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Found 8 results

  1. Epic Games is rolling in cash courtesy of Fortnite, the cool thing the kids are playing these days (or so some cool kids tell me). What exactly has it done with all of that moola? Use it to start a digital storefront designed to compete with the likes of Steam and Good Old Games. "For the past five years, we've been building tools enabling Epic to bring our games directly to players. We built the Epic Games launcher on PC and Mac featuring Fortnite and Unreal Engine; we built a worldwide digital commerce ecosystem supporting dozens of payment methods; and we gained great economies of scale thanks to Fortnite's growth," said Tim Sweeney in his initial announcement of the Epic Games Store. All of this has put Epic Games on track to launch their storefront. The main selling point that Epic Games wants everyone to be aware of is their dedication to showing fairness to developers who sell games on their platform. A major part of their announcement states that all developers will earn 88% of the revenue from sales on the Epic Games Store, a piece of information that was accompanied by a chart comparing an their 12-88 revenue split to Steam's 30-70 (or 30-55 in some cases) split. The graphic also makes it clear why Epic Games is pursuing a piece of the digital distribution market: Devs that make use of Unreal Engine 4 automatically pay 5% of their game's revenue to Epic, but if Epic sells those games on their own platform, they can up that cut to 12% regardless of game engine, all while getting good PR for sharing more revenue with developers who sell through their store. It's a win-win relationship for Epic and those who sell through them. Given that Epic now has strong ties to an entire generation of gamers through Fortnite and the Epic Games launcher, this makes complete sense. They have the technological infrastructure, a readily available pool of customers, and the unique position to reap larger profits while attracting more developers. Another benefit will be a more curated atmosphere that lacks on a service like Steam that has already opened the development floodgates for practically anything to make it onto the platform. Sweeney wrote that the service will help devs reach their players by giving users a newsfeed that will update with information and updates from developers. Developers will also be able to reach out to streamers, vloggers, and bloggers through Epic's Support-A-Creator program to help get the word out about up-and-coming indies. The somewhat murky part of this is that through this program content creators will be able to receive a cut of the revenue (determined by the developer) from purchases made using their referral links. The first 24 months of the service will see Epic Games covering the first 5% of the revenue shared with content creators, so that's pretty neat. Sweeney's announcement was a bit lacking in details regarding exactly when the service would launch, though more details will be coming on Thursday, December 6 during The Game Awards. The Epic Games Store will first launch for PC and Mac before spreading to Android devices and beyond over the next year. Are you excited for a new digital store in the mix? Is a bigger revenue share for the devs enough of an incentive for you as a customer to switch over to Epic? Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  2. Epic Games is rolling in cash courtesy of Fortnite, the cool thing the kids are playing these days (or so some cool kids tell me). What exactly has it done with all of that moola? Use it to start a digital storefront designed to compete with the likes of Steam and Good Old Games. "For the past five years, we've been building tools enabling Epic to bring our games directly to players. We built the Epic Games launcher on PC and Mac featuring Fortnite and Unreal Engine; we built a worldwide digital commerce ecosystem supporting dozens of payment methods; and we gained great economies of scale thanks to Fortnite's growth," said Tim Sweeney in his initial announcement of the Epic Games Store. All of this has put Epic Games on track to launch their storefront. The main selling point that Epic Games wants everyone to be aware of is their dedication to showing fairness to developers who sell games on their platform. A major part of their announcement states that all developers will earn 88% of the revenue from sales on the Epic Games Store, a piece of information that was accompanied by a chart comparing an their 12-88 revenue split to Steam's 30-70 (or 30-55 in some cases) split. The graphic also makes it clear why Epic Games is pursuing a piece of the digital distribution market: Devs that make use of Unreal Engine 4 automatically pay 5% of their game's revenue to Epic, but if Epic sells those games on their own platform, they can up that cut to 12% regardless of game engine, all while getting good PR for sharing more revenue with developers who sell through their store. It's a win-win relationship for Epic and those who sell through them. Given that Epic now has strong ties to an entire generation of gamers through Fortnite and the Epic Games launcher, this makes complete sense. They have the technological infrastructure, a readily available pool of customers, and the unique position to reap larger profits while attracting more developers. Another benefit will be a more curated atmosphere that lacks on a service like Steam that has already opened the development floodgates for practically anything to make it onto the platform. Sweeney wrote that the service will help devs reach their players by giving users a newsfeed that will update with information and updates from developers. Developers will also be able to reach out to streamers, vloggers, and bloggers through Epic's Support-A-Creator program to help get the word out about up-and-coming indies. The somewhat murky part of this is that through this program content creators will be able to receive a cut of the revenue (determined by the developer) from purchases made using their referral links. The first 24 months of the service will see Epic Games covering the first 5% of the revenue shared with content creators, so that's pretty neat. Sweeney's announcement was a bit lacking in details regarding exactly when the service would launch, though more details will be coming on Thursday, December 6 during The Game Awards. The Epic Games Store will first launch for PC and Mac before spreading to Android devices and beyond over the next year. Are you excited for a new digital store in the mix? Is a bigger revenue share for the devs enough of an incentive for you as a customer to switch over to Epic? Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  3. Fortnite has been consistently gaining popularity in recent months. The free-to-play Battle Royale game mode has captured the attention of streamers and celebrities alike. That led to the surprise team up between rapper Drake and Twitch streamer Tyler "Ninja" Blevins. The two have streamed together on multiple occasions while racking up huge viewership numbers. In a recent stream, Ninja encouraged Drake to include references to Fortnite in his next album. Drake responded saying, "It has to happen, it's just gotta be the right way. Someone's gonna do it. Someone's gonna pull it off. I say when Epic gives me the emote, when Epic gives me the Hotline Bling emote, I'll do it." He added a bit jokingly, "Until then, I'm on strike." So, there you have it! Epic Games' lack of a Hotline Bling emote is the only thing standing between Drake and a Fortnite themed rap or album. Would a Fortnite album be something you'd listen to or is it too strange?
  4. Fortnite has been consistently gaining popularity in recent months. The free-to-play Battle Royale game mode has captured the attention of streamers and celebrities alike. That led to the surprise team up between rapper Drake and Twitch streamer Tyler "Ninja" Blevins. The two have streamed together on multiple occasions while racking up huge viewership numbers. In a recent stream, Ninja encouraged Drake to include references to Fortnite in his next album. Drake responded saying, "It has to happen, it's just gotta be the right way. Someone's gonna do it. Someone's gonna pull it off. I say when Epic gives me the emote, when Epic gives me the Hotline Bling emote, I'll do it." He added a bit jokingly, "Until then, I'm on strike." So, there you have it! Epic Games' lack of a Hotline Bling emote is the only thing standing between Drake and a Fortnite themed rap or album. Would a Fortnite album be something you'd listen to or is it too strange? View full article
  5. At GDC, Epic Games revealed an unprecedented demonstration alongside NVIDIA and ILMxLAB, Lucasfilm's division in charge of experimenting with experimenting with techniques for advancing digital trickery. The three companies worked together on a technique called real-time ray tracing and seem to have achieved it, demonstrating the technique on stage during Epic's "State of Unreal" session at the Game Developer's Conference. This represents the first time real-time ray tracing has been publicly displayed live. So what is real-time ray tracing? Ray tracing is basically the technology that allows digital graphics to simulate light and shadow. Real-time ray tracing represents the next step beyond the tech we have now, allowing for multiple light sources to reflect and create shadows in real-time as either they move or the objects around them move. It essentially closes the gap between the tech between what digital animators can achieve in film and what game developers can create in video games. Epic's demonstration ran on NVIDIA's tech housed in Volta GPUs while an iPad running ARKit used a virtual camera to get a close-up view of the smallest details. The assets themselves were created by Lucasfilm for use in Star Wars: The Last Jedi. The demo showcased advances in textured area lights, ray-traced ambient occlusion, reflections, and shadows, and cinematic depth-of-field. Take a look at what that all looks like in action: If that doesn't get you excited and you need something a little more gaming related, NVIDIA also worked with Remedy Entertainment, the developers behind Alan Wake, Quantum Break, and Max Payne, to create a tech demo showing what real-time ray tracing can do inside a video game environment. Remedy's demo could also be a small tease for their mysterious project that's currently only known by the codename "P7." This technology is just on the horizon. It's hard not to get excited over what that could mean for games coming out in the next few years that take advantage of the ability to utilize real-time ray tracing. The one hitch might be that bitcoin mining has caused a huge uptick in GPU prices, so the cost of upgrading a PC graphics card could be prohibitive for those looking to upgrade to a device capable of handling this kind of graphical horsepower. What do you think? Are you excited by these teasers? View full article
  6. At GDC, Epic Games revealed an unprecedented demonstration alongside NVIDIA and ILMxLAB, Lucasfilm's division in charge of experimenting with experimenting with techniques for advancing digital trickery. The three companies worked together on a technique called real-time ray tracing and seem to have achieved it, demonstrating the technique on stage during Epic's "State of Unreal" session at the Game Developer's Conference. This represents the first time real-time ray tracing has been publicly displayed live. So what is real-time ray tracing? Ray tracing is basically the technology that allows digital graphics to simulate light and shadow. Real-time ray tracing represents the next step beyond the tech we have now, allowing for multiple light sources to reflect and create shadows in real-time as either they move or the objects around them move. It essentially closes the gap between the tech between what digital animators can achieve in film and what game developers can create in video games. Epic's demonstration ran on NVIDIA's tech housed in Volta GPUs while an iPad running ARKit used a virtual camera to get a close-up view of the smallest details. The assets themselves were created by Lucasfilm for use in Star Wars: The Last Jedi. The demo showcased advances in textured area lights, ray-traced ambient occlusion, reflections, and shadows, and cinematic depth-of-field. Take a look at what that all looks like in action: If that doesn't get you excited and you need something a little more gaming related, NVIDIA also worked with Remedy Entertainment, the developers behind Alan Wake, Quantum Break, and Max Payne, to create a tech demo showing what real-time ray tracing can do inside a video game environment. Remedy's demo could also be a small tease for their mysterious project that's currently only known by the codename "P7." This technology is just on the horizon. It's hard not to get excited over what that could mean for games coming out in the next few years that take advantage of the ability to utilize real-time ray tracing. The one hitch might be that bitcoin mining has caused a huge uptick in GPU prices, so the cost of upgrading a PC graphics card could be prohibitive for those looking to upgrade to a device capable of handling this kind of graphical horsepower. What do you think? Are you excited by these teasers?
  7. There was once a game called Advent Rising. It was hyped up as the next great science-fiction adventure that would transcend games and become something more. Unfortunately, it released in 2005 with a multitude of bugs in an era where patching post-release was a rarity at best. Advent Rising caused the implosion of its development studio, GlyphX Games. A group of individual developers escaped the studio's downfall, banding together to form Chair Entertainment. The newly minted indie studio went on to develop and release Shadow Complex in 2009. The 2.5D metroidvania sidescroller adopted a more realistic aesthetic and spawned a series of novels authored by Orson Scott Card. The game released and seemed to fill a niche in the indie gaming world that hadn't been filled in quite that same way before. With a recent remaster, it seems like a perfect time to ask the question: Is Shadow Complex one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Tales of Phantasia 'The Koan of Drums' by djpretzel (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR01500) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  8. There was once a game called Advent Rising. It was hyped up as the next great science-fiction adventure that would transcend games and become something more. Unfortunately, it released in 2005 with a multitude of bugs in an era where patching post-release was a rarity at best. Advent Rising caused the implosion of its development studio, GlyphX Games. A group of individual developers escaped the studio's downfall, banding together to form Chair Entertainment. The newly minted indie studio went on to develop and release Shadow Complex in 2009. The 2.5D metroidvania sidescroller adopted a more realistic aesthetic and spawned a series of novels authored by Orson Scott Card. The game released and seemed to fill a niche in the indie gaming world that hadn't been filled in quite that same way before. With a recent remaster, it seems like a perfect time to ask the question: Is Shadow Complex one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Tales of Phantasia 'The Koan of Drums' by djpretzel (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR01500) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
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