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Found 4 results

  1. Batman Episode 2: Children of Arkham’s final action sequence challenges players to make what feels like an impossible choice: Prevent Harvey Dent from facing the wrath of the villainous leader of the Children of Arkham or rescue your adversary-turned-crucial ally Catwoman from being overwhelmed by a gang of thugs. Two significantly different conclusions result from this fork in the road, creating potential for two unique storylines in the third act. Unfortunately, though New World Order features its fair share of captivating moments, seeing these two roads wind back together into the same, basic outcome is disappointing. This narrative setback lies with Harvey Dent, who takes a starring role in the latest chapter. Players with even a casual knowledge of Batman lore likely know of the terrible fate that awaits the Mayoral candidate, and I’d wager few expected him to survive the series with his sanity (and good looks) intact. I’m bummed out that he didn’t. While Harvey’s destined trip to the dark side makes sense in the scenario where players choose to value Catwoman’s well-being over his, seeing him still go down that same road in the opposite outcome feels shoehorned and illogical. Harvey appears perfectly sane in the previous episodes, but even after saving him, he goes completely off the deep end and it feels mostly out of nowhere. Telltale’s explains this away as the stresses of his recent near-death experiences taking their toll, but speaking in third-person with a monstrous voice seems like one heck of a mental leap in just a couple of scenes – especially when, again, he didn’t get hurt! That stinks because prior to going full crazy, Dent’s increased paranoia and his admiration of Batman causes him to believe that brutal justice may be the only method of remedying Gotham’s woes. I wish Telltale had just left him with that fascinating and, more importantly, unexpected state of mind instead. Still, even though I was dissatisfied with how Harvey evolved into his new role over the course of that particular playthrough, I have to praise Telltale for making me feel sorry to witness his downfall – a sympathy which is a crucial element of the character. Dent’s woes add yet another misfortune in the towering pile of them for Bruce Wayne/Batman. “Can things get any worse for him?” becomes a question you’ll regularly ask throughout the episode and you won’t like the answer. After the atrocities committed by his father were exposed to the city, Bruce’s position at Wayne Enterprises is in serious jeopardy. The Children of Akrham, along with their mysterious leader, plot a city-wide disaster. Telltale does a great job of painting the group as a nigh unstoppable threat after revealing the scope of their reach. Penguin continues to tear apart Bruce’s family legacy, easily becoming one of the most despicable villains of any game this year. The way his unbearably smug, confident demeanor masks a remorseless psychopath show shades of Game of Thrones’ Ramsay Bolton (except with an actual backstory to validate his actions), and after the stunt he pulls in New World Order, I genuinely cannot wait for Batman to finally beat the tar out of him. New World Order isn’t the rapid-paced bloodbath that the second installment was, and it’s a slower-paced entry in general, although not to the degree Realm of Shadows was. Only one segment, a meeting with Lucius Fox, felt close to dud. A few important story splits present themselves; some feel inconsequential (for example, choosing to assist Dent or a police officer), others are seeds that won’t see a larger payoff until later episodes. Even so, the decision-making feels increasingly tense thanks to the twists and turns that have occurred thus far. I’m second-guessing several of my actions here thanks to options that feel like necessary risks or lesser evils in no-win situations. Based on Dent’s arc, these differing paths will likely weave back together into the same limited aftermaths, but at least I’m enjoying the act of deciding. New World Order wraps up with the most jarring shocker in the series yet – a conclusion that also makes me nervous going forward. Batman’s story could reach new heights of intrigue or run off the rails depending on how Telltale explains this left-field revelation. Telltale mostly nails the storytelling aspect of Batman, but the studio continues to struggle with making the actual gameplay fun and engaging. The clue-connecting detective mini-game returns with Batman investigating a criminal lair, requiring slightly more critical thinking than in its first appearance (i.e. not very much). Sadly, living in the boots of the World’s Greatest Detective doesn’t get any more robust than that. Outside of the straightforward combat, the only noteworthy activities worth mentioning are staring at a table of equipment and eating Catwoman’s bagels. Those aren’t exactly riveting diversions. Narrative content has always been the entire appeal of Telltale titles, but it’s frustrating to witness the bright gameplay potential for a Batman story go underwhelm so far. Conclusion: New World Order isn’t quite the rollercoaster that Children of Arkham was, but it acts as an exceptional midpoint that does a fine job of advancing Telltale’s gripping Batman narrative. Bruce Wayne’s life hangs by a thread, making the more numerous branching options feel like crucial decisions. The plot sits on a potentially slippery slope between Harvey Dent’s arc and the surprising conclusion, but if Telltale can pull these threads off, players could be in for fantastic developments in the chapters to come. While I gave it a pass in Children of Arkham, gameplay needs to step up in a huge way. Thus far it feels largely forgotten and/or overlooked, failing to live up to the vision Telltale painted for it when the series was announced. Telltale’s Batman Episode 3: New World Order was reviewed on PlayStation 4, and is now available for Xbox One, PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, iOS, and Android
  2. Batman Episode 2: Children of Arkham’s final action sequence challenges players to make what feels like an impossible choice: Prevent Harvey Dent from facing the wrath of the villainous leader of the Children of Arkham or rescue your adversary-turned-crucial ally Catwoman from being overwhelmed by a gang of thugs. Two significantly different conclusions result from this fork in the road, creating potential for two unique storylines in the third act. Unfortunately, though New World Order features its fair share of captivating moments, seeing these two roads wind back together into the same, basic outcome is disappointing. This narrative setback lies with Harvey Dent, who takes a starring role in the latest chapter. Players with even a casual knowledge of Batman lore likely know of the terrible fate that awaits the Mayoral candidate, and I’d wager few expected him to survive the series with his sanity (and good looks) intact. I’m bummed out that he didn’t. While Harvey’s destined trip to the dark side makes sense in the scenario where players choose to value Catwoman’s well-being over his, seeing him still go down that same road in the opposite outcome feels shoehorned and illogical. Harvey appears perfectly sane in the previous episodes, but even after saving him, he goes completely off the deep end and it feels mostly out of nowhere. Telltale’s explains this away as the stresses of his recent near-death experiences taking their toll, but speaking in third-person with a monstrous voice seems like one heck of a mental leap in just a couple of scenes – especially when, again, he didn’t get hurt! That stinks because prior to going full crazy, Dent’s increased paranoia and his admiration of Batman causes him to believe that brutal justice may be the only method of remedying Gotham’s woes. I wish Telltale had just left him with that fascinating and, more importantly, unexpected state of mind instead. Still, even though I was dissatisfied with how Harvey evolved into his new role over the course of that particular playthrough, I have to praise Telltale for making me feel sorry to witness his downfall – a sympathy which is a crucial element of the character. Dent’s woes add yet another misfortune in the towering pile of them for Bruce Wayne/Batman. “Can things get any worse for him?” becomes a question you’ll regularly ask throughout the episode and you won’t like the answer. After the atrocities committed by his father were exposed to the city, Bruce’s position at Wayne Enterprises is in serious jeopardy. The Children of Akrham, along with their mysterious leader, plot a city-wide disaster. Telltale does a great job of painting the group as a nigh unstoppable threat after revealing the scope of their reach. Penguin continues to tear apart Bruce’s family legacy, easily becoming one of the most despicable villains of any game this year. The way his unbearably smug, confident demeanor masks a remorseless psychopath show shades of Game of Thrones’ Ramsay Bolton (except with an actual backstory to validate his actions), and after the stunt he pulls in New World Order, I genuinely cannot wait for Batman to finally beat the tar out of him. New World Order isn’t the rapid-paced bloodbath that the second installment was, and it’s a slower-paced entry in general, although not to the degree Realm of Shadows was. Only one segment, a meeting with Lucius Fox, felt close to dud. A few important story splits present themselves; some feel inconsequential (for example, choosing to assist Dent or a police officer), others are seeds that won’t see a larger payoff until later episodes. Even so, the decision-making feels increasingly tense thanks to the twists and turns that have occurred thus far. I’m second-guessing several of my actions here thanks to options that feel like necessary risks or lesser evils in no-win situations. Based on Dent’s arc, these differing paths will likely weave back together into the same limited aftermaths, but at least I’m enjoying the act of deciding. New World Order wraps up with the most jarring shocker in the series yet – a conclusion that also makes me nervous going forward. Batman’s story could reach new heights of intrigue or run off the rails depending on how Telltale explains this left-field revelation. Telltale mostly nails the storytelling aspect of Batman, but the studio continues to struggle with making the actual gameplay fun and engaging. The clue-connecting detective mini-game returns with Batman investigating a criminal lair, requiring slightly more critical thinking than in its first appearance (i.e. not very much). Sadly, living in the boots of the World’s Greatest Detective doesn’t get any more robust than that. Outside of the straightforward combat, the only noteworthy activities worth mentioning are staring at a table of equipment and eating Catwoman’s bagels. Those aren’t exactly riveting diversions. Narrative content has always been the entire appeal of Telltale titles, but it’s frustrating to witness the bright gameplay potential for a Batman story go underwhelm so far. Conclusion: New World Order isn’t quite the rollercoaster that Children of Arkham was, but it acts as an exceptional midpoint that does a fine job of advancing Telltale’s gripping Batman narrative. Bruce Wayne’s life hangs by a thread, making the more numerous branching options feel like crucial decisions. The plot sits on a potentially slippery slope between Harvey Dent’s arc and the surprising conclusion, but if Telltale can pull these threads off, players could be in for fantastic developments in the chapters to come. While I gave it a pass in Children of Arkham, gameplay needs to step up in a huge way. Thus far it feels largely forgotten and/or overlooked, failing to live up to the vision Telltale painted for it when the series was announced. Telltale’s Batman Episode 3: New World Order was reviewed on PlayStation 4, and is now available for Xbox One, PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, iOS, and Android View full article
  3. There’s a reason not many superhero games place players in the average shoes of the hero’s normal alter ego. How many people are itching to transcribe interviews as Clark Kent or partake in science projects as Peter Parker when they could be performing superhuman feats as Superman and Spider-Man, respectively? Telltale Games tackles this challenge in their episodic Batman game by attempting to make the events of Bruce Wayne’s life as important and exciting as the Dark Knight taking on the crooks of Gotham. While acting out the role of the brooding billionaire doesn’t always get the blood pumping, some promising narrative set-ups and tense decision-making keeps the Bruce Wayne experience from being the drag it easily could have been. Realm of Shadows begins on a high note. A break-in at the mayor’s office leads to a showdown between the Bat and armed mercenaries. Batman’s full display of combat prowess during this sequence translates to Telltale’s signature style with mostly successful results. Quick-time events consist of fast-paced button prompts and analog swipes to capture some of the rush of hand-to-hand combat. It’s a more engaging gameplay experience than in previous Telltale titles, and while I wouldn’t call any of the prompts difficult, they’re a solid test of your reflexes that demand your attention. Batman’s arsenal of high-tech gadgetry is also on display and sport unique mechanics, such as moving a reticle inside the center of a circle to fire the grapple hook. Nailing a QTE provides some level of satisfaction, but players can blow every prompt and scenes still proceed largely as planned with insignificant differences and only handful of hard fail states sprinkled about. It’s like getting a trophy for participation: you still win even if you don’t try. A new finishing maneuver attempts to counter this by offering a small incentive for getting things right. Successful button inputs fill a meter that when activated, unleashes a stylish - and often brutal - conclusion to confrontations, such as Batman violently smashing a thug’s face in. Finishers are a good idea in theory, but the lack of freedom in using them takes much of the fun out as Telltale clearly pushes players to activate the move during specific moments. In one encounter, I purposefully failed every prompt to see if I could complete the scene without triggering my finisher so that I could save it for another fight. The result was a fatal gunshot and a game over screen. There’s little satisfaction in working towards a mandatory reward. Maybe this hand-holding only occurs in this pilot episode. I hope so, otherwise you could easily do away with the meter altogether and present these maneuvers like any standard button prompt. Outside of fisticuffs, players also dabble in detective work. This boils down to inspecting points of interest and literally connecting the dots to see if clues add up, such as linking a bullet hole with a headshot victim. Since these are introductory puzzles, don’t expect your deductive skills to be pushed to their limits, but the design shows potential and fits nicely within Telltale’s framework. I hope to see these puzzles grow in complexity in future episodes, but the offerings presented here are acceptable as an appetizer. The same dot connecting feature mechanic extends to planning an assault against a group of enemies. Unfortunately, with only a handful of options (do you hurl a guy against some stairs or smash his head into a column?) and the lack of ill-advised choices you don’t feel smart or clever here because you're just choosing variants of the same cutscene. That leads to my big issue with the Batman side of things in this episode: choices don’t feature much consequence. Either you die outright and have to start over or a missing a prompt means nothing. There’s great opportunities here to make decisions have some weight via combat. In one scene, I dodged gunfire from a gangster only to take him down soon after. Failing to dodge the gunfire in the scenario results in Batman taking a bullet, but it’s irrelevant because everything proceeds as planned anyway as if Batman wasn’t shot at all. Make it so that getting wounded leads to altered scenes/gameplay where an injured Batman has to cope and produces tougher gameplay - anything to make me care that I messed up a sequence. Decision-making is more substantial in the lengthy Bruce Wayne segments. Batman’s narrative centers Harvey Dent’s mayoral campaign, which Bruce supports morally and financially. The success of Dent’s campaign hinges on which characters Bruce chooses to interact with and he how he behaves doing so. Whether it’s mingling with an influential family to gain their support or addressing the media during a crucial press conference, your actions paint Bruce in either a favorable or less savory light that reflects on Dent’s image. The focus is very much on Bruce in this episode with his various dilemmas serving as the foundation for a majority of the narrative. It sounds boring on paper but, thankfully, most of the choices you confront feel important and aren’t so much about right and wrong but rather different methods of approaching situations. Are you confrontational towards a mob boss’ thinly veiled threats or do you play along and project the appearance of submissiveness? Is it more effective to release crucial evidence publicly through Vicki Vale and the media or to trust Jim Gordon and the police to perform their duties? Unlike Batman’s combat, which needs clearer punishments, the shades of grey for Bruce Wayne is appropriate. I like how decisions feel more like choosing a preferred method instead of just simply doing the objectively right thing, and the consequences have enough weight (or at least hint that they will) to make them matter. Realm of Shadows does a commendable job of planting intriguing narrative seeds set to bloom in future episodes. Chief among them: A dark secret that could irreparably damage the reputation of the Wayne family. The most surprising twist occurs when Batman’s world bleeds over into Bruce’s normal life during a moment I won’t spoil here. Toss in the mysterious re-emergence of Bruce’s childhood friend, and upcoming installments are already brimming with storytelling potential. Conclusion: Realm of Shadows is a solid introduction that thus far delivers on its promise of making the decisions of Bruce Wayne feel as important and engaging as Batman’s. The narrative shows promise as do gameplay elements such as crime scene investigations, but the lack of player freedom and consequence in combat leaves that aspect feeling somewhat flat. All in all, this is very much another Telltale adventure game and that extends to their increasingly dated graphics engine. There’s plenty of narrative intrigue and affection shown for the property to make Realm of Shadows a surefire recommendation for Batman fans. Anyone else, especially those burned out on the Telltale experience, need to ask themselves if the license alone is enough to carry them into another episodic adventure series. Batman: The Telltale Series Episode 1 was reviewed on PlayStation 4 and is now available for Xbox One and PC. It’s also coming soon to PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, iOS and Android
  4. There’s a reason not many superhero games place players in the average shoes of the hero’s normal alter ego. How many people are itching to transcribe interviews as Clark Kent or partake in science projects as Peter Parker when they could be performing superhuman feats as Superman and Spider-Man, respectively? Telltale Games tackles this challenge in their episodic Batman game by attempting to make the events of Bruce Wayne’s life as important and exciting as the Dark Knight taking on the crooks of Gotham. While acting out the role of the brooding billionaire doesn’t always get the blood pumping, some promising narrative set-ups and tense decision-making keeps the Bruce Wayne experience from being the drag it easily could have been. Realm of Shadows begins on a high note. A break-in at the mayor’s office leads to a showdown between the Bat and armed mercenaries. Batman’s full display of combat prowess during this sequence translates to Telltale’s signature style with mostly successful results. Quick-time events consist of fast-paced button prompts and analog swipes to capture some of the rush of hand-to-hand combat. It’s a more engaging gameplay experience than in previous Telltale titles, and while I wouldn’t call any of the prompts difficult, they’re a solid test of your reflexes that demand your attention. Batman’s arsenal of high-tech gadgetry is also on display and sport unique mechanics, such as moving a reticle inside the center of a circle to fire the grapple hook. Nailing a QTE provides some level of satisfaction, but players can blow every prompt and scenes still proceed largely as planned with insignificant differences and only handful of hard fail states sprinkled about. It’s like getting a trophy for participation: you still win even if you don’t try. A new finishing maneuver attempts to counter this by offering a small incentive for getting things right. Successful button inputs fill a meter that when activated, unleashes a stylish - and often brutal - conclusion to confrontations, such as Batman violently smashing a thug’s face in. Finishers are a good idea in theory, but the lack of freedom in using them takes much of the fun out as Telltale clearly pushes players to activate the move during specific moments. In one encounter, I purposefully failed every prompt to see if I could complete the scene without triggering my finisher so that I could save it for another fight. The result was a fatal gunshot and a game over screen. There’s little satisfaction in working towards a mandatory reward. Maybe this hand-holding only occurs in this pilot episode. I hope so, otherwise you could easily do away with the meter altogether and present these maneuvers like any standard button prompt. Outside of fisticuffs, players also dabble in detective work. This boils down to inspecting points of interest and literally connecting the dots to see if clues add up, such as linking a bullet hole with a headshot victim. Since these are introductory puzzles, don’t expect your deductive skills to be pushed to their limits, but the design shows potential and fits nicely within Telltale’s framework. I hope to see these puzzles grow in complexity in future episodes, but the offerings presented here are acceptable as an appetizer. The same dot connecting feature mechanic extends to planning an assault against a group of enemies. Unfortunately, with only a handful of options (do you hurl a guy against some stairs or smash his head into a column?) and the lack of ill-advised choices you don’t feel smart or clever here because you're just choosing variants of the same cutscene. That leads to my big issue with the Batman side of things in this episode: choices don’t feature much consequence. Either you die outright and have to start over or a missing a prompt means nothing. There’s great opportunities here to make decisions have some weight via combat. In one scene, I dodged gunfire from a gangster only to take him down soon after. Failing to dodge the gunfire in the scenario results in Batman taking a bullet, but it’s irrelevant because everything proceeds as planned anyway as if Batman wasn’t shot at all. Make it so that getting wounded leads to altered scenes/gameplay where an injured Batman has to cope and produces tougher gameplay - anything to make me care that I messed up a sequence. Decision-making is more substantial in the lengthy Bruce Wayne segments. Batman’s narrative centers Harvey Dent’s mayoral campaign, which Bruce supports morally and financially. The success of Dent’s campaign hinges on which characters Bruce chooses to interact with and he how he behaves doing so. Whether it’s mingling with an influential family to gain their support or addressing the media during a crucial press conference, your actions paint Bruce in either a favorable or less savory light that reflects on Dent’s image. The focus is very much on Bruce in this episode with his various dilemmas serving as the foundation for a majority of the narrative. It sounds boring on paper but, thankfully, most of the choices you confront feel important and aren’t so much about right and wrong but rather different methods of approaching situations. Are you confrontational towards a mob boss’ thinly veiled threats or do you play along and project the appearance of submissiveness? Is it more effective to release crucial evidence publicly through Vicki Vale and the media or to trust Jim Gordon and the police to perform their duties? Unlike Batman’s combat, which needs clearer punishments, the shades of grey for Bruce Wayne is appropriate. I like how decisions feel more like choosing a preferred method instead of just simply doing the objectively right thing, and the consequences have enough weight (or at least hint that they will) to make them matter. Realm of Shadows does a commendable job of planting intriguing narrative seeds set to bloom in future episodes. Chief among them: A dark secret that could irreparably damage the reputation of the Wayne family. The most surprising twist occurs when Batman’s world bleeds over into Bruce’s normal life during a moment I won’t spoil here. Toss in the mysterious re-emergence of Bruce’s childhood friend, and upcoming installments are already brimming with storytelling potential. Conclusion: Realm of Shadows is a solid introduction that thus far delivers on its promise of making the decisions of Bruce Wayne feel as important and engaging as Batman’s. The narrative shows promise as do gameplay elements such as crime scene investigations, but the lack of player freedom and consequence in combat leaves that aspect feeling somewhat flat. All in all, this is very much another Telltale adventure game and that extends to their increasingly dated graphics engine. There’s plenty of narrative intrigue and affection shown for the property to make Realm of Shadows a surefire recommendation for Batman fans. Anyone else, especially those burned out on the Telltale experience, need to ask themselves if the license alone is enough to carry them into another episodic adventure series. Batman: The Telltale Series Episode 1 was reviewed on PlayStation 4 and is now available for Xbox One and PC. It’s also coming soon to PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, iOS and Android View full article
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