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Found 12 results

  1. Runbow pits up to nine players against one another online in variety of game modes that use color to create and destroy platforms in a variety of interesting ways. the general premise can be summed up in the phrase, "if you can't see it, it doesn't exist." Waves of color splash across the screen and the platforms that match the current screen color vanish until the next color sweeps the stage. It's a simple premise, but the execution makes it special. While up to nine players can play together online at one time, the Switch version of Runbow supports up to eight players in local co-op with the PlayStation 4 supporting four players. Together, players can compete in Run, Arena, or King of the Hill modes in either private games with friends or open your party up to other players from around the world. Runbow also has a single-player Adventure mode with over 140 different levels that take players on a quest to save Poster District from the villain Satura. A separate challenge mode is available that has players swallowed by a gigantic creature and attempting an escape from the beast's colorful innards. Both modes can be tackled solo or with friends. The more players splash around in the colorful world of Runbow, the more fun stuff they can unlock. In addition to concept art and costumes, there are 19 unlockable guest characters, including Shovel Knight, CommanderVideo, Shantae, and Lilac. While Runbow originally released in 2015 on the Wii U and PC (as well as last year in 2017 for Xbox One), the Switch and PlayStation 4 versions have had a bit of a bumpy road to release. The Headup Games and 13AM Games teams have apologized and pushed back the release date that has yet to be specified. The two studios stated that the delay was to spend more time optimizing the game for each respective system. The delay is "just a matter of weeks" according to the developers, so hopefully it doesn't leave too many people flustered.
  2. Runbow pits up to nine players against one another online in variety of game modes that use color to create and destroy platforms in a variety of interesting ways. the general premise can be summed up in the phrase, "if you can't see it, it doesn't exist." Waves of color splash across the screen and the platforms that match the current screen color vanish until the next color sweeps the stage. It's a simple premise, but the execution makes it special. While up to nine players can play together online at one time, the Switch version of Runbow supports up to eight players in local co-op with the PlayStation 4 supporting four players. Together, players can compete in Run, Arena, or King of the Hill modes in either private games with friends or open your party up to other players from around the world. Runbow also has a single-player Adventure mode with over 140 different levels that take players on a quest to save Poster District from the villain Satura. A separate challenge mode is available that has players swallowed by a gigantic creature and attempting an escape from the beast's colorful innards. Both modes can be tackled solo or with friends. The more players splash around in the colorful world of Runbow, the more fun stuff they can unlock. In addition to concept art and costumes, there are 19 unlockable guest characters, including Shovel Knight, CommanderVideo, Shantae, and Lilac. While Runbow originally released in 2015 on the Wii U and PC (as well as last year in 2017 for Xbox One), the Switch and PlayStation 4 versions have had a bit of a bumpy road to release. The Headup Games and 13AM Games teams have apologized and pushed back the release date that has yet to be specified. The two studios stated that the delay was to spend more time optimizing the game for each respective system. The delay is "just a matter of weeks" according to the developers, so hopefully it doesn't leave too many people flustered. View full article
  3. Brawlers are one the main genres I cut my teeth into during my formative gaming years. Favorites such as Streets of Rage, Double Dragon, and the TMNT series let me gleefully take out my aggression by taking down scores of goons, one uppercut at a time. The genre had an amazing heyday in the 80’s and early 90’s before plummeting off a cliff in the following decade. Then Castle Crashers came along in 2009 and suddenly a wave of new brawlers punched their way into the scene, many of them featuring the RPG elements that Behemoth’s successful title popularized. But once that Renaissance came and went, brawlers began to slide out of favor again. I think that’s largely because there hasn’t been much meaningful innovation in the format since then. Enter Redeemer , a top-down beat 'em up created by Russian development team Soboka Studio and published by Gambitious Digital Entertainment. The team's goal is to breath new life into the genre or, in their words, “make a brawler for 2017”. The game puts players in control Vasily, a former top-notch mercenary once employed by an evil corporation who has since walked away from that blood-stained life to find peace within a monk monastery. However, after decades of solitude, the corporation has tracked and located Vasily at his new home, sending the reformed monk on a brutal quest for revenge and redemption. After getting some hands-on time with Redeemer at E3 2017, I almost had to be physically pried away from the controller. The game was a blast, hitting all the right notes for a brawler fan such as myself. Here are the biggest takeaways from my session: Combat Is Deeper Than Mere Button Mashing The brawler genre’s primary appeal, mindlessly punching the snot out of bad guys, has also been its greatest weakness. You can only mash that same hit button so many times before it grows old, especially when every enemy can be toppled in the same manner. Redeemer looks to solve that problem by offering a more refined combat system that emphasizes player skill as well as a variety of methods to put people down. Imagine the Rocksteady Batman combat system applied to a top-down brawler. That pretty much defines Redeemer’s fisticuffs. Chaining together punches and kicks to form bone-crunching combos while performing split-second counters gives combat a similar flow to that of the Caped Crusader’s. Fighting felt great thanks to the smooth animations and transitions, as well as the satisfying sense of weight behind every blow. Different enemy types require different tactics–players can’t mindlessly punch their way through everything. I learned that quickly after certain adversaries blocked my barrage and responded with vicious counter-attacks. One way around them is by using two special attacks that can either drop enemies directly in front of players or a ground-pound that wipes out everyone around you. Since roughly 30 enemies could be on-screen at any time, those room-clearing attacks will be valuable. When opponents are vulnerable, executions moves let players finish off the opponent in savage fashion. Vasily can also perform stealth kills. I entered a room occupied by a couple of soldiers and snapped their necks from behind, preventing them alerting their comrades. Though not a stealth game by any stretch, I appreciate the option to quietly pick off certain foes before going in guns blazing. Speaking of which... Guns Are Helpful (And Deadly) Extensions Of Yourself Vasily’s fists are lethal weapons in their own right. However, that doesn’t stop him from picking up a hot piece and laying down fire. During my demo, I grabbed machine guns and mowed down targets with the tight twin-stick controls, which felt as gratifying as knocking someone’s teeth out. Players can wield arms ranging from handguns to high-tech laser rifles. Even though melee combat is Redeemer's bread and butter, gunplay didn’t feel like an out-of-place or neglected feature. One of the slickest maneuvers in the game is a “John Wick” style move where Vasily can swiftly disarm armed foes and turn their weapons against them. Not only is the action simple to perform, but I felt like the coolest guy ever by rushing a room filled with thugs packing heat, John Wick-ing the nearest goon, then smoothly popping off rounds to the remaining guys without breaking a sweat. Your Surroundings Are Your Best Friend Anyone who’s watched enough Jackie Chan films knows the martial artist is nigh invincible when surrounded by objects he can use to his advantage. Vasily is no different. Deadly environmental kills that evoke Mortal Kombat in their brutality can be performed near highlighted objects. When I wasn't impaling soldiers on tree branches I used them to feed the flames of stone furnaces. Upon entering an area, I gleefully twiddled my fingers Mr. Burns-style plotting how and where I was going to make the most of my surroundings. Additionally, crates and other objects Additionally, crates and other objects and weapons (including sledgehammers and stun batons) can be picked up and hurled, which can be a life-saver when you need to attack from afar but don’t have a firearm. As the developer kept reminding me “crates are always your friend.” The Premise And Tone Is Delightfully Dumb In case you forgot, the game’s premise is a soldier-turned peace-loving monk who embarks on a murder rampage. The campaign's three chapters begin with Vasily taking on human soldiers and escalate to punching mutated monsters in the face. I played a section of the third chapter, which was set in a science fiction-style facility and was gunning down failed, hostile experiments with a laser cannon–while still wearing dusty monk robes. Redeemer has an absurd atmosphere and I love it. The game also sports a fair amount of style thanks to to the comic-illustrated cutscenes and exaggerated character models courtesy of Unreal Engine 4. Redeemer’s single-player campaign consists of three chapters. A two-player horde-style Arena mode will also be present, and Sobaka Studio isn’t ruling out adding co-op play to the campaign after the game launches. I found the game to be a riot and look forward to spending 4-5 hours laying the smack down on fools. Redeemer is slated to hit PC between late summer and early fall of this year for $14.99. Console versions are being considered post-launch. View full article
  4. Brawlers are one the main genres I cut my teeth into during my formative gaming years. Favorites such as Streets of Rage, Double Dragon, and the TMNT series let me gleefully take out my aggression by taking down scores of goons, one uppercut at a time. The genre had an amazing heyday in the 80’s and early 90’s before plummeting off a cliff in the following decade. Then Castle Crashers came along in 2009 and suddenly a wave of new brawlers punched their way into the scene, many of them featuring the RPG elements that Behemoth’s successful title popularized. But once that Renaissance came and went, brawlers began to slide out of favor again. I think that’s largely because there hasn’t been much meaningful innovation in the format since then. Enter Redeemer , a top-down beat 'em up created by Russian development team Soboka Studio and published by Gambitious Digital Entertainment. The team's goal is to breath new life into the genre or, in their words, “make a brawler for 2017”. The game puts players in control Vasily, a former top-notch mercenary once employed by an evil corporation who has since walked away from that blood-stained life to find peace within a monk monastery. However, after decades of solitude, the corporation has tracked and located Vasily at his new home, sending the reformed monk on a brutal quest for revenge and redemption. After getting some hands-on time with Redeemer at E3 2017, I almost had to be physically pried away from the controller. The game was a blast, hitting all the right notes for a brawler fan such as myself. Here are the biggest takeaways from my session: Combat Is Deeper Than Mere Button Mashing The brawler genre’s primary appeal, mindlessly punching the snot out of bad guys, has also been its greatest weakness. You can only mash that same hit button so many times before it grows old, especially when every enemy can be toppled in the same manner. Redeemer looks to solve that problem by offering a more refined combat system that emphasizes player skill as well as a variety of methods to put people down. Imagine the Rocksteady Batman combat system applied to a top-down brawler. That pretty much defines Redeemer’s fisticuffs. Chaining together punches and kicks to form bone-crunching combos while performing split-second counters gives combat a similar flow to that of the Caped Crusader’s. Fighting felt great thanks to the smooth animations and transitions, as well as the satisfying sense of weight behind every blow. Different enemy types require different tactics–players can’t mindlessly punch their way through everything. I learned that quickly after certain adversaries blocked my barrage and responded with vicious counter-attacks. One way around them is by using two special attacks that can either drop enemies directly in front of players or a ground-pound that wipes out everyone around you. Since roughly 30 enemies could be on-screen at any time, those room-clearing attacks will be valuable. When opponents are vulnerable, executions moves let players finish off the opponent in savage fashion. Vasily can also perform stealth kills. I entered a room occupied by a couple of soldiers and snapped their necks from behind, preventing them alerting their comrades. Though not a stealth game by any stretch, I appreciate the option to quietly pick off certain foes before going in guns blazing. Speaking of which... Guns Are Helpful (And Deadly) Extensions Of Yourself Vasily’s fists are lethal weapons in their own right. However, that doesn’t stop him from picking up a hot piece and laying down fire. During my demo, I grabbed machine guns and mowed down targets with the tight twin-stick controls, which felt as gratifying as knocking someone’s teeth out. Players can wield arms ranging from handguns to high-tech laser rifles. Even though melee combat is Redeemer's bread and butter, gunplay didn’t feel like an out-of-place or neglected feature. One of the slickest maneuvers in the game is a “John Wick” style move where Vasily can swiftly disarm armed foes and turn their weapons against them. Not only is the action simple to perform, but I felt like the coolest guy ever by rushing a room filled with thugs packing heat, John Wick-ing the nearest goon, then smoothly popping off rounds to the remaining guys without breaking a sweat. Your Surroundings Are Your Best Friend Anyone who’s watched enough Jackie Chan films knows the martial artist is nigh invincible when surrounded by objects he can use to his advantage. Vasily is no different. Deadly environmental kills that evoke Mortal Kombat in their brutality can be performed near highlighted objects. When I wasn't impaling soldiers on tree branches I used them to feed the flames of stone furnaces. Upon entering an area, I gleefully twiddled my fingers Mr. Burns-style plotting how and where I was going to make the most of my surroundings. Additionally, crates and other objects Additionally, crates and other objects and weapons (including sledgehammers and stun batons) can be picked up and hurled, which can be a life-saver when you need to attack from afar but don’t have a firearm. As the developer kept reminding me “crates are always your friend.” The Premise And Tone Is Delightfully Dumb In case you forgot, the game’s premise is a soldier-turned peace-loving monk who embarks on a murder rampage. The campaign's three chapters begin with Vasily taking on human soldiers and escalate to punching mutated monsters in the face. I played a section of the third chapter, which was set in a science fiction-style facility and was gunning down failed, hostile experiments with a laser cannon–while still wearing dusty monk robes. Redeemer has an absurd atmosphere and I love it. The game also sports a fair amount of style thanks to to the comic-illustrated cutscenes and exaggerated character models courtesy of Unreal Engine 4. Redeemer’s single-player campaign consists of three chapters. A two-player horde-style Arena mode will also be present, and Sobaka Studio isn’t ruling out adding co-op play to the campaign after the game launches. I found the game to be a riot and look forward to spending 4-5 hours laying the smack down on fools. Redeemer is slated to hit PC between late summer and early fall of this year for $14.99. Console versions are being considered post-launch.
  5. A King's Tale: Final Fantasy XV was initially offered as a pre-order exclusive for those who chose to pre-purchase Final Fantasy XV from Gamestop. Since then, players have been unable to obtain and play the retro brawler based on the Final Fantasy XV universe. Square Enix announced that they would be releasing A King's Tale to all players for free on March 1. Like much of the extended universe around Final Fantasy XV, A King's Tale offers an opportunity to deepen the backstory of Square Enix's main title. Players take on the role of Regis, the father of Final Fantasy XV's protagonist Noctis, as he tells his young son a bedtime story about events that took place 30 years before Final Fantasy XV begins. Players must defend the kingdom of Insomnia from attacking monsters alongside long-time allies like Cid, Weskham, and Clarus. Rather than being another RPG, A King's Tale plays more like a brawling Streets of Rage than a typical Final Fantasy game. Players must make good use of combos, blocking, magic, and summons to make progress. It's not a terribly long experience, clocking in at an average of two to three hours, but it's certainly not too shabby for a free game with a charming aesthetic. Players will be able to download A King's Tale: Final Fantasy XV on March 1.
  6. A King's Tale: Final Fantasy XV was initially offered as a pre-order exclusive for those who chose to pre-purchase Final Fantasy XV from Gamestop. Since then, players have been unable to obtain and play the retro brawler based on the Final Fantasy XV universe. Square Enix announced that they would be releasing A King's Tale to all players for free on March 1. Like much of the extended universe around Final Fantasy XV, A King's Tale offers an opportunity to deepen the backstory of Square Enix's main title. Players take on the role of Regis, the father of Final Fantasy XV's protagonist Noctis, as he tells his young son a bedtime story about events that took place 30 years before Final Fantasy XV begins. Players must defend the kingdom of Insomnia from attacking monsters alongside long-time allies like Cid, Weskham, and Clarus. Rather than being another RPG, A King's Tale plays more like a brawling Streets of Rage than a typical Final Fantasy game. Players must make good use of combos, blocking, magic, and summons to make progress. It's not a terribly long experience, clocking in at an average of two to three hours, but it's certainly not too shabby for a free game with a charming aesthetic. Players will be able to download A King's Tale: Final Fantasy XV on March 1. View full article
  7. In partnership with Arc System Works, the owners of the River City franchise, Natsume has announced that the latest in the long running side-scrolling beat-'em-up series will be coming to 3DS systems across North America in the near future. Most players will be familiar with the franchise from the classic beat-'em-up River City Ransom for the NES and its update that released on Game Boy Advance. The series has spun off numerous times in Japan to include additional entries, fighting games, and even volleyball titles. This latest entry comes as part of the 30th anniversary of River City Ransom in Japan. "We know there's a loyal fanbase of the River City series in North America who have been asking for more of these addictive games to play!" said Hiro Maekawa, President & CEO of Natsume. "Whether you're a longtime River City fan or new to the series, there's plenty of side-scrolling action to love." River City: Tokyo Rumble takes place in the middle of a city-wide gang invasion. Players follow the story of Kunio, a high school student with a short fuse as he works various jobs, levels his abilities, and use punches, kicks, soccer balls, iron knuckles, and chains to free the city from the powerful gang that runs it all. There other playable characters for players to experiment with from the long history of the series, too. Tokyo Rumble also has the option to face-off against opponents in Rumble mode or even dodgeball. Though they haven't given a release date, River City: Tokyo Rumble will be making a playable appearance at E3 2016, June 14-16.
  8. In partnership with Arc System Works, the owners of the River City franchise, Natsume has announced that the latest in the long running side-scrolling beat-'em-up series will be coming to 3DS systems across North America in the near future. Most players will be familiar with the franchise from the classic beat-'em-up River City Ransom for the NES and its update that released on Game Boy Advance. The series has spun off numerous times in Japan to include additional entries, fighting games, and even volleyball titles. This latest entry comes as part of the 30th anniversary of River City Ransom in Japan. "We know there's a loyal fanbase of the River City series in North America who have been asking for more of these addictive games to play!" said Hiro Maekawa, President & CEO of Natsume. "Whether you're a longtime River City fan or new to the series, there's plenty of side-scrolling action to love." River City: Tokyo Rumble takes place in the middle of a city-wide gang invasion. Players follow the story of Kunio, a high school student with a short fuse as he works various jobs, levels his abilities, and use punches, kicks, soccer balls, iron knuckles, and chains to free the city from the powerful gang that runs it all. There other playable characters for players to experiment with from the long history of the series, too. Tokyo Rumble also has the option to face-off against opponents in Rumble mode or even dodgeball. Though they haven't given a release date, River City: Tokyo Rumble will be making a playable appearance at E3 2016, June 14-16. View full article
  9. Melbourne-based Big Ant Studios has released its self-proclaimed "psychedelic-comedy action-adventure" game. The title is a third-person brawler that puts players into the role of a blue-skinned jester named Jaxx as he pursues vengeance against an army of evil clowns. The developers bill it a s a return to the lighthearted and comic nature of classic brawlers and platformers of the N64 and PS1 era. The vibrant visuals capture the comic nature of the game. Being a brawler, players should expect some to be chaining together hammer attacks, counters, takedowns, and special attacks for some stylish combos. Masquerade also features some inventive enemies and boss battles. Lest people wonder at the comparison to the platformers of yesteryear, players will be pulling off some high-wire platforming tricks while they traverse the clown-crazy world Big Ant has concocted. Big Ant Studios also notes that the majority of development work on the title took place in Malaysia with their oversight, making this the first next-gen console release to come out of that country. Masquerade: The Baubles of Doom is now available on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.
  10. Melbourne-based Big Ant Studios has released its self-proclaimed "psychedelic-comedy action-adventure" game. The title is a third-person brawler that puts players into the role of a blue-skinned jester named Jaxx as he pursues vengeance against an army of evil clowns. The developers bill it a s a return to the lighthearted and comic nature of classic brawlers and platformers of the N64 and PS1 era. The vibrant visuals capture the comic nature of the game. Being a brawler, players should expect some to be chaining together hammer attacks, counters, takedowns, and special attacks for some stylish combos. Masquerade also features some inventive enemies and boss battles. Lest people wonder at the comparison to the platformers of yesteryear, players will be pulling off some high-wire platforming tricks while they traverse the clown-crazy world Big Ant has concocted. Big Ant Studios also notes that the majority of development work on the title took place in Malaysia with their oversight, making this the first next-gen console release to come out of that country. Masquerade: The Baubles of Doom is now available on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. View full article
  11. WFFF:SAS:GOTH, a comedic role-playing street brawler by Pyrodactyl Games, lets players take up the mantle of a wandering luchador-monk and take part in a sprawling, non-linear narrative that mostly revolves around punching anyone and everyone. Pyrodactyl describes Will Fight for Food's core gameplay experience as, "kill, steal, and tread the tender fields of diplomacy in this RPG brawler with a ridiculously complicated conversation system - or you can just beat up everyone you meet, you psycho." To progress through the world of Will Fight for Food, you can either play the part of an irrational, violent hobo or talk with people and complete side quests and use your fists for justice. Will Fight for Food: Super Actual Sellout: Game of the Hour will release on April 22 for PC, Mac, and Linux.
  12. WFFF:SAS:GOTH, a comedic role-playing street brawler by Pyrodactyl Games, lets players take up the mantle of a wandering luchador-monk and take part in a sprawling, non-linear narrative that mostly revolves around punching anyone and everyone. Pyrodactyl describes Will Fight for Food's core gameplay experience as, "kill, steal, and tread the tender fields of diplomacy in this RPG brawler with a ridiculously complicated conversation system - or you can just beat up everyone you meet, you psycho." To progress through the world of Will Fight for Food, you can either play the part of an irrational, violent hobo or talk with people and complete side quests and use your fists for justice. Will Fight for Food: Super Actual Sellout: Game of the Hour will release on April 22 for PC, Mac, and Linux. View full article
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