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Found 19 results

  1. How does one make something new while retaining the weight of lore and history that comes with a premise that has been reborn again and again countless times in fiction? Marvel has certainly struggled with this question in their cinematic universe and various game developers have their own takes on classic superheroes. Often each iteration retells the heroic beginnings of the headlining hero or makes some connection with a popular continuity of said character. Insomniac Games seems to have been answered the question by skipping the iconic moments of the wall-crawler's origin story altogether in order to tackle the sophomore issues of being a hero. "With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility" - Everyone even remotely familiar with Spider-Man knows the final commandment of Uncle Ben, Peter Parker's father figure who dies early on in his origin story. Usually, when a piece of media starts off with this, we see Parker struggle with figuring out exactly how much responsibility he has to be using his power to help others. Given that Marvel's Spider-Man takes place roughly eight years after the events that made Peter Parker into a superpowered webslinger, it needs to address a different idea. There aren't any quotes delivered on the dying breath of a beloved old man, but the game tackles the issue of what happens to people who have accepted that responsibility but find forces beyond their control pushing them, perverting that sense of duty. How does someone good go on to commit brutal and evil acts despite the goodness they displayed and what does it take to stop them? When Marvel's Spider-Man roars to life with all cylinders blazing, it captures how much larger-than-life everyday struggles can feel sometimes. Clashing with the colossal force of Rhino or dodging the blasts of a villain whose on-the-nose name is "Mr. Negative" can be seen as a fight against the worst parts inside all of us. And part of what makes that resonate so much is that Peter Parker doesn't walk away unscathed. Over the course of the game, these fights take their toll. He is slashed, burned, stabbed, blasted, and crushed. At one point he has so many broken ribs that his allies tell him he shouldn't be standing. Peter, despite all the impediments thrown into his way, continues to do his best to stand by that responsibility, sacrificing himself at every turn. All of this he does while having ample opportunities to walk away and spare himself. In many ways, the way Peter fights as Spider-Man fits into the classic mold of a hero who does what is right no matter the cost to himself. If that's all one is looking for in a game about superheroes, then Marvel's Spider-Man will fulfill that desire. If, however, you're looking for a game that has things to say about the myriad of issues that those acts of heroism touch upon, Marvel's Spider-Man might fall a bit flat. For a super genius with a heart for justice, Peter Parker seems surprisingly unwoke about the systemic issues around him, focusing on the symptoms of various problems instead of the root causes themselves. All of this would be fine if this was a story about a Spider-Man just getting the hang of the hero business, but the game makes a point to show Peter has been at this for a long while now. Of course, one could argue that this version of New York is one without any systemic issues, but the text of the game indicates that's not true. The opening scene has corrupt cops attempting to murder Spider-Man (something that isn't really seen as abnormal by anyone involved); Oscorp routinely poisons the air and water in the name of profits (which Spider-Man fixes, but also doesn't report, effectively letting the billion dollar company off the hook); and both Peter and Aunt May work at a local homeless shelter. However, during all of Spider-Man's running monologues as he traverses the city, he never talks about the systemic issues that lead to those things being problems. Where are his comments about trying to reform the police in some way so as to discourage cops taking bribes? Why doesn't Spider-Man hold the billion dollar corporation responsible for being so focused on profiting that it is willing to allow people to be poisoned? How does Peter Parker not even consider the reality of income inequality staring him in the face when he moves between the world of Norman Osborne and that of FEAST, the homeless shelter at which he volunteers? The omission of any opining comments from Peter on these topics and issues certainly stems from the desire to keep Marvel's Spider-Man as uncontroversial as possible. Clearly, Peter as a character would care about all of those issues, but the game goes out of its way to avoid topics that might be touchy in the current context. Though the in-game world is presented to us as a version of New York City, you won't see Spider-Man or Peter Parker attending a rally against police corruption or breaking up a gathering of Neo-Nazis. There won't be talk about the forces that evict people out onto the street, though the game implies that rent prices are out of control and the care provided for mental health issues is inadequate. Ultimately, its desire to avoid saying anything that might be even slightly seen as controversial leaves Marvel's Spider-Man feeling a bit hollow once the dazzling feeling of swinging between skyscrappers wears off. To clarify, since this topic has become something of a sticking point for the game since its release: The decision to tiptoe around most of its relevant social issues doesn't make Marvel's Spider-Man bad. It's simply a noticeable narrative decision that might lead to its story being forgettable over time. To Insomniac's credit, that shine doesn't wear off quickly. Easily the best parts of Spider-Man are when the game leaves the player to traverse the city and do street-level hero things. Stopping a burglary in progress, disarming a bomb threat, or saving people from the wreckage of a car accident are all thrilling in their own way, but getting to the scene stands as the best part of any of these encounters. Swinging through the city, right from the beginning, feels amazing. The game knows this and has players shooting webs onto buildings within five minutes of booting up the game. As players progress along the three skill trees, new traversal abilities will unlock, making Spider-Man faster, giving him new abilities to keep up momentum, and it results in this gentle learning curve that keeps things fresh from the beginning of the game until the credits roll. However, once I hit the credits scene, complete with clips teasing what future games in this series will be about, I felt fully and totally done. The side content, while enjoyable based on the traversal mechanics alone, isn't terribly interesting. It serves as a decent distraction while going through the main game, avoiding the charge of being bloated fluff by virtue of the overall solid gameplay mechanics and the various tokens you get from doing them that can be used to upgrade gear or unlock new spider suits. However, the stories relegated to the side missions just aren't that interesting even when drawing on fun bits of lore. (Also, Insomniac, make Mysterio a proper villain, you cowards) It's a bit of a missed opportunity because one of the most intriguing decisions Insomniac made with regards to their Spider-Man game is that there are a number of missions where you take on the role of Mary Jane and Miles Morales and need to use stealth and trickery to sneak through different areas. These segments actually had a lot of potential for expansion into interesting side missions, but are only used in the main story under tightly controlled circumstances. Early on, there is a great section where Mary Jane sneaks into a facility owned by Wilson Fisk to collect some evidence and must do some sneaking and puzzle solving. It's fun and a breath of fresh air; seeing more iteration on that idea would have been really neat, maybe adding a social element to it and some more fleshed out stealth options. Miles is given some extreme hacking abilities that would make for awesome stealth gameplay, too, but that never fully pays off in any satisfying way. The little touches around the edges of Marvel's Spider-Man really give it a lot of character. Subtle musical call backs to The Avengers thrum through the most climactic moments. Gaining momentum while flipping through New York City results in a flurry of stringed instruments adding to the sense of speed and wonder. Different camera options in the obligatory photo mode (something no modern game should be without at this point) give players a lot of different options with which to play and get those perfect shots. The diverse array of suits are also really nice, and it was a great idea to tie them to specific powers that are then unlocked on every other suit. Heck, the game even has a Stan Lee guest appearance which was absolutely lovely. Conclusion: Marvel's Spider-Man might just be the best Spider-Man game ever made. It's gorgeously realized, cinematic as heck, for better and worse, and delivers a powerhouse of a final act. It also isn't perfect. Its side missions are dull, saved from mundane boredom by some rock solid traversal mechanics and adequate combat. Seriously, swinging through a city has never been as fun as it is in this particular Spider-Man game. All of that is built on a story about heroism; what it truly means to not just become a hero, but to live like one, too. While it misses the opportunity to be about a much more encompassing and larger idea of what heroes should be outside of the individual, punching-bad-guys level, that core conceit should be enough for just about anyone to enjoy Marvel's Spider-Man. Here's hoping that the sequel builds off of this simple foundation for a significantly bolder narrative that tackles some of the more grounded problems of our current times. Marvel's Spider-Man is now available on PlayStation 4. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  2. How does one make something new while retaining the weight of lore and history that comes with a premise that has been reborn again and again countless times in fiction? Marvel has certainly struggled with this question in their cinematic universe and various game developers have their own takes on classic superheroes. Often each iteration retells the heroic beginnings of the headlining hero or makes some connection with a popular continuity of said character. Insomniac Games seems to have been answered the question by skipping the iconic moments of the wall-crawler's origin story altogether in order to tackle the sophomore issues of being a hero. "With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility" - Everyone even remotely familiar with Spider-Man knows the final commandment of Uncle Ben, Peter Parker's father figure who dies early on in his origin story. Usually, when a piece of media starts off with this, we see Parker struggle with figuring out exactly how much responsibility he has to be using his power to help others. Given that Marvel's Spider-Man takes place roughly eight years after the events that made Peter Parker into a superpowered webslinger, it needs to address a different idea. There aren't any quotes delivered on the dying breath of a beloved old man, but the game tackles the issue of what happens to people who have accepted that responsibility but find forces beyond their control pushing them, perverting that sense of duty. How does someone good go on to commit brutal and evil acts despite the goodness they displayed and what does it take to stop them? When Marvel's Spider-Man roars to life with all cylinders blazing, it captures how much larger-than-life everyday struggles can feel sometimes. Clashing with the colossal force of Rhino or dodging the blasts of a villain whose on-the-nose name is "Mr. Negative" can be seen as a fight against the worst parts inside all of us. And part of what makes that resonate so much is that Peter Parker doesn't walk away unscathed. Over the course of the game, these fights take their toll. He is slashed, burned, stabbed, blasted, and crushed. At one point he has so many broken ribs that his allies tell him he shouldn't be standing. Peter, despite all the impediments thrown into his way, continues to do his best to stand by that responsibility, sacrificing himself at every turn. All of this he does while having ample opportunities to walk away and spare himself. In many ways, the way Peter fights as Spider-Man fits into the classic mold of a hero who does what is right no matter the cost to himself. If that's all one is looking for in a game about superheroes, then Marvel's Spider-Man will fulfill that desire. If, however, you're looking for a game that has things to say about the myriad of issues that those acts of heroism touch upon, Marvel's Spider-Man might fall a bit flat. For a super genius with a heart for justice, Peter Parker seems surprisingly unwoke about the systemic issues around him, focusing on the symptoms of various problems instead of the root causes themselves. All of this would be fine if this was a story about a Spider-Man just getting the hang of the hero business, but the game makes a point to show Peter has been at this for a long while now. Of course, one could argue that this version of New York is one without any systemic issues, but the text of the game indicates that's not true. The opening scene has corrupt cops attempting to murder Spider-Man (something that isn't really seen as abnormal by anyone involved); Oscorp routinely poisons the air and water in the name of profits (which Spider-Man fixes, but also doesn't report, effectively letting the billion dollar company off the hook); and both Peter and Aunt May work at a local homeless shelter. However, during all of Spider-Man's running monologues as he traverses the city, he never talks about the systemic issues that lead to those things being problems. Where are his comments about trying to reform the police in some way so as to discourage cops taking bribes? Why doesn't Spider-Man hold the billion dollar corporation responsible for being so focused on profiting that it is willing to allow people to be poisoned? How does Peter Parker not even consider the reality of income inequality staring him in the face when he moves between the world of Norman Osborne and that of FEAST, the homeless shelter at which he volunteers? The omission of any opining comments from Peter on these topics and issues certainly stems from the desire to keep Marvel's Spider-Man as uncontroversial as possible. Clearly, Peter as a character would care about all of those issues, but the game goes out of its way to avoid topics that might be touchy in the current context. Though the in-game world is presented to us as a version of New York City, you won't see Spider-Man or Peter Parker attending a rally against police corruption or breaking up a gathering of Neo-Nazis. There won't be talk about the forces that evict people out onto the street, though the game implies that rent prices are out of control and the care provided for mental health issues is inadequate. Ultimately, its desire to avoid saying anything that might be even slightly seen as controversial leaves Marvel's Spider-Man feeling a bit hollow once the dazzling feeling of swinging between skyscrappers wears off. To clarify, since this topic has become something of a sticking point for the game since its release: The decision to tiptoe around most of its relevant social issues doesn't make Marvel's Spider-Man bad. It's simply a noticeable narrative decision that might lead to its story being forgettable over time. To Insomniac's credit, that shine doesn't wear off quickly. Easily the best parts of Spider-Man are when the game leaves the player to traverse the city and do street-level hero things. Stopping a burglary in progress, disarming a bomb threat, or saving people from the wreckage of a car accident are all thrilling in their own way, but getting to the scene stands as the best part of any of these encounters. Swinging through the city, right from the beginning, feels amazing. The game knows this and has players shooting webs onto buildings within five minutes of booting up the game. As players progress along the three skill trees, new traversal abilities will unlock, making Spider-Man faster, giving him new abilities to keep up momentum, and it results in this gentle learning curve that keeps things fresh from the beginning of the game until the credits roll. However, once I hit the credits scene, complete with clips teasing what future games in this series will be about, I felt fully and totally done. The side content, while enjoyable based on the traversal mechanics alone, isn't terribly interesting. It serves as a decent distraction while going through the main game, avoiding the charge of being bloated fluff by virtue of the overall solid gameplay mechanics and the various tokens you get from doing them that can be used to upgrade gear or unlock new spider suits. However, the stories relegated to the side missions just aren't that interesting even when drawing on fun bits of lore. (Also, Insomniac, make Mysterio a proper villain, you cowards) It's a bit of a missed opportunity because one of the most intriguing decisions Insomniac made with regards to their Spider-Man game is that there are a number of missions where you take on the role of Mary Jane and Miles Morales and need to use stealth and trickery to sneak through different areas. These segments actually had a lot of potential for expansion into interesting side missions, but are only used in the main story under tightly controlled circumstances. Early on, there is a great section where Mary Jane sneaks into a facility owned by Wilson Fisk to collect some evidence and must do some sneaking and puzzle solving. It's fun and a breath of fresh air; seeing more iteration on that idea would have been really neat, maybe adding a social element to it and some more fleshed out stealth options. Miles is given some extreme hacking abilities that would make for awesome stealth gameplay, too, but that never fully pays off in any satisfying way. The little touches around the edges of Marvel's Spider-Man really give it a lot of character. Subtle musical call backs to The Avengers thrum through the most climactic moments. Gaining momentum while flipping through New York City results in a flurry of stringed instruments adding to the sense of speed and wonder. Different camera options in the obligatory photo mode (something no modern game should be without at this point) give players a lot of different options with which to play and get those perfect shots. The diverse array of suits are also really nice, and it was a great idea to tie them to specific powers that are then unlocked on every other suit. Heck, the game even has a Stan Lee guest appearance which was absolutely lovely. Conclusion: Marvel's Spider-Man might just be the best Spider-Man game ever made. It's gorgeously realized, cinematic as heck, for better and worse, and delivers a powerhouse of a final act. It also isn't perfect. Its side missions are dull, saved from mundane boredom by some rock solid traversal mechanics and adequate combat. Seriously, swinging through a city has never been as fun as it is in this particular Spider-Man game. All of that is built on a story about heroism; what it truly means to not just become a hero, but to live like one, too. While it misses the opportunity to be about a much more encompassing and larger idea of what heroes should be outside of the individual, punching-bad-guys level, that core conceit should be enough for just about anyone to enjoy Marvel's Spider-Man. Here's hoping that the sequel builds off of this simple foundation for a significantly bolder narrative that tackles some of the more grounded problems of our current times. Marvel's Spider-Man is now available on PlayStation 4. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  3. Nintendo went a bit Pokénuts last night when it announced not one, not two, but three new Pokémon titles headed for their flagship console. To clarify, these are supposedly not the materialization of the classic Pokémon experience for console that the company teased last year around E3. Instead, Nintendo aims to do something different. The Switch's first Pokémon is titled Pokémon Quest and it's actually available right now. The new adventure debuts on Switch and will be making its way to mobile platforms around the end of June. The new title brings players to Tumblecube Island, where of all the Pokémon are shaped like cubes. Basically, it looks similar to that popular Minecraft mod that added Pokémon to the creative crafting game. It's adorable and, while initially jarring, definitely something that looks like it could catch on with a wide audience. In Pokémon Quest, players exert indirect control over their animal companions as the ever-growing Poképack clears stage after stage, collecting new items and Pokémon along the way. Between stages, players can build up their base camp, train their Pokémon, and cook them delicious meals. Of course, Pokémon Quest is a free-to-play game, or a "free-to-start" game as Nintendo calls it. That means Nintendo has provided a number of items and packs that people can purchase. These range from $5-$18 apiece, and include items that allow players to cook more meals, new Pokémon, and a variety of Pokéballs - and, of course, more in-game currency. Pokémon Quest uses PM Tickets as its currency, which can be used to speed up different in-game tasks. Yeah, Pokémon Quest will make Nintendo a zillion dollars. The other two games Nintendo announced come in a pair. Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Lets' Go, Eevee! are based off of Pokémon Yellow, each featuring 151 Pokémon with a selection of Alolan versions for those 151. The Let's Go games will have interactions with Pokémon Go, meaning that players who catch Pokémon in Pokémon Go will be able to use them in Let's Go. That's a pretty fantastic idea. The Let's Go games will also use the capture mechanic from Pokémon Go, a notion that might prove more divisive. Players will be able to use the Switch controllers to toss out Pokéballs at different angles to capture new Pokémon. To further deepen the fantasy of actually catching them all, players will be able to buy the Pokéball Plus, a standalone accessory that takes the place of the Joy-Con. The Pokéball Plus has a joystick to allow it to take on the role of a Joy-Con while also having built in lights and sounds specific to Let's Go. It can also work with Pokémon Go in place of the Pokéball accessory that acts as a pedometer and capture aid for the mobile title. However, with a battery life of three hours, it might not be ideal for long rambles in the outdoors. In a neat twist to the Pokémon formula, Let's Go will offer a co-op experience that allows two players to catch Pokémon together and bring their Pokémon Go captures into the same world. This could be a big deal for players who have only ever experienced Pokémon solo or in competition. Let's Go retains some of the features of Pokémon Go and expands on others. That doesn't mean more traditional parts of the franchise are falling by the wayside. The Switch exclusives will feature trainer battles, gyms, a story, and many of the other classic Pokémon staples. Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Lets' Go, Eevee! (along with the Pokéball Plus) will release later this year on November 16 for the Nintendo Switch.
  4. Nintendo went a bit Pokénuts last night when it announced not one, not two, but three new Pokémon titles headed for their flagship console. To clarify, these are supposedly not the materialization of the classic Pokémon experience for console that the company teased last year around E3. Instead, Nintendo aims to do something different. The Switch's first Pokémon is titled Pokémon Quest and it's actually available right now. The new adventure debuts on Switch and will be making its way to mobile platforms around the end of June. The new title brings players to Tumblecube Island, where of all the Pokémon are shaped like cubes. Basically, it looks similar to that popular Minecraft mod that added Pokémon to the creative crafting game. It's adorable and, while initially jarring, definitely something that looks like it could catch on with a wide audience. In Pokémon Quest, players exert indirect control over their animal companions as the ever-growing Poképack clears stage after stage, collecting new items and Pokémon along the way. Between stages, players can build up their base camp, train their Pokémon, and cook them delicious meals. Of course, Pokémon Quest is a free-to-play game, or a "free-to-start" game as Nintendo calls it. That means Nintendo has provided a number of items and packs that people can purchase. These range from $5-$18 apiece, and include items that allow players to cook more meals, new Pokémon, and a variety of Pokéballs - and, of course, more in-game currency. Pokémon Quest uses PM Tickets as its currency, which can be used to speed up different in-game tasks. Yeah, Pokémon Quest will make Nintendo a zillion dollars. The other two games Nintendo announced come in a pair. Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Lets' Go, Eevee! are based off of Pokémon Yellow, each featuring 151 Pokémon with a selection of Alolan versions for those 151. The Let's Go games will have interactions with Pokémon Go, meaning that players who catch Pokémon in Pokémon Go will be able to use them in Let's Go. That's a pretty fantastic idea. The Let's Go games will also use the capture mechanic from Pokémon Go, a notion that might prove more divisive. Players will be able to use the Switch controllers to toss out Pokéballs at different angles to capture new Pokémon. To further deepen the fantasy of actually catching them all, players will be able to buy the Pokéball Plus, a standalone accessory that takes the place of the Joy-Con. The Pokéball Plus has a joystick to allow it to take on the role of a Joy-Con while also having built in lights and sounds specific to Let's Go. It can also work with Pokémon Go in place of the Pokéball accessory that acts as a pedometer and capture aid for the mobile title. However, with a battery life of three hours, it might not be ideal for long rambles in the outdoors. In a neat twist to the Pokémon formula, Let's Go will offer a co-op experience that allows two players to catch Pokémon together and bring their Pokémon Go captures into the same world. This could be a big deal for players who have only ever experienced Pokémon solo or in competition. Let's Go retains some of the features of Pokémon Go and expands on others. That doesn't mean more traditional parts of the franchise are falling by the wayside. The Switch exclusives will feature trainer battles, gyms, a story, and many of the other classic Pokémon staples. Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Lets' Go, Eevee! (along with the Pokéball Plus) will release later this year on November 16 for the Nintendo Switch. View full article
  5. The Dark Souls-inspired Nioh was expected to release later this year. However, Koei Tecmo never revealed an exact date despite hosting alpha and beta test events and making a solid showing at E3 and Gamescom this year. Now we know when to expect Nioh to be available for PlayStation 4 owners: February 9, 2017. The new date was announced during Sony's Tokyo Game Show briefing. This farther out than expected release date for Nioh comes on the heels of news that The Last Guardian will also be available in early December rather than late October. The original expected release window for Nioh was the summer of 2006. It was based on an uncompleted script for a film by legendary Japanese director Akira Kurosawa. Koei Tecmo had plans for Kurosawa's son, Hisao Kurosawa, to finish the script and direct a companion film titled Oni to release alongside the game. A trailer was shown for the game at E3 2005, which you can view below. After that, all news about the game went dark. Nioh silently missed its 2006 release window and nothing was heard of it until 2009. Unfortunately, though it seems we are on track to finally see some version of the game that was announced back in 2004, the Kurosawa film seems to be no more, despite reports of the script having been completed. With months to go before release, Nioh's convoluted development story has quietly built the game up to be one of the more interesting releases of 2017. View full article
  6. The Dark Souls-inspired Nioh was expected to release later this year. However, Koei Tecmo never revealed an exact date despite hosting alpha and beta test events and making a solid showing at E3 and Gamescom this year. Now we know when to expect Nioh to be available for PlayStation 4 owners: February 9, 2017. The new date was announced during Sony's Tokyo Game Show briefing. This farther out than expected release date for Nioh comes on the heels of news that The Last Guardian will also be available in early December rather than late October. The original expected release window for Nioh was the summer of 2006. It was based on an uncompleted script for a film by legendary Japanese director Akira Kurosawa. Koei Tecmo had plans for Kurosawa's son, Hisao Kurosawa, to finish the script and direct a companion film titled Oni to release alongside the game. A trailer was shown for the game at E3 2005, which you can view below. After that, all news about the game went dark. Nioh silently missed its 2006 release window and nothing was heard of it until 2009. Unfortunately, though it seems we are on track to finally see some version of the game that was announced back in 2004, the Kurosawa film seems to be no more, despite reports of the script having been completed. With months to go before release, Nioh's convoluted development story has quietly built the game up to be one of the more interesting releases of 2017.
  7. The alpha demo for the demon slaying Nioh back in April met with smashing success, garnering more than 850,000 downloads over 10 days. Those who played filled out a survey to help Team Ninja fine tune the gameplay and weapons. A beta demo slated for a late August release now includes many of those changes. Players will be able to download the beta through the PlayStation Store from August 23 to September 6. The Dark Souls/Akira Kurosawa-inspired Nioh thrusts players into the role of a 16th century Japanese warrior who clashes with various demons and monsters on his quest to fulfill his destiny. The beta will include a broader range of weapons; more axes, hammers, spears, and katana. Some of the beta will have players retreading the same ground as the alpha, but with revamped gameplay. However, there will be a new dojo area, training mode, and a mysterious stage that Team Ninja has not yet revealed. Nioh releases later this year exclusively for PlayStation 4. View full article
  8. The alpha demo for the demon slaying Nioh back in April met with smashing success, garnering more than 850,000 downloads over 10 days. Those who played filled out a survey to help Team Ninja fine tune the gameplay and weapons. A beta demo slated for a late August release now includes many of those changes. Players will be able to download the beta through the PlayStation Store from August 23 to September 6. The Dark Souls/Akira Kurosawa-inspired Nioh thrusts players into the role of a 16th century Japanese warrior who clashes with various demons and monsters on his quest to fulfill his destiny. The beta will include a broader range of weapons; more axes, hammers, spears, and katana. Some of the beta will have players retreading the same ground as the alpha, but with revamped gameplay. However, there will be a new dojo area, training mode, and a mysterious stage that Team Ninja has not yet revealed. Nioh releases later this year exclusively for PlayStation 4.
  9. A new arena brawler from Kiz Studios has made its way exclusively onto the PlayStation 4. Trans-Galactic Tournament, a 4v4 multiplayer arena title, brings free-to-play MOBA action to the PS4. Players can download the title over PSN and get into the game's current roster of ten champions. In-game, champions can take advantage of over one hundred power-ups across six different arenas and three game modes. These game modes are described like so: "Plunderball is Capture-the-Flag meets Thunderdome. Conquest is a many-headed hydra mutation of King-of-the-Hill, where the challenge isn’t capturing control points, it’s keeping them - and Annihilation (our version of Deathmatch), well, champions have fists for a reason." Unlike most of the popular MOBAs currently available, players don't level their characters while in-game. Instead, players customize their preferred champions outside the action and tailor them to their play style. Another feature that separates Trans-Galactic Tournament from the MOBA pack is the ability to jump over or through obstacles. You can even jump on top of enemies and use them as platforms to reach shortcuts. If you're worried about investing time in the beta only to have your progress in-game wiped away when the full game launches, Kiz Studios has your back. All progress made during the beta will carry over when Trans-Galactic Tournament launches later this summer. View full article
  10. A new arena brawler from Kiz Studios has made its way exclusively onto the PlayStation 4. Trans-Galactic Tournament, a 4v4 multiplayer arena title, brings free-to-play MOBA action to the PS4. Players can download the title over PSN and get into the game's current roster of ten champions. In-game, champions can take advantage of over one hundred power-ups across six different arenas and three game modes. These game modes are described like so: "Plunderball is Capture-the-Flag meets Thunderdome. Conquest is a many-headed hydra mutation of King-of-the-Hill, where the challenge isn’t capturing control points, it’s keeping them - and Annihilation (our version of Deathmatch), well, champions have fists for a reason." Unlike most of the popular MOBAs currently available, players don't level their characters while in-game. Instead, players customize their preferred champions outside the action and tailor them to their play style. Another feature that separates Trans-Galactic Tournament from the MOBA pack is the ability to jump over or through obstacles. You can even jump on top of enemies and use them as platforms to reach shortcuts. If you're worried about investing time in the beta only to have your progress in-game wiped away when the full game launches, Kiz Studios has your back. All progress made during the beta will carry over when Trans-Galactic Tournament launches later this summer.
  11. Powers, the first PlayStation Original Series, is an adaptation of a graphic novel by the same name. Sharlto Copley, best known for his roles in District 9 and Elysium, plays an detective who once had superpowers and now specializes in superhuman criminal investigations. The show is clearly aiming for a gritty, mature tone. The trailer drops several F-bombs, has a couple crazy people, and things get smashed in an angry fashion. It remains to be seen if the series can deliver on its promising concept, but if anyone can be counted on to give an interesting performance it is Copley. There is no announced release date quite yet for the series. However, it is worth noting that the Powers will be free for PlayStation Plus members. View full article
  12. Powers, the first PlayStation Original Series, is an adaptation of a graphic novel by the same name. Sharlto Copley, best known for his roles in District 9 and Elysium, plays an detective who once had superpowers and now specializes in superhuman criminal investigations. The show is clearly aiming for a gritty, mature tone. The trailer drops several F-bombs, has a couple crazy people, and things get smashed in an angry fashion. It remains to be seen if the series can deliver on its promising concept, but if anyone can be counted on to give an interesting performance it is Copley. There is no announced release date quite yet for the series. However, it is worth noting that the Powers will be free for PlayStation Plus members.
  13. After the brief cinematic shown last year, many speculated when we might expect to see Halo 5. Today we have our answer. In a press release that went out this morning, Halo developer 343 Industries' general manager Bonnie Ross talked about the future of Halo, the need to construct the next franchise entry around the hardware of the Xbox One, and the expanded scope of the series: In the tradition of every Halo game since its debut in 2001, it is a massive and exciting project. Halo 5: Guardians is a bigger effort than Halo 4. That applies to the content and scope of the game, as well as the technology in what's now a brand new and more powerful engine. Certainly there are some core elements carried over from prior games, but we've invested a huge effort in retooling our tech to take full advantage of the Xbox One's hardware and ecosystem to create worlds and experiences worthy of next-gen. It’s a game that will hopefully demonstrate the talent, learnings and abilities of the 343 Industries team. A game that will incorporate the things we learned from Halo 4 about technology, aesthetics, performance and scale – and perhaps more importantly, understanding and embracing a community of gamers who love what lies at the heart of this game, and the limitless potential of the Halo universe. Halo 5: Guardians will release fall 2015 as an Xbox One exclusive. More information will be forthcoming on June 9 when Microsoft holds its pre-E3 press conference. View full article
  14. After the brief cinematic shown last year, many speculated when we might expect to see Halo 5. Today we have our answer. In a press release that went out this morning, Halo developer 343 Industries' general manager Bonnie Ross talked about the future of Halo, the need to construct the next franchise entry around the hardware of the Xbox One, and the expanded scope of the series: In the tradition of every Halo game since its debut in 2001, it is a massive and exciting project. Halo 5: Guardians is a bigger effort than Halo 4. That applies to the content and scope of the game, as well as the technology in what's now a brand new and more powerful engine. Certainly there are some core elements carried over from prior games, but we've invested a huge effort in retooling our tech to take full advantage of the Xbox One's hardware and ecosystem to create worlds and experiences worthy of next-gen. It’s a game that will hopefully demonstrate the talent, learnings and abilities of the 343 Industries team. A game that will incorporate the things we learned from Halo 4 about technology, aesthetics, performance and scale – and perhaps more importantly, understanding and embracing a community of gamers who love what lies at the heart of this game, and the limitless potential of the Halo universe. Halo 5: Guardians will release fall 2015 as an Xbox One exclusive. More information will be forthcoming on June 9 when Microsoft holds its pre-E3 press conference. View full article
  15. After the brief cinematic shown last year, many speculated when we might expect to see Halo 5. Today we have our answer. In a press release that went out this morning, Halo developer 343 Industries' general manager Bonnie Ross talked about the future of Halo, the need to construct the next franchise entry around the hardware of the Xbox One, and the expanded scope of the series: In the tradition of every Halo game since its debut in 2001, it is a massive and exciting project. Halo 5: Guardians is a bigger effort than Halo 4. That applies to the content and scope of the game, as well as the technology in what's now a brand new and more powerful engine. Certainly there are some core elements carried over from prior games, but we've invested a huge effort in retooling our tech to take full advantage of the Xbox One's hardware and ecosystem to create worlds and experiences worthy of next-gen. It’s a game that will hopefully demonstrate the talent, learnings and abilities of the 343 Industries team. A game that will incorporate the things we learned from Halo 4 about technology, aesthetics, performance and scale – and perhaps more importantly, understanding and embracing a community of gamers who love what lies at the heart of this game, and the limitless potential of the Halo universe. Halo 5: Guardians will release fall 2015 as an Xbox One exclusive. More information will be forthcoming on June 9 when Microsoft holds its pre-E3 press conference.
  16. Project Aces has announced how and when Ace Combat fans can get access to the PlayStation 3 beta. February 4-11, gamers can download the PlayStation 3-exclusive Ace Combat Infinity open beta client from the PlayStation Store. Access to the beta is free and participants will receive a unique, in-game emblem. Players will be able to give feedback on the beta by filling out this survey. The beta will have two modes, one for single player and another for co-op. The solo campaign will feature ridiculous super weapons, over-the-top aerial dogfights, and other staples of the Ace Combat franchise. Co-op will have players teaming up in up to two groups of four, pitting themselves against hordes of NPC aircraft. As a long-time Ace Combat enthusiast, I am very eager to get some hands-on time with Infinity. Hopefully it will have a relatively long life cycle, despite being a PS3-exclusive.
  17. Project Aces has announced how and when Ace Combat fans can get access to the PlayStation 3 beta. February 4-11, gamers can download the PlayStation 3-exclusive Ace Combat Infinity open beta client from the PlayStation Store. Access to the beta is free and participants will receive a unique, in-game emblem. Players will be able to give feedback on the beta by filling out this survey. The beta will have two modes, one for single player and another for co-op. The solo campaign will feature ridiculous super weapons, over-the-top aerial dogfights, and other staples of the Ace Combat franchise. Co-op will have players teaming up in up to two groups of four, pitting themselves against hordes of NPC aircraft. As a long-time Ace Combat enthusiast, I am very eager to get some hands-on time with Infinity. Hopefully it will have a relatively long life cycle, despite being a PS3-exclusive. View full article
  18. Fans of ridiculously silly, over-the-top, crazy flight combat games rejoice! Namco Bandai Games has proclaimed that a new Ace Combat is on the way. Announced last Friday, we know only a few tantalizing tidbits. It will be available via PSN, but no other methods of distribution have been talked about, making it likely that it will be a downloadable only title. The new Ace Combat will take place in the real world and have something to do with meteors, a world war, and impractical super-weapons. You can watch the teaser trailer for yourself below. Ace Combat Infinity is projected to release on September 25, 2013. View full article
  19. Fans of ridiculously silly, over-the-top, crazy flight combat games rejoice! Namco Bandai Games has proclaimed that a new Ace Combat is on the way. Announced last Friday, we know only a few tantalizing tidbits. It will be available via PSN, but no other methods of distribution have been talked about, making it likely that it will be a downloadable only title. The new Ace Combat will take place in the real world and have something to do with meteors, a world war, and impractical super-weapons. You can watch the teaser trailer for yourself below. Ace Combat Infinity is projected to release on September 25, 2013.
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