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Found 16 results

  1. It finally happened. After almost two full seasons, the enigma once known as John Doe emerged from his crystallis as the newly born Joker. However, the context in which he does so depends on the player’s actions. Did Bruce Wayne push Joker over the edge to becoming a menace? Or did his admiration for Batman’s cause compel him to take up crime-fighting himself? Regardless of which version of the clown you wind up with, this season finale goes out on a turbulent and exciting high note. Surprisingly, the increased gameplay mechanics stuck out to me more than anything. Not only does Same Stitch do a fantastic job of keeping players’ fingers on the buttons, but it does so in a variety of ways. In a tense bomb defusal scene, Batman uses his x-ray to cut the correct cord before a timer counts down. Inspecting photographs for clues brings a new cerebral element on top of the returning crime scene investigations. Confrontations, especially against Joker, offer satisfying brutality and style thanks to the slick manner in which prompts appear. Even the relationship updates get creative, such as the humorous “Joker totally forgot to remember that” notification when Batman reminds him that heroes don’t kill. Best of all, no gameplay segment is shared between the two paths. It’s a great way of making both stories feel separate beyond their narrative content and offers further incentive to play both sides. On that note, I love how differently the two stories play out. Though they understandably share the some pivotal plot points (mainly in regards to supporting characters), playing twice feels justified. For example, the villain Joker route comes out swinging with a gruesome opening and jaw-dropping shake-ups. Vigilante Joker kicks off on a comparatively “lighter” note as you tag team with him him in a cool fight against the Agency’s goons. The narrative gap widens from there, with some fantastic scenes sprinkled about. My favorite segment between both tales involves an explosive dinner party hosted by Joker and Harley Quinn. The episode takes a lot of crazy turns, but they all tie into the same final note: Batman and Joker are two threads of the same stitch. Going toe-to-toe with Joker feels well-earned and emotionally affecting. Because of my heavy influence, I couldn’t help but feel regretful for things I said and did to him. Same Stitch uses that relationship as the thesis for making poignant observations on Batman’s adverse influence on the people around him–unintentional or otherwise. His heart’s in the right place; however when right and wrong becomes more grey, Batman’s best judgement may not be sound. Satisfying conclusions for other threads lead to big surprises that should be fun to explore in a potential third season. Conclusion: Same Stitch offers two great stories that do justice to the Joker’s character as well as the long build to get him here. Gameplay feels the freshest and most fun it’s ever been (that includes all of Season 1), and the story is just as engaging. This might be the most entertaining Batman episode across both seasons and a fitting finale to Joker’s wonderful origin saga. In regards to The Enemy Within as a whole, it’s an exceptional follow up that begins and ends on extremely high notes. Joker’s character development is by far the highlight, but the story of Bruce’s struggle to operate within shades of grey proves fascinating as well. The plot occasionally becomes a bit messy due to the sheer number of players involved (will Freeze’s story go anywhere?) but Telltale juggles these threads well for the most part. Like Season 1, I’m impressed with how confidently the story shakes up Batman lore without mucking things up, with Harley Quinn being a shining example. The Enemy Within should be played if for no other reason than to hang around Telltale’s amazing take of Batman’s greatest foe.
  2. It finally happened. After almost two full seasons, the enigma once known as John Doe emerged from his crystallis as the newly born Joker. However, the context in which he does so depends on the player’s actions. Did Bruce Wayne push Joker over the edge to becoming a menace? Or did his admiration for Batman’s cause compel him to take up crime-fighting himself? Regardless of which version of the clown you wind up with, this season finale goes out on a turbulent and exciting high note. Surprisingly, the increased gameplay mechanics stuck out to me more than anything. Not only does Same Stitch do a fantastic job of keeping players’ fingers on the buttons, but it does so in a variety of ways. In a tense bomb defusal scene, Batman uses his x-ray to cut the correct cord before a timer counts down. Inspecting photographs for clues brings a new cerebral element on top of the returning crime scene investigations. Confrontations, especially against Joker, offer satisfying brutality and style thanks to the slick manner in which prompts appear. Even the relationship updates get creative, such as the humorous “Joker totally forgot to remember that” notification when Batman reminds him that heroes don’t kill. Best of all, no gameplay segment is shared between the two paths. It’s a great way of making both stories feel separate beyond their narrative content and offers further incentive to play both sides. On that note, I love how differently the two stories play out. Though they understandably share the some pivotal plot points (mainly in regards to supporting characters), playing twice feels justified. For example, the villain Joker route comes out swinging with a gruesome opening and jaw-dropping shake-ups. Vigilante Joker kicks off on a comparatively “lighter” note as you tag team with him him in a cool fight against the Agency’s goons. The narrative gap widens from there, with some fantastic scenes sprinkled about. My favorite segment between both tales involves an explosive dinner party hosted by Joker and Harley Quinn. The episode takes a lot of crazy turns, but they all tie into the same final note: Batman and Joker are two threads of the same stitch. Going toe-to-toe with Joker feels well-earned and emotionally affecting. Because of my heavy influence, I couldn’t help but feel regretful for things I said and did to him. Same Stitch uses that relationship as the thesis for making poignant observations on Batman’s adverse influence on the people around him–unintentional or otherwise. His heart’s in the right place; however when right and wrong becomes more grey, Batman’s best judgement may not be sound. Satisfying conclusions for other threads lead to big surprises that should be fun to explore in a potential third season. Conclusion: Same Stitch offers two great stories that do justice to the Joker’s character as well as the long build to get him here. Gameplay feels the freshest and most fun it’s ever been (that includes all of Season 1), and the story is just as engaging. This might be the most entertaining Batman episode across both seasons and a fitting finale to Joker’s wonderful origin saga. In regards to The Enemy Within as a whole, it’s an exceptional follow up that begins and ends on extremely high notes. Joker’s character development is by far the highlight, but the story of Bruce’s struggle to operate within shades of grey proves fascinating as well. The plot occasionally becomes a bit messy due to the sheer number of players involved (will Freeze’s story go anywhere?) but Telltale juggles these threads well for the most part. Like Season 1, I’m impressed with how confidently the story shakes up Batman lore without mucking things up, with Harley Quinn being a shining example. The Enemy Within should be played if for no other reason than to hang around Telltale’s amazing take of Batman’s greatest foe. View full article
  3. After a flat third entry, What Ails You ratchets up the excitement and, more importantly, the variety. The fog surrounding The Pact’s scheme finally dissipates and John Doe’s personal journey hits a major climax. What Ails You focuses on paying off choices. Primarily, the consequences of the player’s interactions with John Doe culminate in an intense and well-executed confrontation. Many of the conversations player had with John resurface in surprising, mostly logical ways, making his turn feel developed and nuanced. An element of inconsistency remains; John still admired Batman despite choosing to totally shun him in the previous episode. Overall, though, Telltale does a good job of making you feel greatly responsible for whichever man John chooses to be. During the episode’s explosive climax I found myself thinking “What have I done?” Everything hits the fan as the scope of The Pact’s goals, along with grander schemes involving the Agency, begin to crystallize. A good thing too, as the overall plot suffered from a lack of direction in the last episode. Their surprisingly personal motivations add a layer of humanity to the cast of rogues (save for Mr. Freeze who’s always had that) even if the more villainous aspect of the plan remains somewhat nebulous. Subplots like Alfred’s mental anguish and the Tiffany Fox saga receive some screen time but still don’t contribute much to the big picture as of yet. Decisions weave several divergent paths. The exciting opening chapter plays out in two very different ways depending on how players chose to conclude Fractured Mask. Seeing my actions result in such substantial differences excited and relieved me after the second episode’s final choice went nowhere. The same applies to the final chapter, with two equally exciting outcomes that I can’t wait to follow up on. Unfortunately, the prolonged delay between episodes has made it tough to remember the finer points of the story. Though a problem with this season as a whole, that came to a head here where players receive answers to questions I’d forgotten were asked. I also have a particular bone to pick with the story: what’s up with so many people learning Batman’s identity? If this keeps up, Bruce may as well out himself like Tony Stark did. We thankfully learn how Amanda Waller became privy to that knowledge, though Bruce still refuses to logically delve deeper into the matter. A couple of new wrinkles to gameplay offer welcomed freshness, like pouncing atop Bane and using the shoulder buttons to pummel him in first-person. Ultimately, the amount of interactivity remains the same: the occasional light puzzle and timed-button action sequence without any standouts. Conclusion: What Ails You serves as a good penultimate episode and probably the most memorable installment since Episode 1. The episode flies by thanks to eye-widening surprises, some much-needed clarity, and high-stakes drama. John Doe undoubtedly steals the show and his transformation looks to set up a thrilling season finale. If only we didn’t have to wait so long to play it.
  4. After a flat third entry, What Ails You ratchets up the excitement and, more importantly, the variety. The fog surrounding The Pact’s scheme finally dissipates and John Doe’s personal journey hits a major climax. What Ails You focuses on paying off choices. Primarily, the consequences of the player’s interactions with John Doe culminate in an intense and well-executed confrontation. Many of the conversations player had with John resurface in surprising, mostly logical ways, making his turn feel developed and nuanced. An element of inconsistency remains; John still admired Batman despite choosing to totally shun him in the previous episode. Overall, though, Telltale does a good job of making you feel greatly responsible for whichever man John chooses to be. During the episode’s explosive climax I found myself thinking “What have I done?” Everything hits the fan as the scope of The Pact’s goals, along with grander schemes involving the Agency, begin to crystallize. A good thing too, as the overall plot suffered from a lack of direction in the last episode. Their surprisingly personal motivations add a layer of humanity to the cast of rogues (save for Mr. Freeze who’s always had that) even if the more villainous aspect of the plan remains somewhat nebulous. Subplots like Alfred’s mental anguish and the Tiffany Fox saga receive some screen time but still don’t contribute much to the big picture as of yet. Decisions weave several divergent paths. The exciting opening chapter plays out in two very different ways depending on how players chose to conclude Fractured Mask. Seeing my actions result in such substantial differences excited and relieved me after the second episode’s final choice went nowhere. The same applies to the final chapter, with two equally exciting outcomes that I can’t wait to follow up on. Unfortunately, the prolonged delay between episodes has made it tough to remember the finer points of the story. Though a problem with this season as a whole, that came to a head here where players receive answers to questions I’d forgotten were asked. I also have a particular bone to pick with the story: what’s up with so many people learning Batman’s identity? If this keeps up, Bruce may as well out himself like Tony Stark did. We thankfully learn how Amanda Waller became privy to that knowledge, though Bruce still refuses to logically delve deeper into the matter. A couple of new wrinkles to gameplay offer welcomed freshness, like pouncing atop Bane and using the shoulder buttons to pummel him in first-person. Ultimately, the amount of interactivity remains the same: the occasional light puzzle and timed-button action sequence without any standouts. Conclusion: What Ails You serves as a good penultimate episode and probably the most memorable installment since Episode 1. The episode flies by thanks to eye-widening surprises, some much-needed clarity, and high-stakes drama. John Doe undoubtedly steals the show and his transformation looks to set up a thrilling season finale. If only we didn’t have to wait so long to play it. View full article
  5. After The Enigma laid the table cloth for what’s to come, The Pact continues to set the silverware. More than anything else, the second episode cashes in on the development of Joker-in-progress John Doe by smartly flipping the roles of his most iconic relationship. The Pact injects a big dose of villainy with a few new faces, most notably one Dr. Harleen Quinzel. But this ain’t your 90s afternoon cartoon Harley Quinn. Keeping in line with Telltale’s penchant for shake-ups, Harley debuts as an established, independent, and intelligent killer. While she still retains her sick yet charming sense of humor, Quinn is far from the ditzy sidekick role she typically assumes. In fact, The Pact marks the first time I’ve ever felt genuinely intimidated by Harley. The change works surprisingly well, largely because of how Telltale managed a skillful switch-a-roo in her relationship with John Doe. Basically, John assumes Harley’s original role. Completely infatuated with Quinn, he aims to impress however possible. After establishing John’s new origin and behavior, his characterization (side note: his sad innocence actually made me feel sorry for him) pays off by making him a believable second-fiddle to Harley. This dynamic, along with your friendship with John, comes to a head during an edge-of-your-seat mission involving the twisted pair and the player. I won’t go into details, but trying to navigating the minefield of both psychos’ temperaments while completing a high-stakes task stands as The Pact’s defining moment. Maintaining Bruce’s increasingly blurry code of conduct is a demanding balancing act that The Pact does a nice job of showcasing. Chiefly, during the aforementioned mission and especially in Bruce’s tumultuous dealings with Tiffany Fox. The latter takes a profound leap forward in a couple of different ways, both of which I’m anxious to see the result of. On the opposite spectrum, Jim Gordon and Amanda Waller’s feud stagnates, lessening the tension. Their story remains the same “we don’t like/trust each other” thread without any real development. Speaking of Waller, The Pact fumbles out of the gate by not logically following-up on last episode’s cliffhanger i.e. Batman not flat-out asking Amanda “So how did you find that out?” Gameplay in general takes a backseat to dialogue choices outside of the action-packed opening chapter. That sounds worse than it actually is, as conversations largely keep you guessing and demand attention to details and consistency with your answers. My contradictions were called out several times in a great touch of realism. In classic Telltale fashion, a Bruce-focused chapter towards the end teases potential failure, yet seems difficult to actually pull off. Based on the seemingly concrete conclusion, that suggestion of variance mostly feels like smoke and mirrors. The same might be said of how players choose to assist John in making a good impression with Harley. I went out of my way to screw that up for him, but the result didn’t differ from if I’d been an ideal wingman. Granted, that could be a facade on John’s part and potentially bite me in the butt later, but at the moment I’m a little bummed how similarly that subplot pans out here. Conclusion: The Pact’s firm middle section is the strongest aspect of an otherwise decent block-building episode. I loved the Harley Quinn stuff, and it plays beautifully into John’s slow burn towards his awakening, so to speak. Maintaining Bruce’s integrity becomes easier said than done, leading to some painful choices and intense moments. The non-answer to The Enigma’s big question bugs me. For logic’s sake, I hope that gets resolved sooner than later. Overall, a solid installment that introduces more fascinating pieces for the story to come. Batman: The Enemy Within - The Pact was reviewed on PlayStation 4. It’s also available now for Xbox One, PC and will launch later for iOS and Android. View full article
  6. After The Enigma laid the table cloth for what’s to come, The Pact continues to set the silverware. More than anything else, the second episode cashes in on the development of Joker-in-progress John Doe by smartly flipping the roles of his most iconic relationship. The Pact injects a big dose of villainy with a few new faces, most notably one Dr. Harleen Quinzel. But this ain’t your 90s afternoon cartoon Harley Quinn. Keeping in line with Telltale’s penchant for shake-ups, Harley debuts as an established, independent, and intelligent killer. While she still retains her sick yet charming sense of humor, Quinn is far from the ditzy sidekick role she typically assumes. In fact, The Pact marks the first time I’ve ever felt genuinely intimidated by Harley. The change works surprisingly well, largely because of how Telltale managed a skillful switch-a-roo in her relationship with John Doe. Basically, John assumes Harley’s original role. Completely infatuated with Quinn, he aims to impress however possible. After establishing John’s new origin and behavior, his characterization (side note: his sad innocence actually made me feel sorry for him) pays off by making him a believable second-fiddle to Harley. This dynamic, along with your friendship with John, comes to a head during an edge-of-your-seat mission involving the twisted pair and the player. I won’t go into details, but trying to navigating the minefield of both psychos’ temperaments while completing a high-stakes task stands as The Pact’s defining moment. Maintaining Bruce’s increasingly blurry code of conduct is a demanding balancing act that The Pact does a nice job of showcasing. Chiefly, during the aforementioned mission and especially in Bruce’s tumultuous dealings with Tiffany Fox. The latter takes a profound leap forward in a couple of different ways, both of which I’m anxious to see the result of. On the opposite spectrum, Jim Gordon and Amanda Waller’s feud stagnates, lessening the tension. Their story remains the same “we don’t like/trust each other” thread without any real development. Speaking of Waller, The Pact fumbles out of the gate by not logically following-up on last episode’s cliffhanger i.e. Batman not flat-out asking Amanda “So how did you find that out?” Gameplay in general takes a backseat to dialogue choices outside of the action-packed opening chapter. That sounds worse than it actually is, as conversations largely keep you guessing and demand attention to details and consistency with your answers. My contradictions were called out several times in a great touch of realism. In classic Telltale fashion, a Bruce-focused chapter towards the end teases potential failure, yet seems difficult to actually pull off. Based on the seemingly concrete conclusion, that suggestion of variance mostly feels like smoke and mirrors. The same might be said of how players choose to assist John in making a good impression with Harley. I went out of my way to screw that up for him, but the result didn’t differ from if I’d been an ideal wingman. Granted, that could be a facade on John’s part and potentially bite me in the butt later, but at the moment I’m a little bummed how similarly that subplot pans out here. Conclusion: The Pact’s firm middle section is the strongest aspect of an otherwise decent block-building episode. I loved the Harley Quinn stuff, and it plays beautifully into John’s slow burn towards his awakening, so to speak. Maintaining Bruce’s integrity becomes easier said than done, leading to some painful choices and intense moments. The non-answer to The Enigma’s big question bugs me. For logic’s sake, I hope that gets resolved sooner than later. Overall, a solid installment that introduces more fascinating pieces for the story to come. Batman: The Enemy Within - The Pact was reviewed on PlayStation 4. It’s also available now for Xbox One, PC and will launch later for iOS and Android.
  7. “Expect the unexpected” would have been an appropriate tagline for Batman’s first season. By the series’ end the Wayne Family name stands forever tarnished, a perennial ally turns becomes a major foe, and Harvey Dent’s scars may only be mental. The surprises keep coming in The Enemy Within. An eventful premier throws players for a loop right out of the gate with big shocks, difficult choices, and gut-punching consequences. A year removed from the triple threat of the Children of Arkham, Penguin, and Two-Face sees Gotham on the mend. Bruce Wayne’s reputation appears largely repaired. Batman’s publicized partnership with newly appointed police commissioner Jim Gordon resulted in dramatically reduced crime rates. But that delicate peace breaks when a dangerous shadow from Gotham’s past reemerges: The Riddler. I dug Telltale’s menacing take on this classic foe. Armed with a question-mark shaped sickle, this Riddler almost finds as much pleasure in slicing throats as perplexing victims with cruel conundrums–almost. He remains the long-winded, insufferable show-off, but now displays a nice, gritty edge. Riddler’s new character wrinkle as Gotham’s first costumed crook plays perfectly into his trademark narcissism and superiority complex. Believing himself better because he came first (among other reasons), his additional source of arrogance makes punching his teeth out all the more satisfying. Riddler’s penchant for puzzles works well with Telltale’s mechanics and dialogue choices. One neat segment involves unraveling one of his death games. Gameplay in general gets a good showing in The Enigma. Combat now presents slightly more dynamic options, like selecting multiple interactive points during battle. Last season’s worthless finishing move meter has thankfully been dropped. I never put the controller down for too long–always a positive for a Telltale title. Like Season 1, juggling the public perceptions of Bruce Wayne and Batman can create genuine decision-making crises. Choices feel less about right and wrong and more about which path might backfire less painfully. This creates a series of tricky moral tightropes to walk across. Batman’s relationship with the debuting Amanda Waller acts as a great example. Waller plays an exciting role acting as the controversial figurehead behind the Suicide Squad and leader of the shadowy government bureau known simply as The Agency. Her organization takes over Gotham’s authorities in pursuit of Riddler. Despite Waller and Batman sharing mutual goals, The Agency’s dubious history makes her difficult to trust. More importantly, a collaboration with her might chip away at Batman’s fragile relationship with Gordon. Do you jeopardize Gordon’s favor by working with Amanda in the name of the greater good? Or do you keep her at a distance and risk creating a powerful new adversary? Armed with years of comics history, I thought I knew that answer from the outset. As the episode progressed, though, my stance shifted in unexpected ways. Doing the “right” thing feels less obvious than ever, and I burned trusted bridges doing what I felt was necessary. Chalk that up to how Telltale skillfully paints choices with thoughtful coats of morally grey. Additionally, The Enigma reminded me to consider suspending any prior Batman knowledge because things don’t always play out as predicted. Bruce’s uneasy dealings with the pale, green-haired “John Doe” highlighted that point. The first conversation with this enigmatic figure had me biting my lip with nerves the entire time, unsure of how to react. His underlying insanity keeps you on edge, but his apparent need for approval from Bruce generates sympathy as well. Could it be he just needs someone good to lean on and perhaps guide him? Somehow, Telltale turned the no-brainer of “how to deal with The Joker” into a complicated dilemma. His arc thus far seems to signal a potentially different outcome than what I’m expecting. I look forward to seeing this simmering story reach its boiling point. A new on-screen indicator of a character’s shift in feeling gives immediate and helpful feedback during relationship milestones. I liked receiving validation that my current path may be working, as well as knowing exactly when I may have messed up with someone. A new post-game report card explains how big choices resulted in your current standing with someone, offering some good food for thought. I walked away from The Enigma pondering how to best improve certain relationships using the info given. Additionally, this provides a helpful reference to mix things up in future replays. Choosing a path can be a fun roller coaster overall, but I took umbrage with one scenario towards the end. Without spoiling, somehow the choice of saving lives led to Batman seemingly becoming more vilified than if he allowed someone to die on his watch. Other characters failed to see the big picture, and that questionable writing almost made me scream at my TV. Telltale continues to drop bombshells with a couple of shocking developments involving pivotal characters. These surprises do a nice job of keeping your emotions on guard. Exciting narrative threads emerge from these moments. One in particular concerns a potentially awesome new ally. I also love that The Enigma features its own self-contained arc, kind of like an episode of a Batman TV show. A central thread begins and ends here, providing an immediate sense of closure and giving the long-term stories some breathing room. The Enigma attempts to do a lot as a pilot and, impressively, accomplishes much of it with relative ease. Conclusion: The Enigma starts Batman’s second season on the right foot. Boasting several jaw-dropping moments, intense conversation scenes, a great villain, and promising story developments, there’s a lot to love here. Tack on a healthy dose of interactivity, and you’ve got the answer to the riddle “how do you open a new season with a successful bang?” Batman: The Enemy Within - The Enigma was reviewed on PlayStation 4. It’s also available now for Xbox One, PC and will launch later for iOS and Android.
  8. “Expect the unexpected” would have been an appropriate tagline for Batman’s first season. By the series’ end the Wayne Family name stands forever tarnished, a perennial ally turns becomes a major foe, and Harvey Dent’s scars may only be mental. The surprises keep coming in The Enemy Within. An eventful premier throws players for a loop right out of the gate with big shocks, difficult choices, and gut-punching consequences. A year removed from the triple threat of the Children of Arkham, Penguin, and Two-Face sees Gotham on the mend. Bruce Wayne’s reputation appears largely repaired. Batman’s publicized partnership with newly appointed police commissioner Jim Gordon resulted in dramatically reduced crime rates. But that delicate peace breaks when a dangerous shadow from Gotham’s past reemerges: The Riddler. I dug Telltale’s menacing take on this classic foe. Armed with a question-mark shaped sickle, this Riddler almost finds as much pleasure in slicing throats as perplexing victims with cruel conundrums–almost. He remains the long-winded, insufferable show-off, but now displays a nice, gritty edge. Riddler’s new character wrinkle as Gotham’s first costumed crook plays perfectly into his trademark narcissism and superiority complex. Believing himself better because he came first (among other reasons), his additional source of arrogance makes punching his teeth out all the more satisfying. Riddler’s penchant for puzzles works well with Telltale’s mechanics and dialogue choices. One neat segment involves unraveling one of his death games. Gameplay in general gets a good showing in The Enigma. Combat now presents slightly more dynamic options, like selecting multiple interactive points during battle. Last season’s worthless finishing move meter has thankfully been dropped. I never put the controller down for too long–always a positive for a Telltale title. Like Season 1, juggling the public perceptions of Bruce Wayne and Batman can create genuine decision-making crises. Choices feel less about right and wrong and more about which path might backfire less painfully. This creates a series of tricky moral tightropes to walk across. Batman’s relationship with the debuting Amanda Waller acts as a great example. Waller plays an exciting role acting as the controversial figurehead behind the Suicide Squad and leader of the shadowy government bureau known simply as The Agency. Her organization takes over Gotham’s authorities in pursuit of Riddler. Despite Waller and Batman sharing mutual goals, The Agency’s dubious history makes her difficult to trust. More importantly, a collaboration with her might chip away at Batman’s fragile relationship with Gordon. Do you jeopardize Gordon’s favor by working with Amanda in the name of the greater good? Or do you keep her at a distance and risk creating a powerful new adversary? Armed with years of comics history, I thought I knew that answer from the outset. As the episode progressed, though, my stance shifted in unexpected ways. Doing the “right” thing feels less obvious than ever, and I burned trusted bridges doing what I felt was necessary. Chalk that up to how Telltale skillfully paints choices with thoughtful coats of morally grey. Additionally, The Enigma reminded me to consider suspending any prior Batman knowledge because things don’t always play out as predicted. Bruce’s uneasy dealings with the pale, green-haired “John Doe” highlighted that point. The first conversation with this enigmatic figure had me biting my lip with nerves the entire time, unsure of how to react. His underlying insanity keeps you on edge, but his apparent need for approval from Bruce generates sympathy as well. Could it be he just needs someone good to lean on and perhaps guide him? Somehow, Telltale turned the no-brainer of “how to deal with The Joker” into a complicated dilemma. His arc thus far seems to signal a potentially different outcome than what I’m expecting. I look forward to seeing this simmering story reach its boiling point. A new on-screen indicator of a character’s shift in feeling gives immediate and helpful feedback during relationship milestones. I liked receiving validation that my current path may be working, as well as knowing exactly when I may have messed up with someone. A new post-game report card explains how big choices resulted in your current standing with someone, offering some good food for thought. I walked away from The Enigma pondering how to best improve certain relationships using the info given. Additionally, this provides a helpful reference to mix things up in future replays. Choosing a path can be a fun roller coaster overall, but I took umbrage with one scenario towards the end. Without spoiling, somehow the choice of saving lives led to Batman seemingly becoming more vilified than if he allowed someone to die on his watch. Other characters failed to see the big picture, and that questionable writing almost made me scream at my TV. Telltale continues to drop bombshells with a couple of shocking developments involving pivotal characters. These surprises do a nice job of keeping your emotions on guard. Exciting narrative threads emerge from these moments. One in particular concerns a potentially awesome new ally. I also love that The Enigma features its own self-contained arc, kind of like an episode of a Batman TV show. A central thread begins and ends here, providing an immediate sense of closure and giving the long-term stories some breathing room. The Enigma attempts to do a lot as a pilot and, impressively, accomplishes much of it with relative ease. Conclusion: The Enigma starts Batman’s second season on the right foot. Boasting several jaw-dropping moments, intense conversation scenes, a great villain, and promising story developments, there’s a lot to love here. Tack on a healthy dose of interactivity, and you’ve got the answer to the riddle “how do you open a new season with a successful bang?” Batman: The Enemy Within - The Enigma was reviewed on PlayStation 4. It’s also available now for Xbox One, PC and will launch later for iOS and Android. View full article
  9. There’s an axiom for Batman stories: when Joker gets involved, things get real. Even with a relatively minor role, that rings true in Batman’s fourth installment. The Clown Prince of Crime’s menacing presence adds increased tension and chaos to an already tumultuous plot and shines as the main attraction in an otherwise middling episode that sets the table for the grand finale. Bruce’s genuinely unnerving first encounter with his future archenemy opens the game on a high note. After awakening as an inmate of Arkham Asylum following his drug-induced beatdown of Oswald Cobblepot, Bruce finds an unlikely ally in the yet-to-be-named Joker. Known simply as “John Doe,” he eagerly helps Wayne in an escape attempt, but clearly has hidden motives for doing so. Cooperating with Joker feels uneasy and even chilling at times. I actually worried about upsetting the psychotic clown. My concern heightened after witnessing Joker’s trademark viciousness and talent for observation and perception – he knows a lot more than he presumably should. I loved the feeling of unease throughout the opening segment. Additionally, catching glimpses of other soon-to-be adversaries like Mr. Zsasz and Ventriloquist makes for cool teases of what might come in the future. On another, perhaps more personal level, Joker creates an interesting dilemma in decision-making. Years of familiarity with the character taught me not to trust a single word he says, nor entertain any kind of partnership with him. Within the context of the story, though, Bruce lacks that insight. Choosing whether to roleplay an uninformed Wayne or to follow my instincts as an educated Batman fan created a stimulating (and maybe unintentional on Telltale’s part) inner conflict. The lingering effects of the Children of Arkham’s rage drug add a twist to early conversations. Bruce flies off the handle at any moment, making his responses largely unreliable. Although a neat wrinkle that effectively sells the drug’s effect, the anger-induced dialogue may also annoy players aiming to maintain a “paragon” protagonist. During my “nice Batman” playthrough, I got into an altercation with angry citizens. I opted for the “I don’t want any trouble” line only for Wayne to violently threaten to run down the mob with his car, much to my horror. Unless you’re already playing the jerk, here’s my advice: keep your trap shut until you’re cured. Thankfully, that occurs sooner rather than later. Major decision-making has highs and lows. On the latter spectrum, two of New World Order’s major choices - housing Lucius Fox/Catwoman at Wayne Manor or keeping him at Wayne Enterprises/shooing her out of Gotham - culminate into nothing of note. Fox’s role plays out practically the same regardless of where he’s situated. The difference lies in whether or not Lucius provides a new gadget, which merely acts as an alternative, yet insignificant, final blow in a brief skirmish later on. Catwoman’s surprisingly minor role renders the option for her to stay meaningless. Why open the mansion to Selina if nothing substantial comes out of it? On the positive side, a tense negotiation with a fully transformed Two-Face in a “Bruce or Batman?” moment provides sufficiently altered outcomes, including an entire conversation scene exclusive to one path. The immediate follow-up to last episode’s big revelation regarding the identity of the Children of Arkham’s leader, Lady Arkham, results in another relative letdown. A grisly (and still ho-hum) investigation of her childhood home reveals little beyond “she’s a horrible person.” Neat story, but I gathered that much already. Players anxious to learn exactly how Lady Arkham amassed a personal army, a stockpile of chemical weapons, and combat skills to rival Batman’s (among other things) won’t get those answers just yet, unfortunately. Her absence here feels like a strange choice after such important character building. If nothing else, my favorite part of this section centers on Batman’s rescue of a young victim. Not only does it display Batman’s gentler side in a nice change of pace, but it potentially plants a tantalizing seed. Could Telltale be teasing a future Robin? After spending three installments pushing against the crushing weight of Murphy’s Law, having an episode wrap up with a (somewhat) triumphant Dark Knight provides a refreshing change. Deciding which major antagonist to neutralize is yet another hard call, and both paths result in entertaining and intensely personal boss battles. The bittersweet cliffhangers do their job of making me question ignoring the opposite road, but Guardian of Gotham concludes too abruptly for my liking. Conclusion: Batman’s penultimate episode continues to entertain, mostly due to the shot of intrigue Joker injects into the experience. However, between the lack of Lady Arkham, a few unexciting outcomes, and a seemingly shorter length, Guardian of Gotham feels a step below the previous two installments. The serviceable, bland gameplay I’ve harped about before remains such. A few technical hiccups also arose ranging from missing audio effects to hard crashes. My reservations about the hit and miss choices/aftermaths aside, the overall story continues to be a surprising and enjoyable spin on Batman lore. Telltale is doing something right since I’m very much looking forward to witnessing how everything weaves together in the final episode. Batman Episode 4: Guardian of Gotham was reviewed on PlayStation 4 and is available for Xbox One, PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, iOS, and Android View full article
  10. Marcus Stewart

    Review: Batman Episode 4 - Guardian of Gotham

    There’s an axiom for Batman stories: when Joker gets involved, things get real. Even with a relatively minor role, that rings true in Batman’s fourth installment. The Clown Prince of Crime’s menacing presence adds increased tension and chaos to an already tumultuous plot and shines as the main attraction in an otherwise middling episode that sets the table for the grand finale. Bruce’s genuinely unnerving first encounter with his future archenemy opens the game on a high note. After awakening as an inmate of Arkham Asylum following his drug-induced beatdown of Oswald Cobblepot, Bruce finds an unlikely ally in the yet-to-be-named Joker. Known simply as “John Doe,” he eagerly helps Wayne in an escape attempt, but clearly has hidden motives for doing so. Cooperating with Joker feels uneasy and even chilling at times. I actually worried about upsetting the psychotic clown. My concern heightened after witnessing Joker’s trademark viciousness and talent for observation and perception – he knows a lot more than he presumably should. I loved the feeling of unease throughout the opening segment. Additionally, catching glimpses of other soon-to-be adversaries like Mr. Zsasz and Ventriloquist makes for cool teases of what might come in the future. On another, perhaps more personal level, Joker creates an interesting dilemma in decision-making. Years of familiarity with the character taught me not to trust a single word he says, nor entertain any kind of partnership with him. Within the context of the story, though, Bruce lacks that insight. Choosing whether to roleplay an uninformed Wayne or to follow my instincts as an educated Batman fan created a stimulating (and maybe unintentional on Telltale’s part) inner conflict. The lingering effects of the Children of Arkham’s rage drug add a twist to early conversations. Bruce flies off the handle at any moment, making his responses largely unreliable. Although a neat wrinkle that effectively sells the drug’s effect, the anger-induced dialogue may also annoy players aiming to maintain a “paragon” protagonist. During my “nice Batman” playthrough, I got into an altercation with angry citizens. I opted for the “I don’t want any trouble” line only for Wayne to violently threaten to run down the mob with his car, much to my horror. Unless you’re already playing the jerk, here’s my advice: keep your trap shut until you’re cured. Thankfully, that occurs sooner rather than later. Major decision-making has highs and lows. On the latter spectrum, two of New World Order’s major choices - housing Lucius Fox/Catwoman at Wayne Manor or keeping him at Wayne Enterprises/shooing her out of Gotham - culminate into nothing of note. Fox’s role plays out practically the same regardless of where he’s situated. The difference lies in whether or not Lucius provides a new gadget, which merely acts as an alternative, yet insignificant, final blow in a brief skirmish later on. Catwoman’s surprisingly minor role renders the option for her to stay meaningless. Why open the mansion to Selina if nothing substantial comes out of it? On the positive side, a tense negotiation with a fully transformed Two-Face in a “Bruce or Batman?” moment provides sufficiently altered outcomes, including an entire conversation scene exclusive to one path. The immediate follow-up to last episode’s big revelation regarding the identity of the Children of Arkham’s leader, Lady Arkham, results in another relative letdown. A grisly (and still ho-hum) investigation of her childhood home reveals little beyond “she’s a horrible person.” Neat story, but I gathered that much already. Players anxious to learn exactly how Lady Arkham amassed a personal army, a stockpile of chemical weapons, and combat skills to rival Batman’s (among other things) won’t get those answers just yet, unfortunately. Her absence here feels like a strange choice after such important character building. If nothing else, my favorite part of this section centers on Batman’s rescue of a young victim. Not only does it display Batman’s gentler side in a nice change of pace, but it potentially plants a tantalizing seed. Could Telltale be teasing a future Robin? After spending three installments pushing against the crushing weight of Murphy’s Law, having an episode wrap up with a (somewhat) triumphant Dark Knight provides a refreshing change. Deciding which major antagonist to neutralize is yet another hard call, and both paths result in entertaining and intensely personal boss battles. The bittersweet cliffhangers do their job of making me question ignoring the opposite road, but Guardian of Gotham concludes too abruptly for my liking. Conclusion: Batman’s penultimate episode continues to entertain, mostly due to the shot of intrigue Joker injects into the experience. However, between the lack of Lady Arkham, a few unexciting outcomes, and a seemingly shorter length, Guardian of Gotham feels a step below the previous two installments. The serviceable, bland gameplay I’ve harped about before remains such. A few technical hiccups also arose ranging from missing audio effects to hard crashes. My reservations about the hit and miss choices/aftermaths aside, the overall story continues to be a surprising and enjoyable spin on Batman lore. Telltale is doing something right since I’m very much looking forward to witnessing how everything weaves together in the final episode. Batman Episode 4: Guardian of Gotham was reviewed on PlayStation 4 and is available for Xbox One, PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, iOS, and Android
  11. Batman Episode 2: Children of Arkham’s final action sequence challenges players to make what feels like an impossible choice: Prevent Harvey Dent from facing the wrath of the villainous leader of the Children of Arkham or rescue your adversary-turned-crucial ally Catwoman from being overwhelmed by a gang of thugs. Two significantly different conclusions result from this fork in the road, creating potential for two unique storylines in the third act. Unfortunately, though New World Order features its fair share of captivating moments, seeing these two roads wind back together into the same, basic outcome is disappointing. This narrative setback lies with Harvey Dent, who takes a starring role in the latest chapter. Players with even a casual knowledge of Batman lore likely know of the terrible fate that awaits the Mayoral candidate, and I’d wager few expected him to survive the series with his sanity (and good looks) intact. I’m bummed out that he didn’t. While Harvey’s destined trip to the dark side makes sense in the scenario where players choose to value Catwoman’s well-being over his, seeing him still go down that same road in the opposite outcome feels shoehorned and illogical. Harvey appears perfectly sane in the previous episodes, but even after saving him, he goes completely off the deep end and it feels mostly out of nowhere. Telltale’s explains this away as the stresses of his recent near-death experiences taking their toll, but speaking in third-person with a monstrous voice seems like one heck of a mental leap in just a couple of scenes – especially when, again, he didn’t get hurt! That stinks because prior to going full crazy, Dent’s increased paranoia and his admiration of Batman causes him to believe that brutal justice may be the only method of remedying Gotham’s woes. I wish Telltale had just left him with that fascinating and, more importantly, unexpected state of mind instead. Still, even though I was dissatisfied with how Harvey evolved into his new role over the course of that particular playthrough, I have to praise Telltale for making me feel sorry to witness his downfall – a sympathy which is a crucial element of the character. Dent’s woes add yet another misfortune in the towering pile of them for Bruce Wayne/Batman. “Can things get any worse for him?” becomes a question you’ll regularly ask throughout the episode and you won’t like the answer. After the atrocities committed by his father were exposed to the city, Bruce’s position at Wayne Enterprises is in serious jeopardy. The Children of Akrham, along with their mysterious leader, plot a city-wide disaster. Telltale does a great job of painting the group as a nigh unstoppable threat after revealing the scope of their reach. Penguin continues to tear apart Bruce’s family legacy, easily becoming one of the most despicable villains of any game this year. The way his unbearably smug, confident demeanor masks a remorseless psychopath show shades of Game of Thrones’ Ramsay Bolton (except with an actual backstory to validate his actions), and after the stunt he pulls in New World Order, I genuinely cannot wait for Batman to finally beat the tar out of him. New World Order isn’t the rapid-paced bloodbath that the second installment was, and it’s a slower-paced entry in general, although not to the degree Realm of Shadows was. Only one segment, a meeting with Lucius Fox, felt close to dud. A few important story splits present themselves; some feel inconsequential (for example, choosing to assist Dent or a police officer), others are seeds that won’t see a larger payoff until later episodes. Even so, the decision-making feels increasingly tense thanks to the twists and turns that have occurred thus far. I’m second-guessing several of my actions here thanks to options that feel like necessary risks or lesser evils in no-win situations. Based on Dent’s arc, these differing paths will likely weave back together into the same limited aftermaths, but at least I’m enjoying the act of deciding. New World Order wraps up with the most jarring shocker in the series yet – a conclusion that also makes me nervous going forward. Batman’s story could reach new heights of intrigue or run off the rails depending on how Telltale explains this left-field revelation. Telltale mostly nails the storytelling aspect of Batman, but the studio continues to struggle with making the actual gameplay fun and engaging. The clue-connecting detective mini-game returns with Batman investigating a criminal lair, requiring slightly more critical thinking than in its first appearance (i.e. not very much). Sadly, living in the boots of the World’s Greatest Detective doesn’t get any more robust than that. Outside of the straightforward combat, the only noteworthy activities worth mentioning are staring at a table of equipment and eating Catwoman’s bagels. Those aren’t exactly riveting diversions. Narrative content has always been the entire appeal of Telltale titles, but it’s frustrating to witness the bright gameplay potential for a Batman story go underwhelm so far. Conclusion: New World Order isn’t quite the rollercoaster that Children of Arkham was, but it acts as an exceptional midpoint that does a fine job of advancing Telltale’s gripping Batman narrative. Bruce Wayne’s life hangs by a thread, making the more numerous branching options feel like crucial decisions. The plot sits on a potentially slippery slope between Harvey Dent’s arc and the surprising conclusion, but if Telltale can pull these threads off, players could be in for fantastic developments in the chapters to come. While I gave it a pass in Children of Arkham, gameplay needs to step up in a huge way. Thus far it feels largely forgotten and/or overlooked, failing to live up to the vision Telltale painted for it when the series was announced. Telltale’s Batman Episode 3: New World Order was reviewed on PlayStation 4, and is now available for Xbox One, PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, iOS, and Android View full article
  12. Marcus Stewart

    Review: Batman Episode 3 - New World Order

    Batman Episode 2: Children of Arkham’s final action sequence challenges players to make what feels like an impossible choice: Prevent Harvey Dent from facing the wrath of the villainous leader of the Children of Arkham or rescue your adversary-turned-crucial ally Catwoman from being overwhelmed by a gang of thugs. Two significantly different conclusions result from this fork in the road, creating potential for two unique storylines in the third act. Unfortunately, though New World Order features its fair share of captivating moments, seeing these two roads wind back together into the same, basic outcome is disappointing. This narrative setback lies with Harvey Dent, who takes a starring role in the latest chapter. Players with even a casual knowledge of Batman lore likely know of the terrible fate that awaits the Mayoral candidate, and I’d wager few expected him to survive the series with his sanity (and good looks) intact. I’m bummed out that he didn’t. While Harvey’s destined trip to the dark side makes sense in the scenario where players choose to value Catwoman’s well-being over his, seeing him still go down that same road in the opposite outcome feels shoehorned and illogical. Harvey appears perfectly sane in the previous episodes, but even after saving him, he goes completely off the deep end and it feels mostly out of nowhere. Telltale’s explains this away as the stresses of his recent near-death experiences taking their toll, but speaking in third-person with a monstrous voice seems like one heck of a mental leap in just a couple of scenes – especially when, again, he didn’t get hurt! That stinks because prior to going full crazy, Dent’s increased paranoia and his admiration of Batman causes him to believe that brutal justice may be the only method of remedying Gotham’s woes. I wish Telltale had just left him with that fascinating and, more importantly, unexpected state of mind instead. Still, even though I was dissatisfied with how Harvey evolved into his new role over the course of that particular playthrough, I have to praise Telltale for making me feel sorry to witness his downfall – a sympathy which is a crucial element of the character. Dent’s woes add yet another misfortune in the towering pile of them for Bruce Wayne/Batman. “Can things get any worse for him?” becomes a question you’ll regularly ask throughout the episode and you won’t like the answer. After the atrocities committed by his father were exposed to the city, Bruce’s position at Wayne Enterprises is in serious jeopardy. The Children of Akrham, along with their mysterious leader, plot a city-wide disaster. Telltale does a great job of painting the group as a nigh unstoppable threat after revealing the scope of their reach. Penguin continues to tear apart Bruce’s family legacy, easily becoming one of the most despicable villains of any game this year. The way his unbearably smug, confident demeanor masks a remorseless psychopath show shades of Game of Thrones’ Ramsay Bolton (except with an actual backstory to validate his actions), and after the stunt he pulls in New World Order, I genuinely cannot wait for Batman to finally beat the tar out of him. New World Order isn’t the rapid-paced bloodbath that the second installment was, and it’s a slower-paced entry in general, although not to the degree Realm of Shadows was. Only one segment, a meeting with Lucius Fox, felt close to dud. A few important story splits present themselves; some feel inconsequential (for example, choosing to assist Dent or a police officer), others are seeds that won’t see a larger payoff until later episodes. Even so, the decision-making feels increasingly tense thanks to the twists and turns that have occurred thus far. I’m second-guessing several of my actions here thanks to options that feel like necessary risks or lesser evils in no-win situations. Based on Dent’s arc, these differing paths will likely weave back together into the same limited aftermaths, but at least I’m enjoying the act of deciding. New World Order wraps up with the most jarring shocker in the series yet – a conclusion that also makes me nervous going forward. Batman’s story could reach new heights of intrigue or run off the rails depending on how Telltale explains this left-field revelation. Telltale mostly nails the storytelling aspect of Batman, but the studio continues to struggle with making the actual gameplay fun and engaging. The clue-connecting detective mini-game returns with Batman investigating a criminal lair, requiring slightly more critical thinking than in its first appearance (i.e. not very much). Sadly, living in the boots of the World’s Greatest Detective doesn’t get any more robust than that. Outside of the straightforward combat, the only noteworthy activities worth mentioning are staring at a table of equipment and eating Catwoman’s bagels. Those aren’t exactly riveting diversions. Narrative content has always been the entire appeal of Telltale titles, but it’s frustrating to witness the bright gameplay potential for a Batman story go underwhelm so far. Conclusion: New World Order isn’t quite the rollercoaster that Children of Arkham was, but it acts as an exceptional midpoint that does a fine job of advancing Telltale’s gripping Batman narrative. Bruce Wayne’s life hangs by a thread, making the more numerous branching options feel like crucial decisions. The plot sits on a potentially slippery slope between Harvey Dent’s arc and the surprising conclusion, but if Telltale can pull these threads off, players could be in for fantastic developments in the chapters to come. While I gave it a pass in Children of Arkham, gameplay needs to step up in a huge way. Thus far it feels largely forgotten and/or overlooked, failing to live up to the vision Telltale painted for it when the series was announced. Telltale’s Batman Episode 3: New World Order was reviewed on PlayStation 4, and is now available for Xbox One, PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, iOS, and Android
  13. Telltale Games has been largely quiet about its Batman title since they unveiled it last year. Today, the Walking Dead developer has broken their silence by announcing the stars of the Dark Knight's episodic caper, as well as revealing when players can get their hands on it. Batman - The Telltale Series arrives this summer for consoles, PC/Mac, and mobile devices. Telltale plans on releasing it both digitally and at retail as a "season pass disc" that gives players access to all five episodes as they become available. Additionally, Telltale has revealed the voice talent: Troy Baker is taking up the mantle as Batman, joined by Enn Reitel as Alfred. The cast also includes Travis Willingham as Harvey Dent, Erin Yvette as Vicki Vale, Murphy Guyer as Lieutenant Jim Gordon, and Laura Bailey as Selina Kyle AKA Catwoman. Telltale promises a growing cast of characters as the season progresses. View full article
  14. Telltale Games has been largely quiet about its Batman title since they unveiled it last year. Today, the Walking Dead developer has broken their silence by announcing the stars of the Dark Knight's episodic caper, as well as revealing when players can get their hands on it. Batman - The Telltale Series arrives this summer for consoles, PC/Mac, and mobile devices. Telltale plans on releasing it both digitally and at retail as a "season pass disc" that gives players access to all five episodes as they become available. Additionally, Telltale has revealed the voice talent: Troy Baker is taking up the mantle as Batman, joined by Enn Reitel as Alfred. The cast also includes Travis Willingham as Harvey Dent, Erin Yvette as Vicki Vale, Murphy Guyer as Lieutenant Jim Gordon, and Laura Bailey as Selina Kyle AKA Catwoman. Telltale promises a growing cast of characters as the season progresses.
  15. Jack Gardner

    Telltale's Batman Coming in 2016

    While the official title has yet to be revealed, Telltale Games announced today that they would be releasing an episodic series based on DC Comics' Batman sometime during 2016. While not much is currently known about the story, Telltale has hinted that it might focus more on Bruce Wayne's struggles to support his Batman-ing. "At Telltale, we've been honored to bring our unique approach to interactive storytelling to some of the biggest entertainment franchises in the world, and we're excited to announce that we'll soon be exploring what it means to be Batman in an all-new series starting next year," said Kevin Bruner, Co-Founder and CEO of Telltale Games. "This iteration of Batman will give fans a first-hand opportunity to dive deeper into the complex life and mind of Bruce Wayne, the duality of his own identity, and the struggle of responsibility in saving a city overcome with corruption and villainy." "Telltale has an established track record of creating award-winning content for some of the best properties in the world," said David Haddad, President of Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment. "We look forward to working with the team as they deliver a new interactive way for fans and gamers to experience the rich narrative world of Batman." Telltale has confirmed that it will be launching digitally across all consoles, PC/Mac, and mobile devices.
  16. While the official title has yet to be revealed, Telltale Games announced today that they would be releasing an episodic series based on DC Comics' Batman sometime during 2016. While not much is currently known about the story, Telltale has hinted that it might focus more on Bruce Wayne's struggles to support his Batman-ing. "At Telltale, we've been honored to bring our unique approach to interactive storytelling to some of the biggest entertainment franchises in the world, and we're excited to announce that we'll soon be exploring what it means to be Batman in an all-new series starting next year," said Kevin Bruner, Co-Founder and CEO of Telltale Games. "This iteration of Batman will give fans a first-hand opportunity to dive deeper into the complex life and mind of Bruce Wayne, the duality of his own identity, and the struggle of responsibility in saving a city overcome with corruption and villainy." "Telltale has an established track record of creating award-winning content for some of the best properties in the world," said David Haddad, President of Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment. "We look forward to working with the team as they deliver a new interactive way for fans and gamers to experience the rich narrative world of Batman." Telltale has confirmed that it will be launching digitally across all consoles, PC/Mac, and mobile devices. View full article
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