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Found 37 results

  1. One of the biggest surprises of E3 2018 was the long-awaited formal reveal of the remake of Resident Evil 2. Twenty years after the launch of the original game back in 1998, and the time has come to rebuild one of the most legendary games of all time, from the ground up. In addition to a cinematic in-engine trailer, the game was also playable on the show floor. There are still a lot of questions about the game, how it feels, how it plays, and from which entries in the series' past it takes the most inspiration. After spending significant hands-on time with the game, I have some answers. Obviously, the first and most immediately apparent inspiration for this remake is the original Resident Evil 2. The E3 demo begins with Leon Kennedy in the lobby of the Raccoon City Police Station, early in the game, but after the original's explosive opening sequence on the streets of Raccoon City. Presumably, that chaotic scene will be represented in the remake, but it was not present at E3. Visually, I was surprised at how easily I recognized the iconic locations from the original game. Everything, from the lobby's maiden statue, to the white and green walls of the station's hallways, and individual rooms within the station, were all distinctly recognizable. However, rather than resting on nostalgia and being a copy-paste HD remaster of the original, the remake shifts the perspective to behind Leon's camera, as seen in Resident Evil 4, 5, 6, and the Revelations games. Don't be fooled, though: the feeling is nothing like those titles. To casual observers, RE2 looks like a slower version of Resident Evil 6, or even akin to Revelations 2, but it feels totally different, more akin to a much more recent entry in the long-running saga. In terms of tone and gameplay, this remake borrows the most from the latest entry in the series, Resident Evil VII: Biohazard. From the looks of things, RE2 is going for a full-on horror experience; even the HUD is taken straight out of RE7. While the environments are recognizable from the original game, the remake runs on the RE Engine created for RE7, and thus supports its filmic, photorealistic style. The police station is no longer well-lit; it's almost pitch black at times, meaning Leon has to make use of his flashlight to see anything more than two feet away from his face. This creates a palpable tension and an overwhelming – but welcome – sense of dread. After a section of deliberately-paced exploration, I finally came face-to-face with a zombie, and was not disappointed. My immediate, visceral reaction was one of fear, and I was surprised and how I welcomed the terror. Much has been made of Resident Evil's infamous straying from its survival horror roots. After RE7 brought things back to basics with a straightforward horror title, many fans were skeptical that RE2 would be a step backwards due to its over-the-shoulder camera lending it a superficial resemblance to Resident Evil 5 and 6. Fortunately, this is not the case. The controversial over-the-shoulder, third-person camera from the series' most divisive era returns, but it's not here to facilitate high-octane shooting action and breakneck pacing; instead, it's here to offer a cinematic perspective with kinetic movements and dynamic zooms. At first, I chose to stand my ground and fight the zombie, and was surprised by just how intense the encounter truly was. Leon's Matilda sidearm has a slow rate of fire, the undead take a ton of bullets to bring down, and Leon lacks the martial arts prowess he exhibits in later titles. Lining up headshots isn't easy, but it's certainly rewarding, even if they're not an instant kill as they often are in zombie-focused media. Zombies are an irrepressible bunch, and I ultimately wind up opting to flee, rather than fight, which brings us to another significant change from the original game: since the environments are all interconnected, rather than separated by loading screens, zombies can follow Leon throughout the police station, although it seems the main lobby area is a safe space... During the demo, at least. The slow, deliberate pacing is akin to RE7, and the combat truly feels like every bullet has value. The final game will have an ammo crafting component, though I didn't get the chance to fiddle with it during my time with the game. I did, however, get to use the combat knife. While it's unclear whether the weapon has limited durability or if there are multiple knives to collect throughout the game, this new feature combines the defensive weapons from the 2002 Resident Evil remake with the classic combat knife fans have known and loved since the beginning. The knife can be used to open objects locked with heavy duty tape, from doors to cabinets. It can also be used in combat, either RE4-style or as a defensive item. Upon being grabbed by a zombie, Leon can counter their bite by plunging the knife into his attacker's head, which looks fantastic, but leaves Leon without a knife. Fortunately, it can be recovered by killing off the zombie and retrieving the blade from their corpse. One change which some fans have not enjoyed is the new faces and voice actors for the entire cast. While Leon sports his trademark "beautiful boy bangs" hairstyle, his face is noticeably different from what we've seen in the past, although it's certainly not as drastic a change as Chris Redfield's unexpectedly svelte appearance in RE7 and its "Not a Hero" DLC. Likewise, Marvin Branagh, who had only a minor role in the original game, seems to behave more like an ill-fated mentor here, giving Leon his combat knife, dispensing advice, and acting as something of a guide during the early stages of a game... Still, he's already bitten by the time Leon finds him, and he knows he's not long for this world. A few other changes include the reworking of famous "moments" from the original game, at least for the demo. In my time with RE2, I didn't encounter a single Licker enemy, though I did see its giant claw marks, and I also crossed paths with at least two of its unlucky victims, who had been violently torn apart. There's no doubt this game will earn the decidedly family-unfriendly M for Mature rating. There's also a new item, "Wooden Boards," which Leon can use to block enemies from breaking in through the police station's windows. Likewise, the game seems to be riddled with all new puzzles, as well as new twists on familiar tasks, offering new challenges to RE2 fans who think they'll be able to breeze through the new game just because they've spent 20 years mastering the original. This new take on Resident Evil 2 is not the game you knew. To call it a remaster would be extremely reductive, but it's not a straightforward remake, either. The 2002 Gamecube version of Resident Evil added new scenarios, characters, enemies, and twists to the classic Mansion incident of the original 1996 game, but it still retained the fixed camera angles, tank controls, 2D backgrounds, and most of the basic gameplay of the original. By comparison, RE2 is aiming to be an even more radical departure from its source material than the previous Resident Evil remake. Resident Evil 2 isn't a stop-gap release meant to hold over fans until the next game. It isn't an extended piece of obligatory fan service to act as counterprogramming to RE7. No, Resident Evil 2, despite being a remake which returns to an established place on the timeline, is the next Resident Evil game. RE2 is the next evolution for the series, combining the jaw-dropping terror of RE7 with the established story of RE2, creating a whole new beast. There's certainly an element of nostalgia at play here, but RE2 is clearly aiming to an unrelenting horror masterpiece without peer. It's not "Resident Evil for a new generation," but the latest evolution for a series which is constantly growing, changing, looking back, and moving forward. We'll find out for sure when Resident Evil 2 launches, on January 29, 2019, for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  2. One of the biggest surprises of E3 2018 was the long-awaited formal reveal of the remake of Resident Evil 2. Twenty years after the launch of the original game back in 1998, and the time has come to rebuild one of the most legendary games of all time, from the ground up. In addition to a cinematic in-engine trailer, the game was also playable on the show floor. There are still a lot of questions about the game, how it feels, how it plays, and from which entries in the series' past it takes the most inspiration. After spending significant hands-on time with the game, I have some answers. Obviously, the first and most immediately apparent inspiration for this remake is the original Resident Evil 2. The E3 demo begins with Leon Kennedy in the lobby of the Raccoon City Police Station, early in the game, but after the original's explosive opening sequence on the streets of Raccoon City. Presumably, that chaotic scene will be represented in the remake, but it was not present at E3. Visually, I was surprised at how easily I recognized the iconic locations from the original game. Everything, from the lobby's maiden statue, to the white and green walls of the station's hallways, and individual rooms within the station, were all distinctly recognizable. However, rather than resting on nostalgia and being a copy-paste HD remaster of the original, the remake shifts the perspective to behind Leon's camera, as seen in Resident Evil 4, 5, 6, and the Revelations games. Don't be fooled, though: the feeling is nothing like those titles. To casual observers, RE2 looks like a slower version of Resident Evil 6, or even akin to Revelations 2, but it feels totally different, more akin to a much more recent entry in the long-running saga. In terms of tone and gameplay, this remake borrows the most from the latest entry in the series, Resident Evil VII: Biohazard. From the looks of things, RE2 is going for a full-on horror experience; even the HUD is taken straight out of RE7. While the environments are recognizable from the original game, the remake runs on the RE Engine created for RE7, and thus supports its filmic, photorealistic style. The police station is no longer well-lit; it's almost pitch black at times, meaning Leon has to make use of his flashlight to see anything more than two feet away from his face. This creates a palpable tension and an overwhelming – but welcome – sense of dread. After a section of deliberately-paced exploration, I finally came face-to-face with a zombie, and was not disappointed. My immediate, visceral reaction was one of fear, and I was surprised and how I welcomed the terror. Much has been made of Resident Evil's infamous straying from its survival horror roots. After RE7 brought things back to basics with a straightforward horror title, many fans were skeptical that RE2 would be a step backwards due to its over-the-shoulder camera lending it a superficial resemblance to Resident Evil 5 and 6. Fortunately, this is not the case. The controversial over-the-shoulder, third-person camera from the series' most divisive era returns, but it's not here to facilitate high-octane shooting action and breakneck pacing; instead, it's here to offer a cinematic perspective with kinetic movements and dynamic zooms. At first, I chose to stand my ground and fight the zombie, and was surprised by just how intense the encounter truly was. Leon's Matilda sidearm has a slow rate of fire, the undead take a ton of bullets to bring down, and Leon lacks the martial arts prowess he exhibits in later titles. Lining up headshots isn't easy, but it's certainly rewarding, even if they're not an instant kill as they often are in zombie-focused media. Zombies are an irrepressible bunch, and I ultimately wind up opting to flee, rather than fight, which brings us to another significant change from the original game: since the environments are all interconnected, rather than separated by loading screens, zombies can follow Leon throughout the police station, although it seems the main lobby area is a safe space... During the demo, at least. The slow, deliberate pacing is akin to RE7, and the combat truly feels like every bullet has value. The final game will have an ammo crafting component, though I didn't get the chance to fiddle with it during my time with the game. I did, however, get to use the combat knife. While it's unclear whether the weapon has limited durability or if there are multiple knives to collect throughout the game, this new feature combines the defensive weapons from the 2002 Resident Evil remake with the classic combat knife fans have known and loved since the beginning. The knife can be used to open objects locked with heavy duty tape, from doors to cabinets. It can also be used in combat, either RE4-style or as a defensive item. Upon being grabbed by a zombie, Leon can counter their bite by plunging the knife into his attacker's head, which looks fantastic, but leaves Leon without a knife. Fortunately, it can be recovered by killing off the zombie and retrieving the blade from their corpse. One change which some fans have not enjoyed is the new faces and voice actors for the entire cast. While Leon sports his trademark "beautiful boy bangs" hairstyle, his face is noticeably different from what we've seen in the past, although it's certainly not as drastic a change as Chris Redfield's unexpectedly svelte appearance in RE7 and its "Not a Hero" DLC. Likewise, Marvin Branagh, who had only a minor role in the original game, seems to behave more like an ill-fated mentor here, giving Leon his combat knife, dispensing advice, and acting as something of a guide during the early stages of a game... Still, he's already bitten by the time Leon finds him, and he knows he's not long for this world. A few other changes include the reworking of famous "moments" from the original game, at least for the demo. In my time with RE2, I didn't encounter a single Licker enemy, though I did see its giant claw marks, and I also crossed paths with at least two of its unlucky victims, who had been violently torn apart. There's no doubt this game will earn the decidedly family-unfriendly M for Mature rating. There's also a new item, "Wooden Boards," which Leon can use to block enemies from breaking in through the police station's windows. Likewise, the game seems to be riddled with all new puzzles, as well as new twists on familiar tasks, offering new challenges to RE2 fans who think they'll be able to breeze through the new game just because they've spent 20 years mastering the original. This new take on Resident Evil 2 is not the game you knew. To call it a remaster would be extremely reductive, but it's not a straightforward remake, either. The 2002 Gamecube version of Resident Evil added new scenarios, characters, enemies, and twists to the classic Mansion incident of the original 1996 game, but it still retained the fixed camera angles, tank controls, 2D backgrounds, and most of the basic gameplay of the original. By comparison, RE2 is aiming to be an even more radical departure from its source material than the previous Resident Evil remake. Resident Evil 2 isn't a stop-gap release meant to hold over fans until the next game. It isn't an extended piece of obligatory fan service to act as counterprogramming to RE7. No, Resident Evil 2, despite being a remake which returns to an established place on the timeline, is the next Resident Evil game. RE2 is the next evolution for the series, combining the jaw-dropping terror of RE7 with the established story of RE2, creating a whole new beast. There's certainly an element of nostalgia at play here, but RE2 is clearly aiming to an unrelenting horror masterpiece without peer. It's not "Resident Evil for a new generation," but the latest evolution for a series which is constantly growing, changing, looking back, and moving forward. We'll find out for sure when Resident Evil 2 launches, on January 29, 2019, for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  3. It's been ten long years since Devil May Cry 4, the final entry in Capcom's over-the-top gothic action franchise. Although some fans were sated by the 2013 reboot, developed by Ninja Theory, many brushed it aside, awaiting a proper return for Dante, Nero, and the rest of the gang. Finally, Devil May Cry 5 has been announced. Hideaki Itsuno, director of DMC3 and 4 (as well as the cult favorite, Dragon's Dogma), has returned to helm a brand new entry in the original Devil May Cry continuity. An eye-popping new trailer showcased all the crazy action, demonic insanity, and charismatic swagger fans have come to expect from the series, all with an extra coat of next-gen paint, courtesy of the current suite of gaming consoles. The game will feature three lead characters: Nero, returning from DMC4, who has lost his arm and is seeking revenge, series stalwart Dante, who rides in on a cool motorcycle and brandishing a grizzly beard, and a third character, who has yet to be properly revealed. Devil May Cry is a series which prides itself on unbridled cinematic action and an unmatched sense of style. This upcoming fifth chapter has been a long time coming, but Dante and Nero are playing it cool, as though they had never left. Devil May Cry 5 is currently on track for a Spring 2019 release. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  4. It's been ten long years since Devil May Cry 4, the final entry in Capcom's over-the-top gothic action franchise. Although some fans were sated by the 2013 reboot, developed by Ninja Theory, many brushed it aside, awaiting a proper return for Dante, Nero, and the rest of the gang. Finally, Devil May Cry 5 has been announced. Hideaki Itsuno, director of DMC3 and 4 (as well as the cult favorite, Dragon's Dogma), has returned to helm a brand new entry in the original Devil May Cry continuity. An eye-popping new trailer showcased all the crazy action, demonic insanity, and charismatic swagger fans have come to expect from the series, all with an extra coat of next-gen paint, courtesy of the current suite of gaming consoles. The game will feature three lead characters: Nero, returning from DMC4, who has lost his arm and is seeking revenge, series stalwart Dante, who rides in on a cool motorcycle and brandishing a grizzly beard, and a third character, who has yet to be properly revealed. Devil May Cry is a series which prides itself on unbridled cinematic action and an unmatched sense of style. This upcoming fifth chapter has been a long time coming, but Dante and Nero are playing it cool, as though they had never left. Devil May Cry 5 is currently on track for a Spring 2019 release. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  5. Capcom aims to hit 2018 with all the nostalgia it can muster for the Blue Bomber's resurgence. Mega Man X Legacy Collection 1 and 2, which we reported on last year, will be hitting the PC, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, and Xbox One this summer as part of the 30th anniversary of Mega Man. Mega Man X Legacy Collection 1 will include Mega Man X, X2, X3, and X4 while the second collection will feature X5, X6, X7, and X8. Mega Man X Legacy Collection 1 and 2 have received something of a remaster treatment from Capcom. The retro games all have cleaned up sprites with or without smoothing and CRT filters that the developers have included. X7 and X8, games that took the X series into 3D, have been given a new coat of paint to provide the best visual experience while remaining true to the original games. Each game can be played in its original resolution, full screen with the original aspect ratio, or in widescreen. Both collections contain a slew of goodies that fans of the series might find really interesting. Both collections include The Day of Σ, a short video that was shipped with Maverick Hunter X (a remake of Mega Man X for the PSP) and details the origins of Sigma and his chaotic legion of robotic Mavericks, serving as something of a prelude to the events in Mega Man X. Each collection also includes a digital museum full of Mega Man X history including hi-res trailers for each game in the series. Each collection also comes with a soundtrack that encompasses the soundscape of each game in the series (along with a few Collection specific tunes and remixes). A challenge mode called X Challenge will also be included in the X Legacy Collections. The mode tests the mettle of Mega Man fanatics by putting them up against two bosses at a time armed with up to three bonus weapons. The boss rush mode will include online leaderboards for players to compare times and vie for high scores. Both Mega Man X Legacy Collections will release on July 24. A retail bundle that includes both will be available on Xbox One, PS4, and Switch. The version for Xbox One and PS4 will include discs for both collections while the Switch version will have a cartridge for the first collection and a digital code for the second. All of this will help Capcom build hype for Mega Man 11 which releases later this summer.
  6. Capcom aims to hit 2018 with all the nostalgia it can muster for the Blue Bomber's resurgence. Mega Man X Legacy Collection 1 and 2, which we reported on last year, will be hitting the PC, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, and Xbox One this summer as part of the 30th anniversary of Mega Man. Mega Man X Legacy Collection 1 will include Mega Man X, X2, X3, and X4 while the second collection will feature X5, X6, X7, and X8. Mega Man X Legacy Collection 1 and 2 have received something of a remaster treatment from Capcom. The retro games all have cleaned up sprites with or without smoothing and CRT filters that the developers have included. X7 and X8, games that took the X series into 3D, have been given a new coat of paint to provide the best visual experience while remaining true to the original games. Each game can be played in its original resolution, full screen with the original aspect ratio, or in widescreen. Both collections contain a slew of goodies that fans of the series might find really interesting. Both collections include The Day of Σ, a short video that was shipped with Maverick Hunter X (a remake of Mega Man X for the PSP) and details the origins of Sigma and his chaotic legion of robotic Mavericks, serving as something of a prelude to the events in Mega Man X. Each collection also includes a digital museum full of Mega Man X history including hi-res trailers for each game in the series. Each collection also comes with a soundtrack that encompasses the soundscape of each game in the series (along with a few Collection specific tunes and remixes). A challenge mode called X Challenge will also be included in the X Legacy Collections. The mode tests the mettle of Mega Man fanatics by putting them up against two bosses at a time armed with up to three bonus weapons. The boss rush mode will include online leaderboards for players to compare times and vie for high scores. Both Mega Man X Legacy Collections will release on July 24. A retail bundle that includes both will be available on Xbox One, PS4, and Switch. The version for Xbox One and PS4 will include discs for both collections while the Switch version will have a cartridge for the first collection and a digital code for the second. All of this will help Capcom build hype for Mega Man 11 which releases later this summer. View full article
  7. The 2012 release of Dragon's Dogma seemed to hit at a time during which people were hungry for rich open-worlds with unique combat systems, difficult encounters, and that touch of artistic strangeness. It scratched an itch that the gaming community was having at the time and earned itself a cult following that persists to this day, spurring the game, along with its expansions, seeing a PC release and even a port last year to PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. The grapple/grab mechanic brought on a lot of comparisons to Shadow of the Colossus, and seeing as the Shadow of the Colossus remake recently released, what better time to talk a little bit about Dragon's Dogma? With schedules being what they are, sometimes coordinating a full episode of The Best Games Period can be difficult. When we can't have a proper discussion, we will be breaking off to do these shorter mini-casts, Honorable Mentions, to talk about fringe games that we might not otherwise be able to talk about on a full episode. Outro music: Sonic the Hedgehog 'The Ultimate Ab Solution' by Ivan Hakštok and finbeard (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03685) If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  8. The 2012 release of Dragon's Dogma seemed to hit at a time during which people were hungry for rich open-worlds with unique combat systems, difficult encounters, and that touch of artistic strangeness. It scratched an itch that the gaming community was having at the time and earned itself a cult following that persists to this day, spurring the game, along with its expansions, seeing a PC release and even a port last year to PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. The grapple/grab mechanic brought on a lot of comparisons to Shadow of the Colossus, and seeing as the Shadow of the Colossus remake recently released, what better time to talk a little bit about Dragon's Dogma? With schedules being what they are, sometimes coordinating a full episode of The Best Games Period can be difficult. When we can't have a proper discussion, we will be breaking off to do these shorter mini-casts, Honorable Mentions, to talk about fringe games that we might not otherwise be able to talk about on a full episode. Outro music: Sonic the Hedgehog 'The Ultimate Ab Solution' by Ivan Hakštok and finbeard (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03685) If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  9. During the announcement of Mega Man 11, Capcom also responded to fans who have been requesting support for the Nintendo Switch when it comes to the Mega Man series. That support comes in the form of Mega Man 11, the total Mega Man X collection, and Mega Man 1-10! The Mega Man Legacy Collection includes Mega Mans 1-6 and The Mega Man Legacy Collection 2 consists of Mega Mans 7-10 (that's a lot of Mega Mans!). These will all be coming to the Switch in early Spring 2018. One minor change will be made to the new version the first collection; a rewind feature allows players to roll back time and undo mistakes, Braid style. This should help players looking to have an easier time completing the 8-bit side-scrollers. Those who already own the Mega Man Legacy Collection for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, or PC will also be gaining the rewind feature. The Legacy Collections will be available for the Nintendo Switch sometime during Spring 2018.
  10. During the announcement of Mega Man 11, Capcom also responded to fans who have been requesting support for the Nintendo Switch when it comes to the Mega Man series. That support comes in the form of Mega Man 11, the total Mega Man X collection, and Mega Man 1-10! The Mega Man Legacy Collection includes Mega Mans 1-6 and The Mega Man Legacy Collection 2 consists of Mega Mans 7-10 (that's a lot of Mega Mans!). These will all be coming to the Switch in early Spring 2018. One minor change will be made to the new version the first collection; a rewind feature allows players to roll back time and undo mistakes, Braid style. This should help players looking to have an easier time completing the 8-bit side-scrollers. Those who already own the Mega Man Legacy Collection for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, or PC will also be gaining the rewind feature. The Legacy Collections will be available for the Nintendo Switch sometime during Spring 2018. View full article
  11. In the year 21XX, Mega Man was reborn as Mega Man X, a robotic bounty hunter taking on the robo-criminals of the future. The X series spanned three console generations before its final entry in 2005 with Mega Man X8. Next summer all eight games will be available for the first time on modern systems (there was a Mega Man X Collection on the GameCube and PlayStation 2, but it only included the first six games of the series). While more information has been promised in the next several months, there are definitely still some questions. Capcom has made a habit of releasing some robust collections, breaking up the mainline Mega Man series into two packages. The Mega Man Legacy Collection included the first six games of the franchise, followed by The Mega Man Legacy Collection 2, which held Mega Man 7-10. Does this mean X will get a similar treatment with X 1-4 as one bundle and X 5-8 as another? Or perhaps all in one bundle? It also isn't outside the realm of possibility that Capcom might see fit to release them all individually. However Capcom decides to do it... MORE MEGA MAN X! That's always a good thing. Look forward to seeing X on Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC sometime next summer.
  12. In the year 21XX, Mega Man was reborn as Mega Man X, a robotic bounty hunter taking on the robo-criminals of the future. The X series spanned three console generations before its final entry in 2005 with Mega Man X8. Next summer all eight games will be available for the first time on modern systems (there was a Mega Man X Collection on the GameCube and PlayStation 2, but it only included the first six games of the series). While more information has been promised in the next several months, there are definitely still some questions. Capcom has made a habit of releasing some robust collections, breaking up the mainline Mega Man series into two packages. The Mega Man Legacy Collection included the first six games of the franchise, followed by The Mega Man Legacy Collection 2, which held Mega Man 7-10. Does this mean X will get a similar treatment with X 1-4 as one bundle and X 5-8 as another? Or perhaps all in one bundle? It also isn't outside the realm of possibility that Capcom might see fit to release them all individually. However Capcom decides to do it... MORE MEGA MAN X! That's always a good thing. Look forward to seeing X on Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC sometime next summer. View full article
  13. The Blue Bomber has just turned 30 years old and Capcom has given everyone's favorite robotic defender a gift: The surprise announcement of Mega Man 11! The new Capcom title aims to take the series in a bold new direction. While Mega Man 9 and 10 adopted the retro aesthetic of the original NES classics, Mega Man 11 makes use of 3D models and lighting to give the decades old franchise a new coat of paint. On top of that, the gameplay clips shown on the 30th anniversary livestream put on by Capcom offered glimpses at a handful of Mega Man's new powers. Charged shots, the return of Rush the robo-dog, an ability to summon a series of brick cubes on top of enemies, and an impressive ability that seems to temporarily supercharge Mega Man round out a few of the fun tools players will have at their disposal. Oh, and newcomers to the series who find the traditional difficulty daunting can take refuge in a lower difficulty mode (and those looking for additional challenge might just find more demanding modes). Capcom reassured fans who might be put off by the visual tweaks saying, "with an expert development team at Capcom, many of whom have been working at the company since the early 8-bit era, we’re revitalizing and revolutionizing Mega Man for a new generation while keeping the series’ tight classic gameplay and the heart of our beloved hero intact. Veterans can expect the series’ signature challenge, and we’re inviting new players to the mix with a variety of difficulty options to choose from in the game." Mega Man 11 is coming to Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC in late 2018.
  14. The Blue Bomber has just turned 30 years old and Capcom has given everyone's favorite robotic defender a gift: The surprise announcement of Mega Man 11! The new Capcom title aims to take the series in a bold new direction. While Mega Man 9 and 10 adopted the retro aesthetic of the original NES classics, Mega Man 11 makes use of 3D models and lighting to give the decades old franchise a new coat of paint. On top of that, the gameplay clips shown on the 30th anniversary livestream put on by Capcom offered glimpses at a handful of Mega Man's new powers. Charged shots, the return of Rush the robo-dog, an ability to summon a series of brick cubes on top of enemies, and an impressive ability that seems to temporarily supercharge Mega Man round out a few of the fun tools players will have at their disposal. Oh, and newcomers to the series who find the traditional difficulty daunting can take refuge in a lower difficulty mode (and those looking for additional challenge might just find more demanding modes). Capcom reassured fans who might be put off by the visual tweaks saying, "with an expert development team at Capcom, many of whom have been working at the company since the early 8-bit era, we’re revitalizing and revolutionizing Mega Man for a new generation while keeping the series’ tight classic gameplay and the heart of our beloved hero intact. Veterans can expect the series’ signature challenge, and we’re inviting new players to the mix with a variety of difficulty options to choose from in the game." Mega Man 11 is coming to Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC in late 2018. View full article
  15. Praise the sun! Okami makes the jump to current-gen consoles this December. The Capcom published critically acclaimed action-adventure game originally released for the PlayStation 2 back in 2006. Since then, it has been ported to Wii and PlayStation 3. Now, Clover Studio's classic will be available in HD with the option to switch between a more modern widescreen presentation or the original 4:3 ratio. In Okami, players become Amaterasu, the goddess of the sun who becomes a white wolf and sets off on a quest to defeat Orochi, an eight-headed demon bent on destroying the world of Nippon. Okami HD releases on December 12 for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One.
  16. Praise the sun! Okami makes the jump to current-gen consoles this December. The Capcom published critically acclaimed action-adventure game originally released for the PlayStation 2 back in 2006. Since then, it has been ported to Wii and PlayStation 3. Now, Clover Studio's classic will be available in HD with the option to switch between a more modern widescreen presentation or the original 4:3 ratio. In Okami, players become Amaterasu, the goddess of the sun who becomes a white wolf and sets off on a quest to defeat Orochi, an eight-headed demon bent on destroying the world of Nippon. Okami HD releases on December 12 for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. View full article
  17. For a long time, story modes in fighting games were largely forgettable affairs that felt tacked on for the sake of checking a box off a feature list. Then Netherrealm rebooted Mortal Kombat in 2011 and implemented a cinematic story mode that was so well-received that it would appear in follow-up games, Mortal Kombat X and the Injustice series. Capcom wants to try its hand at doing the same, first with Street Fighter V and next with Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite. But after playing the 25-minute demo for the latter, the decision feels ill-conceived. For me, the main appeal of Netherrealm’s story modes is the ability to learn a character by taking them through a series of successive battles. By the time a new fighter is introduced, you have a decent handle on the previous one. Marvel vs. Capcom throws that out the window by giving you two characters at once, making it more difficult to become intimately familiar with a single combatant. It doesn’t help that MvC’s bouts are faster paced than most fighters, so it’s harder to take your time figuring out button combinations. Exacerbating things further is that the story demo forced me to use a new combination of fighters in nearly every bout. Within 25 minutes, I went through 10 characters – nearly half of the announced roster – in rapid fire fashion. Since I was hoping to get a real taste for newcomers like Captain Marvel and Mega Man X, this drove me nuts. Dialogue was incredibly lame. The script so far feels like it was written by a cheese-obsessed fan fiction writer, and the delivery isn’t much better. Iron Man teasing Arthur about his huge lance “compensating for something” nearly made me abandon the demo station in embarrassment. Some interactions felt out of character, such as Rocket asking Dante to loan him his handguns and Dante replying “For you Rocket, anything” with a cringy affection and no trace of the demon hunter’s signature snark. It didn’t help that everyone appeared to be largely familiar with each other, which took away much of the fun novelty of seeing these disparate universes collide. The story’s tone feels weirdly straight-faced. Marvel vs. Capcom is an inherently goofy premise but Infinite seems like it’s trying to tell a serious tale and make sense of that absurdity. I mean, Thor expresses actual pathos at seeing Asgard defiled by Ultron Sigma. Instead of just being a silly thing that knows how dumb it is, it seems like they’re actively trying to explain something that doesn’t require any logic. Worsening things is that the stilted cutscenes and aforementioned rough dialogue negate a lot of the weight the story is attempting to establish. One of the reasons Marvel vs Capcom works for me is that, outside of its stupidity, the character interactions are appropriately humorous but also relatively brief. They don’t draw out the joke for too long, leaving me wanting a bit more but not much. So far, Infinite feels like it may be stretching out that joke to its breaking point while also painting it in a coat of grim. You know what this story reminds me of so far? Modern day Sonic the Hedgehog plots, particularly Sonic ‘06. Then, we had talking cartoon animals in a convoluted apocalyptic narrative. Now, we've got Chris Redfield hanging out with Rocket Raccoon and they're getting mauled by a killer robot–and its no laughing matter. Some fans have fussed about Infinite’s art direction and I can’t say I’m a fan either. While the game performs well enough, the more realistic and unified design removes some of the flair that the comic style brought. Certain character models appear just…off, with Chun-Li and Gamora being the most egregious examples. Gamora has a strangely blank expression and Chun-Li looks like a slightly melted action figure in some scenes. During E3, Capcom released the Marvel vs. Capcom story demo for free on Xbox One and PlayStation 4, so you can check all of this out for yourself and see what you think. As for myself, the story mode feels like a bad move in an already divisive entry in the beloved crossover fighter. View full article
  18. For a long time, story modes in fighting games were largely forgettable affairs that felt tacked on for the sake of checking a box off a feature list. Then Netherrealm rebooted Mortal Kombat in 2011 and implemented a cinematic story mode that was so well-received that it would appear in follow-up games, Mortal Kombat X and the Injustice series. Capcom wants to try its hand at doing the same, first with Street Fighter V and next with Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite. But after playing the 25-minute demo for the latter, the decision feels ill-conceived. For me, the main appeal of Netherrealm’s story modes is the ability to learn a character by taking them through a series of successive battles. By the time a new fighter is introduced, you have a decent handle on the previous one. Marvel vs. Capcom throws that out the window by giving you two characters at once, making it more difficult to become intimately familiar with a single combatant. It doesn’t help that MvC’s bouts are faster paced than most fighters, so it’s harder to take your time figuring out button combinations. Exacerbating things further is that the story demo forced me to use a new combination of fighters in nearly every bout. Within 25 minutes, I went through 10 characters – nearly half of the announced roster – in rapid fire fashion. Since I was hoping to get a real taste for newcomers like Captain Marvel and Mega Man X, this drove me nuts. Dialogue was incredibly lame. The script so far feels like it was written by a cheese-obsessed fan fiction writer, and the delivery isn’t much better. Iron Man teasing Arthur about his huge lance “compensating for something” nearly made me abandon the demo station in embarrassment. Some interactions felt out of character, such as Rocket asking Dante to loan him his handguns and Dante replying “For you Rocket, anything” with a cringy affection and no trace of the demon hunter’s signature snark. It didn’t help that everyone appeared to be largely familiar with each other, which took away much of the fun novelty of seeing these disparate universes collide. The story’s tone feels weirdly straight-faced. Marvel vs. Capcom is an inherently goofy premise but Infinite seems like it’s trying to tell a serious tale and make sense of that absurdity. I mean, Thor expresses actual pathos at seeing Asgard defiled by Ultron Sigma. Instead of just being a silly thing that knows how dumb it is, it seems like they’re actively trying to explain something that doesn’t require any logic. Worsening things is that the stilted cutscenes and aforementioned rough dialogue negate a lot of the weight the story is attempting to establish. One of the reasons Marvel vs Capcom works for me is that, outside of its stupidity, the character interactions are appropriately humorous but also relatively brief. They don’t draw out the joke for too long, leaving me wanting a bit more but not much. So far, Infinite feels like it may be stretching out that joke to its breaking point while also painting it in a coat of grim. You know what this story reminds me of so far? Modern day Sonic the Hedgehog plots, particularly Sonic ‘06. Then, we had talking cartoon animals in a convoluted apocalyptic narrative. Now, we've got Chris Redfield hanging out with Rocket Raccoon and they're getting mauled by a killer robot–and its no laughing matter. Some fans have fussed about Infinite’s art direction and I can’t say I’m a fan either. While the game performs well enough, the more realistic and unified design removes some of the flair that the comic style brought. Certain character models appear just…off, with Chun-Li and Gamora being the most egregious examples. Gamora has a strangely blank expression and Chun-Li looks like a slightly melted action figure in some scenes. During E3, Capcom released the Marvel vs. Capcom story demo for free on Xbox One and PlayStation 4, so you can check all of this out for yourself and see what you think. As for myself, the story mode feels like a bad move in an already divisive entry in the beloved crossover fighter.
  19. Monster Hunter is back in a big way with Monster Hunter World. This new console entry boasts a lush open world teeming with wildlife and advanced systems that make hunting monsters deeper and more immersive than ever. Capcom states the game will feature a "living, breathing ecosystem in which players strive to become the ultimate hunter." A seamless world allows players to freely travel between zones without dealing with load times. Ever-changing terrain and environment conditions force players to take the world into account when pursuing quarry. Up to four players can join up online to slay monsters cooperatively. When situations become dire, a new drop-in mechanic let solo players summon the assistance of other hunters from around the globe. Monster Hunter World releases in early 2018 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. View full article
  20. Monster Hunter is back in a big way with Monster Hunter World. This new console entry boasts a lush open world teeming with wildlife and advanced systems that make hunting monsters deeper and more immersive than ever. Capcom states the game will feature a "living, breathing ecosystem in which players strive to become the ultimate hunter." A seamless world allows players to freely travel between zones without dealing with load times. Ever-changing terrain and environment conditions force players to take the world into account when pursuing quarry. Up to four players can join up online to slay monsters cooperatively. When situations become dire, a new drop-in mechanic let solo players summon the assistance of other hunters from around the globe. Monster Hunter World releases in early 2018 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.
  21. Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite marks a big shake-up for the popular fighter. In addition to the reduced 2-on-2 combat, streamlined gameplay, and the Infinity Stones power-ups, Infinite looks to try its hand at presenting a cinematic story mode popularized by Mortal Kombat and Injustice. Heroes of the Marvel and Capcom universes are shown striking an uneasy deal with Thanos in exchange for the whereabouts of the Infinity Stones. The boundless power of these gems appears to be the only method of confronting the combined might of Marvel's Ultron and Mega Man X's Sigma. We're treated to a montage of "dream" team-ups, from Chun-Li and Captain America to the pairing fans of both properties have dreamed about for years: Iron Man and Nathan "RAD" Spencer. The dialogue and interactions feel incredibly silly and somewhat awkward, which may be both good and bad. You can decide for yourself by downloading a free demo of the story mode from the PlayStation and Xbox stores right now. Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite releases September 15 for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. View full article
  22. Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite marks a big shake-up for the popular fighter. In addition to the reduced 2-on-2 combat, streamlined gameplay, and the Infinity Stones power-ups, Infinite looks to try its hand at presenting a cinematic story mode popularized by Mortal Kombat and Injustice. Heroes of the Marvel and Capcom universes are shown striking an uneasy deal with Thanos in exchange for the whereabouts of the Infinity Stones. The boundless power of these gems appears to be the only method of confronting the combined might of Marvel's Ultron and Mega Man X's Sigma. We're treated to a montage of "dream" team-ups, from Chun-Li and Captain America to the pairing fans of both properties have dreamed about for years: Iron Man and Nathan "RAD" Spencer. The dialogue and interactions feel incredibly silly and somewhat awkward, which may be both good and bad. You can decide for yourself by downloading a free demo of the story mode from the PlayStation and Xbox stores right now. Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite releases September 15 for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.
  23. The first Mega Man Legacy Collection released back in 2015 and covered the first six titles of the Mega Man series. Those first six games represent the entire NES era of Mega Man. Capcom has announced that a second Legacy Collection will release containing the further adventures of side-scrolling Mega Man that released following Mega Man 6. Mega Man Legacy Collection 2 will contain Mega Man 7-10, covering the period of time when the series broke out of 8-bit graphics and into 16/32-bit action before returning to its 8-bit roots. Since 9 and 10 are modern installments, both will contain all DLC released for them to date. There will be minor tweaks and improvements throughout the four games of the collection. One of the major additions that could help new players appreciate Mega Man without the frustration is the new "Extra Armor" option that halves all damage taken and a checkpoint system to help pick up the action from a convenient distance instead of starting the level over from scratch. If that seems too easy, stages have been remixed for difficulty in the new Challenge Mode where players can compete and compare completion time with others around the world. For those who value gaming history, Capcom has also included an in-game museum that includes production art, sketches, development material, concepts, and a music player to listen to all the catchy bloops and bleeps of the Mega Man soundtracks. Mega Man Legacy Collection 2 releases on August 8th for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Oddly, the title doesn't appear to be coming to the Nintendo Switch at this time. View full article
  24. The first Mega Man Legacy Collection released back in 2015 and covered the first six titles of the Mega Man series. Those first six games represent the entire NES era of Mega Man. Capcom has announced that a second Legacy Collection will release containing the further adventures of side-scrolling Mega Man that released following Mega Man 6. Mega Man Legacy Collection 2 will contain Mega Man 7-10, covering the period of time when the series broke out of 8-bit graphics and into 16/32-bit action before returning to its 8-bit roots. Since 9 and 10 are modern installments, both will contain all DLC released for them to date. There will be minor tweaks and improvements throughout the four games of the collection. One of the major additions that could help new players appreciate Mega Man without the frustration is the new "Extra Armor" option that halves all damage taken and a checkpoint system to help pick up the action from a convenient distance instead of starting the level over from scratch. If that seems too easy, stages have been remixed for difficulty in the new Challenge Mode where players can compete and compare completion time with others around the world. For those who value gaming history, Capcom has also included an in-game museum that includes production art, sketches, development material, concepts, and a music player to listen to all the catchy bloops and bleeps of the Mega Man soundtracks. Mega Man Legacy Collection 2 releases on August 8th for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Oddly, the title doesn't appear to be coming to the Nintendo Switch at this time.
  25. Hideki Kamiya's Devil May Cry released in 2001 for the PlayStation 2 and arguably changed the course of action games for years to come. In a very loose adaptation of Dante's Inferno, Devil May Cry stars a white-haired, pistol and sword-wielding demon slayer named Dante who embarks on a quest to stop a demonic invasion of Earth. The fluid combat mechanics and cheesy story captivated audiences. Have the years been kind to the game that was once intended to be Resident Evil 4? Is Devil May Cry one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Tales of Symphonia: Dawn of the New World 'Go the Distance' by Sixto Sounds (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR01850) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
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