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Found 9 results

  1. After over a decade of developing story-driven mods using a variety of different engines and subject matter, Dark Craft Studios has released their final mod. Titled The Shadow of the Ramlord, this standalone adventure game takes players on a macabre journey through an occult mansion to unravel a dark conspiracy along the way. Dark Craft Studios describes it as Lovecraftian adventure that's light on deliberate scares, but heavy on story, atmosphere, and environmental storytelling. Caecea Manor takes center stage in The Shadow of the Ramlord. Consumed by the desire to summon the deeply evil Ramlord, an entity of inexplicable evil, the Baron who calls Caecea home has conducted ever more grotesque experiments. His wife, imprisoned deep within the manor, managed to smuggle out a desperate cry for help. Roped into undertaking a rescue, the player embarks to delve into the secrets of Caecea Manor and in the process discovers "an intricate, disquieting narrative through the occult, madness, and despair." The Shadow of the Ramlord was developed using the tools that came with Amnesia: The Dark Descent and it's sequel Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs. Veterans of both games will notice a number of assets repurposed from the original games used to fill out a grisly new world. The game is designed to be more contemplative than a straight horror title. If typical horror games are too scary or the anxiety of jump scares puts you off, The Shadow of the Ramlord might just be more your speed. The adventure takes about an hour to complete in full and is free. Below you can see a teaser for the mod released last year. You can download The Shadow of the Ramlord for free from ModDB. The adventure will be the last one released by Dark Craft Studios. Glenn Winklemann Jr. founded the studio in 2009 to pursue opportunities to expand and hone his writing skills. The studio created three mods, each standalone titles in their own right: The Worry at Newport, Triptych, and now The Shadow of the Ramlord. The first two were developed using CryEngine 2 that shipped with the original Crysis. Winklemann Jr. put out a statement along with the release of the The Shadow of the Ramlord that reads: This will be the end of a long road for me. With the release of this project, I am officially retiring from video game/mod design. Dark Craft Studios will have its symbolic doors closed, and I will transition to simply writing. It has been the throughline for all of my projects from the very first in 2009 to the final, today, in 2019. I'm hoping to hone my craft and take serious interest in professionally developing that hobby into something tangible for me. Unfortunately that means leaving the world of video games behind as a creative mind. With that said, I hope you all enjoy The Shadow of the Ramlord as the swansong for Dark Craft Studios. It has been nearly a decade spent with all of you in some way, and it will take me time to reflect and absorb that chapter turn. A decade of efforts is a long time to devote to anything, especially to undertaking complex endeavors life coordinating and writing the creation of entire games in exchange for nothing. At the very least, Dark Craft Studio's previous three projects are worth a look and a play if you have the opportunity. They're all free and incredibly impressive, each with an interesting and complex story with an eldritch tinge. Best of luck to the Winklemann Jr. and everyone who contributed to the studio's final swansong to interactive storytelling. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  2. After over a decade of developing story-driven mods using a variety of different engines and subject matter, Dark Craft Studios has released their final mod. Titled The Shadow of the Ramlord, this standalone adventure game takes players on a macabre journey through an occult mansion to unravel a dark conspiracy along the way. Dark Craft Studios describes it as Lovecraftian adventure that's light on deliberate scares, but heavy on story, atmosphere, and environmental storytelling. Caecea Manor takes center stage in The Shadow of the Ramlord. Consumed by the desire to summon the deeply evil Ramlord, an entity of inexplicable evil, the Baron who calls Caecea home has conducted ever more grotesque experiments. His wife, imprisoned deep within the manor, managed to smuggle out a desperate cry for help. Roped into undertaking a rescue, the player embarks to delve into the secrets of Caecea Manor and in the process discovers "an intricate, disquieting narrative through the occult, madness, and despair." The Shadow of the Ramlord was developed using the tools that came with Amnesia: The Dark Descent and it's sequel Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs. Veterans of both games will notice a number of assets repurposed from the original games used to fill out a grisly new world. The game is designed to be more contemplative than a straight horror title. If typical horror games are too scary or the anxiety of jump scares puts you off, The Shadow of the Ramlord might just be more your speed. The adventure takes about an hour to complete in full and is free. Below you can see a teaser for the mod released last year. You can download The Shadow of the Ramlord for free from ModDB. The adventure will be the last one released by Dark Craft Studios. Glenn Winklemann Jr. founded the studio in 2009 to pursue opportunities to expand and hone his writing skills. The studio created three mods, each standalone titles in their own right: The Worry at Newport, Triptych, and now The Shadow of the Ramlord. The first two were developed using CryEngine 2 that shipped with the original Crysis. Winklemann Jr. put out a statement along with the release of the The Shadow of the Ramlord that reads: This will be the end of a long road for me. With the release of this project, I am officially retiring from video game/mod design. Dark Craft Studios will have its symbolic doors closed, and I will transition to simply writing. It has been the throughline for all of my projects from the very first in 2009 to the final, today, in 2019. I'm hoping to hone my craft and take serious interest in professionally developing that hobby into something tangible for me. Unfortunately that means leaving the world of video games behind as a creative mind. With that said, I hope you all enjoy The Shadow of the Ramlord as the swansong for Dark Craft Studios. It has been nearly a decade spent with all of you in some way, and it will take me time to reflect and absorb that chapter turn. A decade of efforts is a long time to devote to anything, especially to undertaking complex endeavors life coordinating and writing the creation of entire games in exchange for nothing. At the very least, Dark Craft Studio's previous three projects are worth a look and a play if you have the opportunity. They're all free and incredibly impressive, each with an interesting and complex story with an eldritch tinge. Best of luck to the Winklemann Jr. and everyone who contributed to the studio's final swansong to interactive storytelling. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  3. Hey guys! My husband and I will be hosting a Halloween Horror Stream on Halloween day to get you hyped for your Halloween night festivities! We will be in costume, myself as the Cheshire Cat, and we will be playing Amnesia: The Dark Descent. We will start at 1pm and play until we can't take it anymore. The game is approximately 9 hours long, so we are aiming to beat it! Hope to see you there! www.twitch.tv/mokinns *Is anyone else doing something special for Halloween? I know Zyaldar has done his horror stream, so if you are doing one as well you should share it below!*
  4. In honor of this year’s day celebrating everything spooky and specter-like I decided to share the best horror Let’s Plays that I’ve come across over the years. Don’t see your favorite a horror series represented? Feel free to share it in the comments! Keep in mind that Let’s Plays, especially those that deal with games in the horror genre, tend to include some explicit language! Ah, Let’s Plays. Some people love them, some people just don’t get the appeal. I tend to treat them like entertaining podcasts that I listen to while writing or working out. For that reason, my favorite horror Let’s Plays aren’t really playthroughs that instill a sense of fear, but the ones that contain entertaining commentary that isn’t centered entirely on obnoxious overreactions to jump scares. I also appreciate Let’s Plays that show me games that I would not normally play. Without further ado, the five best playthroughs of horror games on the internet. 5. The Spoony Experiment – Phantasmagoria 2: A Puzzle of Flesh Phantasmagoria 2 is a fantastically weird and definitely adult-oriented point-and-click adventure title. The story follows seemingly uninteresting office drone Curtis Craig who quickly becomes swept up in events that rattle his sanity and leave many of the people in his life horrifically murdered. The game was made during the heyday of FMV games, so there is no shortage of cheesy footage to find entertaining. Visually, it is an interesting look into a strange and largely abandoned period of video game history. The commentary really constitutes the meat of any Let’s Play and The Spoony Experiment captures the feeling of watching episodes of Mystery Science Theater 3000. The commentator, Noah Antwiler, delivers jokes in a matter of fact manner, responding to the unexpected and just bizarre puzzles and solutions that occur in his playthrough. Though Phantasmagoria 2 might have once been an unnerving experience with cutting edge technology, the effect of the FMV footage has been severely dulled with time. While it would undoubtedly be a frustrating game to play, watching Antwiler struggles while empathizing with his baffled reactions proves to be a great deal of fun. 4. Kikoskia – The Last Door: Chapter One The Game Kitchen, a newish indie studio based in Spain, successfully Kickstarted a pixel art horror adventure game, called The Last Door. Released over the course of five chapters, The Last Door succeeds in being surprisingly creepy. The first chapter centers on a man named Jeremiah Devitt the recipient of a cryptic letter from an old school friend who appears to have gotten into deadly trouble. Kikoskia’s colorful commentary comes across as someone who is sincerely interested and enthusiastic about what he is playing. It is all very natural and smooth. A major reason that I enjoyed the playthrough of Chapter One was because it appeared genuinely good. I had only heard of The Last Door and never really intended to get around to actually playing it. However, the eeriness of the narrative and rapidly darkening atmosphere won me over, becoming one of the few Let’s Plays that has convinced me to play a game. It helps that all episodes of The Last Door are free. While most Let’s Plays can span hours, Kikoskia’s clocks in at around 35 minutes, making it a relatively quick look at a bit of well executed horror. 3. Giant Bomb – Fear Gauntlet The setup is simple: Two Giant Bomb interns who claim to be total horror game pansies force themselves through a gauntlet of progressively scarier games in an effort to build up an immunity to the effects of the horror genre. Matt Kessler and Steve Ramirez have an engaging chemistry that makes their exploits highly enjoyable to watch. They begin with Luigi's Mansion and work their way up to Condemned 2: Bloodshot. Unfortunately the series appears to have gone on an indefinite hiatus following Giant Bomb's acquisition by CBS. However, the evidence of the two intrepid interns attempting to conquer their fears endures on YouTube. 2. Game Informer – OverBlood Super Replay OverBlood is hands down the worst horror game of all time. Not only does it fail to scare at every possible opportunity, but the game itself, while mediocre for its time as an early PS1 title, has only become worse with age. It is the Troll 2 of video games. It is a crash course in how not to design an interactive experience. OverBlood's epic journey through sci-fi horror follows a frozen man named Raz Karcy and his trusty robot sidekick Pipo as they attempt to escape the confines of a mysteriously abandoned laboratory. The Game Informer editors attempt to puzzle their way through the entire game and, boy, is it just a wild slog through poor game design and laughably executed scares. It is impossible to watch any part of OverBlood and not either be laughing at it or staring in disbelief. 1. Day[9] – Amnesia AKA How Day[9] Lost His Manhood There is only one thing better than watching two self-proclaimed cowards try to muscle through scary games and that is watching a self-proclaimed horror game champion get reduced to a puddle of hysterical laughter and terror. Sean Plott, also known as Day[9], is one of my favorite people in the world. He's a great StarCraft II commentator and entirely comes across as entirely genuine. That sincerity really adds to the comedic value of watching as he throws himself into the experience of Amnesia: The Dark Descent with a reckless, cocky abandon. Observing that cockiness slowly degrade over the course of an hour is sweet, but seeing him soldier on beyond that is just amazingly fun. This is my absolute favorite example of a horror game causing someone to go bananas. While it might be a bit underwhelming at first, it is a delightfully slow ramp up into insanity. Honorable Mention: Game Grumps – Sonic ‘06 While not exactly a horror game, the 2006 Sonic the Hedgehog game is so broken it’s scary. It comes complete with glitches that defy logic. The game design on display is so bland and uninspired. The jarring Final Fantasy-esque cutscenes involve characters that look completely out of place next to the traditional cast. The reactions and subsequent mental breakdowns this game provokes from the two hosts of Game Grumps are nothing short of a journey to the edge of madness. Nothing can prepare you. Nothing can save you. Happy Halloween!
  5. In honor of this year’s day celebrating everything spooky and specter-like I decided to share the best horror Let’s Plays that I’ve come across over the years. Don’t see your favorite a horror series represented? Feel free to share it in the comments! Keep in mind that Let’s Plays, especially those that deal with games in the horror genre, tend to include some explicit language! Ah, Let’s Plays. Some people love them, some people just don’t get the appeal. I tend to treat them like entertaining podcasts that I listen to while writing or working out. For that reason, my favorite horror Let’s Plays aren’t really playthroughs that instill a sense of fear, but the ones that contain entertaining commentary that isn’t centered entirely on obnoxious overreactions to jump scares. I also appreciate Let’s Plays that show me games that I would not normally play. Without further ado, the five best playthroughs of horror games on the internet. 5. The Spoony Experiment – Phantasmagoria 2: A Puzzle of Flesh Phantasmagoria 2 is a fantastically weird and definitely adult-oriented point-and-click adventure title. The story follows seemingly uninteresting office drone Curtis Craig who quickly becomes swept up in events that rattle his sanity and leave many of the people in his life horrifically murdered. The game was made during the heyday of FMV games, so there is no shortage of cheesy footage to find entertaining. Visually, it is an interesting look into a strange and largely abandoned period of video game history. The commentary really constitutes the meat of any Let’s Play and The Spoony Experiment captures the feeling of watching episodes of Mystery Science Theater 3000. The commentator, Noah Antwiler, delivers jokes in a matter of fact manner, responding to the unexpected and just bizarre puzzles and solutions that occur in his playthrough. Though Phantasmagoria 2 might have once been an unnerving experience with cutting edge technology, the effect of the FMV footage has been severely dulled with time. While it would undoubtedly be a frustrating game to play, watching Antwiler struggles while empathizing with his baffled reactions proves to be a great deal of fun. 4. Kikoskia – The Last Door: Chapter One The Game Kitchen, a newish indie studio based in Spain, successfully Kickstarted a pixel art horror adventure game, called The Last Door. Released over the course of five chapters, The Last Door succeeds in being surprisingly creepy. The first chapter centers on a man named Jeremiah Devitt the recipient of a cryptic letter from an old school friend who appears to have gotten into deadly trouble. Kikoskia’s colorful commentary comes across as someone who is sincerely interested and enthusiastic about what he is playing. It is all very natural and smooth. A major reason that I enjoyed the playthrough of Chapter One was because it appeared genuinely good. I had only heard of The Last Door and never really intended to get around to actually playing it. However, the eeriness of the narrative and rapidly darkening atmosphere won me over, becoming one of the few Let’s Plays that has convinced me to play a game. It helps that all episodes of The Last Door are free. While most Let’s Plays can span hours, Kikoskia’s clocks in at around 35 minutes, making it a relatively quick look at a bit of well executed horror. 3. Giant Bomb – Fear Gauntlet The setup is simple: Two Giant Bomb interns who claim to be total horror game pansies force themselves through a gauntlet of progressively scarier games in an effort to build up an immunity to the effects of the horror genre. Matt Kessler and Steve Ramirez have an engaging chemistry that makes their exploits highly enjoyable to watch. They begin with Luigi's Mansion and work their way up to Condemned 2: Bloodshot. Unfortunately the series appears to have gone on an indefinite hiatus following Giant Bomb's acquisition by CBS. However, the evidence of the two intrepid interns attempting to conquer their fears endures on YouTube. 2. Game Informer – OverBlood Super Replay OverBlood is hands down the worst horror game of all time. Not only does it fail to scare at every possible opportunity, but the game itself, while mediocre for its time as an early PS1 title, has only become worse with age. It is the Troll 2 of video games. It is a crash course in how not to design an interactive experience. OverBlood's epic journey through sci-fi horror follows a frozen man named Raz Karcy and his trusty robot sidekick Pipo as they attempt to escape the confines of a mysteriously abandoned laboratory. The Game Informer editors attempt to puzzle their way through the entire game and, boy, is it just a wild slog through poor game design and laughably executed scares. It is impossible to watch any part of OverBlood and not either be laughing at it or staring in disbelief. 1. Day[9] – Amnesia AKA How Day[9] Lost His Manhood There is only one thing better than watching two self-proclaimed cowards try to muscle through scary games and that is watching a self-proclaimed horror game champion get reduced to a puddle of hysterical laughter and terror. Sean Plott, also known as Day[9], is one of my favorite people in the world. He's a great StarCraft II commentator and entirely comes across as entirely genuine. That sincerity really adds to the comedic value of watching as he throws himself into the experience of Amnesia: The Dark Descent with a reckless, cocky abandon. Observing that cockiness slowly degrade over the course of an hour is sweet, but seeing him soldier on beyond that is just amazingly fun. This is my absolute favorite example of a horror game causing someone to go bananas. While it might be a bit underwhelming at first, it is a delightfully slow ramp up into insanity. Honorable Mention: Game Grumps – Sonic ‘06 While not exactly a horror game, the 2006 Sonic the Hedgehog game is so broken it’s scary. It comes complete with glitches that defy logic. The game design on display is so bland and uninspired. The jarring Final Fantasy-esque cutscenes involve characters that look completely out of place next to the traditional cast. The reactions and subsequent mental breakdowns this game provokes from the two hosts of Game Grumps are nothing short of a journey to the edge of madness. Nothing can prepare you. Nothing can save you. Happy Halloween! View full article
  6. Sweden-based developer Frictional Games has a history of creating the scariest games known to man. Their next project involves aliens, brains, pooping your pants in terror, and will be coming to PC and PS4. While Frictional has been teasing SOMA with live-action trailers for the last month or so, today they revealed the gameplay trailer for the project and it is suitably creepy. Refreshingly, it appears that the development team decided to leave grim Victorian era Europe in favor of a creepy sci-fi aesthetic. In the trailer we see robots, what appears to be alien technology, and lobotomies. The gameplay looks very similar to Amnesia: The Dark Descent, though the player's character seems to have more to say than the protagonist of Amnesia. The trailer ends with the phrase "I Think, therefore I am," a quote from the French philosopher Descartes. Thomas Grip, the lead creative director of SOMA posted some of his thoughts on the project while announcing that the title will be coming to PlayStation 4: The subject that SOMA will discuss is consciousness. Personally, I find it the most profound questions that it is possible to ask. “How can the feeling of subjective experience arise from a chunk of flesh?” Exploring this further takes us to questions such as “Can machines be conscious?” and “Do we have free will?” It quickly gets very disturbing, and is ideal for a futuristic horror setting. It is the kind of sci-fi that we want to make. From the start, we knew that this could not just come through background story or dialog. We want you to play through this. It must be an integral part of the gameplay, not just fluff. [...] Our goal is for SOMA to not just be another carnival ride of cheap scares. It is meant to chill you to your core, and confront you with questions about your very existence. SOMA will be releasing sometime in 2015. View full article
  7. Sweden-based developer Frictional Games has a history of creating the scariest games known to man. Their next project involves aliens, brains, pooping your pants in terror, and will be coming to PC and PS4. While Frictional has been teasing SOMA with live-action trailers for the last month or so, today they revealed the gameplay trailer for the project and it is suitably creepy. Refreshingly, it appears that the development team decided to leave grim Victorian era Europe in favor of a creepy sci-fi aesthetic. In the trailer we see robots, what appears to be alien technology, and lobotomies. The gameplay looks very similar to Amnesia: The Dark Descent, though the player's character seems to have more to say than the protagonist of Amnesia. The trailer ends with the phrase "I Think, therefore I am," a quote from the French philosopher Descartes. Thomas Grip, the lead creative director of SOMA posted some of his thoughts on the project while announcing that the title will be coming to PlayStation 4: The subject that SOMA will discuss is consciousness. Personally, I find it the most profound questions that it is possible to ask. “How can the feeling of subjective experience arise from a chunk of flesh?” Exploring this further takes us to questions such as “Can machines be conscious?” and “Do we have free will?” It quickly gets very disturbing, and is ideal for a futuristic horror setting. It is the kind of sci-fi that we want to make. From the start, we knew that this could not just come through background story or dialog. We want you to play through this. It must be an integral part of the gameplay, not just fluff. [...] Our goal is for SOMA to not just be another carnival ride of cheap scares. It is meant to chill you to your core, and confront you with questions about your very existence. SOMA will be releasing sometime in 2015.
  8. One of the indie titles on display at the Sony E3 booth was a game called Outlast. I stopped by to play Red Barrels’ heart-pounding descent into horror on the PS4. While waiting to play the game I took the opportunity to chat with a couple of the Outlast developers. With their goal being to “make the game as scary as possible,” I was told that Outlast relies heavily on paranoia, drawing upon the hair-raising Amnesia: The Dark Descent for inspiration. I was also told that they designed the game with somewhat unpredictable AI. Even while playtesting the game multiple times, enemies would do the unexpected and create organic scares. This means that few of the moments in Outlast are predetermined, scripted events. Scenarios employ an “ease in, ease out” where a scripted sequence will introduce a new enemy and their motivation, then concluding with another scripted sequence. In between these two segments, the AI will take over and direct the enemy’s actions for the majority of the gameplay segment. In Outlast, players take on the mantle of independent journalist Miles Upshur as he breaks into a remote asylum for the criminally insane in Colorado. Miles is on the trail of a compelling news story after receiving an anonymous tip that something was happening at the asylum. This is the situation in which I assumed control of Miles and began playing. Being a journalist, Miles’ constant companion throughout the game will be his trusty camera, through which he views almost all of the horrific events taking place within the asylum. The camera is his only tool, allowing him and the player to see in the darkness. The downside of this is that the camera runs on batteries. If you run out of batteries, your ability to see in the dark is drastically reduced and you are left very vulnerable. One of the hooks of Outlast is that there is no combat. You cannot fight the enemies, you can only run, hide, and pray that they don’t find you. After checking the front door of the asylum and finding it locked, Miles decides it would be a great idea to break in through an old set of scaffolding which leads up to a window. Upon entering, he sees blood all over the floor. For some suicidal reason he is undeterred and pushes on, despite seeing bodies and obvious signs that something has gone horribly wrong. By the time Miles figures out that the asylum is one of the worst places on earth it is too late and he is trapped in the depths of the asylum with some of the worst and most twisted criminal minds on the loose. Not all of the enemies will want to kill Miles immediately. This trades on the paranoia that Red Barrels wants to provide. Some of the inmates will have different reactions toward Miles ranging from benevolence to apathy to murderous hatred. The question most survival horror fans must be pondering: Is Outlast scary? Horror, like humor, is a subjective thing. However, in my time with Outlast I physically jumped, was unnerved, and made involuntary noises. The atmosphere is taut and nails the feeling of being in an abandoned building full of lunatics. As for the lunatics in question they were incredibly effective as nightmare material. In my estimation: Yes. Outlast is very scary and you can look forward to being terrified and entertained. Outlast will debut on PC at the end of summer, while the PS4 version will release in early 2014. Currently there are no plans to bring the title to Xbox One.
  9. One of the indie titles on display at the Sony E3 booth was a game called Outlast. I stopped by to play Red Barrels’ heart-pounding descent into horror on the PS4. While waiting to play the game I took the opportunity to chat with a couple of the Outlast developers. With their goal being to “make the game as scary as possible,” I was told that Outlast relies heavily on paranoia, drawing upon the hair-raising Amnesia: The Dark Descent for inspiration. I was also told that they designed the game with somewhat unpredictable AI. Even while playtesting the game multiple times, enemies would do the unexpected and create organic scares. This means that few of the moments in Outlast are predetermined, scripted events. Scenarios employ an “ease in, ease out” where a scripted sequence will introduce a new enemy and their motivation, then concluding with another scripted sequence. In between these two segments, the AI will take over and direct the enemy’s actions for the majority of the gameplay segment. In Outlast, players take on the mantle of independent journalist Miles Upshur as he breaks into a remote asylum for the criminally insane in Colorado. Miles is on the trail of a compelling news story after receiving an anonymous tip that something was happening at the asylum. This is the situation in which I assumed control of Miles and began playing. Being a journalist, Miles’ constant companion throughout the game will be his trusty camera, through which he views almost all of the horrific events taking place within the asylum. The camera is his only tool, allowing him and the player to see in the darkness. The downside of this is that the camera runs on batteries. If you run out of batteries, your ability to see in the dark is drastically reduced and you are left very vulnerable. One of the hooks of Outlast is that there is no combat. You cannot fight the enemies, you can only run, hide, and pray that they don’t find you. After checking the front door of the asylum and finding it locked, Miles decides it would be a great idea to break in through an old set of scaffolding which leads up to a window. Upon entering, he sees blood all over the floor. For some suicidal reason he is undeterred and pushes on, despite seeing bodies and obvious signs that something has gone horribly wrong. By the time Miles figures out that the asylum is one of the worst places on earth it is too late and he is trapped in the depths of the asylum with some of the worst and most twisted criminal minds on the loose. Not all of the enemies will want to kill Miles immediately. This trades on the paranoia that Red Barrels wants to provide. Some of the inmates will have different reactions toward Miles ranging from benevolence to apathy to murderous hatred. The question most survival horror fans must be pondering: Is Outlast scary? Horror, like humor, is a subjective thing. However, in my time with Outlast I physically jumped, was unnerved, and made involuntary noises. The atmosphere is taut and nails the feeling of being in an abandoned building full of lunatics. As for the lunatics in question they were incredibly effective as nightmare material. In my estimation: Yes. Outlast is very scary and you can look forward to being terrified and entertained. Outlast will debut on PC at the end of summer, while the PS4 version will release in early 2014. Currently there are no plans to bring the title to Xbox One. View full article
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