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Found 14 results

  1. What Remains of Edith Finch can now be obtained for free on the fledgling Epic Games store on PC. Epic Games announced last December that they would be releasing free games throughout the 2019 year. So far, the company has made good on their promise, releasing the ocean-based exploration and crafting adventure Subnautica and following that up with the excellent platformer Super Meat Boy. Epic Games continues to fulfill its promise of releasing a free game every two weeks with the release of What Remains of Edith Finch. The indie hit will be available through the Epic Games store for free from now until 11:59pm EST on January 24. Developed by Giant Sparrow, What Remains of Edith Finch tells the story of Edith Finch, a young woman exploring her family history, all of which is contained within the Finch family house. Each member of the family has died and the game reveals their stories on the day that they died. Edith Finch just wants to know why she remains the only Finch left alive. If you're curious about what will follow the current free title, Epic Games announced that The Jackbox Party Pack will be the next free game following What Remains of Edith Finch. The pack of party games will become available on January 24 and remain available for free download through the Epic Games store until February 7. It's interesting to see the titles Epic is curating to try and make their store a more widely used platform. Going from strong single-player experiences that haven't found massive market penetration in the current generation of gaming to a party game feels like some really savvy planning on their part. The recent announcement that The Division 2 will only be available through the Epic Games store also feels like a big win, and one we should expect to see more of in the near future as more devs and publishers bring their games to Epic's platform for a bigger cut of their games' sales. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  2. What Remains of Edith Finch can now be obtained for free on the fledgling Epic Games store on PC. Epic Games announced last December that they would be releasing free games throughout the 2019 year. So far, the company has made good on their promise, releasing the ocean-based exploration and crafting adventure Subnautica and following that up with the excellent platformer Super Meat Boy. Epic Games continues to fulfill its promise of releasing a free game every two weeks with the release of What Remains of Edith Finch. The indie hit will be available through the Epic Games store for free from now until 11:59pm EST on January 24. Developed by Giant Sparrow, What Remains of Edith Finch tells the story of Edith Finch, a young woman exploring her family history, all of which is contained within the Finch family house. Each member of the family has died and the game reveals their stories on the day that they died. Edith Finch just wants to know why she remains the only Finch left alive. If you're curious about what will follow the current free title, Epic Games announced that The Jackbox Party Pack will be the next free game following What Remains of Edith Finch. The pack of party games will become available on January 24 and remain available for free download through the Epic Games store until February 7. It's interesting to see the titles Epic is curating to try and make their store a more widely used platform. Going from strong single-player experiences that haven't found massive market penetration in the current generation of gaming to a party game feels like some really savvy planning on their part. The recent announcement that The Division 2 will only be available through the Epic Games store also feels like a big win, and one we should expect to see more of in the near future as more devs and publishers bring their games to Epic's platform for a bigger cut of their games' sales. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  3. Alfonso Ribeiro, the actor who played Carlton on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, and Russell "Backpack Kid" Horning have filed lawsuits against Epic Games for their use of the Carlton dance and "The Russell" dances in the popular battle royale game Fortnite. With Fortnite recently surpassing 200 million players, the game has hit the kind of general cultural penetration of which even the largest gaming franchises can only dream. Given that many of the signature dance emotes in-game are being sold as microtransactions, some of the originators of those moves want a small slice of that colossal profit-pie. It was reported in July that Fornite's in-game microtransactions alone had earned Epic Games over $1 billion in revenue. One of the biggest sellers on the platform happens to be different emotes and dances, too, which makes the irritation many of the sources of inspiration for the dances seem pretty understandable. It becomes even more understandable when you learn that many of the originators weren't even asked or compensated for their moves being used beat-for-beat in-game to earn a lot of real-world dollars. Yesterday, it came to light that the mother of the 16-year-old Horning had filed a lawsuit in her son's name as they are in the process of copyrighting the iconic dance move. Details about the lawsuit remain unknown and the damages specified haven't been revealed as of yet. Concerning Alfonso Ribiero, his lawyer, David Hecht of the law firm Pierce Bainbridge Beck Price & Hecht explained the reasoning behind the lawsuit saying, “Epic has earned record profits off of downloadable content in the game, including emotes like ‘Fresh.’ Yet Epic has failed to compensate or even ask permission from Mr. Ribeiro for the use of his likeness and iconic intellectual property,” The same law firm is also representing Russel Horning and the rapper 2 Milly who announced earlier this month that he would be suing Epic Games over the in-game use of the Milly Rock dance. For those wondering if the dances used in Fortnite are really that similar to those performed by the people filing lawsuits, check out the video below for a side-by-side comparison courtesy of YouTube channel Cinema of Gaming. So, does this lawsuit have a case? Well, the answer isn't really straightforward. A large part of it could revolve around the technical ownership of the dances themselves. For example, the Carlton dance might technically belong to the producers of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air depending on the contracts Alfonso Ribiero signed. It could also be that no one technically owns the rights, making the dance a work in the public domain. Depending on how long it has been since the dance was created, it might be impossible to prove who really created the dance and thereby impossible to prove ownership of any copyright. It could also be that a freelance choreographer was hired, making the work technically someone else's entirely. All this means that a legal battle over the ownership of these dances could be a long and complicated legal battle. That might make Epic more interested in settling out of court for undisclosed sums of money or a share in the profits, especially given that in at least some of the cases the company never asked for permission. It will be interesting to see if more of these dance creators appear to claim some share of Epic Games' $1 billion in revenue. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  4. Alfonso Ribeiro, the actor who played Carlton on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, and Russell "Backpack Kid" Horning have filed lawsuits against Epic Games for their use of the Carlton dance and "The Russell" dances in the popular battle royale game Fortnite. With Fortnite recently surpassing 200 million players, the game has hit the kind of general cultural penetration of which even the largest gaming franchises can only dream. Given that many of the signature dance emotes in-game are being sold as microtransactions, some of the originators of those moves want a small slice of that colossal profit-pie. It was reported in July that Fornite's in-game microtransactions alone had earned Epic Games over $1 billion in revenue. One of the biggest sellers on the platform happens to be different emotes and dances, too, which makes the irritation many of the sources of inspiration for the dances seem pretty understandable. It becomes even more understandable when you learn that many of the originators weren't even asked or compensated for their moves being used beat-for-beat in-game to earn a lot of real-world dollars. Yesterday, it came to light that the mother of the 16-year-old Horning had filed a lawsuit in her son's name as they are in the process of copyrighting the iconic dance move. Details about the lawsuit remain unknown and the damages specified haven't been revealed as of yet. Concerning Alfonso Ribiero, his lawyer, David Hecht of the law firm Pierce Bainbridge Beck Price & Hecht explained the reasoning behind the lawsuit saying, “Epic has earned record profits off of downloadable content in the game, including emotes like ‘Fresh.’ Yet Epic has failed to compensate or even ask permission from Mr. Ribeiro for the use of his likeness and iconic intellectual property,” The same law firm is also representing Russel Horning and the rapper 2 Milly who announced earlier this month that he would be suing Epic Games over the in-game use of the Milly Rock dance. For those wondering if the dances used in Fortnite are really that similar to those performed by the people filing lawsuits, check out the video below for a side-by-side comparison courtesy of YouTube channel Cinema of Gaming. So, does this lawsuit have a case? Well, the answer isn't really straightforward. A large part of it could revolve around the technical ownership of the dances themselves. For example, the Carlton dance might technically belong to the producers of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air depending on the contracts Alfonso Ribiero signed. It could also be that no one technically owns the rights, making the dance a work in the public domain. Depending on how long it has been since the dance was created, it might be impossible to prove who really created the dance and thereby impossible to prove ownership of any copyright. It could also be that a freelance choreographer was hired, making the work technically someone else's entirely. All this means that a legal battle over the ownership of these dances could be a long and complicated legal battle. That might make Epic more interested in settling out of court for undisclosed sums of money or a share in the profits, especially given that in at least some of the cases the company never asked for permission. It will be interesting to see if more of these dance creators appear to claim some share of Epic Games' $1 billion in revenue. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  5. Jack Gardner

    PSA: Grab Subnautica for Free

    The deep sea survival game Subnautica is free for a limited time through the Epic Games Launcher. This follows closely on the heels of Epic's announcement of an Epic digital distribution service that begins with their launcher. And even better? Epic says they will be releasing a free game every two weeks until the end of 2019! Subnautica debuted to the world four years ago as an Early Access title through Steam. After years of additional development, the seafaring title released fully in January of this year. The game places players in a dire survival scenario: Their spaceship has crashed, seemingly with all hands either lost or dead. Players end up having to fend for themselves on an uncharted ocean world. Securing resources, salvaging gear, upgrading equipment, researching upgrades, and constructing a base of operations all become engrossing activities. It only recently launched on consoles, and unfortunately the free version seems to be exclusive to PC for now. Announced via Epic Games, the company has launched its year-long free game service with Subnautica, an offer which will disappear on December 27 to be replaced by a new free title. The service itself is free - all that you need to do to download the free biweekly game is to download the Epic Games Launcher and download the free title from there. From that point on, it's yours to keep with no strings attached. While a schedule of the games coming to the platform have yet to be announced, we do know that the next game heading to Epic users for free will be Team Meat's classic platformer Super Meat Boy. This move to distribute free games doesn't come out of the goodness of Epic Games' heart, however. The company is making an effort to capitalize on the 200 million people who play Fortnite through their service, a number that absolutely dwarfs juggernauts of the industry like Steam, which boasted a record 18.5 million users in January of this year. If even 10% of Epic's user base begins to use Epic Games as their go-to digital platform of choice, things could really begin to shake up in the slowly crowding digital distribution market. Undoubtedly, the allure of free games for an entire year will keep people opening up the Epic Games platform and building a collection of titles that could potentially include a few games they picked up on the storefront beyond the free games. It's a perfect way to rope in people who are already playing Fortnite and bring in new blood who want free games. Overall, this will likely accelerate some degree of competition between the biggest digital storefronts like Steam, Good Old Games, and Origin. With free games bringing in users and a better cost sharing arrangement than other platforms, Epic really does have a shot at securing a spot as not one of the most used but the most used digital games platforms in the world. This could be the beginning of an entirely different digital ecosystem. Be sure to grab Subnautica on PC before December 27! Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  6. The deep sea survival game Subnautica is free for a limited time through the Epic Games Launcher. This follows closely on the heels of Epic's announcement of an Epic digital distribution service that begins with their launcher. And even better? Epic says they will be releasing a free game every two weeks until the end of 2019! Subnautica debuted to the world four years ago as an Early Access title through Steam. After years of additional development, the seafaring title released fully in January of this year. The game places players in a dire survival scenario: Their spaceship has crashed, seemingly with all hands either lost or dead. Players end up having to fend for themselves on an uncharted ocean world. Securing resources, salvaging gear, upgrading equipment, researching upgrades, and constructing a base of operations all become engrossing activities. It only recently launched on consoles, and unfortunately the free version seems to be exclusive to PC for now. Announced via Epic Games, the company has launched its year-long free game service with Subnautica, an offer which will disappear on December 27 to be replaced by a new free title. The service itself is free - all that you need to do to download the free biweekly game is to download the Epic Games Launcher and download the free title from there. From that point on, it's yours to keep with no strings attached. While a schedule of the games coming to the platform have yet to be announced, we do know that the next game heading to Epic users for free will be Team Meat's classic platformer Super Meat Boy. This move to distribute free games doesn't come out of the goodness of Epic Games' heart, however. The company is making an effort to capitalize on the 200 million people who play Fortnite through their service, a number that absolutely dwarfs juggernauts of the industry like Steam, which boasted a record 18.5 million users in January of this year. If even 10% of Epic's user base begins to use Epic Games as their go-to digital platform of choice, things could really begin to shake up in the slowly crowding digital distribution market. Undoubtedly, the allure of free games for an entire year will keep people opening up the Epic Games platform and building a collection of titles that could potentially include a few games they picked up on the storefront beyond the free games. It's a perfect way to rope in people who are already playing Fortnite and bring in new blood who want free games. Overall, this will likely accelerate some degree of competition between the biggest digital storefronts like Steam, Good Old Games, and Origin. With free games bringing in users and a better cost sharing arrangement than other platforms, Epic really does have a shot at securing a spot as not one of the most used but the most used digital games platforms in the world. This could be the beginning of an entirely different digital ecosystem. Be sure to grab Subnautica on PC before December 27! Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  7. Epic Games is rolling in cash courtesy of Fortnite, the cool thing the kids are playing these days (or so some cool kids tell me). What exactly has it done with all of that moola? Use it to start a digital storefront designed to compete with the likes of Steam and Good Old Games. "For the past five years, we've been building tools enabling Epic to bring our games directly to players. We built the Epic Games launcher on PC and Mac featuring Fortnite and Unreal Engine; we built a worldwide digital commerce ecosystem supporting dozens of payment methods; and we gained great economies of scale thanks to Fortnite's growth," said Tim Sweeney in his initial announcement of the Epic Games Store. All of this has put Epic Games on track to launch their storefront. The main selling point that Epic Games wants everyone to be aware of is their dedication to showing fairness to developers who sell games on their platform. A major part of their announcement states that all developers will earn 88% of the revenue from sales on the Epic Games Store, a piece of information that was accompanied by a chart comparing an their 12-88 revenue split to Steam's 30-70 (or 30-55 in some cases) split. The graphic also makes it clear why Epic Games is pursuing a piece of the digital distribution market: Devs that make use of Unreal Engine 4 automatically pay 5% of their game's revenue to Epic, but if Epic sells those games on their own platform, they can up that cut to 12% regardless of game engine, all while getting good PR for sharing more revenue with developers who sell through their store. It's a win-win relationship for Epic and those who sell through them. Given that Epic now has strong ties to an entire generation of gamers through Fortnite and the Epic Games launcher, this makes complete sense. They have the technological infrastructure, a readily available pool of customers, and the unique position to reap larger profits while attracting more developers. Another benefit will be a more curated atmosphere that lacks on a service like Steam that has already opened the development floodgates for practically anything to make it onto the platform. Sweeney wrote that the service will help devs reach their players by giving users a newsfeed that will update with information and updates from developers. Developers will also be able to reach out to streamers, vloggers, and bloggers through Epic's Support-A-Creator program to help get the word out about up-and-coming indies. The somewhat murky part of this is that through this program content creators will be able to receive a cut of the revenue (determined by the developer) from purchases made using their referral links. The first 24 months of the service will see Epic Games covering the first 5% of the revenue shared with content creators, so that's pretty neat. Sweeney's announcement was a bit lacking in details regarding exactly when the service would launch, though more details will be coming on Thursday, December 6 during The Game Awards. The Epic Games Store will first launch for PC and Mac before spreading to Android devices and beyond over the next year. Are you excited for a new digital store in the mix? Is a bigger revenue share for the devs enough of an incentive for you as a customer to switch over to Epic? Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  8. Epic Games is rolling in cash courtesy of Fortnite, the cool thing the kids are playing these days (or so some cool kids tell me). What exactly has it done with all of that moola? Use it to start a digital storefront designed to compete with the likes of Steam and Good Old Games. "For the past five years, we've been building tools enabling Epic to bring our games directly to players. We built the Epic Games launcher on PC and Mac featuring Fortnite and Unreal Engine; we built a worldwide digital commerce ecosystem supporting dozens of payment methods; and we gained great economies of scale thanks to Fortnite's growth," said Tim Sweeney in his initial announcement of the Epic Games Store. All of this has put Epic Games on track to launch their storefront. The main selling point that Epic Games wants everyone to be aware of is their dedication to showing fairness to developers who sell games on their platform. A major part of their announcement states that all developers will earn 88% of the revenue from sales on the Epic Games Store, a piece of information that was accompanied by a chart comparing an their 12-88 revenue split to Steam's 30-70 (or 30-55 in some cases) split. The graphic also makes it clear why Epic Games is pursuing a piece of the digital distribution market: Devs that make use of Unreal Engine 4 automatically pay 5% of their game's revenue to Epic, but if Epic sells those games on their own platform, they can up that cut to 12% regardless of game engine, all while getting good PR for sharing more revenue with developers who sell through their store. It's a win-win relationship for Epic and those who sell through them. Given that Epic now has strong ties to an entire generation of gamers through Fortnite and the Epic Games launcher, this makes complete sense. They have the technological infrastructure, a readily available pool of customers, and the unique position to reap larger profits while attracting more developers. Another benefit will be a more curated atmosphere that lacks on a service like Steam that has already opened the development floodgates for practically anything to make it onto the platform. Sweeney wrote that the service will help devs reach their players by giving users a newsfeed that will update with information and updates from developers. Developers will also be able to reach out to streamers, vloggers, and bloggers through Epic's Support-A-Creator program to help get the word out about up-and-coming indies. The somewhat murky part of this is that through this program content creators will be able to receive a cut of the revenue (determined by the developer) from purchases made using their referral links. The first 24 months of the service will see Epic Games covering the first 5% of the revenue shared with content creators, so that's pretty neat. Sweeney's announcement was a bit lacking in details regarding exactly when the service would launch, though more details will be coming on Thursday, December 6 during The Game Awards. The Epic Games Store will first launch for PC and Mac before spreading to Android devices and beyond over the next year. Are you excited for a new digital store in the mix? Is a bigger revenue share for the devs enough of an incentive for you as a customer to switch over to Epic? Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  9. Fortnite has been consistently gaining popularity in recent months. The free-to-play Battle Royale game mode has captured the attention of streamers and celebrities alike. That led to the surprise team up between rapper Drake and Twitch streamer Tyler "Ninja" Blevins. The two have streamed together on multiple occasions while racking up huge viewership numbers. In a recent stream, Ninja encouraged Drake to include references to Fortnite in his next album. Drake responded saying, "It has to happen, it's just gotta be the right way. Someone's gonna do it. Someone's gonna pull it off. I say when Epic gives me the emote, when Epic gives me the Hotline Bling emote, I'll do it." He added a bit jokingly, "Until then, I'm on strike." So, there you have it! Epic Games' lack of a Hotline Bling emote is the only thing standing between Drake and a Fortnite themed rap or album. Would a Fortnite album be something you'd listen to or is it too strange?
  10. Fortnite has been consistently gaining popularity in recent months. The free-to-play Battle Royale game mode has captured the attention of streamers and celebrities alike. That led to the surprise team up between rapper Drake and Twitch streamer Tyler "Ninja" Blevins. The two have streamed together on multiple occasions while racking up huge viewership numbers. In a recent stream, Ninja encouraged Drake to include references to Fortnite in his next album. Drake responded saying, "It has to happen, it's just gotta be the right way. Someone's gonna do it. Someone's gonna pull it off. I say when Epic gives me the emote, when Epic gives me the Hotline Bling emote, I'll do it." He added a bit jokingly, "Until then, I'm on strike." So, there you have it! Epic Games' lack of a Hotline Bling emote is the only thing standing between Drake and a Fortnite themed rap or album. Would a Fortnite album be something you'd listen to or is it too strange? View full article
  11. At GDC, Epic Games revealed an unprecedented demonstration alongside NVIDIA and ILMxLAB, Lucasfilm's division in charge of experimenting with experimenting with techniques for advancing digital trickery. The three companies worked together on a technique called real-time ray tracing and seem to have achieved it, demonstrating the technique on stage during Epic's "State of Unreal" session at the Game Developer's Conference. This represents the first time real-time ray tracing has been publicly displayed live. So what is real-time ray tracing? Ray tracing is basically the technology that allows digital graphics to simulate light and shadow. Real-time ray tracing represents the next step beyond the tech we have now, allowing for multiple light sources to reflect and create shadows in real-time as either they move or the objects around them move. It essentially closes the gap between the tech between what digital animators can achieve in film and what game developers can create in video games. Epic's demonstration ran on NVIDIA's tech housed in Volta GPUs while an iPad running ARKit used a virtual camera to get a close-up view of the smallest details. The assets themselves were created by Lucasfilm for use in Star Wars: The Last Jedi. The demo showcased advances in textured area lights, ray-traced ambient occlusion, reflections, and shadows, and cinematic depth-of-field. Take a look at what that all looks like in action: If that doesn't get you excited and you need something a little more gaming related, NVIDIA also worked with Remedy Entertainment, the developers behind Alan Wake, Quantum Break, and Max Payne, to create a tech demo showing what real-time ray tracing can do inside a video game environment. Remedy's demo could also be a small tease for their mysterious project that's currently only known by the codename "P7." This technology is just on the horizon. It's hard not to get excited over what that could mean for games coming out in the next few years that take advantage of the ability to utilize real-time ray tracing. The one hitch might be that bitcoin mining has caused a huge uptick in GPU prices, so the cost of upgrading a PC graphics card could be prohibitive for those looking to upgrade to a device capable of handling this kind of graphical horsepower. What do you think? Are you excited by these teasers? View full article
  12. At GDC, Epic Games revealed an unprecedented demonstration alongside NVIDIA and ILMxLAB, Lucasfilm's division in charge of experimenting with experimenting with techniques for advancing digital trickery. The three companies worked together on a technique called real-time ray tracing and seem to have achieved it, demonstrating the technique on stage during Epic's "State of Unreal" session at the Game Developer's Conference. This represents the first time real-time ray tracing has been publicly displayed live. So what is real-time ray tracing? Ray tracing is basically the technology that allows digital graphics to simulate light and shadow. Real-time ray tracing represents the next step beyond the tech we have now, allowing for multiple light sources to reflect and create shadows in real-time as either they move or the objects around them move. It essentially closes the gap between the tech between what digital animators can achieve in film and what game developers can create in video games. Epic's demonstration ran on NVIDIA's tech housed in Volta GPUs while an iPad running ARKit used a virtual camera to get a close-up view of the smallest details. The assets themselves were created by Lucasfilm for use in Star Wars: The Last Jedi. The demo showcased advances in textured area lights, ray-traced ambient occlusion, reflections, and shadows, and cinematic depth-of-field. Take a look at what that all looks like in action: If that doesn't get you excited and you need something a little more gaming related, NVIDIA also worked with Remedy Entertainment, the developers behind Alan Wake, Quantum Break, and Max Payne, to create a tech demo showing what real-time ray tracing can do inside a video game environment. Remedy's demo could also be a small tease for their mysterious project that's currently only known by the codename "P7." This technology is just on the horizon. It's hard not to get excited over what that could mean for games coming out in the next few years that take advantage of the ability to utilize real-time ray tracing. The one hitch might be that bitcoin mining has caused a huge uptick in GPU prices, so the cost of upgrading a PC graphics card could be prohibitive for those looking to upgrade to a device capable of handling this kind of graphical horsepower. What do you think? Are you excited by these teasers?
  13. There was once a game called Advent Rising. It was hyped up as the next great science-fiction adventure that would transcend games and become something more. Unfortunately, it released in 2005 with a multitude of bugs in an era where patching post-release was a rarity at best. Advent Rising caused the implosion of its development studio, GlyphX Games. A group of individual developers escaped the studio's downfall, banding together to form Chair Entertainment. The newly minted indie studio went on to develop and release Shadow Complex in 2009. The 2.5D metroidvania sidescroller adopted a more realistic aesthetic and spawned a series of novels authored by Orson Scott Card. The game released and seemed to fill a niche in the indie gaming world that hadn't been filled in quite that same way before. With a recent remaster, it seems like a perfect time to ask the question: Is Shadow Complex one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Tales of Phantasia 'The Koan of Drums' by djpretzel (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR01500) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  14. There was once a game called Advent Rising. It was hyped up as the next great science-fiction adventure that would transcend games and become something more. Unfortunately, it released in 2005 with a multitude of bugs in an era where patching post-release was a rarity at best. Advent Rising caused the implosion of its development studio, GlyphX Games. A group of individual developers escaped the studio's downfall, banding together to form Chair Entertainment. The newly minted indie studio went on to develop and release Shadow Complex in 2009. The 2.5D metroidvania sidescroller adopted a more realistic aesthetic and spawned a series of novels authored by Orson Scott Card. The game released and seemed to fill a niche in the indie gaming world that hadn't been filled in quite that same way before. With a recent remaster, it seems like a perfect time to ask the question: Is Shadow Complex one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Tales of Phantasia 'The Koan of Drums' by djpretzel (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR01500) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
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