Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'e3 2016'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Extra Life News
    • Extra Life Updates
    • Best Practices
    • Community Content
    • Why I Extra Life
    • Fundraising
    • Contests
  • Gaming News
  • Features
  • Podcast

Discussions

  • Extra Life Discussions
    • General Extra Life Discussion
    • Local Extra Lifers
    • Fundraising Ideas
    • Live Streaming Tips & Tricks
    • Official Extra Life Stream Team Discussion
    • Extra Life JSON Code Discussion & Sharing
    • Extra Life United
    • Extra Life Q & A
  • Articles & Extra Life Announcements
    • Announcements
  • Official Extra Life Guilds
    • Guild information and Discussion
    • Canada
    • Northeastern US
    • Southeastern US
    • Central US
    • Western US
  • Gaming Discussions
    • General Gaming Discussion
  • Other Stuff
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Recent Posts

Calendars

  • Extra Life Community Calendar
  • Extra Life Stream Team
  • Akron Guild
  • Albany Guild
  • Albuquerque Guild
  • Anchorage Guild
  • Atlanta Guild
  • Austin Guild
  • Bakersfield Guild
  • Baltimore Guild
  • Birmingham Guild
  • Boston Guild
  • Burlington Guild
  • Buffalo Guild
  • Calgary, AB Guild
  • Morgantown Guild
  • Charlottesville Guild
  • Chicago Guild
  • Cincinnati Guild
  • Cleveland Guild
  • Columbia, MO Guild
  • Columbus, OH Guild
  • Dallas Guild
  • Dayton Guild
  • Denver Guild
  • Des Moines Guild
  • Detroit Guild
  • Edmonton, AB Guild
  • Fargo-Valley City Guild
  • Fresno Guild
  • Ft. Worth Guild
  • Gainesville-Tallahassee Guild
  • Grand Rapids Guild
  • Halifax, NS Guild
  • Hamilton, ON Guild
  • Hartford Guild
  • Hershey Guild
  • Hudson Valley Guild
  • Houston Guild
  • Indianapolis Guild
  • Jacksonville Guild
  • Kansas City Guild
  • Knoxville Guild
  • Lansing Guild
  • London, ON Guild
  • Los Angeles Guild
  • Milwaukee / Madison Guild
  • Minneapolis / Twin Cities Guild
  • Montreal / Quebec City Guild
  • Nashville Guild
  • Newark Guild
  • NYC & Long Island Guild
  • Oakland / San Francisco Guild
  • Omaha Guild
  • Orange County Guild
  • Orlando Guild
  • Ottawa, ON Guild
  • Philadelphia Guild
  • Phoenix Guild
  • Pittsburgh Guild
  • Portland, OR Guild
  • Portland, ME Guild
  • Raleigh-Durham Guild
  • Richmond Guild
  • Sacramento Guild
  • Salt Lake City Guild
  • San Antonio Guild
  • San Diego Guild
  • San Juan, PR Guild
  • Saskatchewan Guild
  • Seattle Guild
  • Spokane Guild
  • Springfield-Champaign, IL Guild
  • Springfield, MA Guild
  • St. Louis Guild
  • Syracuse Guild
  • Tampa / St. Petersburg Guild
  • Toronto, ON Guild
  • Vancouver, BC Guild
  • Washington DC Guild
  • Winnipeg, MB Guild
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Events
  • Extra Life Akron's Events

Categories

  • Broadcasting Toolkit
  • Multimedia Kit
  • Extra Life Guild Tool Kit
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Files
  • Extra Life Akron's Files

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Hospital


Location


Why I "Extra Life"


Interests


Twitter


Instagram


Twitch


Mixer


Discord


Blizzard Battletag


Nintendo ID


PSN ID


Steam


Origin


Xbox Gamertag

Found 34 results

  1. Marcus Stewart

    In Aragami, the Darkness is Your Ultimate Weapon

    Tenchu: Stealth Assassins was a great game in its day. Sneaking around as the ninja Rikimaru, you took down adversaries using a combination of cool weaponry and sheer wits. Since Tenchu has been put on ice, it’s been a long time since gaming has received a 3D ninja stealth game. Enter Lince Works’ Aragami to fill that void. This stylish stealth title partly acts as a callback to Tenchu’s heyday, but carves its own identity thanks to a suite of supernatural shadow-based abilities. I sat down with Aragami's designers to complete the first three levels and came away impressed. As the titular ninja, you’ve been summoned from the dead by an enigmatic girl named Yamiko. In addition to new life, Aragami has also been bestowed with the power to manipulate shadows. Players can teleport between shadows to bypass obstacles and sneak past enemies. Shadow teleporting took some getting used to due to the aiming reticule, but once I was settled in, I was zipping around relatively smoothly. I regularly used it to warp behind enemies and perform lethal takedowns. Other powers include being able to generate and place your own shadows (ideal for lit areas), and even summoning a shadow dragon. One of my favorite powers was Shin'en, a shadow-based ground trap. I set one up, then goaded a guard into chasing me near it. Once he was within range, I triggered my trap which summoned a black hole that devoured him without leaving a trace. The developers told me these abilities can be expanded by upgrading them. As an example, players who invest in upgrading Shin'en can eventually tag enemies with it. They could eliminate that single foe or, even better, activate it once the target is near other comrades to suck up multiple foes in one fell swoop. All of the abilities I used seemed cool and, most importantly, useful. I found myself regularly swapping between all of them as I played. Aragami’s otherworldly talents are powerful but limited. His cape acts as a physical spell meter, conveying shadow usage with the fading of its glowing pattern. The effect is somewhat reminiscent of the traveler’s scarf in Journey. Hiding in dark areas replenishes shadow magic, so players must be mindful of how and where they use their powers. If Aragami’s supernatural gas tank is running on empty, he can rely on his good, old-fashioned sword and kunai. I found the latter particularly handy for discreetly killing enemies from a distance. Aragami is a hardcore stealth game through and through, so remaining undetected is vital. Triggering an alert makes missions significantly harder. This is mainly because when Kaiho, the army of light, spot players, they unleash radiant beams that kill in a single hit. Not to mention that checkpoints are situated between decently large segments. I had to restart entire areas anew several times, but my frustration was tempered by the fact that deaths were entirely my fault, due to either my carelessness or my impatience. Aragami is tough and demands skill, but it’s not unfair. Whether you choose cut down every adversary or sneak by without harming a hair, Aragami rewards both approaches and doesn’t push players towards either option. I finished a zone by taking the non-violent route (which is tough to do) and was recognized for it with a special accolade in the post-level grading screen. As nice as that felt, it was equally satisfying to just murder everyone and receive an award for clearing the stage of all enemies - a challenging feat in its own right. Player freedom is also encouraged in the variety of routes presented in each level. I once stumbled upon a secret area that lead to a shortcut. Thorough explorers will discover hidden ninja scrolls that weave narrative threads about Aragami’s former life as well as his explaining connection to Yamiko. Those who wish to share the shadows with a friend can do so in Aragami’s cooperative mode. Two players can tackle the entire campaign together online. Both players have to reach the end of levels to complete them and must trust in one another's skills to do so effectively. A slip-up from one player, such as raising an alarm, makes things harder for his or her partner. As someone who enjoys stealth games, as well as all things ninja, Aragami is officially on my radar. The shadow gameplay fits the ninja philosophy like a glove, plus it's just flat-out cool. As I stated earlier, the difficulty is up there but much of the fun is derived from the steep challenge. I relished the opportunity to test my skills in each new area. Aragami rises from the shadows this fall for PlayStation 4 as well as PC, Mac, and Linux.
  2. Tenchu: Stealth Assassins was a great game in its day. Sneaking around as the ninja Rikimaru, you took down adversaries using a combination of cool weaponry and sheer wits. Since Tenchu has been put on ice, it’s been a long time since gaming has received a 3D ninja stealth game. Enter Lince Works’ Aragami to fill that void. This stylish stealth title partly acts as a callback to Tenchu’s heyday, but carves its own identity thanks to a suite of supernatural shadow-based abilities. I sat down with Aragami's designers to complete the first three levels and came away impressed. As the titular ninja, you’ve been summoned from the dead by an enigmatic girl named Yamiko. In addition to new life, Aragami has also been bestowed with the power to manipulate shadows. Players can teleport between shadows to bypass obstacles and sneak past enemies. Shadow teleporting took some getting used to due to the aiming reticule, but once I was settled in, I was zipping around relatively smoothly. I regularly used it to warp behind enemies and perform lethal takedowns. Other powers include being able to generate and place your own shadows (ideal for lit areas), and even summoning a shadow dragon. One of my favorite powers was Shin'en, a shadow-based ground trap. I set one up, then goaded a guard into chasing me near it. Once he was within range, I triggered my trap which summoned a black hole that devoured him without leaving a trace. The developers told me these abilities can be expanded by upgrading them. As an example, players who invest in upgrading Shin'en can eventually tag enemies with it. They could eliminate that single foe or, even better, activate it once the target is near other comrades to suck up multiple foes in one fell swoop. All of the abilities I used seemed cool and, most importantly, useful. I found myself regularly swapping between all of them as I played. Aragami’s otherworldly talents are powerful but limited. His cape acts as a physical spell meter, conveying shadow usage with the fading of its glowing pattern. The effect is somewhat reminiscent of the traveler’s scarf in Journey. Hiding in dark areas replenishes shadow magic, so players must be mindful of how and where they use their powers. If Aragami’s supernatural gas tank is running on empty, he can rely on his good, old-fashioned sword and kunai. I found the latter particularly handy for discreetly killing enemies from a distance. Aragami is a hardcore stealth game through and through, so remaining undetected is vital. Triggering an alert makes missions significantly harder. This is mainly because when Kaiho, the army of light, spot players, they unleash radiant beams that kill in a single hit. Not to mention that checkpoints are situated between decently large segments. I had to restart entire areas anew several times, but my frustration was tempered by the fact that deaths were entirely my fault, due to either my carelessness or my impatience. Aragami is tough and demands skill, but it’s not unfair. Whether you choose cut down every adversary or sneak by without harming a hair, Aragami rewards both approaches and doesn’t push players towards either option. I finished a zone by taking the non-violent route (which is tough to do) and was recognized for it with a special accolade in the post-level grading screen. As nice as that felt, it was equally satisfying to just murder everyone and receive an award for clearing the stage of all enemies - a challenging feat in its own right. Player freedom is also encouraged in the variety of routes presented in each level. I once stumbled upon a secret area that lead to a shortcut. Thorough explorers will discover hidden ninja scrolls that weave narrative threads about Aragami’s former life as well as his explaining connection to Yamiko. Those who wish to share the shadows with a friend can do so in Aragami’s cooperative mode. Two players can tackle the entire campaign together online. Both players have to reach the end of levels to complete them and must trust in one another's skills to do so effectively. A slip-up from one player, such as raising an alarm, makes things harder for his or her partner. As someone who enjoys stealth games, as well as all things ninja, Aragami is officially on my radar. The shadow gameplay fits the ninja philosophy like a glove, plus it's just flat-out cool. As I stated earlier, the difficulty is up there but much of the fun is derived from the steep challenge. I relished the opportunity to test my skills in each new area. Aragami rises from the shadows this fall for PlayStation 4 as well as PC, Mac, and Linux. View full article
  3. What exactly is a “Tetroidvania”? That’s the question I posed to designer Bob Webb when I met with him to play Next Gen Pants' upcoming title, Refactor. This incomprehensible mash-up of Tetris and a Metroidvania was something I needed to experience first-hand to truly understand it. After playing through the first stage, I found Refactor to be a more cohesive and fascinating experience than I imagined. Players assume the role of an imperfect, 3-squared shape who is on a conveyor belt loaded with other rejected blocks headed towards destruction. Webb says Refactor is a game about imperfect shapes trying to find a place in a world that doesn’t want them. You wouldn’t expect a world inhabited by blocks to have much personality, but the character’s WALL-E-inspired communication, as well as environmental elements like Cold War-era propaganda posters promoting perfection, establish an oppressive yet humorous atmosphere. Refactor's overall tone is evocative of Oddworld: Abe's Oddysee, a comparison Webb acknowledged as a common one. Refactor performs as a mostly physics-based platformer. Despite the protagonist being an awkward, hard-edged shape, moving around doesn’t reflect that. Rolling along feels smoother than I expected, with momentum gained as you push forward. Jumping feels adequate and leaves a margin for error that allows for quick mid-air adjustments, an element I made ample use of to complete tricky maneuvers. It’s also possible to cling onto ledges and pull yourself up. Early on, players encounter a second character, a single cube, who combines with the player to create proper four-squared object. In addition to bypassing sentry droids seeking out imperfect shapes, upgrades are tied to the multiple forms this duo can become. The square shape grants a downward slam used to defeat enemies or press buttons. The T-shape can grapple onto objects or foes. While the premise is certainly different, Refractor’s true uniqueness lies in its level design. It’s a somewhat tricky concept to explain, so bear with me. Rooms are shaped like Tetris blocks and can be rotated and joined together to form various paths. Entering designated control rooms opens a simple map interface that displays every available area and is where players tinker with room arrangement. Manipulating levels is a puzzle game in itself, messing around with several configurations to find a path that works. A quick tutorial at the game’s start does a great job of explaining the mechanic in a manner that's plain and easy to grasp. At one point, I got stuck for a good while trying to create a working path (I made it more complicated than it was), but there’s enjoyment in discovering a successful arrangement. Webb told me room manipulation won’t be a constant occurrence, which should alleviate potential frustration. Another source of relief comes in the form of a warp button that instantly sends players back to the last control room. This way, players won’t have to needlessly backtrack if they find the path they explored to be unfavorable. Warping also helps encourage regular experimentation. No single correct answer exist in path-making. As long as your path is valid (indicated by a yellow highlight), you should be able to traverse it with your current abilities. This could have created a multitude of progression and balance issues, but several limitations keep exploration in check while remaining flexible. For example, players can only manipulate rooms they’ve already explored. Doing this allows the developers to have some control over room planning and progression, since they’ll know what a room’s orientation will be before players arrive there. Restricting level editing to the static control rooms prevents players from simply taking the room they’re currently occupying and moving it straight to their destination. You’ll always need to explore no matter how conveniently you arrange areas. Even so, Webb did state that it was still possible to sequence break the game, which could be good news for potential speedrunners. Shifting rooms affects more than just exploration. Enemies get tossed around environments as you change them, altering their behavior to your advantage (such as disorientating drones programmed to only move left to right). I eventually gained an upgrade that put a real time camera in the map editor, allowing me to view the room as I rotated it. Seeing the occupants ricochet of the walls like toys inside of a dryer results in no small amount of amusement. This camera also helps players plan ahead and arrange levels in a way that's most advantageous to them. Refactor's levels are filled with collectibles and secrets. Depending on how your rooms are arranged, some are easier to locate than others. You'll also encounter other characters, some of whom issue side-quests. I came across another imperfect shape who controlled access to a locked door. He wouldn't open it unless I fetched him another cube to make him a four-squared piece. Players also find ability points used augment their powers. These points can be reassigned at any time, so players are never locked into their choices. This is key in boss battles, who can be tackled using several strategies, some better than others. If you feel a skill isn’t cutting it against a boss, just move those points towards other abilities. Upgrades are helpful, but not required. In fact, players can complete the entire game without upgrading a single ability if they choose to. Speaking of bosses, the first level boss was a huge robotic head that defended itself using a moving buzz saw. I dodged the blades and used my ground-pounded buttons to activate elevated platforms from which to leap off of to smash the boss’s vulnerable cranium. This battle provided decent first encounter, and I'm curious to see how the other bosses pan out. So far, Refactor is shaping up to be one of the most inventive takes on the Metroidvania I've ever seen. I was impressed at how Next Gen Pants were able to take two seemingly disjointed designs and meld them into a concept that makes more and more sense as you play. Refactor is hitting PC, Mac, and Linux as well as PlayStation 4 later this year. View full article
  4. What exactly is a “Tetroidvania”? That’s the question I posed to designer Bob Webb when I met with him to play Next Gen Pants' upcoming title, Refactor. This incomprehensible mash-up of Tetris and a Metroidvania was something I needed to experience first-hand to truly understand it. After playing through the first stage, I found Refactor to be a more cohesive and fascinating experience than I imagined. Players assume the role of an imperfect, 3-squared shape who is on a conveyor belt loaded with other rejected blocks headed towards destruction. Webb says Refactor is a game about imperfect shapes trying to find a place in a world that doesn’t want them. You wouldn’t expect a world inhabited by blocks to have much personality, but the character’s WALL-E-inspired communication, as well as environmental elements like Cold War-era propaganda posters promoting perfection, establish an oppressive yet humorous atmosphere. Refactor's overall tone is evocative of Oddworld: Abe's Oddysee, a comparison Webb acknowledged as a common one. Refactor performs as a mostly physics-based platformer. Despite the protagonist being an awkward, hard-edged shape, moving around doesn’t reflect that. Rolling along feels smoother than I expected, with momentum gained as you push forward. Jumping feels adequate and leaves a margin for error that allows for quick mid-air adjustments, an element I made ample use of to complete tricky maneuvers. It’s also possible to cling onto ledges and pull yourself up. Early on, players encounter a second character, a single cube, who combines with the player to create proper four-squared object. In addition to bypassing sentry droids seeking out imperfect shapes, upgrades are tied to the multiple forms this duo can become. The square shape grants a downward slam used to defeat enemies or press buttons. The T-shape can grapple onto objects or foes. While the premise is certainly different, Refractor’s true uniqueness lies in its level design. It’s a somewhat tricky concept to explain, so bear with me. Rooms are shaped like Tetris blocks and can be rotated and joined together to form various paths. Entering designated control rooms opens a simple map interface that displays every available area and is where players tinker with room arrangement. Manipulating levels is a puzzle game in itself, messing around with several configurations to find a path that works. A quick tutorial at the game’s start does a great job of explaining the mechanic in a manner that's plain and easy to grasp. At one point, I got stuck for a good while trying to create a working path (I made it more complicated than it was), but there’s enjoyment in discovering a successful arrangement. Webb told me room manipulation won’t be a constant occurrence, which should alleviate potential frustration. Another source of relief comes in the form of a warp button that instantly sends players back to the last control room. This way, players won’t have to needlessly backtrack if they find the path they explored to be unfavorable. Warping also helps encourage regular experimentation. No single correct answer exist in path-making. As long as your path is valid (indicated by a yellow highlight), you should be able to traverse it with your current abilities. This could have created a multitude of progression and balance issues, but several limitations keep exploration in check while remaining flexible. For example, players can only manipulate rooms they’ve already explored. Doing this allows the developers to have some control over room planning and progression, since they’ll know what a room’s orientation will be before players arrive there. Restricting level editing to the static control rooms prevents players from simply taking the room they’re currently occupying and moving it straight to their destination. You’ll always need to explore no matter how conveniently you arrange areas. Even so, Webb did state that it was still possible to sequence break the game, which could be good news for potential speedrunners. Shifting rooms affects more than just exploration. Enemies get tossed around environments as you change them, altering their behavior to your advantage (such as disorientating drones programmed to only move left to right). I eventually gained an upgrade that put a real time camera in the map editor, allowing me to view the room as I rotated it. Seeing the occupants ricochet of the walls like toys inside of a dryer results in no small amount of amusement. This camera also helps players plan ahead and arrange levels in a way that's most advantageous to them. Refactor's levels are filled with collectibles and secrets. Depending on how your rooms are arranged, some are easier to locate than others. You'll also encounter other characters, some of whom issue side-quests. I came across another imperfect shape who controlled access to a locked door. He wouldn't open it unless I fetched him another cube to make him a four-squared piece. Players also find ability points used augment their powers. These points can be reassigned at any time, so players are never locked into their choices. This is key in boss battles, who can be tackled using several strategies, some better than others. If you feel a skill isn’t cutting it against a boss, just move those points towards other abilities. Upgrades are helpful, but not required. In fact, players can complete the entire game without upgrading a single ability if they choose to. Speaking of bosses, the first level boss was a huge robotic head that defended itself using a moving buzz saw. I dodged the blades and used my ground-pounded buttons to activate elevated platforms from which to leap off of to smash the boss’s vulnerable cranium. This battle provided decent first encounter, and I'm curious to see how the other bosses pan out. So far, Refactor is shaping up to be one of the most inventive takes on the Metroidvania I've ever seen. I was impressed at how Next Gen Pants were able to take two seemingly disjointed designs and meld them into a concept that makes more and more sense as you play. Refactor is hitting PC, Mac, and Linux as well as PlayStation 4 later this year.
  5. Usually, each week we tackle a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. This week, we make an exception and break from convention to talk about the best and worst games shown at E3 this year. Jeremy and Daniel talk about the various reveals shown at the E3 press conferences and what each of the major developers and publishers are bringing to the biggest gaming show of the year. They also touch on issues related to VR that appeared on the show floor, Father's Day, and generally digest all the E3 news with some friendly banter. This episode strays into some NSFW territory, so heads up on that fact. Outro music: Super Mario 64 'Ripples of Hope' by Chimpazilla and Emunator (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03366) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monda View full article
  6. Jack Gardner

    The Best Games Period - Episode 29 - E3 2016

    Usually, each week we tackle a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. This week, we make an exception and break from convention to talk about the best and worst games shown at E3 this year. Jeremy and Daniel talk about the various reveals shown at the E3 press conferences and what each of the major developers and publishers are bringing to the biggest gaming show of the year. They also touch on issues related to VR that appeared on the show floor, Father's Day, and generally digest all the E3 news with some friendly banter. This episode strays into some NSFW territory, so heads up on that fact. Outro music: Super Mario 64 'Ripples of Hope' by Chimpazilla and Emunator (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03366) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monda
  7. As a fan of Metroid/Castlevania-inspired titles, it’s been great to play so many creative iterations on the concept in the last generation. Chasm, another Metroidvania tribute from the publisher of Axiom Verge, separates itself from the pack by utilizing procedural generation in its level design. I got my hands on it at E3, and thus far it feels like another well-crafted homage to the 16-bit era. Chasm is more akin to Castlevania: Symphony of the Night than Metroid. As the lone soldier Daltyn, players earn experience points to level up, outfit themselves head to toe with an assortment of gear, and arm themselves with swords and whips, as well as sub-items such as magical daggers and Molotovs. Symphony’s influence is further evident in Daltyn’s backwards dash and even his jumping pose is resembles Alucard’s. Unlike Castlevania, procedural generation plays a big role. When I spoke to publisher Dan Adelman (who also published 2015's Axiom Verge), he said the idea stemmed from the realization that Super Metroid and similar titles lose their sense of discovery in subsequent playthroughs because players eventually memorize every location. In Chasm, rooms are hand-crafted but are stitched together in different ways on the map each time you load the game. The route taken to reach a certain room won’t be the same in your next game. Despite being randomized, the game engine is sophisticated enough to know when players are able to progress by recognizing their current upgrades and arranging levels accordingly so that they’ll never encounter total dead ends. It’s a smart idea, ensuring the game stays fresh and keeps players guessing after multiple playthroughs. So is it fun? So far, the answer is yes. Jumping feels good, albeit a bit floaty (Adelman assured me it’s being tweaked). Traversal upgrades, such as a ledge grab present in the demo, makes platforming more fun by letting players wall jump and pull themselves up cliff edges. Striking foes with your weapon has a similar snappiness to it that always made Castlevania’s relatively simple combat enjoyable. Despite being an original title, it was interesting how my Symphony of the Night muscle memory was still triggered and helped me quickly settle into Chasm. I encountered a few challenging platforming segments. One room had me leaping across a spiked floor with only a couple of distant, fragile platforms before ascending to a higher level using the ledge grab to bounce between walls to reach the upgrade awaiting me. It was tough, but rewarding. Even in its unfinished state, Chasm's current polish makes difficult areas a joy to get through rather than a chore. Putting Chasm down was tough. The Metroidvania bug had bitten me, and I wanted nothing more than to continue exploring and overcoming more platforming obstacles. Its procedural elements already leave me excited for a second playthrough before I've even completed the first. I have high hopes for the full release. Chasm doesn’t have a concrete launch window, but Adelman hopes to see it hit PlayStation 4 and PC (with Mac and Linux supported through Steam) later this year. View full article
  8. As a fan of Metroid/Castlevania-inspired titles, it’s been great to play so many creative iterations on the concept in the last generation. Chasm, another Metroidvania tribute from the publisher of Axiom Verge, separates itself from the pack by utilizing procedural generation in its level design. I got my hands on it at E3, and thus far it feels like another well-crafted homage to the 16-bit era. Chasm is more akin to Castlevania: Symphony of the Night than Metroid. As the lone soldier Daltyn, players earn experience points to level up, outfit themselves head to toe with an assortment of gear, and arm themselves with swords and whips, as well as sub-items such as magical daggers and Molotovs. Symphony’s influence is further evident in Daltyn’s backwards dash and even his jumping pose is resembles Alucard’s. Unlike Castlevania, procedural generation plays a big role. When I spoke to publisher Dan Adelman (who also published 2015's Axiom Verge), he said the idea stemmed from the realization that Super Metroid and similar titles lose their sense of discovery in subsequent playthroughs because players eventually memorize every location. In Chasm, rooms are hand-crafted but are stitched together in different ways on the map each time you load the game. The route taken to reach a certain room won’t be the same in your next game. Despite being randomized, the game engine is sophisticated enough to know when players are able to progress by recognizing their current upgrades and arranging levels accordingly so that they’ll never encounter total dead ends. It’s a smart idea, ensuring the game stays fresh and keeps players guessing after multiple playthroughs. So is it fun? So far, the answer is yes. Jumping feels good, albeit a bit floaty (Adelman assured me it’s being tweaked). Traversal upgrades, such as a ledge grab present in the demo, makes platforming more fun by letting players wall jump and pull themselves up cliff edges. Striking foes with your weapon has a similar snappiness to it that always made Castlevania’s relatively simple combat enjoyable. Despite being an original title, it was interesting how my Symphony of the Night muscle memory was still triggered and helped me quickly settle into Chasm. I encountered a few challenging platforming segments. One room had me leaping across a spiked floor with only a couple of distant, fragile platforms before ascending to a higher level using the ledge grab to bounce between walls to reach the upgrade awaiting me. It was tough, but rewarding. Even in its unfinished state, Chasm's current polish makes difficult areas a joy to get through rather than a chore. Putting Chasm down was tough. The Metroidvania bug had bitten me, and I wanted nothing more than to continue exploring and overcoming more platforming obstacles. Its procedural elements already leave me excited for a second playthrough before I've even completed the first. I have high hopes for the full release. Chasm doesn’t have a concrete launch window, but Adelman hopes to see it hit PlayStation 4 and PC (with Mac and Linux supported through Steam) later this year.
  9. Headlander’s concept of becoming a disembodied head that controls interchangeable, disposable bodies took some getting used to. Many games have trained me to value self-preservation, but Headlander is the literal example of the philosophy to fight like you’re in someone else’s body. Recklessly throwing yourself into a hail of lasers is A-okay; there’s always another empty vessel to hijack nearby. It's a strange premise, but after playing the demo it's a concept with promise. At its core, Headlander is a Metroidvania. Players explore labyrinthine levels by either rocketing through the air as the mute severed head, or by docking your head onto a robotic body. Gaining new abilities to access previously barred areas is key, and reaching such places often requires the literal use of your head. Sometimes you’ll have to send your floating noggin into narrow air ducts to find additional rooms and secrets, or plug yourself into a computer terminal to open sealed doors. The action is satisfying thanks to its emphasis on landing tricky headshots. Lasers can be fired straight ahead, but Headlander heavily encourages players to carefully aim their shots (using a handy laser sight) to ricochet beams to hit enemies from difficult vantage points. Successfully executing a headshot by having a laser bounce off of two or three carefully plotted points felt slick and gratifying. Various upgrades help mix up the arsenal with new abilities. The power-up presented in the demo was a suction ability used to suck up and carry objects and, best of all, rip the heads off enemies. There are also other strategies that come into play. At one point I neutralized an enemy’s attack by placing myself directly in its line of fire, then ejected to another suit on the opposite side, thus turning my previous body into an improvised barrier to block the enemy’s shots. Another fun tactic is ditching soon-to-explode bodies among a group of adversaries. There's something oddly gleeful in going "whatever!" and taking new bodies when your old ones outlive their usefulness. Humanoid suits aren’t the only objects ripe for hijacking. Players can plug their heads into several machines to serve a variety of purposes. An example I encountered was a tiny tunnel accessible only to small maintenance droids (anything else was turned away by the sassy A.I. door control). After recalling seeing such a machine in a previous room, I returned to it and plugged myself into it which allowed me to proceed through the hatch. The full game features machines like vacuum cleaners and even a dog-like robot. With its groovy 70’s era sci-fi (including a grainy film filter), Double Fine’s trademark humor, and a wacky approach to exploration and puzzle-solving, Headlander is shaping up to be one of the more unique takes on the Metroidvania out there. I had a fun time with it and look forward to seeing how the headless concept expands further into the game. Those looking forward to playing won’t have to lose their heads waiting forever. Headlander is planned to release later this summer on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.
  10. Headlander’s concept of becoming a disembodied head that controls interchangeable, disposable bodies took some getting used to. Many games have trained me to value self-preservation, but Headlander is the literal example of the philosophy to fight like you’re in someone else’s body. Recklessly throwing yourself into a hail of lasers is A-okay; there’s always another empty vessel to hijack nearby. It's a strange premise, but after playing the demo it's a concept with promise. At its core, Headlander is a Metroidvania. Players explore labyrinthine levels by either rocketing through the air as the mute severed head, or by docking your head onto a robotic body. Gaining new abilities to access previously barred areas is key, and reaching such places often requires the literal use of your head. Sometimes you’ll have to send your floating noggin into narrow air ducts to find additional rooms and secrets, or plug yourself into a computer terminal to open sealed doors. The action is satisfying thanks to its emphasis on landing tricky headshots. Lasers can be fired straight ahead, but Headlander heavily encourages players to carefully aim their shots (using a handy laser sight) to ricochet beams to hit enemies from difficult vantage points. Successfully executing a headshot by having a laser bounce off of two or three carefully plotted points felt slick and gratifying. Various upgrades help mix up the arsenal with new abilities. The power-up presented in the demo was a suction ability used to suck up and carry objects and, best of all, rip the heads off enemies. There are also other strategies that come into play. At one point I neutralized an enemy’s attack by placing myself directly in its line of fire, then ejected to another suit on the opposite side, thus turning my previous body into an improvised barrier to block the enemy’s shots. Another fun tactic is ditching soon-to-explode bodies among a group of adversaries. There's something oddly gleeful in going "whatever!" and taking new bodies when your old ones outlive their usefulness. Humanoid suits aren’t the only objects ripe for hijacking. Players can plug their heads into several machines to serve a variety of purposes. An example I encountered was a tiny tunnel accessible only to small maintenance droids (anything else was turned away by the sassy A.I. door control). After recalling seeing such a machine in a previous room, I returned to it and plugged myself into it which allowed me to proceed through the hatch. The full game features machines like vacuum cleaners and even a dog-like robot. With its groovy 70’s era sci-fi (including a grainy film filter), Double Fine’s trademark humor, and a wacky approach to exploration and puzzle-solving, Headlander is shaping up to be one of the more unique takes on the Metroidvania out there. I had a fun time with it and look forward to seeing how the headless concept expands further into the game. Those looking forward to playing won’t have to lose their heads waiting forever. Headlander is planned to release later this summer on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. View full article
  11. During their Treehouse livestream this morning, Nintendo announced they are bringing a brand new role-playing title to their handheld lineup. Ever Oasis is an RPG starring main character Tethu (who can be male or female) going on adventures and solving puzzles in a desert oasis created and managed by the player. Battling monsters and gathering resources plays a large role, and players can also join up with other wanderers to tackle dungeons. You can check out the reveal trailer below. Ever Oasis releases in 2017 for Nintendo 3DS.
  12. During their Treehouse livestream this morning, Nintendo announced they are bringing a brand new role-playing title to their handheld lineup. Ever Oasis is an RPG starring main character Tethu (who can be male or female) going on adventures and solving puzzles in a desert oasis created and managed by the player. Battling monsters and gathering resources plays a large role, and players can also join up with other wanderers to tackle dungeons. You can check out the reveal trailer below. Ever Oasis releases in 2017 for Nintendo 3DS. View full article
  13. Nintendo announced during their live stream this morning that they have finally given a name to their newest Legend of Zelda game. Now known as The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, and its has a brand new trailer highlighting the game's expansive world. Breath of the Wild is expected to release in Spring 2017 for the Wii U and NX. Nintendo is streaming all day, so stay tuned for more updates!
  14. Nintendo announced during their live stream this morning that they have finally given a name to their newest Legend of Zelda game. Now known as The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, and its has a brand new trailer highlighting the game's expansive world. Breath of the Wild is expected to release in Spring 2017 for the Wii U and NX. Nintendo is streaming all day, so stay tuned for more updates! View full article
  15. cinerdella

    A Harrowing Look at the Other 99

    Deck 13 and Burning Arrow brings us a survival game that is unlike any other. Stranded on an island with no memory of how you got there, players are forced to either fight or hide for their lives. Notes are scattered around the island to provide clues as to why you're there and how to escape, but the other island-dwellers may pick them up first. This three-hour campaign is designed to rely not only on your decisions, but the NPC's decisions as well. Build camps, craft weapons, or stick to hiding in bushes. You can choose to take down every player yourself, or wait until they take out each other. Every game is different, and no paths are alike. Early access to this game will be available July 11, 2016 on Steam with plans to release on Xbox One and PlayStation 4.
  16. Deck 13 and Burning Arrow brings us a survival game that is unlike any other. Stranded on an island with no memory of how you got there, players are forced to either fight or hide for their lives. Notes are scattered around the island to provide clues as to why you're there and how to escape, but the other island-dwellers may pick them up first. This three-hour campaign is designed to rely not only on your decisions, but the NPC's decisions as well. Build camps, craft weapons, or stick to hiding in bushes. You can choose to take down every player yourself, or wait until they take out each other. Every game is different, and no paths are alike. Early access to this game will be available July 11, 2016 on Steam with plans to release on Xbox One and PlayStation 4. View full article
  17. From the studio that brought you Life is Strange and Remember Me comes an action-RPG set in 1900’s disease-crippled London. Vampyr follows the story of World War I veteran Doctor Jonathan Reid as he experiences the agony and deprivation that comes with being a vampire. But it’s not all prowling the streets and stalking prey, as Reid is determined to find a cure for this disease. Pick your victims wisely, because each choice you make creates a butterfly effect. Your actions, and subsequently meals, will trigger devastating consequences if you pick the wrong target. Build your combat tree to customize your vampire-fighting techniques and take on the ghostly streets of London. Vampyr is set to be released in 2017 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC.
  18. From the studio that brought you Life is Strange and Remember Me comes an action-RPG set in 1900’s disease-crippled London. Vampyr follows the story of World War I veteran Doctor Jonathan Reid as he experiences the agony and deprivation that comes with being a vampire. But it’s not all prowling the streets and stalking prey, as Reid is determined to find a cure for this disease. Pick your victims wisely, because each choice you make creates a butterfly effect. Your actions, and subsequently meals, will trigger devastating consequences if you pick the wrong target. Build your combat tree to customize your vampire-fighting techniques and take on the ghostly streets of London. Vampyr is set to be released in 2017 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC. View full article
  19. Marcus Stewart

    A Summary of Ubisoft's E3 2016 Press Conference

    Ubisoft's annual E3 press event brought the big news and strange happenings we've come to expect from the publisher's E3 outings. Things kicked off with a Just Dance performance set to Queen, which included, but was not limited to, a dancing giraffe, a panda, and a guy playing a huge, butterfly-shaped guitar. It was as goofy and over-the-top as we’ve come to expect from Just Dance E3 segments. Perennial host Aisha Tyler then took the stage to welcome us all, as well as confirm that Just Dance 2017 is releasing on all platforms in October and next year for Nintendo NX. Ghost Recon: Wildlands got a new trailer setting the table for its narrative. Players assume the role of Ghost agents tasked with eliminating a Mexican drug lord, who has seized the majority of cocaine operations in Bolivia. With the motives established, a lengthy gameplay video showcased the four-player cooperative tactics. Players can plot their approach and work together to complete missions stealthily or barrel in guns blazing. The video provided examples of both scenarios unfolding in the same mission, as the quiet infiltration soon devolves into a raucous multi-vehicle car chase and shootout. Ghost Recon: Wildlands releases March 7, 2017. South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone brought new footage of South Park: The Fractured But Whole, the superhero sequel to The Stick of Truth. The switch from high fantasy to costumed vigilantes runs deeper than just aesthetics. It also brings two new mechanics called Space and Time. Space lets players maneuver and position themselves in various parts of the field during combat (such as behind enemies) instead of remaining static. Time refers to the ability to alter the turn order using a fart so powerful, it tears through time itself. South Park: The Fractured But Whole releases December 6 of this year. The Division took the stage next with information about its first year of DLC. The first major expansion, Underground, pits players against a new threat beneath New York City. It launches June 28 on Xbox One and PC and August 2 for PlayStation 4. To commemorate Ubisoft's 30th anniversary, three new outfits based on Splinter Cell, Ghost Recon, and Rainbow Six will be free to members of the Ubisoft Club at the release of Underground. Ubisoft then teased the second expansion, Survival. This different approach to Division gameplay is centered around the idea of scavenging for scarce supplies while enduring harsh weather conditions. While there's no release date, Ubisoft promised Survival will arrive "sooner than you think". And now for something completely different. Oculus Rift founder Palmer Lucky along with other designers stepped up to play a round of Eagle Flight, the first-person VR flight title that puts players behind the beak of birds of prey. On display was a Capture the Flag inspired mode called Capture the Prey. Teams of eagles must locate and secure designated prey while preventing the opposing avian team from doing the same. It looks very weird, but kind of fun. Like all VR games, it’s difficult to cast a verdict without trying it yourself. Ever wanted to explore and interact with the bridge of the Enterprise? Star Trek: Bridge Crew looks to fulfill every Trekkie's dream using the technology of Oculus Rift. Demonstrated by Star Trek alumni such as Levar Burton and Karl Urban, players can assume the roles of Enterprise crew roles, such as Captain and Engineer, to maintain and pilot the ship while exploring the cosmos. Boldly go where no man has gone before in what looks to be the most immersive Star Trek experience yet. For Honor has focused so much on the multiplayer side of things that some players may be surprised to know that there’s a story mode. A slick narrative focused video revealed what seems to be the antagonist of the game. Viking gameplay was showcased with a ten-minute gameplay footage of Viking raid of a Samurai-occupied fort. Grow Home melted a lot of hearts in 2015, and now B.U.D. is back in Grow Up. This time, he’s free from the watchful eye of M.O.M. allowing him free rein across an entire planet. In addition to the plant growing mechanic, players can now use seeds to sprout plants used to bounce to incredible heights, even reaching the moon. Grow Up sprouts this August for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. The minds behind the Trials series and Far Cry 3: Blood Dragon are combining their unique brands of zany to create a title filled to the brim with insanity. Trails of the Blood Dragon takes the classic motocross gameplay of trials and drenches it in the 80’s neon-colored paint of Blood Dragon. The result looks as ridiculous as it does fun. Don’t just take my word for it. Trials of the Blood Dragon is available now. In case you weren't aware, there's an Assassin's Creed movie coming this December. While there weren't any gaming related updates about Ubisoft's historical juggernaut, Aisha Tyler did sit down with producer Frank Marshall to discuss the film's development. Capping off the chat was a behind-the-scenes trailer for the film that provides a glimpse into how the game adaptation is being assembled. Video game-based movies have an less than stellar track record, but Assassin's Creed has one of the best shots at being at least halfway decent. Watch Dogs 2 hacked its way into the show, showing off one of its infiltration missions. New hero Marcus Holloway sneaks and hacks his way into the home of a nefarious social media CEO. With some Eric B. and Rakim banging in his earphones, Marcus crashes the party, displaying his combat prowess while backed by some technical support (literally) from his Dedsec allies. Watch Dogs 2 appears to be shaping up nicely and already displays significantly more personality than its predecessor. Ubisoft announced DLC for Watch Dogs 2 hits PlayStation 4 30 days before other platforms and that a Watch Dogs feature film is in the works. Watch Dogs 2 arrives November 15 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Ubisoft wrapped their event by unveiling a new IP called Steep. Developed by Ubisoft Annecy, Steep is set in the snowy Alps and is a multiplayer-focused sports titles. Players take the roles of skiers and wingsuit fliers to compete in a variety of stunts and challenges across different areas of the popular mountain range. Skier tracks remain carved into the mountain, and can be traced and viewed in a menu. You can also use the tracks to view replays of your run, as well as pinpoint the tricky jumps or turns you pulled off and send them to friends as challenges. Annecy is planning beta periods for Steep before its full release this December. Ubisoft didn't have any blockbusters announcements, but they did a great job of showcasing the titles we already knew about and making them look like must-play experiences. For Honor looks better with each showing, and Watch Dogs 2 seems to be steadily winning over naysayers of the original. We got a great look Ghost Recon and South Park in action, and players of The Division have a clear road map of meaningful content to look forward to. I'm not sold on Eagle Flight and Star Trek: Bridge Crew yet. They look cool on paper, until you realize their level of enjoyment largely depends on having several friends who live in close proximity who have also taken the ultra-expensive plunge into VR. That simply isn't a reality for a majority of players, so I don't know how exciting those projects can really be right now. Even still, this was another good, solid showing for Ubisoft.
  20. Ubisoft's annual E3 press event brought the big news and strange happenings we've come to expect from the publisher's E3 outings. Things kicked off with a Just Dance performance set to Queen, which included, but was not limited to, a dancing giraffe, a panda, and a guy playing a huge, butterfly-shaped guitar. It was as goofy and over-the-top as we’ve come to expect from Just Dance E3 segments. Perennial host Aisha Tyler then took the stage to welcome us all, as well as confirm that Just Dance 2017 is releasing on all platforms in October and next year for Nintendo NX. Ghost Recon: Wildlands got a new trailer setting the table for its narrative. Players assume the role of Ghost agents tasked with eliminating a Mexican drug lord, who has seized the majority of cocaine operations in Bolivia. With the motives established, a lengthy gameplay video showcased the four-player cooperative tactics. Players can plot their approach and work together to complete missions stealthily or barrel in guns blazing. The video provided examples of both scenarios unfolding in the same mission, as the quiet infiltration soon devolves into a raucous multi-vehicle car chase and shootout. Ghost Recon: Wildlands releases March 7, 2017. South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone brought new footage of South Park: The Fractured But Whole, the superhero sequel to The Stick of Truth. The switch from high fantasy to costumed vigilantes runs deeper than just aesthetics. It also brings two new mechanics called Space and Time. Space lets players maneuver and position themselves in various parts of the field during combat (such as behind enemies) instead of remaining static. Time refers to the ability to alter the turn order using a fart so powerful, it tears through time itself. South Park: The Fractured But Whole releases December 6 of this year. The Division took the stage next with information about its first year of DLC. The first major expansion, Underground, pits players against a new threat beneath New York City. It launches June 28 on Xbox One and PC and August 2 for PlayStation 4. To commemorate Ubisoft's 30th anniversary, three new outfits based on Splinter Cell, Ghost Recon, and Rainbow Six will be free to members of the Ubisoft Club at the release of Underground. Ubisoft then teased the second expansion, Survival. This different approach to Division gameplay is centered around the idea of scavenging for scarce supplies while enduring harsh weather conditions. While there's no release date, Ubisoft promised Survival will arrive "sooner than you think". And now for something completely different. Oculus Rift founder Palmer Lucky along with other designers stepped up to play a round of Eagle Flight, the first-person VR flight title that puts players behind the beak of birds of prey. On display was a Capture the Flag inspired mode called Capture the Prey. Teams of eagles must locate and secure designated prey while preventing the opposing avian team from doing the same. It looks very weird, but kind of fun. Like all VR games, it’s difficult to cast a verdict without trying it yourself. Ever wanted to explore and interact with the bridge of the Enterprise? Star Trek: Bridge Crew looks to fulfill every Trekkie's dream using the technology of Oculus Rift. Demonstrated by Star Trek alumni such as Levar Burton and Karl Urban, players can assume the roles of Enterprise crew roles, such as Captain and Engineer, to maintain and pilot the ship while exploring the cosmos. Boldly go where no man has gone before in what looks to be the most immersive Star Trek experience yet. For Honor has focused so much on the multiplayer side of things that some players may be surprised to know that there’s a story mode. A slick narrative focused video revealed what seems to be the antagonist of the game. Viking gameplay was showcased with a ten-minute gameplay footage of Viking raid of a Samurai-occupied fort. Grow Home melted a lot of hearts in 2015, and now B.U.D. is back in Grow Up. This time, he’s free from the watchful eye of M.O.M. allowing him free rein across an entire planet. In addition to the plant growing mechanic, players can now use seeds to sprout plants used to bounce to incredible heights, even reaching the moon. Grow Up sprouts this August for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. The minds behind the Trials series and Far Cry 3: Blood Dragon are combining their unique brands of zany to create a title filled to the brim with insanity. Trails of the Blood Dragon takes the classic motocross gameplay of trials and drenches it in the 80’s neon-colored paint of Blood Dragon. The result looks as ridiculous as it does fun. Don’t just take my word for it. Trials of the Blood Dragon is available now. In case you weren't aware, there's an Assassin's Creed movie coming this December. While there weren't any gaming related updates about Ubisoft's historical juggernaut, Aisha Tyler did sit down with producer Frank Marshall to discuss the film's development. Capping off the chat was a behind-the-scenes trailer for the film that provides a glimpse into how the game adaptation is being assembled. Video game-based movies have an less than stellar track record, but Assassin's Creed has one of the best shots at being at least halfway decent. Watch Dogs 2 hacked its way into the show, showing off one of its infiltration missions. New hero Marcus Holloway sneaks and hacks his way into the home of a nefarious social media CEO. With some Eric B. and Rakim banging in his earphones, Marcus crashes the party, displaying his combat prowess while backed by some technical support (literally) from his Dedsec allies. Watch Dogs 2 appears to be shaping up nicely and already displays significantly more personality than its predecessor. Ubisoft announced DLC for Watch Dogs 2 hits PlayStation 4 30 days before other platforms and that a Watch Dogs feature film is in the works. Watch Dogs 2 arrives November 15 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Ubisoft wrapped their event by unveiling a new IP called Steep. Developed by Ubisoft Annecy, Steep is set in the snowy Alps and is a multiplayer-focused sports titles. Players take the roles of skiers and wingsuit fliers to compete in a variety of stunts and challenges across different areas of the popular mountain range. Skier tracks remain carved into the mountain, and can be traced and viewed in a menu. You can also use the tracks to view replays of your run, as well as pinpoint the tricky jumps or turns you pulled off and send them to friends as challenges. Annecy is planning beta periods for Steep before its full release this December. Ubisoft didn't have any blockbusters announcements, but they did a great job of showcasing the titles we already knew about and making them look like must-play experiences. For Honor looks better with each showing, and Watch Dogs 2 seems to be steadily winning over naysayers of the original. We got a great look Ghost Recon and South Park in action, and players of The Division have a clear road map of meaningful content to look forward to. I'm not sold on Eagle Flight and Star Trek: Bridge Crew yet. They look cool on paper, until you realize their level of enjoyment largely depends on having several friends who live in close proximity who have also taken the ultra-expensive plunge into VR. That simply isn't a reality for a majority of players, so I don't know how exciting those projects can really be right now. Even still, this was another good, solid showing for Ubisoft. View full article
  21. Many wondered what Bethesda would show at their pre-E3 conference this year. Would they show a Skyrim remaster? Prey 2? Evil Within 2? Bethesda threw a mixed bag at its audience this year with some predictions coming to pass, some only slightly happening, and others not appearing at all in their announcement line-up. The pre-E3 Bethesda press conference began with a bang that many weren't expecting so close on the heels of Doom's release. A new entry in the Quake series, Quake Champions burst into glorious existence in a hail of gunfire. The team at id Software supposedly have the title running at an impressive 120hz with an unlocked framerate and the cinematic trailer that heralded Quake's revival looked fantastic. The multiplayer arena shooter boasts new characters with unique abilities, each one catering to a different playstyle. Several of Quake's champions show their signature moves in the reveal trailer. The conference then moved through a brief retrospective of what had happened over the past year. The surprise success of Fallout Shelter, The Elder Scrolls Online hanging on and managing to survive, the release of Fallout 4 and Doom were all touched upon. Bethesda then described The Elder Scrolls Legnds, a card game that delves into the lore of The Elder Scrolls universe. Told by a Moth Priest named Kellen, Legends follows the legend of Elder Scrolls lore and pairs that with a strategic card game. The intro cinematic was shown and allowed to speak for itself as to what Legends will be about. Players can join the beta of Legends on the Bethesda website. Moving on to Fallout things, three new expansions to Fallout 4 were briefly teased during the Bethesda showcase. The first, Contraptions Workshop, will allow players to build all kinds of new things in their settlements like elevators, conveyor belts, racks for weapons and armor, ball tracks, and more! Contraptions becomes available on June 14. The second Fallout 4 expansion shown, called Vault-Tec Workshop, grants players the ability to build their own Vaults. Of course, it appear that building a new Vault comes with its own unique challenges, like angry underground monsters, raiders, and more. Once the Vault attracts some residents, players can start conducting experiments on the new inhabitants. The final DLC was revealed with a short camera pan up from the Wasteland to an abandoned Nuka-Cola-themed park. Appropriately enough, this expansion is titled Nuka World and takes place in a long abandoned theme park. No release dates were given for Vault-Tec Workshop or Nuka World. Rounding out the Fallout news, Fallout Shelter's 1.6 update overhauls combat, adds questing, new items, characters, and locations. The addition of questing has apparently bolstered Bethesda's confidence in the mobile title enough to bring it to PC. The update and PC version will be releasing sometime next month. And yes, Bethesda is working on a Skyrim remaster. Titled Skyrim Special Addition brings massively overhauled graphics to the world of Skyrim for Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and PC, along with full PC mod support for the consoles. Since the announcement of its existence, Bethesda tweeted that those who own Skyrim and all its add-ons or own the Steam Legendary Edition will receive a free upgrade to Skyrim Special Edition. Skyrim Special Edition releases on October 28. Perhaps the most surprising moment of the night was the reveal of Prey, Arkane Studio's reimagining/reboot of the 2006 Prey. Instead of highlighting spiritual aspects of Native American culture as gameplay mechanics and story beats, the new Prey puts a psychological twist on everything. Forsaking former protagonist Domasi "Tommy" Tawodi, Prey centers on the tormented struggle of Morgan Yu as he awakens on the Talos 1 space station. With a mysterious alien force in pursuit and a growing sense of urgency, Morgan will need to harness his mind-bending abilities to uncover the secrets of the station and get through his ordeal alive. While certainly not the Prey 2 that was once teased in years long past or even the remnants of that amazing "what could have been" game, Prey looks like an interesting project to keep an eye on. Arkane states that Prey will release in 2017 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC. A multitude of free new updates are on the way for Doom's SnapMap, allowing players to create new single-player experiences to share online with new props, logic options, and visual themes. New multiplayer content is on the way as well, with new game modes like Exodus, Sector, and three free-for-all modes. Next month a premium DLC pack will release. Called Unto the Evil, it will focus on multiplayer with three new maps, a new demon, a new gun, and more. Perhaps the coolest part of the Doom announcements was the nod to Doom's roots as a shareware title. Following the Bethesda conference, anyone who does not own a copy of Doom can play the first level of the title on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC for free. Bethesda followed up the Doom portion of the presentation to talk about The Elder Scrolls Online. A Japanese release of the MMO is on the way, opening up the community of seven million players to Eastern markets. The majority of the ESO talk focused on the release of the The Dark Brotherhood DLC for PC/Mac today and Xbox One/PlayStation 4 on June 14. Bethesda then announced their Bethesda VR initiative which allows players to take a virtual tour of Hell in the world of Doom and play Fallout 4, wandering the Wasteland in full VR. Fallout 4 VR will be possible with Vive support later this fall. The crowning part of the evening was an in-depth look at the gameplay of Dishonored 2 through the eyes of new protagonist Emily Kaldwin. New powers, expanded verticality, and powerful gadgets await players who wish to dive into all that stealth has to offer. Honestly, it looks very slick, so just watch the gameplay. Dishonored 2 releases on November 11 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC. That wraps up pretty much everything that Bethesda touched on during their press conference. You can watch the full broadcast on Bethesda's YouTube channel. For more E3 press conference news, check out our coverage of EA's press event!
  22. Many wondered what Bethesda would show at their pre-E3 conference this year. Would they show a Skyrim remaster? Prey 2? Evil Within 2? Bethesda threw a mixed bag at its audience this year with some predictions coming to pass, some only slightly happening, and others not appearing at all in their announcement line-up. The pre-E3 Bethesda press conference began with a bang that many weren't expecting so close on the heels of Doom's release. A new entry in the Quake series, Quake Champions burst into glorious existence in a hail of gunfire. The team at id Software supposedly have the title running at an impressive 120hz with an unlocked framerate and the cinematic trailer that heralded Quake's revival looked fantastic. The multiplayer arena shooter boasts new characters with unique abilities, each one catering to a different playstyle. Several of Quake's champions show their signature moves in the reveal trailer. The conference then moved through a brief retrospective of what had happened over the past year. The surprise success of Fallout Shelter, The Elder Scrolls Online hanging on and managing to survive, the release of Fallout 4 and Doom were all touched upon. Bethesda then described The Elder Scrolls Legnds, a card game that delves into the lore of The Elder Scrolls universe. Told by a Moth Priest named Kellen, Legends follows the legend of Elder Scrolls lore and pairs that with a strategic card game. The intro cinematic was shown and allowed to speak for itself as to what Legends will be about. Players can join the beta of Legends on the Bethesda website. Moving on to Fallout things, three new expansions to Fallout 4 were briefly teased during the Bethesda showcase. The first, Contraptions Workshop, will allow players to build all kinds of new things in their settlements like elevators, conveyor belts, racks for weapons and armor, ball tracks, and more! Contraptions becomes available on June 14. The second Fallout 4 expansion shown, called Vault-Tec Workshop, grants players the ability to build their own Vaults. Of course, it appear that building a new Vault comes with its own unique challenges, like angry underground monsters, raiders, and more. Once the Vault attracts some residents, players can start conducting experiments on the new inhabitants. The final DLC was revealed with a short camera pan up from the Wasteland to an abandoned Nuka-Cola-themed park. Appropriately enough, this expansion is titled Nuka World and takes place in a long abandoned theme park. No release dates were given for Vault-Tec Workshop or Nuka World. Rounding out the Fallout news, Fallout Shelter's 1.6 update overhauls combat, adds questing, new items, characters, and locations. The addition of questing has apparently bolstered Bethesda's confidence in the mobile title enough to bring it to PC. The update and PC version will be releasing sometime next month. And yes, Bethesda is working on a Skyrim remaster. Titled Skyrim Special Addition brings massively overhauled graphics to the world of Skyrim for Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and PC, along with full PC mod support for the consoles. Since the announcement of its existence, Bethesda tweeted that those who own Skyrim and all its add-ons or own the Steam Legendary Edition will receive a free upgrade to Skyrim Special Edition. Skyrim Special Edition releases on October 28. Perhaps the most surprising moment of the night was the reveal of Prey, Arkane Studio's reimagining/reboot of the 2006 Prey. Instead of highlighting spiritual aspects of Native American culture as gameplay mechanics and story beats, the new Prey puts a psychological twist on everything. Forsaking former protagonist Domasi "Tommy" Tawodi, Prey centers on the tormented struggle of Morgan Yu as he awakens on the Talos 1 space station. With a mysterious alien force in pursuit and a growing sense of urgency, Morgan will need to harness his mind-bending abilities to uncover the secrets of the station and get through his ordeal alive. While certainly not the Prey 2 that was once teased in years long past or even the remnants of that amazing "what could have been" game, Prey looks like an interesting project to keep an eye on. Arkane states that Prey will release in 2017 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC. A multitude of free new updates are on the way for Doom's SnapMap, allowing players to create new single-player experiences to share online with new props, logic options, and visual themes. New multiplayer content is on the way as well, with new game modes like Exodus, Sector, and three free-for-all modes. Next month a premium DLC pack will release. Called Unto the Evil, it will focus on multiplayer with three new maps, a new demon, a new gun, and more. Perhaps the coolest part of the Doom announcements was the nod to Doom's roots as a shareware title. Following the Bethesda conference, anyone who does not own a copy of Doom can play the first level of the title on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC for free. Bethesda followed up the Doom portion of the presentation to talk about The Elder Scrolls Online. A Japanese release of the MMO is on the way, opening up the community of seven million players to Eastern markets. The majority of the ESO talk focused on the release of the The Dark Brotherhood DLC for PC/Mac today and Xbox One/PlayStation 4 on June 14. Bethesda then announced their Bethesda VR initiative which allows players to take a virtual tour of Hell in the world of Doom and play Fallout 4, wandering the Wasteland in full VR. Fallout 4 VR will be possible with Vive support later this fall. The crowning part of the evening was an in-depth look at the gameplay of Dishonored 2 through the eyes of new protagonist Emily Kaldwin. New powers, expanded verticality, and powerful gadgets await players who wish to dive into all that stealth has to offer. Honestly, it looks very slick, so just watch the gameplay. Dishonored 2 releases on November 11 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC. That wraps up pretty much everything that Bethesda touched on during their press conference. You can watch the full broadcast on Bethesda's YouTube channel. For more E3 press conference news, check out our coverage of EA's press event! View full article
  23. DICE showed of Battlefield 1's first gameplay trailer during EA Play's live event. The video highlighted the World War I-era shooter's standout features, such as behemoth vehicle assaults, dynamic weather, and refined destructibility. Unpredictable, ever-changing weather conditions are designed to continually alter playstyles, presenting new gameplay options with each match. Elements such as rain and fog require players to approach the battlefield with different tactics to find new ways of engaging the enemy. DICE is also refining Battlefield's destructibility to further allow players to blast their own path through maps to invent unique strategies. DICE revealed Operations, the multiplayer arena where players can take control of massive vehicles - dubbed "behemoths" - to turn the tide of conflicts in their favor. Air ships, battleships, and armored trains can be controlled to lay waste to scores of enemies and shift the momentum in the massive, interconnected clashes. The gameplay trailer was highlighted by an explosive dogfight between a zeppelin airship and a squad of fighter planes. Battlefield 1 is getting an open beta later this summer for those looking to take a zeppelin for a test spin a few months early. Otherwise, circle October 28 as the date Battlefield 1 launches for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.
  24. DICE showed of Battlefield 1's first gameplay trailer during EA Play's live event. The video highlighted the World War I-era shooter's standout features, such as behemoth vehicle assaults, dynamic weather, and refined destructibility. Unpredictable, ever-changing weather conditions are designed to continually alter playstyles, presenting new gameplay options with each match. Elements such as rain and fog require players to approach the battlefield with different tactics to find new ways of engaging the enemy. DICE is also refining Battlefield's destructibility to further allow players to blast their own path through maps to invent unique strategies. DICE revealed Operations, the multiplayer arena where players can take control of massive vehicles - dubbed "behemoths" - to turn the tide of conflicts in their favor. Air ships, battleships, and armored trains can be controlled to lay waste to scores of enemies and shift the momentum in the massive, interconnected clashes. The gameplay trailer was highlighted by an explosive dogfight between a zeppelin airship and a squad of fighter planes. Battlefield 1 is getting an open beta later this summer for those looking to take a zeppelin for a test spin a few months early. Otherwise, circle October 28 as the date Battlefield 1 launches for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. View full article
  25. Sports titles have taken a few stabs over the years at implementing a narrative-focused campaign with middling success. Sometimes the idea clicks like Fight Night Champion's Champion Mode, other times it's an ill-advised debacle like NBA 2K16's bizarre "Livin' Da Dream" plotline. FIFA 17 looks to try its hand at telling a compelling sports drama with The Journey. The Journey centers around the fictional player Alex Hunter, a rookie prospect hailing from a lineage of football greatness. Players witness his rise to the premier league through cinematic storytelling and steer Alex's career by making decisions both on and off the field (such as selecting his team). EA promises the story will include "new characters full of depth...navigate emotional highs and lows of their unique story arc through decisions off the pitch, their performance on it, and character interactions throughout the 2016/17 season while playing for any of the 20 Premier League clubs." While Frostbite 3 powers the graphical and gameplay elements of The Journey, the narrative aspects and authenticity are influenced by the inputs of actual premier players. We'll see how Alex's story shapes up when FIFA 17 launches for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC September 27 in North America, followed by a worldwide release on September 29. View full article
×