Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'demo'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Extra Life News
    • Extra Life Updates
    • Best Practices
    • Community Content
    • Why I Extra Life
    • Fundraising
    • Contests
  • Gaming News
  • Features
  • Podcast

Discussions

  • Extra Life Discussions
    • General Extra Life Discussion
    • Local Extra Lifers
    • Fundraising Ideas
    • Live Streaming Tips & Tricks
    • Official Extra Life Stream Team Discussion
    • Extra Life JSON Code Discussion & Sharing
    • Extra Life United
    • Extra Life Q & A
  • Articles & Extra Life Announcements
    • Announcements
  • Official Extra Life Guilds
    • Guild information and Discussion
    • Canada
    • Northeastern US
    • Southeastern US
    • Central US
    • Western US
  • Gaming Discussions
    • General Gaming Discussion
  • Other Stuff
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Recent Posts

Calendars

  • Extra Life Community Calendar
  • Extra Life Stream Team
  • Akron Guild
  • Albany Guild
  • Albuquerque Guild
  • Anchorage Guild
  • Atlanta Guild
  • Austin Guild
  • Bakersfield Guild
  • Baltimore Guild
  • Birmingham Guild
  • Boston Guild
  • Burlington Guild
  • Buffalo Guild
  • Calgary, AB Guild
  • Morgantown Guild
  • Charlottesville Guild
  • Chicago Guild
  • Cincinnati Guild
  • Cleveland Guild
  • Columbia, MO Guild
  • Columbus, OH Guild
  • Dallas Guild
  • Dayton Guild
  • Denver Guild
  • Des Moines Guild
  • Detroit Guild
  • Edmonton, AB Guild
  • Fargo-Valley City Guild
  • Fresno Guild
  • Ft. Worth Guild
  • Gainesville-Tallahassee Guild
  • Grand Rapids Guild
  • Halifax, NS Guild
  • Hamilton, ON Guild
  • Hartford Guild
  • Hershey Guild
  • Hudson Valley Guild
  • Houston Guild
  • Indianapolis Guild
  • Jacksonville Guild
  • Kansas City Guild
  • Knoxville Guild
  • Lansing Guild
  • London, ON Guild
  • Los Angeles Guild
  • Milwaukee / Madison Guild
  • Minneapolis / Twin Cities Guild
  • Montreal / Quebec City Guild
  • Nashville Guild
  • Newark Guild
  • NYC & Long Island Guild
  • Oakland / San Francisco Guild
  • Omaha Guild
  • Orange County Guild
  • Orlando Guild
  • Ottawa, ON Guild
  • Philadelphia Guild
  • Phoenix Guild
  • Pittsburgh Guild
  • Portland, OR Guild
  • Portland, ME Guild
  • Raleigh-Durham Guild
  • Richmond Guild
  • Sacramento Guild
  • Salt Lake City Guild
  • San Antonio Guild
  • San Diego Guild
  • San Juan, PR Guild
  • Saskatchewan Guild
  • Seattle Guild
  • Spokane Guild
  • Springfield-Champaign, IL Guild
  • Springfield, MA Guild
  • St. Louis Guild
  • Syracuse Guild
  • Tampa / St. Petersburg Guild
  • Toronto, ON Guild
  • Vancouver, BC Guild
  • Washington DC Guild
  • Winnipeg, MB Guild
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Events
  • Extra Life Akron's Events

Categories

  • Broadcasting Toolkit
  • Multimedia Kit
  • Extra Life Guild Tool Kit
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Files
  • Extra Life Akron's Files

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Hospital


Location


Why I "Extra Life"


Interests


Twitter


Instagram


Twitch


Mixer


Discord


Blizzard Battletag


Nintendo ID


PSN ID


Steam


Origin


Xbox Gamertag

Found 26 results

  1. It was unclear whether Yakuza 6: The Song of Life would have a demo after Sega removed it from the PlayStation Network last month. The demo was notable for its size due to the demo including all of the data for the full game. The idea was to allow those who played the demo to carry over their progress and trophies to the full game on release day. However, the demo was intended to cap progress at the end of the first chapter of Yakuza 6, but some players either didn't run into that cap or found a way around it. Once that became public knowledge, Sega pulled the demo. It seems that some tweaks have been made to the demo to ensure no one can get access to the full game now. Players will be able to progress up to the end of the first chapter and then grind experience that will carry over into the full release. However, if you've already played through the demo, any trophies you've earned will be reset. If you were one of the players who made it past the chapter one cut off point, you will not be able to load that data for the demo. However, the full version of Yakuza 6 should still load that data so you can pick up where you left off. View full article
  2. It was unclear whether Yakuza 6: The Song of Life would have a demo after Sega removed it from the PlayStation Network last month. The demo was notable for its size due to the demo including all of the data for the full game. The idea was to allow those who played the demo to carry over their progress and trophies to the full game on release day. However, the demo was intended to cap progress at the end of the first chapter of Yakuza 6, but some players either didn't run into that cap or found a way around it. Once that became public knowledge, Sega pulled the demo. It seems that some tweaks have been made to the demo to ensure no one can get access to the full game now. Players will be able to progress up to the end of the first chapter and then grind experience that will carry over into the full release. However, if you've already played through the demo, any trophies you've earned will be reset. If you were one of the players who made it past the chapter one cut off point, you will not be able to load that data for the demo. However, the full version of Yakuza 6 should still load that data so you can pick up where you left off.
  3. It seems that Sega has a bit of a kerfuffle on it's hands. After releasing the demo of Yakuza 6: The Song of Life on PSN, players found a way to use it to unlock the full game prior to its official release date. The demo apparently was the full Yakuza 6 game and was designed to lock progression after completing the first chapter. The intent of approaching the demo this way was to allow players to make progress in the game in a way that would carry over to the full release if they made the leap to the fully priced game. While progress was indeed locked for users in regions around the world, that did not happen for certain players in North America. It's not clear if those players were able to tamper with the demo to break the lock or if it was simply never locked to begin with. Whatever the case, Sega issued a statement via their social media channels to alert players that the demo would no longer be available in North America: We apologize, but have had to remove the Yakuza 6: The Song of Life demo from the PlayStation Store. We are as upset as you are, and had hoped to have this demo available for everyone today. We discovered that some were able to use the demo to unlock the full game. We’re looking into the nature of the issue. Thank you for your patience. It is unclear if Sega intends to re-release the demo at this time. Yakuza 6: The Song of Life is currently slated for an April 17 release date on the PlayStation 4. View full article
  4. It seems that Sega has a bit of a kerfuffle on it's hands. After releasing the demo of Yakuza 6: The Song of Life on PSN, players found a way to use it to unlock the full game prior to its official release date. The demo apparently was the full Yakuza 6 game and was designed to lock progression after completing the first chapter. The intent of approaching the demo this way was to allow players to make progress in the game in a way that would carry over to the full release if they made the leap to the fully priced game. While progress was indeed locked for users in regions around the world, that did not happen for certain players in North America. It's not clear if those players were able to tamper with the demo to break the lock or if it was simply never locked to begin with. Whatever the case, Sega issued a statement via their social media channels to alert players that the demo would no longer be available in North America: We apologize, but have had to remove the Yakuza 6: The Song of Life demo from the PlayStation Store. We are as upset as you are, and had hoped to have this demo available for everyone today. We discovered that some were able to use the demo to unlock the full game. We’re looking into the nature of the issue. Thank you for your patience. It is unclear if Sega intends to re-release the demo at this time. Yakuza 6: The Song of Life is currently slated for an April 17 release date on the PlayStation 4.
  5. We finally have more details on the upcoming Square Enix title Project Octopath Traveler that was teased during the Nintendo Direct back in February. With Project Octopath Traveler, Square Enix seems to be angling to recapture the retro RPG fans with stylish presentation, a branching narrative, and a unique combat system. Watching Octopath Traveler in action and it immediately becomes clear that you've never seen anything quite like it. Square Enix announced that the title will make use of a new aesthetic technique that they have dubbed HD-2D. This new style looks like an old-school RPG format that has been tilted into a 3D world while retaining 2D characters. It's certainly unique and eye-catching while retaining that ye olden days RPG feel. We now know that the octopath in Octopath Traveler references the eight potential protagonists that players can select when beginning their adventure. Each character has their own story, motivations in the world, and a unique ability that will allow them to pursue their goals. The two characters shown, Olberic and Primrose, can manipulate NPCs. Olberic can challenge almost anyone to a duel to prove his strength or move characters out of his way. Primrose, on the other hand, can seduce NPCs to help her on quests or lure enemies into traps. While Octopath Traveler certainly seems like a retro RPG, Square Enix has been experimenting with combat mechanics. Turn-based battles that will be immediately familiar to RPG fans are present in full force, but the major difference in Octopath Traveler is the ability to gain Boost Points with every turn that passes. These points can then be used to boost attacks, doing two, three, or four times more damage. They can also be used to heal, cast spells, or even chain combos together. A demo for Octopath Traveler is currently available on the Nintendo Switch eShop. The full game is expected to release sometime during 2018 and, while it has certainly been covered in Nintendo events, it seems like it might be coming to other systems as well. View full article
  6. We finally have more details on the upcoming Square Enix title Project Octopath Traveler that was teased during the Nintendo Direct back in February. With Project Octopath Traveler, Square Enix seems to be angling to recapture the retro RPG fans with stylish presentation, a branching narrative, and a unique combat system. Watching Octopath Traveler in action and it immediately becomes clear that you've never seen anything quite like it. Square Enix announced that the title will make use of a new aesthetic technique that they have dubbed HD-2D. This new style looks like an old-school RPG format that has been tilted into a 3D world while retaining 2D characters. It's certainly unique and eye-catching while retaining that ye olden days RPG feel. We now know that the octopath in Octopath Traveler references the eight potential protagonists that players can select when beginning their adventure. Each character has their own story, motivations in the world, and a unique ability that will allow them to pursue their goals. The two characters shown, Olberic and Primrose, can manipulate NPCs. Olberic can challenge almost anyone to a duel to prove his strength or move characters out of his way. Primrose, on the other hand, can seduce NPCs to help her on quests or lure enemies into traps. While Octopath Traveler certainly seems like a retro RPG, Square Enix has been experimenting with combat mechanics. Turn-based battles that will be immediately familiar to RPG fans are present in full force, but the major difference in Octopath Traveler is the ability to gain Boost Points with every turn that passes. These points can then be used to boost attacks, doing two, three, or four times more damage. They can also be used to heal, cast spells, or even chain combos together. A demo for Octopath Traveler is currently available on the Nintendo Switch eShop. The full game is expected to release sometime during 2018 and, while it has certainly been covered in Nintendo events, it seems like it might be coming to other systems as well.
  7. The year is 1986 and Miami has found itself struggling against gangs, drugs, and the AIDS epidemic. One person per day is found murdered and hundreds go missing, overwhelming local police departments. Many of those people are never found, disappearing without a trace. Consuelo "Chelo" Martínez tracks down those ghosts to uncover the truth behind their disappearances. Ghosts of Miami tells the story of Chelo's sleuthing as she solves cases and makes a name for herself as a lady who can get things done. I had a chance to play through the demo of Ghosts of Miami this week and found myself really impressed. I'm not one who typically falls in love with visual novels. The limited degree of interactivity and the stylistic rut many fall into generally loses my interest. Not so with Ghosts of Miami. Developed by Pillow Fight, the team that made a name for themselves with 2015's We Know The Devil, Ghosts of Miami drips with 80s style. The dream pop art exudes charm and personality. While backgrounds have an ethereal, dream-like quality, the principle characters come alive. Their various facial expressions and poses render the cast instantly endearing and eye-catching. The animated opening alone demonstrates how much life Pillow Fight poured into Ghosts of Miami. There's a really passionate core to the game that its visuals thoroughly succeed in conveying. While style certainly contributes to the tone of Ghosts of Miami, writing remains the lifeblood of a visual novel. It needs to hold up to scrutiny. On that front, the title stands strong. Chelo herself presents a compelling protagonist as a sleuth who can take more morally ambiguous jobs because she lacks even a Private Investigator designation. The player feels her frustrations, insecurities, and fears via her dialogue or internal asides. The well realized supporting characters showcased in the demo pull their own weight, too. While the game itself will follow Chelo over the course of five cases, the demo only shows a part of her first case. She's hired by her landlord, Mrs. Woon, to find Grace Woon, her daughter who has been missing for two days. This first case proves to be an important one for Chelo, both because it could make or break her reputation, but also because it is her first case after quitting her gas station job and she really doesn't want to go back there. After setting the scene, Ghosts of Miami allows players to choose which lead they would like to follow up. The catch is that each lead takes time - Chelo only has time to visit three locations throughout the day - morning, afternoon, and evening. Do you go to Grace's favorite childhood spot? Check out her sketchy boyfriend? See if you can track down her best friend? Or do you put all that aside for now and see what your screw-up of a brother is up to this time? While visiting locations, players typically encounter new characters who can prove helpful, resistant, or clueless depending on the circumstance and the approach players choose to take. Like many visual novels, players will encounter helpful (or possibly distracting) love interests while solving mysteries. Players can rebuff these romantic advances to focus on work or blow off work to spend time with their new romance. Be warned! Spending too much time with those amorous connections could lead to disaster. The Ghosts of Miami has been Greenlit on Steam and it's definitely worth a look, especially if you're in the market for a different kind of game to spice things up in this year of great games. The full release of Ghosts of Miami is coming up sometime this summer. It will be available in English, Spanish, and Traditional Chinese. Pillow Fight is also working on additional accessibility options like screenreading, text-to-speech, and gamepad controls. I thoroughly enjoyed my time with Ghosts of Miami. The demo felt incredibly refreshing with its overpowering charm, stylish aesthetic, and well written dialogue. It made me want to spend more time in its world and characters over the course of just one in-game day. Keep an eye on this one. You can download the demo from the Ghosts of Miami website. View full article
  8. Jack Gardner

    Become an 80s Detective in Ghosts of Miami

    The year is 1986 and Miami has found itself struggling against gangs, drugs, and the AIDS epidemic. One person per day is found murdered and hundreds go missing, overwhelming local police departments. Many of those people are never found, disappearing without a trace. Consuelo "Chelo" Martínez tracks down those ghosts to uncover the truth behind their disappearances. Ghosts of Miami tells the story of Chelo's sleuthing as she solves cases and makes a name for herself as a lady who can get things done. I had a chance to play through the demo of Ghosts of Miami this week and found myself really impressed. I'm not one who typically falls in love with visual novels. The limited degree of interactivity and the stylistic rut many fall into generally loses my interest. Not so with Ghosts of Miami. Developed by Pillow Fight, the team that made a name for themselves with 2015's We Know The Devil, Ghosts of Miami drips with 80s style. The dream pop art exudes charm and personality. While backgrounds have an ethereal, dream-like quality, the principle characters come alive. Their various facial expressions and poses render the cast instantly endearing and eye-catching. The animated opening alone demonstrates how much life Pillow Fight poured into Ghosts of Miami. There's a really passionate core to the game that its visuals thoroughly succeed in conveying. While style certainly contributes to the tone of Ghosts of Miami, writing remains the lifeblood of a visual novel. It needs to hold up to scrutiny. On that front, the title stands strong. Chelo herself presents a compelling protagonist as a sleuth who can take more morally ambiguous jobs because she lacks even a Private Investigator designation. The player feels her frustrations, insecurities, and fears via her dialogue or internal asides. The well realized supporting characters showcased in the demo pull their own weight, too. While the game itself will follow Chelo over the course of five cases, the demo only shows a part of her first case. She's hired by her landlord, Mrs. Woon, to find Grace Woon, her daughter who has been missing for two days. This first case proves to be an important one for Chelo, both because it could make or break her reputation, but also because it is her first case after quitting her gas station job and she really doesn't want to go back there. After setting the scene, Ghosts of Miami allows players to choose which lead they would like to follow up. The catch is that each lead takes time - Chelo only has time to visit three locations throughout the day - morning, afternoon, and evening. Do you go to Grace's favorite childhood spot? Check out her sketchy boyfriend? See if you can track down her best friend? Or do you put all that aside for now and see what your screw-up of a brother is up to this time? While visiting locations, players typically encounter new characters who can prove helpful, resistant, or clueless depending on the circumstance and the approach players choose to take. Like many visual novels, players will encounter helpful (or possibly distracting) love interests while solving mysteries. Players can rebuff these romantic advances to focus on work or blow off work to spend time with their new romance. Be warned! Spending too much time with those amorous connections could lead to disaster. The Ghosts of Miami has been Greenlit on Steam and it's definitely worth a look, especially if you're in the market for a different kind of game to spice things up in this year of great games. The full release of Ghosts of Miami is coming up sometime this summer. It will be available in English, Spanish, and Traditional Chinese. Pillow Fight is also working on additional accessibility options like screenreading, text-to-speech, and gamepad controls. I thoroughly enjoyed my time with Ghosts of Miami. The demo felt incredibly refreshing with its overpowering charm, stylish aesthetic, and well written dialogue. It made me want to spend more time in its world and characters over the course of just one in-game day. Keep an eye on this one. You can download the demo from the Ghosts of Miami website.
  9. Outlast 2 may have been been delayed until 2017, but players can at least get their hands on a small bit of the game this month. Red Barrels, the developer behind the psychotic horror game Outlast and its upcoming sequel, has released a demo that provides the public with a free slice of gameplay from Outlast 2. The demo is available digitally via Steam (PC), Xbox Live (Xbox One), and PSN (PS4). However, it will only be available for a limited time. Red Barrels will be pulling the demo from digital storefronts on November 1, so download it before then if you want to scare yourself silly. We were pretty impressed with Outlast 2's E3 showing earlier this year, with writer Alissa Gould calling what she saw "terrifyingly fantastic." Though it is a shame the title won't be releasing this year, a horror demo around Halloween might just be the perfect consolation to help us - outlast - the delay.
  10. Outlast 2 may have been been delayed until 2017, but players can at least get their hands on a small bit of the game this month. Red Barrels, the developer behind the psychotic horror game Outlast and its upcoming sequel, has released a demo that provides the public with a free slice of gameplay from Outlast 2. The demo is available digitally via Steam (PC), Xbox Live (Xbox One), and PSN (PS4). However, it will only be available for a limited time. Red Barrels will be pulling the demo from digital storefronts on November 1, so download it before then if you want to scare yourself silly. We were pretty impressed with Outlast 2's E3 showing earlier this year, with writer Alissa Gould calling what she saw "terrifyingly fantastic." Though it is a shame the title won't be releasing this year, a horror demo around Halloween might just be the perfect consolation to help us - outlast - the delay. View full article
  11. The alpha demo for the demon slaying Nioh back in April met with smashing success, garnering more than 850,000 downloads over 10 days. Those who played filled out a survey to help Team Ninja fine tune the gameplay and weapons. A beta demo slated for a late August release now includes many of those changes. Players will be able to download the beta through the PlayStation Store from August 23 to September 6. The Dark Souls/Akira Kurosawa-inspired Nioh thrusts players into the role of a 16th century Japanese warrior who clashes with various demons and monsters on his quest to fulfill his destiny. The beta will include a broader range of weapons; more axes, hammers, spears, and katana. Some of the beta will have players retreading the same ground as the alpha, but with revamped gameplay. However, there will be a new dojo area, training mode, and a mysterious stage that Team Ninja has not yet revealed. Nioh releases later this year exclusively for PlayStation 4. View full article
  12. Jack Gardner

    Second Demo for Nioh Coming in August

    The alpha demo for the demon slaying Nioh back in April met with smashing success, garnering more than 850,000 downloads over 10 days. Those who played filled out a survey to help Team Ninja fine tune the gameplay and weapons. A beta demo slated for a late August release now includes many of those changes. Players will be able to download the beta through the PlayStation Store from August 23 to September 6. The Dark Souls/Akira Kurosawa-inspired Nioh thrusts players into the role of a 16th century Japanese warrior who clashes with various demons and monsters on his quest to fulfill his destiny. The beta will include a broader range of weapons; more axes, hammers, spears, and katana. Some of the beta will have players retreading the same ground as the alpha, but with revamped gameplay. However, there will be a new dojo area, training mode, and a mysterious stage that Team Ninja has not yet revealed. Nioh releases later this year exclusively for PlayStation 4.
  13. The dark, difficult samurai action-RPG, Nioh, has released a playable demo onto the PlayStation 4. Similar to the Dark Souls 3 alpha stress test, the Nioh demo has a relatively short lifespan and will be available for a little over a week. Publisher Koei Tecmo has also said that all players who complete the demo will receive The Mark of the Conqueror DLC when the full game launches. According to Koei Tecmo, The Mark of the Conqueror will not be available to those who don't complete the demo, though that could change. The demo occurs through two areas, Usuki and Dazaifu. Usuki is a destroyed, shambling fishing village and Dazaifu is a place completely overrun with demons. Three basic weapon types are available; katana, spear, and axe. Nioh is being developed by Team Ninja and will be released on PlayStation 4. No release date has been given as of yet. View full article
  14. The dark, difficult samurai action-RPG, Nioh, has released a playable demo onto the PlayStation 4. Similar to the Dark Souls 3 alpha stress test, the Nioh demo has a relatively short lifespan and will be available for a little over a week. Publisher Koei Tecmo has also said that all players who complete the demo will receive The Mark of the Conqueror DLC when the full game launches. According to Koei Tecmo, The Mark of the Conqueror will not be available to those who don't complete the demo, though that could change. The demo occurs through two areas, Usuki and Dazaifu. Usuki is a destroyed, shambling fishing village and Dazaifu is a place completely overrun with demons. Three basic weapon types are available; katana, spear, and axe. Nioh is being developed by Team Ninja and will be released on PlayStation 4. No release date has been given as of yet.
  15. A new, free demo for Final Fantasy XV is available to download right now on PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. The demo places players within protagonist Noctis' dreams, a world where anything is possible from shrinking down to the size of an action figure and running through toy castles to battling five storey high monsters. Through it all, players will be able to experience the controls, combat, and some visuals unique from the core game. Players will also have an adorable fuzzy companion on their travels through Noctis' dreamworld. The Platinum Demo will be a completely separate experience from the base game, allowing players to transform into different animals and monsters and wield weapons like toy hammers and drive miniature cars while battling the nightmares that inhabit the dreamscape. It's a long time from now until Final Fantasy XV's September 30 release date. However, the Platinum Demo might just temporarily sate our desire for Final Fantasy XV. Check it out if you have a chance!
  16. A new, free demo for Final Fantasy XV is available to download right now on PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. The demo places players within protagonist Noctis' dreams, a world where anything is possible from shrinking down to the size of an action figure and running through toy castles to battling five storey high monsters. Through it all, players will be able to experience the controls, combat, and some visuals unique from the core game. Players will also have an adorable fuzzy companion on their travels through Noctis' dreamworld. The Platinum Demo will be a completely separate experience from the base game, allowing players to transform into different animals and monsters and wield weapons like toy hammers and drive miniature cars while battling the nightmares that inhabit the dreamscape. It's a long time from now until Final Fantasy XV's September 30 release date. However, the Platinum Demo might just temporarily sate our desire for Final Fantasy XV. Check it out if you have a chance! View full article
  17. If you haven't heard of Titan Souls yet, you are missing out. Conceived of as an entry in the Ludum Dare game jam back in 2013, the idea stuck with creators Mark Foster, David Fenn, and Andrew Gleeson. Together, they decided that they would make Titan Souls a full game. And make it, they did! It releases on April 14. Until then, you can try your hand at mastering the demo they've put together that remasters their original game jam prototype. The core idea of Titan Souls is that you are armed with a bow and only one arrow. You can slay the bosses in one shot, but they can also kill you instantly if one of their attacks connects. Titan Souls revolves around carefully timing and positioning attacks. It is intense and more than a little nerve-racking in the best possible way. You can download the demo on the Steam Store page for if you're curious. Titan Souls releases on April 14 for PC, Mac, PlayStation 4, and PS Vita. View full article
  18. Jack Gardner

    Titan Souls Demo Goes Live on Steam

    If you haven't heard of Titan Souls yet, you are missing out. Conceived of as an entry in the Ludum Dare game jam back in 2013, the idea stuck with creators Mark Foster, David Fenn, and Andrew Gleeson. Together, they decided that they would make Titan Souls a full game. And make it, they did! It releases on April 14. Until then, you can try your hand at mastering the demo they've put together that remasters their original game jam prototype. The core idea of Titan Souls is that you are armed with a bow and only one arrow. You can slay the bosses in one shot, but they can also kill you instantly if one of their attacks connects. Titan Souls revolves around carefully timing and positioning attacks. It is intense and more than a little nerve-racking in the best possible way. You can download the demo on the Steam Store page for if you're curious. Titan Souls releases on April 14 for PC, Mac, PlayStation 4, and PS Vita.
  19. Jack Gardner

    The Twisted Design of P.T.

    During gamescom 2014, a playable teaser for the upcoming psychological horror game Silent Hills was released on the PlayStation 4. The project is a collaboration between Hideo Kojima and Guillermo del Toro. I finally had a chance to play through the demo this week and, while P.T. certainly nails key horror genre elements, it has a number of baffling design choices. P.T. seems to take cues from games like Outlast and Amnesia: The Dark Descent. The majority of the interactions players have with the environment is simply walking around. Essentially, the player character is a passive observer to the disturbing scenes and sounds of the environment. Players are able to move and look at different objects with the camera. A cursory examination of the different buttons reveal that none of them seem to perform any function, with the exception of a slight zoom of the camera by pressing the right analogue stick. This is important because it turns out the only way to progress in P.T. is by looking at specific objects. The problem is that P.T. occasionally changes the rules. There is one occasion in P.T. when players are supposed to intuitively know that they need to press a specific button while looking at an object. Unfortunately, the game has already established that the buttons serve no function, which makes it all the more frustrating that this is one of only two times in P.T. where players are required to press a button. At one point the demo requires players to find several scraps of a ripped up photograph. This would be fine if it was clear that the player should be looking for scraps. For a while I assumed that I was just supposed to be looking at unique objects in the hallway, because I found two by zooming in on a teddy bear and a potted plant. It wasn’t until I looked up a guide online that it was clear that I was looking for small, hidden pieces of that picture. Persistent players will eventually reach one of the most perplexing requirements of the demo; a part which has been commonly referred to as the “final puzzle.” To proceed, players must have a headset or microphone plugged into the PS4 controller. There is no indication for this; presumably players were just supposed to figure this out on their own. With the headset/mic in hand, players have to hear or compel a baby to laugh three times by looking at various objects or moving in certain ways. There are a variety of strategies that people say work, but all of them are pretty dang obscure (there are over eleven methods of unlocking the end of P.T. in this IGN walkthrough). Kojima is known for keeping his projects a surprise until just the right time, and has even admitted that he thought it would take the internet longer to figure out the secret to unlocking the ending of the demo. To me, this seems like confusing design for the sake of being mysterious. Perhaps that was entirely the point and I am being hard on P.T. because I don’t understand it. But I think that there are some decisions here that need to be called out. In particular, the ending of P.T. is not a puzzle, nor is any part of P.T. for that matter. Inconsistent controls and obscure requirements for what happens to be plugged into the PS4 controller aren’t puzzles. Good puzzles are like a Rubik’s cube. Most people understand how a Rubik’s cube works and what the goal is almost from the instant they pick it up. It is intuitive. The puzzle is figuring out how to use the simple mechanics of the cube in order to solve it. But what if there was occasionally a hidden rule to Rubik’s cubes? What if it was decided that at a very specific point in solving one you had to make a turn of the cube using only one hand? What if in order to officially have solved the cube you had to do your best impression of Freddie Mercury? Now imagine that you eliminate the Rubik’s cube and replace it with wandering around a creepy hallway. There is no puzzle there, just a weirdo having a hand around and occasionally acting like a terrible Freddie Mercury impersonator. That’s what trying to play through P.T. is like. Just because something is difficult to figure out doesn’t make it a puzzle. One of the reasons I am hounding this issue is because genuinely ruins the experience of being freaked out. Being trapped in a haunted hallway is terrifying. Being trapped in a haunted hallway where nothing happens for twenty minutes while you are trying to figure out how to get a door to open is just frustrating. In video games, frustration trumps horror. This comic by artist Bryce Corbett (warning: harsh language) perfectly sums up how many people have experienced the teaser for Silent Hills. The design creates unintended frustration, and that seems to me like a fundamental flaw. It might seem like I am being a bit hard on P.T. Like I said earlier, the atmosphere is electrifyingly uncomfortable. The environment consists of a hallway, a cement chamber, and a bathroom. Using that limited scope, it deftly manages to be unnerving, demonic, and horrifying without relying overly much on jump scares. Baby wails, guttural muttering, static-laced radio broadcasts regarding murder, bugs crawling on moldering walls, and piles of trash on the floor all work together to make the area uncomfortable. There are little details like bars on the windows, an abundance of abstract paintings, a swinging ceiling light that give the affair a sense of surreal dread. Despite my concerns, I am optimistic about a new Silent Hill game. I am hoping that most of the design decisions in the teaser reflect Kojima’s penchant for dramatic reveals and secrecy, not his vision of the full game. Honestly, I call out Kojima as being the largest name attached to the project with a history of game design. It could be that these decisions came from Guillermo del Toro. Who knows? Either way, the atmosphere of an exceedingly terrifying experience is already in place, there just needs to be a competent game behind the visuals and sound to back it all up with something that doesn’t rely on guesswork, luck, and strategy guides.
  20. Jack Gardner

    Feature: The Twisted Design of P.T.

    During gamescom 2014, a playable teaser for the upcoming psychological horror game Silent Hills was released on the PlayStation 4. The project is a collaboration between Hideo Kojima and Guillermo del Toro. I finally had a chance to play through the demo this week and, while P.T. certainly nails key horror genre elements, it has a number of baffling design choices. P.T. seems to take cues from games like Outlast and Amnesia: The Dark Descent. The majority of the interactions players have with the environment is simply walking around. Essentially, the player character is a passive observer to the disturbing scenes and sounds of the environment. Players are able to move and look at different objects with the camera. A cursory examination of the different buttons reveal that none of them seem to perform any function, with the exception of a slight zoom of the camera by pressing the right analogue stick. This is important because it turns out the only way to progress in P.T. is by looking at specific objects. The problem is that P.T. occasionally changes the rules. There is one occasion in P.T. when players are supposed to intuitively know that they need to press a specific button while looking at an object. Unfortunately, the game has already established that the buttons serve no function, which makes it all the more frustrating that this is one of only two times in P.T. where players are required to press a button. At one point the demo requires players to find several scraps of a ripped up photograph. This would be fine if it was clear that the player should be looking for scraps. For a while I assumed that I was just supposed to be looking at unique objects in the hallway, because I found two by zooming in on a teddy bear and a potted plant. It wasn’t until I looked up a guide online that it was clear that I was looking for small, hidden pieces of that picture. Persistent players will eventually reach one of the most perplexing requirements of the demo; a part which has been commonly referred to as the “final puzzle.” To proceed, players must have a headset or microphone plugged into the PS4 controller. There is no indication for this; presumably players were just supposed to figure this out on their own. With the headset/mic in hand, players have to hear or compel a baby to laugh three times by looking at various objects or moving in certain ways. There are a variety of strategies that people say work, but all of them are pretty dang obscure (there are over eleven methods of unlocking the end of P.T. in this IGN walkthrough). Kojima is known for keeping his projects a surprise until just the right time, and has even admitted that he thought it would take the internet longer to figure out the secret to unlocking the ending of the demo. To me, this seems like confusing design for the sake of being mysterious. Perhaps that was entirely the point and I am being hard on P.T. because I don’t understand it. But I think that there are some decisions here that need to be called out. In particular, the ending of P.T. is not a puzzle, nor is any part of P.T. for that matter. Inconsistent controls and obscure requirements for what happens to be plugged into the PS4 controller aren’t puzzles. Good puzzles are like a Rubik’s cube. Most people understand how a Rubik’s cube works and what the goal is almost from the instant they pick it up. It is intuitive. The puzzle is figuring out how to use the simple mechanics of the cube in order to solve it. But what if there was occasionally a hidden rule to Rubik’s cubes? What if it was decided that at a very specific point in solving one you had to make a turn of the cube using only one hand? What if in order to officially have solved the cube you had to do your best impression of Freddie Mercury? Now imagine that you eliminate the Rubik’s cube and replace it with wandering around a creepy hallway. There is no puzzle there, just a weirdo having a hand around and occasionally acting like a terrible Freddie Mercury impersonator. That’s what trying to play through P.T. is like. Just because something is difficult to figure out doesn’t make it a puzzle. One of the reasons I am hounding this issue is because genuinely ruins the experience of being freaked out. Being trapped in a haunted hallway is terrifying. Being trapped in a haunted hallway where nothing happens for twenty minutes while you are trying to figure out how to get a door to open is just frustrating. In video games, frustration trumps horror. This comic by artist Bryce Corbett (warning: harsh language) perfectly sums up how many people have experienced the teaser for Silent Hills. The design creates unintended frustration, and that seems to me like a fundamental flaw. It might seem like I am being a bit hard on P.T. Like I said earlier, the atmosphere is electrifyingly uncomfortable. The environment consists of a hallway, a cement chamber, and a bathroom. Using that limited scope, it deftly manages to be unnerving, demonic, and horrifying without relying overly much on jump scares. Baby wails, guttural muttering, static-laced radio broadcasts regarding murder, bugs crawling on moldering walls, and piles of trash on the floor all work together to make the area uncomfortable. There are little details like bars on the windows, an abundance of abstract paintings, a swinging ceiling light that give the affair a sense of surreal dread. Despite my concerns, I am optimistic about a new Silent Hill game. I am hoping that most of the design decisions in the teaser reflect Kojima’s penchant for dramatic reveals and secrecy, not his vision of the full game. Honestly, I call out Kojima as being the largest name attached to the project with a history of game design. It could be that these decisions came from Guillermo del Toro. Who knows? Either way, the atmosphere of an exceedingly terrifying experience is already in place, there just needs to be a competent game behind the visuals and sound to back it all up with something that doesn’t rely on guesswork, luck, and strategy guides. View full article
  21. For All To Play has taken to Kickstarter to fund their development of a game with no need for visuals, Grail to the Thief: An Interactive Audio Adventure. Designed to be played and enjoyed by both the visually impaired and ocularly enabled, Grail to the Thief is a text adventure that conveys all of its information in an audio format. All dialogue is voiced, while sound effects, music, and ambient sound convey additional details about the in-game environment. Grail to the Thief iterates on the traditional text adventure formula by giving players access to a number of options in any given scenario. This eliminates the tedium and frustration of experimenting with typed commands and allows players to enjoy the story, which draws inspiration from the likes of Zork, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, and the movie Time Bandits. I could try and summarize the plot, but I'll let the developers do it for me in their own words: The game stars Hank Krang, a dirty thief from the near future, who recently had a self-aware time machine called the Time Excursion Digital Interface, or TEDI, fall into his lap after a poker game. He has decided to use this technology to go throughout time, stealing priceless artifacts. On his first adventure, Grail to the Thief, Hank travels to Arthurian times in search of the Holy Grail. Now if that isn't a plot I can get behind, I don't know what is. Grail to the Thief, if fully funded in the next 25 days will be released on PC, Mac OS X, and Linux, with stretch goals for mobile, a playable female character, and Spanish localization. Interested parties can play a prototype of Grail to the Thief in either Chrome or Opera web browsers by following the link foralltoplay.com/prototype. To support pledge money in support of the project, head over to their Kickstarter page. It is amazing to see how far games have come in recent years with more projects being undertaken to accommodate players who might not otherwise be able to play and enjoy games. Hopefully, we will be seeing more games take less able gamers into account as we move forward as an industry.
  22. For All To Play has taken to Kickstarter to fund their development of a game with no need for visuals, Grail to the Thief: An Interactive Audio Adventure. Designed to be played and enjoyed by both the visually impaired and ocularly enabled, Grail to the Thief is a text adventure that conveys all of its information in an audio format. All dialogue is voiced, while sound effects, music, and ambient sound convey additional details about the in-game environment. Grail to the Thief iterates on the traditional text adventure formula by giving players access to a number of options in any given scenario. This eliminates the tedium and frustration of experimenting with typed commands and allows players to enjoy the story, which draws inspiration from the likes of Zork, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, and the movie Time Bandits. I could try and summarize the plot, but I'll let the developers do it for me in their own words: The game stars Hank Krang, a dirty thief from the near future, who recently had a self-aware time machine called the Time Excursion Digital Interface, or TEDI, fall into his lap after a poker game. He has decided to use this technology to go throughout time, stealing priceless artifacts. On his first adventure, Grail to the Thief, Hank travels to Arthurian times in search of the Holy Grail. Now if that isn't a plot I can get behind, I don't know what is. Grail to the Thief, if fully funded in the next 25 days will be released on PC, Mac OS X, and Linux, with stretch goals for mobile, a playable female character, and Spanish localization. Interested parties can play a prototype of Grail to the Thief in either Chrome or Opera web browsers by following the link foralltoplay.com/prototype. To support pledge money in support of the project, head over to their Kickstarter page. It is amazing to see how far games have come in recent years with more projects being undertaken to accommodate players who might not otherwise be able to play and enjoy games. Hopefully, we will be seeing more games take less able gamers into account as we move forward as an industry. View full article
  23. For people who may not be familiar with Octodad, you play as an octopus that masquerades as a human and tries to perform mundane tasks like walking or using forks without alerting normal humans that he is, in fact, an octopus. During E3, I was able to sit down and play as the sneaky cephalopod on the PS4. The demo of Dadliest Catch (by the way, how can you NOT love such a terrible/hilarious play on Deadliest Catch?) tasked me with making it to my wedding without drawing too much attention to my rather obvious tentacles. Shoulder buttons control leg movements in conjunction with the analog sticks, while tapping one of the face buttons allows you to control one of the hand-tentacles to grab and manipulate objects. While the controls seem simple, deadliest Catch goes to great lengths to inform players that if an octopus was to put on a man’s suit, tie, and pants, it would be very difficult for that aquatic creature to assume the role of a father. By using the octopus’ natural (See: completely unnatural) ability to walk and pick up things, players will need to figure out the best way to complete objectives like cooking dinner or putting a wedding ring on a beloved’s hand. Often, picking up a single object or walking in a straight line results in hilarious destruction and much limb flailing. I began by having to put on a bowtie, which proved incredibly disastrous, as I sent wedding gifts scattering across the floor before falling onto a table, burying myself underneath a mountain of presents. When I tried to rise up, like a beautiful, aquatic phoenix, I smashed a few of the gifts through the stained-glass window of the church. Luckily, no one was around to observe my miserable performance and I was able to saunter away from the wreckage of my bowtie adventure, whistling innocently (or whatever the cephalopod equivalent of whistling would be). Following the bowtie escapade, I needed to walk down the aisle of a church to get married to my human bride. On the way, I wobbled from right to left, knocking over several pillars that lined the pews and nearly falling over multiple times, all while the digital wedding-goers wondered at my clumsiness. If these missteps occur too often while other people can see you, they will begin to get suspicious and eventually see through the ruse, resulting in a game over. Luckily, I successfully made it to my bride, after which I needed to make my way to a nearby chest and retrieve the wedding ring. Retrieving the ring with little effort (okay, I might have thrown a ton of jewels out of the chest all over the church altar), I carefully placed the ring into the possession of my bride. And just like that, the demo was over. I could tell you a lot of things about Octodad: Dadliest Catch. I could say that the animations are amazingly funny; that the ridiculousness of the premise is really enjoyable if you can find some modicum of joy in your heart; that the team at Young Horses has put a lot of genuine heart into Dadliest Catch. I could say those things. But I think what really speaks for the game is that throughout the entire demo I couldn’t stop smiling and laughing. Dadliest Catch is a direct sequel to the original PC game (which can be downloaded here) and will be releasing on PC, Mac, Linux, and PS4 sometime this year. View full article
  24. Jack Gardner

    Hands-On with Octodad: Dadliest Catch

    For people who may not be familiar with Octodad, you play as an octopus that masquerades as a human and tries to perform mundane tasks like walking or using forks without alerting normal humans that he is, in fact, an octopus. During E3, I was able to sit down and play as the sneaky cephalopod on the PS4. The demo of Dadliest Catch (by the way, how can you NOT love such a terrible/hilarious play on Deadliest Catch?) tasked me with making it to my wedding without drawing too much attention to my rather obvious tentacles. Shoulder buttons control leg movements in conjunction with the analog sticks, while tapping one of the face buttons allows you to control one of the hand-tentacles to grab and manipulate objects. While the controls seem simple, deadliest Catch goes to great lengths to inform players that if an octopus was to put on a man’s suit, tie, and pants, it would be very difficult for that aquatic creature to assume the role of a father. By using the octopus’ natural (See: completely unnatural) ability to walk and pick up things, players will need to figure out the best way to complete objectives like cooking dinner or putting a wedding ring on a beloved’s hand. Often, picking up a single object or walking in a straight line results in hilarious destruction and much limb flailing. I began by having to put on a bowtie, which proved incredibly disastrous, as I sent wedding gifts scattering across the floor before falling onto a table, burying myself underneath a mountain of presents. When I tried to rise up, like a beautiful, aquatic phoenix, I smashed a few of the gifts through the stained-glass window of the church. Luckily, no one was around to observe my miserable performance and I was able to saunter away from the wreckage of my bowtie adventure, whistling innocently (or whatever the cephalopod equivalent of whistling would be). Following the bowtie escapade, I needed to walk down the aisle of a church to get married to my human bride. On the way, I wobbled from right to left, knocking over several pillars that lined the pews and nearly falling over multiple times, all while the digital wedding-goers wondered at my clumsiness. If these missteps occur too often while other people can see you, they will begin to get suspicious and eventually see through the ruse, resulting in a game over. Luckily, I successfully made it to my bride, after which I needed to make my way to a nearby chest and retrieve the wedding ring. Retrieving the ring with little effort (okay, I might have thrown a ton of jewels out of the chest all over the church altar), I carefully placed the ring into the possession of my bride. And just like that, the demo was over. I could tell you a lot of things about Octodad: Dadliest Catch. I could say that the animations are amazingly funny; that the ridiculousness of the premise is really enjoyable if you can find some modicum of joy in your heart; that the team at Young Horses has put a lot of genuine heart into Dadliest Catch. I could say those things. But I think what really speaks for the game is that throughout the entire demo I couldn’t stop smiling and laughing. Dadliest Catch is a direct sequel to the original PC game (which can be downloaded here) and will be releasing on PC, Mac, Linux, and PS4 sometime this year.
  25. The fine folks at CD Projekt RED were kind enough to show us a nearly hour long gameplay demo of the upcoming high-fantasy RPG blockbuster, as well as answer some of our nagging questions. Here is what we took away from what we saw. The Witcher 3 Wild Hunt is set several years after the events of The Witcher 2, meaning that there are few direct connections to previous games in the series. The decision was made to distance the third title from the previous two so that the team could step away from the political intrigue of the previous titles and focus on Geralt’s personal journey. In The Witcher 3, Geralt is in pursuit of a terrifying and deadly group of spectral warriors known as the Wild Hunt. In the game world, witchers were originally monster hunters and that aspect of the game world will become the central focus of the story. There are several new features being added into The Witcher 3: Trading and Bartering: the new system will make it profitable to travel around the world buying and selling items to locations that might have them in short supply to earn a profit. For example, fish will be cheap in coastal towns, while towns farther inland or far from bodies of water will pay well for fish. Transportation: With the dramatically increased scope of the world, the team at CD Projekt RED wanted to make it easy to traverse the world. To this end, they included abilities and vehicles like swimming climbing, sailing, riding, and fast travel. These means of transportation are not without their hazards however. We were cautioned that sailing into a storm, could result in a ship wreck and having to swim to shore and that swimming comes with its own dangers, like freezing from ice water. A Day/Night Cycle: You will be able to rest and change the time of day. This will have various effects on the monsters you hunt and how you hunt them. The example we were given was that if you were to fight werewolves, you would be better off fighting them in daylight, rather than under the light of a full-moon. Witcher Senses: the visualization of Geralt’s years of training. You’ll be able to see the important investigative markers that will help you track monsters. These clues will lead you to monsters or give you clues regarding how to best defeat them. The scale of The Witcher 3 has increased dramatically. For the purposes of the demo, we were only shown one island, but we were told that island was bigger than all of The Witcher 2. In fact, the entire world is 35x larger than the previous Witcher games and it is entirely open world. The team at CD Projekt RED designed the world to be large, but also dense, so there will always be something new to explore and see just over the next hill or behind the next tree. We were shown a portion of the main quest, which revolves around Geralt’s mission to destroy the Wild Hunt, a ghastly, deadly, and evil collection of spectral warriors. In the gameplay segment, Geralt was searching for Bjorn, the sole survivor of a raid by the Hunt. Traveling to the small village in which Bjorn has gone to stay with relatives, the demonstrator steered us toward some intriguing ruins on the top of a hill. He explained to us that the team has worked very hard to make such areas appealing so that players will want to diverge from the beaten path and explore. In the ruins, we discovered a hulking creature known as a fiend. Looking like a cross between a stag and a rhinoceros, the fiend charged Geralt and we were given the chance to see the titular witcher in combat. More dodge moves have been added since The Witcher 2, increasing maneuverability within combat scenarios. Geralt can also do minor magic, like shooting sparks and flames from his hands. These spells will have different effects on monsters, like lighting them on fire which can then spread elsewhere. As the fight with the fiend progressed, it demonstrated how important it is to know your adversary in The Witcher 3. When you discover what kind of a beast you are going to be facing, it is best to consult the Bestiary, a compendium of Geralt’s lifetime of monster hunting and adventuring. This will give players insight into how best to tackle the creature. With the fiend, he can cast a spell of darkness and shroud itself in shadow, the only visible thing remaining is a singular red eye on its forehead. It can use this opportunity to either attack or escape, making an unprepared attack on the fiend a very poor idea. For prospective players who are just hearing about this series now or who are intrigued, we were assured that players won’t have had to play the The Witcher and The Witcher 2 in order to understand what is happening. The Witcher 3 Wild Hunt will release on Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC in early 2014. View full article
×