Logs and books filling in the world’s lore littered environments for the player’s reading pleasure. Every piece of furniture, as well as bodies, can be searched for supplies. And search for supplies you should because We Happy Few focuses heavily on crafting and survival. Food, medical supplies, tools, and even clothing must be whipped up using random parts. Additionally, players can discover blueprints to make other items. As someone who enjoys picking up junk to create not-junk, I felt that unexplainable but familiar satisfaction of hoarding everything in sight and got excited for every new blueprint. Player’s maintain Arthur’s hunger and thirst by devouring food and water. Most of the food I found barely qualified as edible, so I needed to craft food poisoning remedies to keep on hand at all times. Maintaining Arthur’s statuses seemed like a potential burden, but these meters depleted slowly. I also frequently found food (albeit decayed), which left me to enjoy myself without stopping every few minutes to stuff Arthur’s face. The map’s enormous scale stood out as I roamed the scenic British countryside. In fact, my lengthy trek only uncovered a relatively small portion of it. Furthermore, the area I occupied only represented one of around five or six zones players explore. Needless to say, We Happy Few seems poised to offer plenty of game to across its roughly 20 hour campaign. A huge world needs plenty of side activities. We Happy Few features traditional NPC side-quests as well as extra objectives. I found maps that revealed dig spots where I unearthed buried treasure. Discovering certain ingredients opened up crafting quests which essentially acted as tutorials for assembling a new recipe. It remains to be seen just how much We Happy Few has to offer outside of the critical path, but the diversions I found left me feeling optimistic on that front. I eventually reached my objective: a dilapidated, poverty-stricken town. Its population appeared to consist of sullen Wellington Wells outcasts. Since they resented their former home, they didn’t take kindly to Arthur’s fancy city garb and proceeded to band together and give chase. I fled into a nearby church. Inside, I met a character recommending I tear up my clothing to appear more downtrodden. Blending into the surroundings is another crucial element of We Happy Few. That could involve posing as a exile on the outside or maintaining the illusion of Joy-fueled cheerfulness within Wellington Wells. After crafting a crappier version of my outfit, I stepped outside to greet the unruly mob. Upon noticing my new digs, they instantly shrugged and dissipated in a somewhat comedic moment. I could now freely explore the town. Citizen interactions have an Elder Scrolls-like flavor. For example, intruding into homes uninvited or getting caught stealing possessions can cause residents to violently retaliate. Now that I’ve successfully assimilated myself into the local populace, crossing a bridge to reach the next region became my next goal. I reached the gentleman guarding the bridge gate; however, it turned out a local gang swiped his precious war medals and he wouldn’t let me pass until I recovered them. Furthermore, I also needed to find a necessary power cell. To recover the medals, I had to locate and infiltrate the gang’s stronghold. Despite sneaking through a back opening undetected (one of multiple routes), the gang were prepared for intruders all along and captured me when I rode their elevator. The reason behind their setup: to lure potential competitors to battle to the death in their popular fighting arena. After stripping me of my belongings, the thugs led me into their battlefield. I met my opponent: a former associate of Arthur’s who blamed him for not publishing one of his articles in the newspaper. Arthur explained that the man’s piece blatantly plagiarized Arthur’s own work, but the man still swore revenge in a humorous exchange. I had the option of choosing to use non-lethal or deadly force. I went with the non-fatal pipe wrapped in padding. My adversary swiftly opted for a deadlier weapon, much to Arthur’s chagrin. Despite having this choice, We Happy Few doesn’t feature a morality mechanic. When I asked Compulsion’s Narrative Director Alex Epstein about this, he told me he’d rather players feel the consequences themselves rather than gamify it. Judging by this response, I wouldn't expect any horns to sprout on Arthur's head if you opt for a bloodier approach. Combat resembled the style of BioShock or Dishonored. The right shoulder button initiated attacks while the left shoulder button blocked. Players can also perform a guard-breaking shove. Picking up downed bodies and hurling them at opponents became my favorite offensive move for its silliness. After incapacitating the writer, more enemies entered the fray. I found it easy to drop foes by backing them into a corner and wailing on them, though I had to remain mindful of Arthur’s stamina meter. After finally beating my challengers, the gang allowed me to walk free, but I had no intention of leaving without accomplishing my mission. I snuck my way into the underbelly of the hideout. Navigating unseen, I creeped up behind unsuspecting foes and choked them out. To distract others, I lobbed glass bottles. These mechanics won’t surprise stealth fans, but players can access more abilities by unlocking them in the skill tree. I eventually found the gatekeeper’s medals, along with a power cell and my stolen inventory, and chose to escape without making a ruckus. After returning the medals to the grateful veteran, I passed through the gate and took a train to the next area. Unfortunately, I had to end things there before I could see what lay ahead. Had I not had to hoof it to another appointment, I’d have gladly kept playing. We Happy Few’s strange world begs to be explored, and I got hooked on gathering as many resources to make Arthur as capable as possible. With a world this large, We Happy Few will live or die based on the number of interesting things to do. Ultimately, I’m relieved to have substantial single-player component to sink my teeth into as the idea of the multiplayer doesn’t excite me in the same way. The wait for We Happy Few won’t last much longer, thankfully. It launches August 10 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  4. Marcus Stewart

    We Happy Few's E3 Demo Made Me A Believer Again

    We Happy Few turned a lot of heads when it debuted in 2015. Its intriguing premise of a drug-fueled utopia, combined with the Bioshock-esque presentation and gameplay, gave the impression of narrative-focused shooter on-par with Ken Levine’s work. That excitement turned to disappointment when the game’s multiplayer entered early beta in 2016. Even though developer Compulsion Games promised a single-player component from the beginning, an off-put player base didn’t react kindly to this first offering. They weren’t alone. My own enthusiasm for We Happy Few waned significantly in light of this direction. Fast-forward months later, and Compulsion has found a publisher in Gearbox Software. The financial backing of a triple-A publisher has allowed the developer to expand the project’s scope–particularly its single-player. After spending an hour with We Happy Few’s revamped story campaign, I can confidently say that it feels like the experience people wanted from the get-go. On a personal note, I fell in love with the project all over again. To quickly recap the game’s premise, We Happy Few takes place in the retrofuturistic city of Wellington Wells. Set in an alternate 1960’s Britain, citizens live their lives constantly hopped up on a drug called Joy. As the name suggests, the drug basically brainwashes them into a creepy, forced happiness, causing hallucinations and general insanity. Those who don’t take their Joy get labeled as Downers, and become exiled as enemies. The demo I played picked up immediately after the conclusion of the game’s E3 2016 trailer. Protagonist Arthur Hastings, a newspaper censor, (and one of three available characters) was outed as a Downer and narrowly evaded capture by the authorities. We last saw him enter the sewers where I continued his escape. I immediately felt the Bioshock vibes, from the quirky writing (though We Happy Few leans harder into black comedy territory) to the the exaggerated characters. Logs and books filling in the world’s lore littered environments for the player’s reading pleasure. Every piece of furniture, as well as bodies, can be searched for supplies. And search for supplies you should because We Happy Few focuses heavily on crafting and survival. Food, medical supplies, tools, and even clothing must be whipped up using random parts. Additionally, players can discover blueprints to make other items. As someone who enjoys picking up junk to create not-junk, I felt that unexplainable but familiar satisfaction of hoarding everything in sight and got excited for every new blueprint. Player’s maintain Arthur’s hunger and thirst by devouring food and water. Most of the food I found barely qualified as edible, so I needed to craft food poisoning remedies to keep on hand at all times. Maintaining Arthur’s statuses seemed like a potential burden, but these meters depleted slowly. I also frequently found food (albeit decayed), which left me to enjoy myself without stopping every few minutes to stuff Arthur’s face. The map’s enormous scale stood out as I roamed the scenic British countryside. In fact, my lengthy trek only uncovered a relatively small portion of it. Furthermore, the area I occupied only represented one of around five or six zones players explore. Needless to say, We Happy Few seems poised to offer plenty of game to across its roughly 20 hour campaign. A huge world needs plenty of side activities. We Happy Few features traditional NPC side-quests as well as extra objectives. I found maps that revealed dig spots where I unearthed buried treasure. Discovering certain ingredients opened up crafting quests which essentially acted as tutorials for assembling a new recipe. It remains to be seen just how much We Happy Few has to offer outside of the critical path, but the diversions I found left me feeling optimistic on that front. I eventually reached my objective: a dilapidated, poverty-stricken town. Its population appeared to consist of sullen Wellington Wells outcasts. Since they resented their former home, they didn’t take kindly to Arthur’s fancy city garb and proceeded to band together and give chase. I fled into a nearby church. Inside, I met a character recommending I tear up my clothing to appear more downtrodden. Blending into the surroundings is another crucial element of We Happy Few. That could involve posing as a exile on the outside or maintaining the illusion of Joy-fueled cheerfulness within Wellington Wells. After crafting a crappier version of my outfit, I stepped outside to greet the unruly mob. Upon noticing my new digs, they instantly shrugged and dissipated in a somewhat comedic moment. I could now freely explore the town. Citizen interactions have an Elder Scrolls-like flavor. For example, intruding into homes uninvited or getting caught stealing possessions can cause residents to violently retaliate. Now that I’ve successfully assimilated myself into the local populace, crossing a bridge to reach the next region became my next goal. I reached the gentleman guarding the bridge gate; however, it turned out a local gang swiped his precious war medals and he wouldn’t let me pass until I recovered them. Furthermore, I also needed to find a necessary power cell. To recover the medals, I had to locate and infiltrate the gang’s stronghold. Despite sneaking through a back opening undetected (one of multiple routes), the gang were prepared for intruders all along and captured me when I rode their elevator. The reason behind their setup: to lure potential competitors to battle to the death in their popular fighting arena. After stripping me of my belongings, the thugs led me into their battlefield. I met my opponent: a former associate of Arthur’s who blamed him for not publishing one of his articles in the newspaper. Arthur explained that the man’s piece blatantly plagiarized Arthur’s own work, but the man still swore revenge in a humorous exchange. I had the option of choosing to use non-lethal or deadly force. I went with the non-fatal pipe wrapped in padding. My adversary swiftly opted for a deadlier weapon, much to Arthur’s chagrin. Despite having this choice, We Happy Few doesn’t feature a morality mechanic. When I asked Compulsion’s Narrative Director Alex Epstein about this, he told me he’d rather players feel the consequences themselves rather than gamify it. Judging by this response, I wouldn't expect any horns to sprout on Arthur's head if you opt for a bloodier approach. Combat resembled the style of BioShock or Dishonored. The right shoulder button initiated attacks while the left shoulder button blocked. Players can also perform a guard-breaking shove. Picking up downed bodies and hurling them at opponents became my favorite offensive move for its silliness. After incapacitating the writer, more enemies entered the fray. I found it easy to drop foes by backing them into a corner and wailing on them, though I had to remain mindful of Arthur’s stamina meter. After finally beating my challengers, the gang allowed me to walk free, but I had no intention of leaving without accomplishing my mission. I snuck my way into the underbelly of the hideout. Navigating unseen, I creeped up behind unsuspecting foes and choked them out. To distract others, I lobbed glass bottles. These mechanics won’t surprise stealth fans, but players can access more abilities by unlocking them in the skill tree. I eventually found the gatekeeper’s medals, along with a power cell and my stolen inventory, and chose to escape without making a ruckus. After returning the medals to the grateful veteran, I passed through the gate and took a train to the next area. Unfortunately, I had to end things there before I could see what lay ahead. Had I not had to hoof it to another appointment, I’d have gladly kept playing. We Happy Few’s strange world begs to be explored, and I got hooked on gathering as many resources to make Arthur as capable as possible. With a world this large, We Happy Few will live or die based on the number of interesting things to do. Ultimately, I’m relieved to have substantial single-player component to sink my teeth into as the idea of the multiplayer doesn’t excite me in the same way. The wait for We Happy Few won’t last much longer, thankfully. It launches August 10 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  5. This tease seemed to come out of nowhere. Russian developer Mundfish announced a very slick looking game called Atomic Heart earlier this week. Players will explore a research lab/military base (that might also double as a theme park?) during the height of the Soviet Union. Dr. Stockhausen has been conducting unholy experiments in the heart of the facility that have had an effect on both machines and the bodies of the dead that they have left in their wake. What exactly the nature of those experiments might have been remains a mystery for players to uncover as they delve into the secrets of Atomic Heart. The name seems to reference a bit of lore teased by the team back in March - a picture of two human hearts hooked to machines and a cryptic message about the love of two employees in Facility #3826. Players get drawn into this alternate history version of the Soviet Union as investigator P-3 who has been dispatched to investigate 3826. They find the facility in a state of decay and chaos as a wide variety of machines run amok alongside resurrected soldiers, some of whom have been creepily painted as clowns. As players explore, they'll find a variety of insane, mind-bending experiments still in progress, like people made of blood or strange, seemingly sentient pockets of air under water. Beware of making too much of a scene, though. Drawing the attention of the rampaging machines by running afoul of their patrol drones can lead to a quick, messy death. Atomic Heart seems to have an in-depth crafting system for weapons that will allow players to gear up as they progress and make weapons that suit their playstyle. While the trailer doesn't hint at an official release date, Mundfish expects to release Atomic Heart sometime this year for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One.
  6. This tease seemed to come out of nowhere. Russian developer Mundfish announced a very slick looking game called Atomic Heart earlier this week. Players will explore a research lab/military base (that might also double as a theme park?) during the height of the Soviet Union. Dr. Stockhausen has been conducting unholy experiments in the heart of the facility that have had an effect on both machines and the bodies of the dead that they have left in their wake. What exactly the nature of those experiments might have been remains a mystery for players to uncover as they delve into the secrets of Atomic Heart. The name seems to reference a bit of lore teased by the team back in March - a picture of two human hearts hooked to machines and a cryptic message about the love of two employees in Facility #3826. Players get drawn into this alternate history version of the Soviet Union as investigator P-3 who has been dispatched to investigate 3826. They find the facility in a state of decay and chaos as a wide variety of machines run amok alongside resurrected soldiers, some of whom have been creepily painted as clowns. As players explore, they'll find a variety of insane, mind-bending experiments still in progress, like people made of blood or strange, seemingly sentient pockets of air under water. Beware of making too much of a scene, though. Drawing the attention of the rampaging machines by running afoul of their patrol drones can lead to a quick, messy death. Atomic Heart seems to have an in-depth crafting system for weapons that will allow players to gear up as they progress and make weapons that suit their playstyle. While the trailer doesn't hint at an official release date, Mundfish expects to release Atomic Heart sometime this year for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. View full article
  7. It's hard out there for a new development studio. You need to really stand out from the crowd. When The Astronauts debuted their first game, The Vanishing of Ethan Carter, back in 2014 they managed to do that with a thoroughly surreal journey and fantastic visuals. It was a thoughtful, mysterious adventure game that involved unraveling a series of murders and uncovering strange, seemingly occult puzzles. Witchfire completely bucks expectations and draws upon the team's roots in shooters - many of The Astronauts worked on projects like Bulletstorm and Painkiller. The result of that pooled experience thrusts players into the world of a dark fantasy FPS very reminiscent of Painkiller. The protagonist struggles against skeletal enemies powered by mystical forces in gorgeously gothic locations. The jaw-dropping environments and enemies have been constructed using advanced photogrammetry tech that allows the team to scan real-world objects and use them as assets. The technique is scaleable to assets the size of buildings, so whatever the team is planning will be big. Adrian Chmielarz, one of the co-founders of The Astronauts, gave a bit more context for the mysterious teaser saying, "[Witchfire] is still a long way from release and we are not announcing any other platforms than PC/Steam. The reason we’re launching the teaser so early is simply to let everyone know that we’re alive and kicking, and how radically different this new project of ours is compared to our previous game, The Vanishing of Ethan Carter. [...] While Witchfire is also a shooter, we’re aiming to make a game unlike anything we have done in the past, both in tone and in game mechanics." We don't know much more than that, though there are some hints that 2018 might hold more information as production on Witchfire continues and The Astronauts finalizes more features and builds up the world of Witchfire. Until then, imagine the possibilities presented by a spiritual successor to Painkiller mixed with the narrative sensibilities The Astronauts have demonstrated thus far.
  8. It's hard out there for a new development studio. You need to really stand out from the crowd. When The Astronauts debuted their first game, The Vanishing of Ethan Carter, back in 2014 they managed to do that with a thoroughly surreal journey and fantastic visuals. It was a thoughtful, mysterious adventure game that involved unraveling a series of murders and uncovering strange, seemingly occult puzzles. Witchfire completely bucks expectations and draws upon the team's roots in shooters - many of The Astronauts worked on projects like Bulletstorm and Painkiller. The result of that pooled experience thrusts players into the world of a dark fantasy FPS very reminiscent of Painkiller. The protagonist struggles against skeletal enemies powered by mystical forces in gorgeously gothic locations. The jaw-dropping environments and enemies have been constructed using advanced photogrammetry tech that allows the team to scan real-world objects and use them as assets. The technique is scaleable to assets the size of buildings, so whatever the team is planning will be big. Adrian Chmielarz, one of the co-founders of The Astronauts, gave a bit more context for the mysterious teaser saying, "[Witchfire] is still a long way from release and we are not announcing any other platforms than PC/Steam. The reason we’re launching the teaser so early is simply to let everyone know that we’re alive and kicking, and how radically different this new project of ours is compared to our previous game, The Vanishing of Ethan Carter. [...] While Witchfire is also a shooter, we’re aiming to make a game unlike anything we have done in the past, both in tone and in game mechanics." We don't know much more than that, though there are some hints that 2018 might hold more information as production on Witchfire continues and The Astronauts finalizes more features and builds up the world of Witchfire. Until then, imagine the possibilities presented by a spiritual successor to Painkiller mixed with the narrative sensibilities The Astronauts have demonstrated thus far. View full article
  9. After a poorly received attempt to revive the Wolfenstein franchise in 2009, many expected the franchise to wither away into obscurity. That is, until MachineGames, a developer formed from ex-members of Starbreeze Studios, took charge of the series and attempted to breathe life into the series one more time in 2014. They succeeded and created the adrenaline-fueled game (with a surprisingly tender heart) about a brain damaged soldier kicking off a new resistance movement against the Nazis in an alternate timeline where the Nazis were able to conquer the world. Is Wolfenstein: The New Order one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Wolfenstein 3D 'My Loved Ones Are Gone' by Psycho Crusher (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02508) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  10. After a poorly received attempt to revive the Wolfenstein franchise in 2009, many expected the franchise to wither away into obscurity. That is, until MachineGames, a developer formed from ex-members of Starbreeze Studios, took charge of the series and attempted to breathe life into the series one more time in 2014. They succeeded and created the adrenaline-fueled game (with a surprisingly tender heart) about a brain damaged soldier kicking off a new resistance movement against the Nazis in an alternate timeline where the Nazis were able to conquer the world. Is Wolfenstein: The New Order one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Wolfenstein 3D 'My Loved Ones Are Gone' by Psycho Crusher (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02508) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  11. This week we play a cruel trick: Doom (1993) or Doom (2016) which game should be inducted into the canon of The Best Games Period? Doom has changed the face of gaming arguably moreso than any other shooter in video game history, but does the original hold up in the face of its modern refinement? Which one wins out in this winner-take-all debate to the death!? This battle for the ages finds itself argued by Daniel Jones and special guest Joseph Lopes. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Also, due to some technical hiccups, Daniel sounds like he is wearing a scuba suit this week. We'll have it sorted by next week! Outro music: Doom 'Army Worthy of Phobos' by HeavenWraith (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03433) You can follow Joe on Twitter @pixelsnthoughts and give him grief for his opinions! You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  12. This week we play a cruel trick: Doom (1993) or Doom (2016) which game should be inducted into the canon of The Best Games Period? Doom has changed the face of gaming arguably moreso than any other shooter in video game history, but does the original hold up in the face of its modern refinement? Which one wins out in this winner-take-all debate to the death!? This battle for the ages finds itself argued by Daniel Jones and special guest Joseph Lopes. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Also, due to some technical hiccups, Daniel sounds like he is wearing a scuba suit this week. We'll have it sorted by next week! Outro music: Doom 'Army Worthy of Phobos' by HeavenWraith (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03433) You can follow Joe on Twitter @pixelsnthoughts and give him grief for his opinions! You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  13. First Person Shooters have a certain ability. They can raise our blood pressure, help us invent new ways to flip tables, but most of all they have the ability to bring us together. Aww. This is a phenomenon that the creators of the new Call of Duty entry WWII seem to be well aware of and made the center of their new trailer "“Reassemble!” which launched on October 15. In it, we see a tropey but self-aware story using the plotline of the gang getting back together for one more hit, but this time it's for the return of the game. "Haven't you heard? Call of Duty is going back to World War II baby," the inciting member says to a squad member, "we gotta get the guys back together," he replies. The ensuing scenes include the gathering of the squad through various settings. It's endearing and seems to be translating well for fans, at least so far. As of publishing this article, the like/dislike ratio sits at 17,000 likes to 1,000 dislikes. Significantly better than Call of Duty trailers have faired in the past. The Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare Reveal Trailer currently has a bitter ratio of 581,000 likes to 3 million dislikes. Ouch. The WWII launch trailer is at 1 million likes to 97,000 dislikes, by the way, possibly showing tempered expectations. Call of Duty: World War II launches November 3 to PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC. How do you feel about Call of Duty returning to WWII? Are your hopes high for the latest installment? Let us know in the comments below.
  14. First Person Shooters have a certain ability. They can raise our blood pressure, help us invent new ways to flip tables, but most of all they have the ability to bring us together. Aww. This is a phenomenon that the creators of the new Call of Duty entry WWII seem to be well aware of and made the center of their new trailer "“Reassemble!” which launched on October 15. In it, we see a tropey but self-aware story using the plotline of the gang getting back together for one more hit, but this time it's for the return of the game. "Haven't you heard? Call of Duty is going back to World War II baby," the inciting member says to a squad member, "we gotta get the guys back together," he replies. The ensuing scenes include the gathering of the squad through various settings. It's endearing and seems to be translating well for fans, at least so far. As of publishing this article, the like/dislike ratio sits at 17,000 likes to 1,000 dislikes. Significantly better than Call of Duty trailers have faired in the past. The Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare Reveal Trailer currently has a bitter ratio of 581,000 likes to 3 million dislikes. Ouch. The WWII launch trailer is at 1 million likes to 97,000 dislikes, by the way, possibly showing tempered expectations. Call of Duty: World War II launches November 3 to PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC. How do you feel about Call of Duty returning to WWII? Are your hopes high for the latest installment? Let us know in the comments below. View full article
  15. Earth has been destroyed. The century following the apocalypse saw to a massive shift in the planet's ecosystem as the world grew cold and dark. What remained of humanity entered into a new ice age known as the Great Freeze. To survive, humans retreated to the narrow equatorial band around the planet and set up remote colonies over highly valuable resources outside of the habitable zone. ARKTIKA.1 focuses on a mercenary sent to defend one of those colonies in the ruins of old Russia. Known as ARKTIKA.1, the colony finds itself besieged by raiders, robots, and horrifying creatures that have adapted to the harsh climate. Players must use tactics, quick reflexes, and an array of customizable weaponry to combat those threats and discover what happened to ARKTIKA.1. This VR title comes to us courtesy of 4A Games, the developers of the Metro series. They've developed a new engine for use with VR tech that they tout will have "some of the most impressive visuals ever seen in VR." They've taken steps into the VR world while also working on the upcoming Metro Exodus slated for release next year. ARKTIKA.1 releases on October 10 for the Oculus Touch. It will be accompanied by a simultaneously released ebook titled ARKTIKA.1: My Name is Viktoria. View full article
  16. Earth has been destroyed. The century following the apocalypse saw to a massive shift in the planet's ecosystem as the world grew cold and dark. What remained of humanity entered into a new ice age known as the Great Freeze. To survive, humans retreated to the narrow equatorial band around the planet and set up remote colonies over highly valuable resources outside of the habitable zone. ARKTIKA.1 focuses on a mercenary sent to defend one of those colonies in the ruins of old Russia. Known as ARKTIKA.1, the colony finds itself besieged by raiders, robots, and horrifying creatures that have adapted to the harsh climate. Players must use tactics, quick reflexes, and an array of customizable weaponry to combat those threats and discover what happened to ARKTIKA.1. This VR title comes to us courtesy of 4A Games, the developers of the Metro series. They've developed a new engine for use with VR tech that they tout will have "some of the most impressive visuals ever seen in VR." They've taken steps into the VR world while also working on the upcoming Metro Exodus slated for release next year. ARKTIKA.1 releases on October 10 for the Oculus Touch. It will be accompanied by a simultaneously released ebook titled ARKTIKA.1: My Name is Viktoria.
  17. After Bungie concluded their work on Halo: Reach, they turned their eyes toward a game that a small segment of the company had been fleshing out for years. That game would eventually become Destiny after overcoming numerous development challenges. Destiny's devs had to contend with a malicious engine that required obscene amounts of time to load changes, stratospheric expectations, a rough split with its long-time composer, and the decision to scrap the entire story with less than a year left of development time. The stakes were high. But when Destiny released to the public, Bungie thought they had a winner on their hands - Destiny was, after all, the most pre-ordered game in history! Unfortunately, the critical reception was mixed. Despite this, Destiny certainly accrued a huge following over the years, which led to Jason Pfitzer from Northern Heart Games, this week's guest, to nominate Bungie's FPS MMO hybrid. Looking at Destiny several years after its launch and subsequent revisions - is it one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Destiny 'Hope Rising' by Jillian Aversa and zircon (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03002) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can follow Jason on Twitter, @JasonPfitzer, and be sure to check out the game he has been working on at Northern Heart Games! Pinbrawl is a competitive, four-player pinball melee. Having played it at multiple stages in its development, I can confirm that it's very fun. If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  18. After Bungie concluded their work on Halo: Reach, they turned their eyes toward a game that a small segment of the company had been fleshing out for years. That game would eventually become Destiny after overcoming numerous development challenges. Destiny's devs had to contend with a malicious engine that required obscene amounts of time to load changes, stratospheric expectations, a rough split with its long-time composer, and the decision to scrap the entire story with less than a year left of development time. The stakes were high. But when Destiny released to the public, Bungie thought they had a winner on their hands - Destiny was, after all, the most pre-ordered game in history! Unfortunately, the critical reception was mixed. Despite this, Destiny certainly accrued a huge following over the years, which led to Jason Pfitzer from Northern Heart Games, this week's guest, to nominate Bungie's FPS MMO hybrid. Looking at Destiny several years after its launch and subsequent revisions - is it one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Destiny 'Hope Rising' by Jillian Aversa and zircon (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03002) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can follow Jason on Twitter, @JasonPfitzer, and be sure to check out the game he has been working on at Northern Heart Games! Pinbrawl is a competitive, four-player pinball melee. Having played it at multiple stages in its development, I can confirm that it's very fun. If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  19. Activision wanted Call of Duty to return to its roots and the latest trailer really goes hard into those roots. Revealed during an accompanying hour-long livestream, Call of Duty: WWII brings players back to the battlefields of the European theater of World War II. The trailer begins on the landing boats of Normandy and seems to imply players will be storming the beaches from a first-person perspective when the title releases later this year. Players take on the role of a new recruit to the 1st Infantry Division as they fight their way through Europe against Nazi Germany. While the trailer does class things up with an operatic, punctuating score, there are still enough yelling, shooting, explosions, and punching to remind you that this is going to be a brutal Call of Duty experience. Of the details that have been revealed regarding Call of Duty: WWII's gameplay, perhaps the most unique is the axing of passively regenerating health. In the last decade of Call of Duty titles, recovering health meant taking cover and waiting for a few moments before popping up again, ready to do battle. That's not the case in Call of Duty: WWII. Instead, players will have to rely on their allies to bring them medicine and bandage their wounds on the battlefield. This extends to other needs, too. Out of ammo? Players will have to call out to their squad to bring them more. Need covering fire to make it to the next patch of relative safety? You'll have to shout for your allies to do that. If that sounds custom-made for a co-op experience, fear not! While the single-player campaign has players relying on AI companions, Sledgehammer Games has added a second co-op campaign with its own story so you can harangue your real-life friends to give you health, ammo, and cover. More details on Call of Duty: WWII will be revealed during E3. View full article
  20. Activision wanted Call of Duty to return to its roots and the latest trailer really goes hard into those roots. Revealed during an accompanying hour-long livestream, Call of Duty: WWII brings players back to the battlefields of the European theater of World War II. The trailer begins on the landing boats of Normandy and seems to imply players will be storming the beaches from a first-person perspective when the title releases later this year. Players take on the role of a new recruit to the 1st Infantry Division as they fight their way through Europe against Nazi Germany. While the trailer does class things up with an operatic, punctuating score, there are still enough yelling, shooting, explosions, and punching to remind you that this is going to be a brutal Call of Duty experience. Of the details that have been revealed regarding Call of Duty: WWII's gameplay, perhaps the most unique is the axing of passively regenerating health. In the last decade of Call of Duty titles, recovering health meant taking cover and waiting for a few moments before popping up again, ready to do battle. That's not the case in Call of Duty: WWII. Instead, players will have to rely on their allies to bring them medicine and bandage their wounds on the battlefield. This extends to other needs, too. Out of ammo? Players will have to call out to their squad to bring them more. Need covering fire to make it to the next patch of relative safety? You'll have to shout for your allies to do that. If that sounds custom-made for a co-op experience, fear not! While the single-player campaign has players relying on AI companions, Sledgehammer Games has added a second co-op campaign with its own story so you can harangue your real-life friends to give you health, ammo, and cover. More details on Call of Duty: WWII will be revealed during E3.
  21. After a long period of rumor and speculation, Activision Blizzard has confirmed that the next Call of Duty will indeed be returning to the battlefields of World War II. The next installment will be called Call of Duty: WWII. More details will be revealed in a livestream on the Call of Duty website next Wednesday, April 26. Images purporting to be from Call of Duty promotional material have been circulating internet forums for the past months, but nothing official came out of Activision. The only hint that the images and information might be real was from an Activision investor call back in February in which the company stated that they would be going back to "traditional combat" after their forays into science-fiction action. Due to the lackluster performance of Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare, they said that their 2017 addition to the series would be "giving the players what they want." Though Call of Duty initially started as a series set exclusively in the historical conflicts of World War II, that changed with Infinity Ward's Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare. That game catapulted the series into ubiquity and Activision never really looked back. Treyarch delivered one more WWII entry to the series in 2008 with Call of Duty: World at War, but after that the series shifted focus to highlight fictional, near-future conflicts. After almost a decade, seeing Call of Duty return to its roots is a refreshing change of pace.
  22. After a long period of rumor and speculation, Activision Blizzard has confirmed that the next Call of Duty will indeed be returning to the battlefields of World War II. The next installment will be called Call of Duty: WWII. More details will be revealed in a livestream on the Call of Duty website next Wednesday, April 26. Images purporting to be from Call of Duty promotional material have been circulating internet forums for the past months, but nothing official came out of Activision. The only hint that the images and information might be real was from an Activision investor call back in February in which the company stated that they would be going back to "traditional combat" after their forays into science-fiction action. Due to the lackluster performance of Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare, they said that their 2017 addition to the series would be "giving the players what they want." Though Call of Duty initially started as a series set exclusively in the historical conflicts of World War II, that changed with Infinity Ward's Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare. That game catapulted the series into ubiquity and Activision never really looked back. Treyarch delivered one more WWII entry to the series in 2008 with Call of Duty: World at War, but after that the series shifted focus to highlight fictional, near-future conflicts. After almost a decade, seeing Call of Duty return to its roots is a refreshing change of pace. View full article
  23. It can be easy to forget the hype machine leading up to a potential big release. When Destiny was first announced, the excitement was palpable. Bungie's promotional images and appearances played up how big the Destiny universe would be. It was a bold new frontier full of alien threats, unknowable constructs, and visually striking heroes. The story seemed larger than life, promising the kind of broad space opera that captivated the world with the release of Star Wars. Accordingly, Destiny's initial trailers adopted a tone fitting those expectations. The first gameplay reveal from E3 2013 offered glimpses of the game Bungie had so carefully crafted, backed by a reverent voice over with a building orchestral score. We saw broad vistas that offered adventure and imposing enemies that threatened us. This experience would surely be something monumental; it would change games forever. Of course, that's not what happened. Destiny turned out to be a highly polished game with some glaring flaws that couldn't deliver on the full promise of what our minds had imagined (as few games truly do). Over the years, Bungie has slowly worked to claw back that dream, adding features, fixing flawed systems, expanding the story, and more. This ongoing development helped Destiny retain its player base. I suppose that's why the drastic shift in tone in the reveal for Destiny 2 has me scratching my head. Revealing a new game in a series not known for its comedy with a joke trailer is unusual to say the least. The trailer and its accompanying teaser are fine and functional, but the tonal shift is something I think warrants a little bit of a think. The trailer for Destiny 2 is a very far cry from how Bungie had initially pitched the franchise. Nathan Fillion reprises his role as the Hunter Exo named Cayde-6 in both the teaser and the trailer proper. Fillion adds a comical punch to what had once been played very straight and earnest. I'm not entirely opposed to the idea of Destiny taking a more tongue-in-cheek approach to its previously self-serious lore, but it does seem rather at odds with the story and tone thus far, especially given that Destiny 2's inciting incident sees humanity all but wiped out and its last line of defense scattered throughout the system. If we continue to see this style of marketing in the lead up to E3 and beyond, it is very possible that Bungie and Activision have decided to steer Destiny's sci-fi epic into more of a Borderlands-like jaunt for loot and humor. If that's the case, it's entirely possible that the developer and publisher have been seeing the reach of Destiny-related social media. We could be seeing an entirely different type of game from what Destiny's player base has come to expect from the quality of life adjustments and expansions to the original Destiny. How that potential revision of the Destiny brand might go over with long-time Destiny fans remains to be seen. Destiny 2 releases September 8 for PS4, Xbox One, and PC.
  24. It can be easy to forget the hype machine leading up to a potential big release. When Destiny was first announced, the excitement was palpable. Bungie's promotional images and appearances played up how big the Destiny universe would be. It was a bold new frontier full of alien threats, unknowable constructs, and visually striking heroes. The story seemed larger than life, promising the kind of broad space opera that captivated the world with the release of Star Wars. Accordingly, Destiny's initial trailers adopted a tone fitting those expectations. The first gameplay reveal from E3 2013 offered glimpses of the game Bungie had so carefully crafted, backed by a reverent voice over with a building orchestral score. We saw broad vistas that offered adventure and imposing enemies that threatened us. This experience would surely be something monumental; it would change games forever. Of course, that's not what happened. Destiny turned out to be a highly polished game with some glaring flaws that couldn't deliver on the full promise of what our minds had imagined (as few games truly do). Over the years, Bungie has slowly worked to claw back that dream, adding features, fixing flawed systems, expanding the story, and more. This ongoing development helped Destiny retain its player base. I suppose that's why the drastic shift in tone in the reveal for Destiny 2 has me scratching my head. Revealing a new game in a series not known for its comedy with a joke trailer is unusual to say the least. The trailer and its accompanying teaser are fine and functional, but the tonal shift is something I think warrants a little bit of a think. The trailer for Destiny 2 is a very far cry from how Bungie had initially pitched the franchise. Nathan Fillion reprises his role as the Hunter Exo named Cayde-6 in both the teaser and the trailer proper. Fillion adds a comical punch to what had once been played very straight and earnest. I'm not entirely opposed to the idea of Destiny taking a more tongue-in-cheek approach to its previously self-serious lore, but it does seem rather at odds with the story and tone thus far, especially given that Destiny 2's inciting incident sees humanity all but wiped out and its last line of defense scattered throughout the system. If we continue to see this style of marketing in the lead up to E3 and beyond, it is very possible that Bungie and Activision have decided to steer Destiny's sci-fi epic into more of a Borderlands-like jaunt for loot and humor. If that's the case, it's entirely possible that the developer and publisher have been seeing the reach of Destiny-related social media. We could be seeing an entirely different type of game from what Destiny's player base has come to expect from the quality of life adjustments and expansions to the original Destiny. How that potential revision of the Destiny brand might go over with long-time Destiny fans remains to be seen. Destiny 2 releases September 8 for PS4, Xbox One, and PC. View full article
  25. TyRich159

    Rainbow Six: Siege

    Hey all! I'm new to the forum, so I figured I'd make a pretty simple first post. Rainbow Six: Siege has easily made it's way into my Top 3 games that I play constantly, along with Overwatch & Black Ops 3 (because Zombies). I made my way into Gold 4 this season for ranked game play (then one loss plummeted it to Silver 2) because I feel like the pressure's on to perform when streaming ranked. Who else plays? If you play ranked, what's your rank? Keep Calm & Game On! ~Tyler "TyRich159" Richard
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