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Found 22 results

  1. What Rainbow Six Siege did for PvP, Rainbow Six Quarantine aims to do with PvE. This promise was made by Ubisoft during their E3 2019 press conference. There are two kinds of people in the world: PvP players, who love fighting their friends and strangers competitively, and PvE players, who love teaming up and taking down hordes of enemies with old friends and new acquaintances alike. With Rainbow Six Siege, Ubisoft proved their worth as a publisher who supports their games over time, turning a middling – but promising – squad-based shooter into one of the biggest competitive multiplayer games in the world. Even though many gamers continue to lament the untimely cancellation of Rainbow 6: Patriots, it's impossible to deny that Rainbow Six Siege is truly something special. Now, Ubisoft looks to turn their attention to the cooperative PvE space with Rainbow Six Quarantine. Though we know little about the upcoming co-op shooter, Ubisoft's introductory teaser trailer showed Quarantine will involve some kind of viral infection which can affect players. Presumably, said virus also serves as the source of the hordes of enemies which are required in any type of co-op shooter. Rainbow Six Quarantine features teams of three, a popular fireteam size in co-op games (see Destiny, another extremely popular multiplayer title), though not much is known beyond that, as no actual gameplay was shown during Ubisoft's E3 presentation. Back in early 2018, Rainbow Six Siege experimented with PvE action in Operation Chimera, a limited-time game mode which pitted Siege's operators against an alien threat. While it's unknown what cues – if any – Quarantine will take from Operation Chimera, it's nice to see Ubisoft experimenting with the Tom Clancy brand, even if die hard fans of the old-school Rainbow Six games scoff and roll their eyes at the very thought of extra-terrestrial threats in the ultra-realistic universe of the Tom Clancy games. At the very least, Rainbow Six Siege has proven popular and enduring enough for the brand to have earned the right to branch out in whatever way they want, no matter how unexpected. Despite being nearly four years old, Siege remains insanely popular to this day, and if Ubisoft can pull off a similar stunt using a cooperative, rather than a competitive, template, then Rainbow Six Quarantine has the potential to be a preeminent great multiplayer experience for years to come. Rainbow Six Quarantine is scheduled for release on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC sometime in 2020. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games View full article
  2. What Rainbow Six Siege did for PvP, Rainbow Six Quarantine aims to do with PvE. This promise was made by Ubisoft during their E3 2019 press conference. There are two kinds of people in the world: PvP players, who love fighting their friends and strangers competitively, and PvE players, who love teaming up and taking down hordes of enemies with old friends and new acquaintances alike. With Rainbow Six Siege, Ubisoft proved their worth as a publisher who supports their games over time, turning a middling – but promising – squad-based shooter into one of the biggest competitive multiplayer games in the world. Even though many gamers continue to lament the untimely cancellation of Rainbow 6: Patriots, it's impossible to deny that Rainbow Six Siege is truly something special. Now, Ubisoft looks to turn their attention to the cooperative PvE space with Rainbow Six Quarantine. Though we know little about the upcoming co-op shooter, Ubisoft's introductory teaser trailer showed Quarantine will involve some kind of viral infection which can affect players. Presumably, said virus also serves as the source of the hordes of enemies which are required in any type of co-op shooter. Rainbow Six Quarantine features teams of three, a popular fireteam size in co-op games (see Destiny, another extremely popular multiplayer title), though not much is known beyond that, as no actual gameplay was shown during Ubisoft's E3 presentation. Back in early 2018, Rainbow Six Siege experimented with PvE action in Operation Chimera, a limited-time game mode which pitted Siege's operators against an alien threat. While it's unknown what cues – if any – Quarantine will take from Operation Chimera, it's nice to see Ubisoft experimenting with the Tom Clancy brand, even if die hard fans of the old-school Rainbow Six games scoff and roll their eyes at the very thought of extra-terrestrial threats in the ultra-realistic universe of the Tom Clancy games. At the very least, Rainbow Six Siege has proven popular and enduring enough for the brand to have earned the right to branch out in whatever way they want, no matter how unexpected. Despite being nearly four years old, Siege remains insanely popular to this day, and if Ubisoft can pull off a similar stunt using a cooperative, rather than a competitive, template, then Rainbow Six Quarantine has the potential to be a preeminent great multiplayer experience for years to come. Rainbow Six Quarantine is scheduled for release on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC sometime in 2020. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games
  3. Ubisoft's Watch Dogs series follows a world where private security companies have all but monopolized public safety, leading to increased surveillance by private companies and zero expectations of privacy. The first two games, set in Chicago and San Francisco, respectively, feature hackers who seek to undermine the evil corporations and their totalitarian aspirations while simultaneously following their own, more personal, quests. In Watch Dogs: Legion, the centralized protagonist has been replaced by the game's main hook: a veritable army of freedom fighters who make up an ensemble cast of leading characters. In the not too distant future, London is every conspiracy theorist's worst nightmare come to life. Spy drones litter the sky, surveillance cameras dot every street corner, and a single corporate conglomerate oversees the entirety of the city's existence. Ubisoft's E3 presentation opened with the player character, a bald Brit named Ian Robshaw, communicating with a formless, but charming, Artificial Intelligence named Bagley. The entire demo looks like a real-time play session, and As Ian walks down the street, it's clear this isn't the London we all know and love. In the world of Watch Dogs, the city has become something of a cyberpunk dystopia; bright neon lights and holographic projections offer a heightened technological aesthetic which pairs nicely with the oppressive surveillance state the city has become. Ian and Bagley are searching for an expert on the city's high-tech drones, and they find one in the form of a Jimmy Shaw, a young man who winds up getting into a fight with London's heavily militarized private police force. Ian puts on a creepy skull mask and rescues the hacker, making himself the target. An exciting chase ensues, in which an armed drone wounds Ian to the point where a choice appears on screen: surrender, or keep fighting. Ian opts to keep fighting, activating optical camouflage to buy enough time to hijack a taxi and speed off. Unfortunately, the private army follows, and Ian is ultimately shot to death after crashing his stolen vehicle. Instead of a game over screen, however, the game goes to a menu where the player can choose from another DedSec agent. From here, the demo features Helen, a senior citizen and retired assassin with an infectiously devil-may-care demeanor, and Naomi Brooke, a no-nonsense operative who completes the mission, recruiting Jimmy to DedSec and lamenting Ian's death with the grateful young revolutionary. There are no continues in Watch Dogs: Legion; when a character dies, they don't come back. This roguelike element is almost entirely unheard of in the AAA open-world space. It's hard to imagine the game will have unique dialogue for all of the potential player characters in every single cutscene, but this provocative early look certainly earned our attention. If Ubisoft can follow through on the ideas brought forth in this first look, then Watch Dogs: Legion could be one of the most exciting and ambitious games of the generation. Watch Dogs: Legion releases March 5, 2020 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, PC, and Google Stadia. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  4. Ubisoft's Watch Dogs series follows a world where private security companies have all but monopolized public safety, leading to increased surveillance by private companies and zero expectations of privacy. The first two games, set in Chicago and San Francisco, respectively, feature hackers who seek to undermine the evil corporations and their totalitarian aspirations while simultaneously following their own, more personal, quests. In Watch Dogs: Legion, the centralized protagonist has been replaced by the game's main hook: a veritable army of freedom fighters who make up an ensemble cast of leading characters. In the not too distant future, London is every conspiracy theorist's worst nightmare come to life. Spy drones litter the sky, surveillance cameras dot every street corner, and a single corporate conglomerate oversees the entirety of the city's existence. Ubisoft's E3 presentation opened with the player character, a bald Brit named Ian Robshaw, communicating with a formless, but charming, Artificial Intelligence named Bagley. The entire demo looks like a real-time play session, and As Ian walks down the street, it's clear this isn't the London we all know and love. In the world of Watch Dogs, the city has become something of a cyberpunk dystopia; bright neon lights and holographic projections offer a heightened technological aesthetic which pairs nicely with the oppressive surveillance state the city has become. Ian and Bagley are searching for an expert on the city's high-tech drones, and they find one in the form of a Jimmy Shaw, a young man who winds up getting into a fight with London's heavily militarized private police force. Ian puts on a creepy skull mask and rescues the hacker, making himself the target. An exciting chase ensues, in which an armed drone wounds Ian to the point where a choice appears on screen: surrender, or keep fighting. Ian opts to keep fighting, activating optical camouflage to buy enough time to hijack a taxi and speed off. Unfortunately, the private army follows, and Ian is ultimately shot to death after crashing his stolen vehicle. Instead of a game over screen, however, the game goes to a menu where the player can choose from another DedSec agent. From here, the demo features Helen, a senior citizen and retired assassin with an infectiously devil-may-care demeanor, and Naomi Brooke, a no-nonsense operative who completes the mission, recruiting Jimmy to DedSec and lamenting Ian's death with the grateful young revolutionary. There are no continues in Watch Dogs: Legion; when a character dies, they don't come back. This roguelike element is almost entirely unheard of in the AAA open-world space. It's hard to imagine the game will have unique dialogue for all of the potential player characters in every single cutscene, but this provocative early look certainly earned our attention. If Ubisoft can follow through on the ideas brought forth in this first look, then Watch Dogs: Legion could be one of the most exciting and ambitious games of the generation. Watch Dogs: Legion releases March 5, 2020 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, PC, and Google Stadia. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  5. After a day spent exploring the E3 show floor, the writing team reconvenes to discuss what they learned after spending time talking with developers and publishers. There's a lot to discuss! Jack Gardner, Naomi Lugo, Zak Wojnar, and Marcus Stewart gather to talk about the best games they've seen so far and what might be just around the corner in gaming. Together, the group has assembled to help parse the massive number of games and experiences brought on by the year's biggest gaming trade show. They will be doing daily recaps of each day of the event, cataloging what they've seen, heard, and played. Music from https://filmmusic.io: "Spellbound" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com) Licence: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  6. After a day spent exploring the E3 show floor, the writing team reconvenes to discuss what they learned after spending time talking with developers and publishers. There's a lot to discuss! Jack Gardner, Naomi Lugo, Zak Wojnar, and Marcus Stewart gather to talk about the best games they've seen so far and what might be just around the corner in gaming. Together, the group has assembled to help parse the massive number of games and experiences brought on by the year's biggest gaming trade show. They will be doing daily recaps of each day of the event, cataloging what they've seen, heard, and played. Music from https://filmmusic.io: "Spellbound" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com) Licence: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  7. After a day spent exploring the E3 show floor, the writing team reconvenes to discuss what they learned after spending time talking with developers and publishers. There's a lot to discuss! Jack Gardner, Naomi Lugo, Zak Wojnar, and Marcus Stewart gather to talk about the best games they've seen so far and what might be just around the corner in gaming. Together, the group has assembled to help parse the massive number of games and experiences brought on by the year's biggest gaming trade show. They will be doing daily recaps of each day of the event, cataloging what they've seen, heard, and played. Music from https://filmmusic.io: "Spellbound" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com) Licence: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  8. After a day spent exploring the E3 show floor, the writing team reconvenes to discuss what they learned after spending time talking with developers and publishers. There's a lot to discuss! Jack Gardner, Naomi Lugo, Zak Wojnar, and Marcus Stewart gather to talk about the best games they've seen so far and what might be just around the corner in gaming. Together, the group has assembled to help parse the massive number of games and experiences brought on by the year's biggest gaming trade show. They will be doing daily recaps of each day of the event, cataloging what they've seen, heard, and played. Music from https://filmmusic.io: "Spellbound" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com) Licence: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  9. Rumors of a game collaboration between Game of Thrones writer George R.R. Martin and developers FromSoftware and Bandai Namco circulated before it officially revealed during the E3 Microsoft press conference on June 9. The only information available at that time though was the name Elden Ring and some imagery. Leaks revealed themselves via a security issue with the Bandai Namco site where information on Elden Ring, a Ni no Kuni remaster, and new Tales game existed. A leak almost seemed predestined due to the game’s progress, “Development for Elden Ring started just after development for the Dark Souls 3 DLC had ended,” said Hidetaka Miyazaki. During the press conference, the official reveal trailer made its debut. From the trailer, we gather that Elden Ring is a new intellectual property and takes place in a universe created by both Martin and president of FromSoftware Hidetaka Miyazaki. Miyazaki, before becoming the head of the Japanese game dev company joined FromSoftware as a game designer and headed the creation of the Dark Souls series. The trailer itself starts with dramatic footage (complete with eerie sound design) of a figure seemingly presenting a dismembered arm to a whole host of grasping arms with unknown origins. As the camera pans out, it looks like these arms could even belong to the figure, but just as soon as we may be able to piece anything together, we move on to the next scene. “I doubt you could even imagine it,” the looming narrative voice says over this imagery in a moment of metacommentary. The rest of the trailer showcases imagery of what we can presume is a blacksmith forming armor as depictions of battle flash in and out. The blacksmith appears to break in both a literal and physical means as their body begins to crack. Then the trailer cuts out. Further details were released via Microsoft however. Via the game’s page description on the Xbox website we learned that Elden Ring is a fantasy action-RPG adventure. “Danger and discovery lurk around every corner in FromSoftware’s largest game to-date,” says the game page. No release window surfaced with the reveal trailer but we did learn that the game releases to Xbox One and PC. Elden Ring is set to publish via Bandai Namco with FromSoftware heading the development. What do you think Elden Ring will look like? When will we get to play it? Let us know your predictions in the comments and on social! Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  10. Rumors of a game collaboration between Game of Thrones writer George R.R. Martin and developers FromSoftware and Bandai Namco circulated before it officially revealed during the E3 Microsoft press conference on June 9. The only information available at that time though was the name Elden Ring and some imagery. Leaks revealed themselves via a security issue with the Bandai Namco site where information on Elden Ring, a Ni no Kuni remaster, and new Tales game existed. A leak almost seemed predestined due to the game’s progress, “Development for Elden Ring started just after development for the Dark Souls 3 DLC had ended,” said Hidetaka Miyazaki. During the press conference, the official reveal trailer made its debut. From the trailer, we gather that Elden Ring is a new intellectual property and takes place in a universe created by both Martin and president of FromSoftware Hidetaka Miyazaki. Miyazaki, before becoming the head of the Japanese game dev company joined FromSoftware as a game designer and headed the creation of the Dark Souls series. The trailer itself starts with dramatic footage (complete with eerie sound design) of a figure seemingly presenting a dismembered arm to a whole host of grasping arms with unknown origins. As the camera pans out, it looks like these arms could even belong to the figure, but just as soon as we may be able to piece anything together, we move on to the next scene. “I doubt you could even imagine it,” the looming narrative voice says over this imagery in a moment of metacommentary. The rest of the trailer showcases imagery of what we can presume is a blacksmith forming armor as depictions of battle flash in and out. The blacksmith appears to break in both a literal and physical means as their body begins to crack. Then the trailer cuts out. Further details were released via Microsoft however. Via the game’s page description on the Xbox website we learned that Elden Ring is a fantasy action-RPG adventure. “Danger and discovery lurk around every corner in FromSoftware’s largest game to-date,” says the game page. No release window surfaced with the reveal trailer but we did learn that the game releases to Xbox One and PC. Elden Ring is set to publish via Bandai Namco with FromSoftware heading the development. What do you think Elden Ring will look like? When will we get to play it? Let us know your predictions in the comments and on social! Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  11. Another year, another E3! Jack and Naomi are back together again and are joined by Marcus Stewart and Zak Wojnar. Together, the group has assembled to help parse the massive number of games and experiences brought on by the year's biggest gaming trade show. They will be doing daily recaps of each day of the event, cataloging what they've seen and played. With this first recap, the convention center in LA hasn't even opened yet, but the press conferences are all but complete (with the sole exception of Nintendo). The four industry professionals give you the best insight we have into what's been announced and what it might mean. Music from https://filmmusic.io: "Spellbound" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com) Licence: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  12. Another year, another E3! Jack and Naomi are back together again and are joined by Marcus Stewart and Zak Wojnar. Together, the group has assembled to help parse the massive number of games and experiences brought on by the year's biggest gaming trade show. They will be doing daily recaps of each day of the event, cataloging what they've seen and played. With this first recap, the convention center in LA hasn't even opened yet, but the press conferences are all but complete (with the sole exception of Nintendo). The four industry professionals give you the best insight we have into what's been announced and what it might mean. Music from https://filmmusic.io: "Spellbound" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com) Licence: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  13. Although Final Fantasy VII stole show at Square Enix's E3 2019 presentation, the publisher also announced a high definition port of the beloved Final Fantasy VIII, due out later this year. Final Fantasy VIII Remastered completes the trilogy of mainline PlayStation Final Fantasy titles playable on modern consoles. It came as something of a surprise when VII and IX were announced for PlayStation 4 (and later, other current-gen systems), while no news emerged regarding VIII. At long last, that unfortunate oversight has been noted and rectified with the announcement of Final Fantasy VIII Remastered. Initially released in 1999 for the PlayStation, Final Fantasy VIII earned a legion of fans for its innovative Junction system, which lessened the importance of traditional JRPG level grinding by instead focusing on linking magic to characters' stats, allowing for greater customization of the roster's strengths and weaknesses. The story of Final Fantasy VIII divided audiences with its intimate focus on the whirlwind romance between protagonists Squall and Rinoa, with game-changing plot twists that would define other titles in the series being swiftly overlooked by the characters who simply have different priorities in their lives. Final Fantasy VIII's bold storytelling was controversial to the point of derision, but now allows the game to stand out from the pack in an ever-growing landscape of JRPG titles. While Final Fantasy VII and Final Fantasy IX both received minor visual enhancements in their HD ports, Square Enix has clearly gone an extra mile with Final Fantasy VIII, with brand new textures replacing the old, pixelated versions, allowing characters to appear clear and expressive in battle. Subtle, yet profound, the changes cause character models to practically pop off the screen; it still looks like a classic PlayStation game, but the prettiest and cleanest HD version of a PlayStation game one could possibly imagine. As of this writing, it's unclear as to whether Final Fantasy VIII Remastered will receive any other enhancements over the original game; the HD ports of VII and IX both benefited from cheats which allowed players to skip random encounters, instantly max out stats, and triple the game's speed. It would be reasonable to expect Final Fantasy VIII to follow suit, but nothing is confirmed yet. Either way, fans of the classic PlayStation era of Final Fantasy will be overjoyed to have all three timeless classics downloaded to their gaming platform of choice, finally playable in glorious high definition. Final Fantasy VIII Remastered releases later in 2019 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  14. Although Final Fantasy VII stole show at Square Enix's E3 2019 presentation, the publisher also announced a high definition port of the beloved Final Fantasy VIII, due out later this year. Final Fantasy VIII Remastered completes the trilogy of mainline PlayStation Final Fantasy titles playable on modern consoles. It came as something of a surprise when VII and IX were announced for PlayStation 4 (and later, other current-gen systems), while no news emerged regarding VIII. At long last, that unfortunate oversight has been noted and rectified with the announcement of Final Fantasy VIII Remastered. Initially released in 1999 for the PlayStation, Final Fantasy VIII earned a legion of fans for its innovative Junction system, which lessened the importance of traditional JRPG level grinding by instead focusing on linking magic to characters' stats, allowing for greater customization of the roster's strengths and weaknesses. The story of Final Fantasy VIII divided audiences with its intimate focus on the whirlwind romance between protagonists Squall and Rinoa, with game-changing plot twists that would define other titles in the series being swiftly overlooked by the characters who simply have different priorities in their lives. Final Fantasy VIII's bold storytelling was controversial to the point of derision, but now allows the game to stand out from the pack in an ever-growing landscape of JRPG titles. While Final Fantasy VII and Final Fantasy IX both received minor visual enhancements in their HD ports, Square Enix has clearly gone an extra mile with Final Fantasy VIII, with brand new textures replacing the old, pixelated versions, allowing characters to appear clear and expressive in battle. Subtle, yet profound, the changes cause character models to practically pop off the screen; it still looks like a classic PlayStation game, but the prettiest and cleanest HD version of a PlayStation game one could possibly imagine. As of this writing, it's unclear as to whether Final Fantasy VIII Remastered will receive any other enhancements over the original game; the HD ports of VII and IX both benefited from cheats which allowed players to skip random encounters, instantly max out stats, and triple the game's speed. It would be reasonable to expect Final Fantasy VIII to follow suit, but nothing is confirmed yet. Either way, fans of the classic PlayStation era of Final Fantasy will be overjoyed to have all three timeless classics downloaded to their gaming platform of choice, finally playable in glorious high definition. Final Fantasy VIII Remastered releases later in 2019 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  15. Back in 2017, Square Enix and Marvel announced their collaboration on a game based on Earth's Mightiest Heroes, The Avengers. After over two years of total silence, E3 2019 saw the debut of Marvel's Avengers, an online multiplayer co-op action game with a narrative focus and a unique take on the world of Marvel's comic book universe. Although Square Enix's presentation on Marvel's Avengers failed to show off any actual gameplay, the trailer was built using the in-game engine. The visuals look spectacular, with a realistic style clearly inspired by the MCU, but with its own unique takes on the signature heroes which will surely cause discussions within the fandom; for example, Captain America wears a tactical outfit complete with a bulky flak jacket, giving him a more brutish appearance than the Chris Evans version of the character. Marvel's Avengers tells an intriguing story which looks to set up a brand new status quo for these iconic characters. The first trailer for the game (seen below) shows the events of "A-Day," which sees the destruction of the team's custom helicarrier, causing the death of numerous civilians and – apparently – Captain America himself. Five years later, The Avengers have long since disbanded, but are forced to reassemble when a new threat presents itself. One notable mystery teased in the presentation regards the origin of the helicarrier's destruction; was it doomed by a miscalculation from Tony Stark, or sabotaged by an outside force? Despite the apparent death of Captain America, there must be more to this part of the story, since the star-spangled man remains one of five playable characters confirmed by developers Crystal Dynamics and Eidos Montreal, who had previously collaborated on 2018's Shadow of the Tomb Raider. Alongside Cap, Iron Man, Black Widow, The Hulk, and Thor round out the main cast revealed during the presentation, though a teaser at the end did suggest Hank Pym (Ant-Man) plays a role in the game, though it remains unclear if he will be a playable Avenger. As for future content updates, the team promised that playable Avengers will be free, and there will be no lootboxes or pay-to-win microtransactions. They also teased early beta access for PlayStation 4 players and further exclusive "surprises" to be revealed at a later date. Could this include a potential crossover with Marvel's Spider-Man? We can only speculate. While it's easy to get excited for Marvel's Avengers, the E3 presentation left more questions than answers. We still haven't seen gameplay, how multiplayer works compared to playing solo, and how much content will be available at launch; while the absence of lootboxes is much appreciated, the promise of an "ever-expanding" experience can't help but call to mind the veritable graveyard of "live service" titles which were lambasted for a dearth of content in the early part of their life cycles. No matter what, the promise of a big-budget Avengers video game is simply too good to ignore. More information about the ambitious title will surely trickle out as E3 2019 progresses, but perhaps the biggest and most exciting announcement regarding this mysterious game came in the form of a release date: Marvel's Avengers hits PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC, and Google Stadia on May 15, 2020. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  16. Back in 2017, Square Enix and Marvel announced their collaboration on a game based on Earth's Mightiest Heroes, The Avengers. After over two years of total silence, E3 2019 saw the debut of Marvel's Avengers, an online multiplayer co-op action game with a narrative focus and a unique take on the world of Marvel's comic book universe. Although Square Enix's presentation on Marvel's Avengers failed to show off any actual gameplay, the trailer was built using the in-game engine. The visuals look spectacular, with a realistic style clearly inspired by the MCU, but with its own unique takes on the signature heroes which will surely cause discussions within the fandom; for example, Captain America wears a tactical outfit complete with a bulky flak jacket, giving him a more brutish appearance than the Chris Evans version of the character. Marvel's Avengers tells an intriguing story which looks to set up a brand new status quo for these iconic characters. The first trailer for the game (seen below) shows the events of "A-Day," which sees the destruction of the team's custom helicarrier, causing the death of numerous civilians and – apparently – Captain America himself. Five years later, The Avengers have long since disbanded, but are forced to reassemble when a new threat presents itself. One notable mystery teased in the presentation regards the origin of the helicarrier's destruction; was it doomed by a miscalculation from Tony Stark, or sabotaged by an outside force? Despite the apparent death of Captain America, there must be more to this part of the story, since the star-spangled man remains one of five playable characters confirmed by developers Crystal Dynamics and Eidos Montreal, who had previously collaborated on 2018's Shadow of the Tomb Raider. Alongside Cap, Iron Man, Black Widow, The Hulk, and Thor round out the main cast revealed during the presentation, though a teaser at the end did suggest Hank Pym (Ant-Man) plays a role in the game, though it remains unclear if he will be a playable Avenger. As for future content updates, the team promised that playable Avengers will be free, and there will be no lootboxes or pay-to-win microtransactions. They also teased early beta access for PlayStation 4 players and further exclusive "surprises" to be revealed at a later date. Could this include a potential crossover with Marvel's Spider-Man? We can only speculate. While it's easy to get excited for Marvel's Avengers, the E3 presentation left more questions than answers. We still haven't seen gameplay, how multiplayer works compared to playing solo, and how much content will be available at launch; while the absence of lootboxes is much appreciated, the promise of an "ever-expanding" experience can't help but call to mind the veritable graveyard of "live service" titles which were lambasted for a dearth of content in the early part of their life cycles. No matter what, the promise of a big-budget Avengers video game is simply too good to ignore. More information about the ambitious title will surely trickle out as E3 2019 progresses, but perhaps the biggest and most exciting announcement regarding this mysterious game came in the form of a release date: Marvel's Avengers hits PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC, and Google Stadia on May 15, 2020. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  17. There are few things in this world more satisfying than killing Nazis, and no video game series handles this task with more righteous vigor than Wolfenstein. Originally created by id Software in the 1980s, it was 1992's Wolfenstein 3D which caused the series to skyrocket in popularity, revolutionizing the first-person shooter genre and changing video games forever. In 2014, developer MachineGames revived the franchise with Wolfenstein: The New Order, shocking audiences with its provocative alternate history story and impactful gunplay. Wolfenstein: Youngblood sees the twin daughters of series protagonist B.J. Blazkowicz take the fight to Nazi-occupied Paris after their father goes missing in the region. Set twenty years after the end of Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus, Youngblood follows the next generation of Nazi-killers as they take up the family trade. Co-developed by Arkane Studios (Prey, Dishonored), Youngblood adds two player co-op to the mix, allowing players to team up with a friend to save B.J. from the Nazi menace. Along the way, the sisters will inevitably rack up a massive body count with the series' signature mix of efficiently gory stealth kills and visceral shooting. The Wolfenstein games (especially the latest chapters) have always been exceptionally violent, and Youngblood proudly carries the blood-soaked torch in that regard! The recent Wolfenstein games take place in an alternate history in which the Nazis won World War II due to their use of anachronistic technology developed by The New Order's main villain, General Deathshead.The aesthetic of Youngblood leans heavily on its 1980s setting, and the trailer offers moody synth licks which match nicely with the retro dystopia of a Paris subjugated by fascism. Youngblood ups the ante from its predecessors with even more visibly high-tech weaponry and lasers which fire a decidedly neon-hued stream of flaming light. B.J.'s daughters, Jessica and Sophia, know their way around a battlefield, and they both wear the same type of high-tech body suit which B.J. himself equipped in Wolfenstein II. MachineGames and Arkane promise Youngblood offers the biggest environments yet seen in a Wolfenstein title, encouraging players to use teamwork while still being able to tackle combat scenarios however they choose. The series already shines in this respect, and Arkane's work on such freedom-driven games as Dishonored can only add to this mission statement. Depending on how skillfully the game takes advantage of its co-op potential, Youngblood may prove more than just a stopgap in between "proper" Wolfenstein titles; it could be a fantastic co-op experience for the ages. Wolfenstein: Youngblood releases July 26 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  18. There are few things in this world more satisfying than killing Nazis, and no video game series handles this task with more righteous vigor than Wolfenstein. Originally created by id Software in the 1980s, it was 1992's Wolfenstein 3D which caused the series to skyrocket in popularity, revolutionizing the first-person shooter genre and changing video games forever. In 2014, developer MachineGames revived the franchise with Wolfenstein: The New Order, shocking audiences with its provocative alternate history story and impactful gunplay. Wolfenstein: Youngblood sees the twin daughters of series protagonist B.J. Blazkowicz take the fight to Nazi-occupied Paris after their father goes missing in the region. Set twenty years after the end of Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus, Youngblood follows the next generation of Nazi-killers as they take up the family trade. Co-developed by Arkane Studios (Prey, Dishonored), Youngblood adds two player co-op to the mix, allowing players to team up with a friend to save B.J. from the Nazi menace. Along the way, the sisters will inevitably rack up a massive body count with the series' signature mix of efficiently gory stealth kills and visceral shooting. The Wolfenstein games (especially the latest chapters) have always been exceptionally violent, and Youngblood proudly carries the blood-soaked torch in that regard! The recent Wolfenstein games take place in an alternate history in which the Nazis won World War II due to their use of anachronistic technology developed by The New Order's main villain, General Deathshead.The aesthetic of Youngblood leans heavily on its 1980s setting, and the trailer offers moody synth licks which match nicely with the retro dystopia of a Paris subjugated by fascism. Youngblood ups the ante from its predecessors with even more visibly high-tech weaponry and lasers which fire a decidedly neon-hued stream of flaming light. B.J.'s daughters, Jessica and Sophia, know their way around a battlefield, and they both wear the same type of high-tech body suit which B.J. himself equipped in Wolfenstein II. MachineGames and Arkane promise Youngblood offers the biggest environments yet seen in a Wolfenstein title, encouraging players to use teamwork while still being able to tackle combat scenarios however they choose. The series already shines in this respect, and Arkane's work on such freedom-driven games as Dishonored can only add to this mission statement. Depending on how skillfully the game takes advantage of its co-op potential, Youngblood may prove more than just a stopgap in between "proper" Wolfenstein titles; it could be a fantastic co-op experience for the ages. Wolfenstein: Youngblood releases July 26 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  19. Final Fantasy VII: A Symphonic Reunion played to a packed audience yesterday, bringing the musical themes and melodies of the classic PlayStation One title to life. However, attendees got a bit more than they bargained for when Tetsuya Nomura, the director of both the Kingdom Hearts franchise and the upcoming Final Fantasy VII Remake, took the stage along with the game's producer, Yoshinori Kitase. Ahead of the upcoming Square Enix press conference for E3, the duo announced the official release date for the PS4 worldwide release of the long anticipated remake: March 3, 2020. Along with this news, they introduced a short clip of both gameplay footage and in-game cinematics that had never been seen before. They also revealed a piece of key art for the game's antagonist, Sephiroth. In the image, Sephiroth stands atop a pillar of rumble as the decimated city of Midgar burns behind him. As if that wasn't enough, more information is supposed to be coming later today at the Square Enix media event. If the release date and a new trailer aren't everything that Square Enix has in store, there must be some truly intriguing nuggets of information still to come. Perhaps they are related to how the game's episodic releases will be structured? With all of the development trouble Final Fantasy VII Remake has gone through, it would hardly be surprising if Square Enix announced that one of their most anticipated titles will be undergoing some dramatic last minute transformations. Square Enix will be holding its press event later today at 6pm PDT, so we will learn more then. Until it starts, though, it's always fun to speculate! What do you think Square still has left to reveal about Final Fantasy VII Remake? Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  20. Final Fantasy VII: A Symphonic Reunion played to a packed audience yesterday, bringing the musical themes and melodies of the classic PlayStation One title to life. However, attendees got a bit more than they bargained for when Tetsuya Nomura, the director of both the Kingdom Hearts franchise and the upcoming Final Fantasy VII Remake, took the stage along with the game's producer, Yoshinori Kitase. Ahead of the upcoming Square Enix press conference for E3, the duo announced the official release date for the PS4 worldwide release of the long anticipated remake: March 3, 2020. Along with this news, they introduced a short clip of both gameplay footage and in-game cinematics that had never been seen before. They also revealed a piece of key art for the game's antagonist, Sephiroth. In the image, Sephiroth stands atop a pillar of rumble as the decimated city of Midgar burns behind him. As if that wasn't enough, more information is supposed to be coming later today at the Square Enix media event. If the release date and a new trailer aren't everything that Square Enix has in store, there must be some truly intriguing nuggets of information still to come. Perhaps they are related to how the game's episodic releases will be structured? With all of the development trouble Final Fantasy VII Remake has gone through, it would hardly be surprising if Square Enix announced that one of their most anticipated titles will be undergoing some dramatic last minute transformations. Square Enix will be holding its press event later today at 6pm PDT, so we will learn more then. Until it starts, though, it's always fun to speculate! What do you think Square still has left to reveal about Final Fantasy VII Remake? Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  21. To say Fallout 76 failed to meet fan expectations for the multiplayer-focused sci-fi title would be a massive understatement. Upon its initial launch last year, Fallout 76 bombed critically, not unlike the nuclear Armageddon which created the irradiated wasteland that serves as the game's setting. For better or worse, the "games as a service" trend means games are living, breathing experiences which evolve over time; a bad game can turn itself around and become what it should have been from the start. Fallout 76, Bethesda's multiplayer experiment in the Fallout universe, is aiming to turn itself around with a slew of "Year 2" content which has the potential to turn the game's short-term failure into long-term success. The jury's still out on whether or not the game will ultimately succeed in its attempt at course correction, but the early impressions seen at Bethesda's E3 press conference look promising enough for apprehensive gamers to err on the side of cautious optimism. Two new additions are coming to Fallout 76. First up, Nuclear Winter, a battle royale mode which combines the trendy "last person standing" rules of the most popular multiplayer experiences on the market with the particular gunplay and mechanics of Fallout 76. The 52-player mode will become available as a "sneak peek" starting June 10. Conveniently, June 10 also marks the start of a week-long Fallout 76 free trial across all platforms. Further into the future, this fall sees the release of a free, new expansion for Fallout 76, Wastelanders. This expansion includes human NPCs for players to interact with, as well as a brand new main quest. The biggest issues players had with the base game involved its toothless storytelling and anemic quests, devoid of personality and context. The classic Fallout formula, of meaningful player choice, extensive dialogue options, and well-written characters, was completely absent from Fallout 76. If Wastelanders applies these features as well as it promises, the Fallout 76 of the future will be a marked improvement from its current state, to say nothing of its rocky launch. We've seen these "live service" games turn themselves around; The Division had certain issues at launch which were ironed out through multiple patches and content drops. Destiny 2 was seen as a sparse sequel which managed to pad out its content and smooth out its rough edges with remarkable grace. Will Fallout 76 join these games and reverse its initial misfortunes? Or should this nuclear wasteland remain quarantined from the general public? We'll find out as Nuclear Winter and Wastelanders release throughout the remainder of 2019. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  22. To say Fallout 76 failed to meet fan expectations for the multiplayer-focused sci-fi title would be a massive understatement. Upon its initial launch last year, Fallout 76 bombed critically, not unlike the nuclear Armageddon which created the irradiated wasteland that serves as the game's setting. For better or worse, the "games as a service" trend means games are living, breathing experiences which evolve over time; a bad game can turn itself around and become what it should have been from the start. Fallout 76, Bethesda's multiplayer experiment in the Fallout universe, is aiming to turn itself around with a slew of "Year 2" content which has the potential to turn the game's short-term failure into long-term success. The jury's still out on whether or not the game will ultimately succeed in its attempt at course correction, but the early impressions seen at Bethesda's E3 press conference look promising enough for apprehensive gamers to err on the side of cautious optimism. Two new additions are coming to Fallout 76. First up, Nuclear Winter, a battle royale mode which combines the trendy "last person standing" rules of the most popular multiplayer experiences on the market with the particular gunplay and mechanics of Fallout 76. The 52-player mode will become available as a "sneak peek" starting June 10. Conveniently, June 10 also marks the start of a week-long Fallout 76 free trial across all platforms. Further into the future, this fall sees the release of a free, new expansion for Fallout 76, Wastelanders. This expansion includes human NPCs for players to interact with, as well as a brand new main quest. The biggest issues players had with the base game involved its toothless storytelling and anemic quests, devoid of personality and context. The classic Fallout formula, of meaningful player choice, extensive dialogue options, and well-written characters, was completely absent from Fallout 76. If Wastelanders applies these features as well as it promises, the Fallout 76 of the future will be a marked improvement from its current state, to say nothing of its rocky launch. We've seen these "live service" games turn themselves around; The Division had certain issues at launch which were ironed out through multiple patches and content drops. Destiny 2 was seen as a sparse sequel which managed to pad out its content and smooth out its rough edges with remarkable grace. Will Fallout 76 join these games and reverse its initial misfortunes? Or should this nuclear wasteland remain quarantined from the general public? We'll find out as Nuclear Winter and Wastelanders release throughout the remainder of 2019. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
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