Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'closure'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Extra Life News
    • Extra Life Updates
    • Best Practices
    • Community Content
    • Why I Extra Life
    • Fundraising
    • Contests
  • Gaming News
  • Features
  • Podcast

Discussions

  • Extra Life Discussions
    • General Extra Life Discussion
    • Local Extra Lifers
    • Fundraising Ideas
    • Live Streaming Tips & Tricks
    • Official Extra Life Stream Team Discussion
    • Extra Life JSON Code Discussion & Sharing
    • Extra Life United
    • Extra Life Q & A
  • Articles & Extra Life Announcements
    • Announcements
  • Official Extra Life Guilds
    • Guild information and Discussion
    • Canada
    • Northeastern US
    • Southeastern US
    • Central US
    • Western US
  • Gaming Discussions
    • General Gaming Discussion
  • Other Stuff
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Recent Posts

Calendars

  • Extra Life Community Calendar
  • Extra Life Stream Team
  • Akron Guild
  • Albany Guild
  • Albuquerque Guild
  • Anchorage Guild
  • Atlanta Guild
  • Austin Guild
  • Bakersfield Guild
  • Baltimore Guild
  • Birmingham Guild
  • Boston Guild
  • Burlington Guild
  • Buffalo Guild
  • Calgary, AB Guild
  • Morgantown Guild
  • Charlottesville Guild
  • Chicago Guild
  • Cincinnati Guild
  • Cleveland Guild
  • Columbia, MO Guild
  • Columbus, OH Guild
  • Dallas Guild
  • Dayton Guild
  • Denver Guild
  • Des Moines Guild
  • Detroit Guild
  • Edmonton, AB Guild
  • Fargo-Valley City Guild
  • Fresno Guild
  • Ft. Worth Guild
  • Gainesville-Tallahassee Guild
  • Grand Rapids Guild
  • Halifax, NS Guild
  • Hamilton, ON Guild
  • Hartford Guild
  • Hershey Guild
  • Hudson Valley Guild
  • Houston Guild
  • Indianapolis Guild
  • Jacksonville Guild
  • Kansas City Guild
  • Knoxville Guild
  • Lansing Guild
  • London, ON Guild
  • Los Angeles Guild
  • Milwaukee / Madison Guild
  • Minneapolis / Twin Cities Guild
  • Montreal / Quebec City Guild
  • Nashville Guild
  • Newark Guild
  • NYC & Long Island Guild
  • Oakland / San Francisco Guild
  • Omaha Guild
  • Orange County Guild
  • Orlando Guild
  • Ottawa, ON Guild
  • Philadelphia Guild
  • Phoenix Guild
  • Pittsburgh Guild
  • Portland, OR Guild
  • Portland, ME Guild
  • Raleigh-Durham Guild
  • Richmond Guild
  • Sacramento Guild
  • Salt Lake City Guild
  • San Antonio Guild
  • San Diego Guild
  • San Juan, PR Guild
  • Saskatchewan Guild
  • Seattle Guild
  • Spokane Guild
  • Springfield-Champaign, IL Guild
  • Springfield, MA Guild
  • St. Louis Guild
  • Syracuse Guild
  • Tampa / St. Petersburg Guild
  • Toronto, ON Guild
  • Vancouver, BC Guild
  • Washington DC Guild
  • Winnipeg, MB Guild
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Events
  • Extra Life Akron's Events

Categories

  • Broadcasting Toolkit
  • Multimedia Kit
  • Extra Life Guild Tool Kit
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Files
  • Extra Life Akron's Files

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Hospital


Location


Why I "Extra Life"


Interests


Twitter


Instagram


Twitch


Mixer


Discord


Blizzard Battletag


Nintendo ID


PSN ID


Steam


Origin


Xbox Gamertag

Found 10 results

  1. Update 2: Telltale pulled The Walking Dead: The Final Season from digital storefronts earlier this week without giving a clear reason as to why. Good Old Games released a statement saying that it was a temporary removal requested by the company. However, we finally have an answer as to the fate of The Walking Dead: The Final Season. In a quote reported by Polygon, a Telltale representative offered this clarification: Yes, we have removed season passes for The Walking Dead: The Final Season from stores for the time being. We’re currently still working to find a way to hand off production of episodes 3 and 4 so that the season can be completed. The outcome of those efforts will determine when and how The Final Season returns to stores. We hope to have a firm announcement before the end of the week. For now, we apologize for any inconvenience. Update 1: The studio has issued a full statement via Twitter about the closure of the company. You can read it in full below: Today Telltale Games made the difficult decision to begin a majority studio closure following a year marked by insurmountable challenges. A majority of the company’s employees were dismissed earlier this morning, with a small group of 25 employees staying on to fulfill the company’s obligations to its board and partners. CEO Pete Hawley issued the following statement. “It’s been an incredibly difficult year for Telltale as we worked to set the company on a new course. Unfortunately, we ran out of time trying to get there. We released some of our best content this year and received a tremendous amount of positive feedback, but ultimately, that did not translate to sales. With a heavy heart, we watch our friends leave today to spread our brand of storytelling across the games industry.” Telltale will issue further comments regarding its product portfolio in the coming weeks. On top of that, various former Telltale employees have stated on social media that they believe the fourth and final season of the company's The Walking Dead franchise will come to a premature end after the impending release of its second episode on September 25. Additionally, the remaining employees at Telltale will instead be working to fulfill obligations to Netflix for Minecraft: Story Mode, which was set to release on the streaming service this fall. Original: The developer behind works like The Walking Dead and Tales from the Borderlands has ceased operations with the exception of 25 employees who will stay on until the final season of The Walking Dead is finished. Over 225 employees have been laid off. The studio has been oddly silent thus far with no official comments on the planned fate of the developer. Former employees have reported that all future projects after the last season of The Walking Dead have been cancelled. The games that are no more include the adaptation of Stranger Things, The Wolf Among Us Season Two, and a follow-up to their Game of Thrones title. Because of the radio silence from the studio, there's some speculation that this might not be a complete closure. Instead, it could be a massive restructuring to make the company more attractive to potential buyers. It's also possible that this change has been made to drastically reduce the size of the company to narrow the focus of the company. We're hoping that everyone who has been left in the lurch finds their feet again soon. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  2. Update 2: Telltale pulled The Walking Dead: The Final Season from digital storefronts earlier this week without giving a clear reason as to why. Good Old Games released a statement saying that it was a temporary removal requested by the company. However, we finally have an answer as to the fate of The Walking Dead: The Final Season. In a quote reported by Polygon, a Telltale representative offered this clarification: Yes, we have removed season passes for The Walking Dead: The Final Season from stores for the time being. We’re currently still working to find a way to hand off production of episodes 3 and 4 so that the season can be completed. The outcome of those efforts will determine when and how The Final Season returns to stores. We hope to have a firm announcement before the end of the week. For now, we apologize for any inconvenience. Update 1: The studio has issued a full statement via Twitter about the closure of the company. You can read it in full below: Today Telltale Games made the difficult decision to begin a majority studio closure following a year marked by insurmountable challenges. A majority of the company’s employees were dismissed earlier this morning, with a small group of 25 employees staying on to fulfill the company’s obligations to its board and partners. CEO Pete Hawley issued the following statement. “It’s been an incredibly difficult year for Telltale as we worked to set the company on a new course. Unfortunately, we ran out of time trying to get there. We released some of our best content this year and received a tremendous amount of positive feedback, but ultimately, that did not translate to sales. With a heavy heart, we watch our friends leave today to spread our brand of storytelling across the games industry.” Telltale will issue further comments regarding its product portfolio in the coming weeks. On top of that, various former Telltale employees have stated on social media that they believe the fourth and final season of the company's The Walking Dead franchise will come to a premature end after the impending release of its second episode on September 25. Additionally, the remaining employees at Telltale will instead be working to fulfill obligations to Netflix for Minecraft: Story Mode, which was set to release on the streaming service this fall. Original: The developer behind works like The Walking Dead and Tales from the Borderlands has ceased operations with the exception of 25 employees who will stay on until the final season of The Walking Dead is finished. Over 225 employees have been laid off. The studio has been oddly silent thus far with no official comments on the planned fate of the developer. Former employees have reported that all future projects after the last season of The Walking Dead have been cancelled. The games that are no more include the adaptation of Stranger Things, The Wolf Among Us Season Two, and a follow-up to their Game of Thrones title. Because of the radio silence from the studio, there's some speculation that this might not be a complete closure. Instead, it could be a massive restructuring to make the company more attractive to potential buyers. It's also possible that this change has been made to drastically reduce the size of the company to narrow the focus of the company. We're hoping that everyone who has been left in the lurch finds their feet again soon. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  3. Jack Gardner

    EA Shuts Down Creators of Dead Space

    Earlier today, EA sent out an update regarding the development of the unnamed Star Wars title. The title, codenamed Ragtag, has long been rumored to have internal development troubles, and the announcement all but confirms those rumors. Patrick Söderlund, EA Worldwide's executive vice president, penned the public message that attempted to clarify the company's decision to close Visceral Games, one of their most well-known subsidiary studios: Our Visceral studio has been developing an action-adventure title set in the Star Wars universe. In its current form, it was shaping up to be a story-based, linear adventure game. Throughout the development process, we have been testing the game concept with players, listening to the feedback about what and how they want to play, and closely tracking fundamental shifts in the marketplace. It has become clear that to deliver an experience that players will want to come back to and enjoy for a long time to come, we needed to pivot the design. We will maintain the stunning visuals, authenticity in the Star Wars universe, and focus on bringing a Star Wars story to life. Importantly, we are shifting the game to be a broader experience that allows for more variety and player agency, leaning into the capabilities of our Frostbite engine and reimagining central elements of the game to give players a Star Wars adventure of greater depth and breadth to explore. This move leads to a few other changes: A development team from across EA Worldwide Studios will take over development of this game, led by a team from EA Vancouver that has already been working on the project. Our Visceral studio will be ramping down and closing, and we’re in the midst of shifting as many of the team as possible to other projects and teams at EA. Lastly, while we had originally expected this game to launch late in our fiscal year 2019, we’re now looking at a new timeframe that we will announce in the future. This move seems to be coming from EA in an attempt to move the game away from being a linear, story-focused experience and toward a more long-term investment. Essentially, this is EA stepping in to make sure that project Ragtag can continue generating money post-launch, probably through microtransactions and/or DLC, both of which have become core parts of their business strategy in recent years. I suspect that it will also be shifting focus of the title from a linear, single-player story toward a multiplayer competitive title that can be milked for money via DLC and microtransactions for years after release. Kotaku was able to get some further clarification on Visceral's closure. Söderlund responded to their questions by saying that the EA Vancouver team that was already attached to the project would take the lead along with a team taken from across EA Worldwide Studios. EA executive producer Steve Anthony will lead the entire effort and much of the work done by Visceral will be used in the final game such as assets that have already been built. Amy Hennig, known for her work directing Uncharted 1-4, had been helming Visceral's Ragtag project. Her fate seems to be uncertain, although an EA spokesperson stated that, "We are in discussions with Amy about her next move." EA has said that they are trying to move as many devs as possible to other parts of EA, but many will be finding themselves without a job. Other studios across the industry, such as God of War developer Sony Santa Monica and 2K Games, have expressed their sympathy for the people affected and opened their doors to applicants who might not make it through the dissolution of Visceral.
  4. Earlier today, EA sent out an update regarding the development of the unnamed Star Wars title. The title, codenamed Ragtag, has long been rumored to have internal development troubles, and the announcement all but confirms those rumors. Patrick Söderlund, EA Worldwide's executive vice president, penned the public message that attempted to clarify the company's decision to close Visceral Games, one of their most well-known subsidiary studios: Our Visceral studio has been developing an action-adventure title set in the Star Wars universe. In its current form, it was shaping up to be a story-based, linear adventure game. Throughout the development process, we have been testing the game concept with players, listening to the feedback about what and how they want to play, and closely tracking fundamental shifts in the marketplace. It has become clear that to deliver an experience that players will want to come back to and enjoy for a long time to come, we needed to pivot the design. We will maintain the stunning visuals, authenticity in the Star Wars universe, and focus on bringing a Star Wars story to life. Importantly, we are shifting the game to be a broader experience that allows for more variety and player agency, leaning into the capabilities of our Frostbite engine and reimagining central elements of the game to give players a Star Wars adventure of greater depth and breadth to explore. This move leads to a few other changes: A development team from across EA Worldwide Studios will take over development of this game, led by a team from EA Vancouver that has already been working on the project. Our Visceral studio will be ramping down and closing, and we’re in the midst of shifting as many of the team as possible to other projects and teams at EA. Lastly, while we had originally expected this game to launch late in our fiscal year 2019, we’re now looking at a new timeframe that we will announce in the future. This move seems to be coming from EA in an attempt to move the game away from being a linear, story-focused experience and toward a more long-term investment. Essentially, this is EA stepping in to make sure that project Ragtag can continue generating money post-launch, probably through microtransactions and/or DLC, both of which have become core parts of their business strategy in recent years. I suspect that it will also be shifting focus of the title from a linear, single-player story toward a multiplayer competitive title that can be milked for money via DLC and microtransactions for years after release. Kotaku was able to get some further clarification on Visceral's closure. Söderlund responded to their questions by saying that the EA Vancouver team that was already attached to the project would take the lead along with a team taken from across EA Worldwide Studios. EA executive producer Steve Anthony will lead the entire effort and much of the work done by Visceral will be used in the final game such as assets that have already been built. Amy Hennig, known for her work directing Uncharted 1-4, had been helming Visceral's Ragtag project. Her fate seems to be uncertain, although an EA spokesperson stated that, "We are in discussions with Amy about her next move." EA has said that they are trying to move as many devs as possible to other parts of EA, but many will be finding themselves without a job. Other studios across the industry, such as God of War developer Sony Santa Monica and 2K Games, have expressed their sympathy for the people affected and opened their doors to applicants who might not make it through the dissolution of Visceral. View full article
  5. The developer behind SimCity and Spore is being shut down and their work will be redistributed to the remaining branches of Maxis. "Everyone's out of a job." Emmeryville's most recent projects, Spore and SimCity (2013), both received a lukewarm reception from the public, with SimCity coming under fire for having an insufficient infrastructure to support its players on launch. Since its acquisition by EA in 1997, Maxis continued to operate out of their Walnut Creek offices until it was closed down in 2004 and development was split between the Redwood City and Emeryville locations, with the development of The Sims transferring to The Sims Studio. It is always sad to see a studio close, our best wishes and prayers go out to those who have lost their jobs in this closure. View full article
  6. Jack Gardner

    EA Closes Maxis Emeryville

    The developer behind SimCity and Spore is being shut down and their work will be redistributed to the remaining branches of Maxis. "Everyone's out of a job." Emmeryville's most recent projects, Spore and SimCity (2013), both received a lukewarm reception from the public, with SimCity coming under fire for having an insufficient infrastructure to support its players on launch. Since its acquisition by EA in 1997, Maxis continued to operate out of their Walnut Creek offices until it was closed down in 2004 and development was split between the Redwood City and Emeryville locations, with the development of The Sims transferring to The Sims Studio. It is always sad to see a studio close, our best wishes and prayers go out to those who have lost their jobs in this closure.
  7. Jack Gardner

    Sega Folds on Console Gaming

    Sega has asked around 300 member of both the US and Japanese development staff to accept a voluntary retirement package. The goal of these layoffs is to restructure the company around mobile and online PC gaming. Eurogamer caught wind of Sega's reorganization today through a note sent out today. Sega of America's office will be moved out of San Francisco to lower costs as nearly 120 employees will be let go between now and summer. These changes will not affect any of Sega's announced release dates or the Sonic Boom television series, though it remains to be seen how developers who work with Sega as their publisher, like Creative Assembly or Relic Entertainment, will be affected. This is certainly an unfortunate turn of events for the once monolithic rival to Nintendo. Despite numerous attempts to reboot Sonic the Hedgehog and make a competitive run at console game development, Sega hasn't had a hugely successful console hit in years. Still, it feels something like the end of an era. We wish only the best to those affected and their families.
  8. Sega has asked around 300 member of both the US and Japanese development staff to accept a voluntary retirement package. The goal of these layoffs is to restructure the company around mobile and online PC gaming. Eurogamer caught wind of Sega's reorganization today through a note sent out today. Sega of America's office will be moved out of San Francisco to lower costs as nearly 120 employees will be let go between now and summer. These changes will not affect any of Sega's announced release dates or the Sonic Boom television series, though it remains to be seen how developers who work with Sega as their publisher, like Creative Assembly or Relic Entertainment, will be affected. This is certainly an unfortunate turn of events for the once monolithic rival to Nintendo. Despite numerous attempts to reboot Sonic the Hedgehog and make a competitive run at console game development, Sega hasn't had a hugely successful console hit in years. Still, it feels something like the end of an era. We wish only the best to those affected and their families. View full article
  9. Jack Gardner

    Joystiq Is No More

    After a rumblings of a closure were reported by Re/code, rumors began circulating earlier this week, Joystiq has confirmed that AOL will be shutting them down. The site will continue to publish content until next Tuesday. For those of you who might be wondering why, the word on the street is that AOL is going through some restructuring and Joystiq wasn't pulling in as much money as its parent company desired. Perhaps its a sensible business move in a world where half of the traffic to most video game websites uses Ad Block software (effectively cutting all revenue earned in half). Maybe it makes sense to someone in a corporate meeting who can only see the numbers. To them, its a good move to shut down Joystiq after eleven years covering the industry. Eleven years. Eleven years is a life-age in the world of video game websites. Most seem to go under in less than five years. To those of us who followed Joystiq's work and labored in the trenches alongside them, Joystiq was an institution. It just was. It seems impossible that when I wake up on Wednesday morning, it will be over and gone. No more news coverage from Alexander Sliwinski. No more reviews appearing from Susan Arendt. No more goofy bits of everything written by Ludwig Kietzmann. No more from any of the talented people who worked on building Joystiq: Xav de Matos, Richard Mitchell, Jess Conditt, Sinan Kubba, Danny Cowan, Mike Suszek, Earnest Cavalli, Sam Prell, Thomas Schulenberg, or Anthony John Agnello. These people did great work, a lot of great work. I hope we'll see them land on their feet, but for now, I think it is okay to be sad. Next Tuesday, the video game community will witness the passing of something extraordinary. After eleven years, Joystiq is closing shop.
  10. Jack Gardner

    Gaming News:Joystiq Is No More

    After a rumblings of a closure were reported by Re/code, rumors began circulating earlier this week, Joystiq has confirmed that AOL will be shutting them down. The site will continue to publish content until next Tuesday. For those of you who might be wondering why, the word on the street is that AOL is going through some restructuring and Joystiq wasn't pulling in as much money as its parent company desired. Perhaps its a sensible business move in a world where half of the traffic to most video game websites uses Ad Block software (effectively cutting all revenue earned in half). Maybe it makes sense to someone in a corporate meeting who can only see the numbers. To them, its a good move to shut down Joystiq after eleven years covering the industry. Eleven years. Eleven years is a life-age in the world of video game websites. Most seem to go under in less than five years. To those of us who followed Joystiq's work and labored in the trenches alongside them, Joystiq was an institution. It just was. It seems impossible that when I wake up on Wednesday morning, it will be over and gone. No more news coverage from Alexander Sliwinski. No more reviews appearing from Susan Arendt. No more goofy bits of everything written by Ludwig Kietzmann. No more from any of the talented people who worked on building Joystiq: Xav de Matos, Richard Mitchell, Jess Conditt, Sinan Kubba, Danny Cowan, Mike Suszek, Earnest Cavalli, Sam Prell, Thomas Schulenberg, or Anthony John Agnello. These people did great work, a lot of great work. I hope we'll see them land on their feet, but for now, I think it is okay to be sad. Next Tuesday, the video game community will witness the passing of something extraordinary. After eleven years, Joystiq is closing shop. View full article
×