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Found 16 results

  1. If you're interested in turn-based 4X strategy titles, Praxis Games wants you to know about Interstellar Space: Genesis entering into alpha. The devs have touted the title as "virtually feature complete" and noted that they worked with Neon Dolphin and Grant Kirkhope, composer of such classics as GoldenEye 007, Banjo Kazooie, and Civilization: After Earth, on their space-faring soundtrack. Interstellar Space: Genesis follows much the same premise of other space 4X strategy games (the four Xs stand for Explore, Exploit, Expand, and Exterminate) - players take on the role of a leader on a galactic scale and spread out into an unknown galaxy. There are tons of unknown dangers, both from alien empires and random events left by past or present civilizations across the sea of stars. Players will have to decide to pursue either peace or war when dealing with rivals. Will you rule the galaxy through bloodshed or with a gentle, guiding hand? The title features turn-based tactical combat augmented by the ability to go in and customize ships to fine-tune them to suit different needs. Players will be treated to a Grant Kirkhope musical score; something that's always a treat. Interestingly, each civilization will be given a random tech tree to spice up the different playthroughs, just one part of the many ways Interstellar Space seeks to differentiate itself. Players will be able to create custom alien races with their own unique needs and leaders. Colony management takes up a large part of the game, as does terraforming and diplomacy. Corner the market in asteroid mining or space tourism and use those funds to push even further into the unknowns of space. Praxis Games was founded by the duo who run Space Sector, a website dedicated to sci-fi strategy games, Adam Solo and Hugo Rosado. Mr. Rosado even worked for the European Space Agency as well as the private space sector. He commented on reaching the alpha stage of Interstellar Space: Genesis saying, "Space has been my passion since childhood. I was lucky to have a professional career in the space industry – at both the European Space Agency and private aerospace space company Elecnor Deimos. Now, I’m still in the space industry – but the venue is quite different: We are developing our first 4X title, and our launch is just within reach. Hopefully, everyone who gets to play this Alpha build will love it as much as we’ve been enjoying the development process itself!” People who pre-order will gain immediate access to the latest build and help shape its future with their feedback. However, pre-orders will only be available through the Humble Store through December 16. Praxis hopes to release Interstellar Space: Genesis for PC during the second quarter of 2019. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  2. If you're interested in turn-based 4X strategy titles, Praxis Games wants you to know about Interstellar Space: Genesis entering into alpha. The devs have touted the title as "virtually feature complete" and noted that they worked with Neon Dolphin and Grant Kirkhope, composer of such classics as GoldenEye 007, Banjo Kazooie, and Civilization: After Earth, on their space-faring soundtrack. Interstellar Space: Genesis follows much the same premise of other space 4X strategy games (the four Xs stand for Explore, Exploit, Expand, and Exterminate) - players take on the role of a leader on a galactic scale and spread out into an unknown galaxy. There are tons of unknown dangers, both from alien empires and random events left by past or present civilizations across the sea of stars. Players will have to decide to pursue either peace or war when dealing with rivals. Will you rule the galaxy through bloodshed or with a gentle, guiding hand? The title features turn-based tactical combat augmented by the ability to go in and customize ships to fine-tune them to suit different needs. Players will be treated to a Grant Kirkhope musical score; something that's always a treat. Interestingly, each civilization will be given a random tech tree to spice up the different playthroughs, just one part of the many ways Interstellar Space seeks to differentiate itself. Players will be able to create custom alien races with their own unique needs and leaders. Colony management takes up a large part of the game, as does terraforming and diplomacy. Corner the market in asteroid mining or space tourism and use those funds to push even further into the unknowns of space. Praxis Games was founded by the duo who run Space Sector, a website dedicated to sci-fi strategy games, Adam Solo and Hugo Rosado. Mr. Rosado even worked for the European Space Agency as well as the private space sector. He commented on reaching the alpha stage of Interstellar Space: Genesis saying, "Space has been my passion since childhood. I was lucky to have a professional career in the space industry – at both the European Space Agency and private aerospace space company Elecnor Deimos. Now, I’m still in the space industry – but the venue is quite different: We are developing our first 4X title, and our launch is just within reach. Hopefully, everyone who gets to play this Alpha build will love it as much as we’ve been enjoying the development process itself!” People who pre-order will gain immediate access to the latest build and help shape its future with their feedback. However, pre-orders will only be available through the Humble Store through December 16. Praxis hopes to release Interstellar Space: Genesis for PC during the second quarter of 2019. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  3. Human Head Studios came onto many gamer's radars in 2006 with the release of Prey. With a strong emphasis on Cherokee culture and outside-the-box shooting mechanics, the game was different than anything that had come before; in many ways its success hasn't been duplicated since. The sequel, Prey 2, was cancelled after a very troubled period of development, leaving the team to go back to the drawing board. The company decided to go both forward with a completely new project, see the fascinating debut of The Quiet Man, and backward to revisit a project that had long been in the works at Human Head. While Prey put the studio on the map, its history goes back farther than 2006. Rune, an action adventure title that takes place across the realms of Norse mythology, released at the turn of the millennium, and now the Wisconsin-based studio wants to return to their world of gods, magic, and mythological mayhem. I was able to sit down with the developers and an alpha build of the new Rune for about an hour, peppering them with questions. The experience kicked off with a character creation process where players can tweak an avatar to their hearts' content. Gender, skin color, scars, tattoos, all of the major customization options players have come to expect are included, along with all of the corresponding sliders that govern muscle mass and facial structure. Each newly minted Norse warrior must dedicate themselves to a deity of their choice: Odin, Thor, Freya, or Loki. Though Rune might lack Ragnarok in its name, the end times of its in-game world are at hand. The prophecy regarding the end of the world states that it must end with the death of gods. Loki, fearing his demise, has spirited himself away, prolonging the chaos of the apocalypse. In order to stop the end of all things, players must fight across the world of Midgard, gaining power and glory for their god while uncovering Loki's machinations. Of course, it's the apocalypse and the dead are rising to do battle, opportunists raid villages, and giants roam the lands searching for humans to crush. While Rune can be played solo, the game has been designed to support up to 64 players running around a world at the same time. This will, ideally, lead to players cooperating or turning against one another while trying to bring glory to their gods. The world itself offers differently leveled sections that are suited to higher or lower level play, which should result in players of similar levels being pitted against one another. The build I played only had myself and one other person in it, so it's hard to specify exactly how social and gameplay interactions will shake out in the wild. Combat in Rune revolves around directional inputs. Holding forward while attacking creates a different move than holding to the side or backward and each melee weapon offers its own moveset. Players can also perform plunging attacks from above, use consumables like magic runes, or running attacks. Each weapon can be thrown at enemies, too. This can prove to be ineffective or very effective depending on the type of weapon thrown. These Norse warriors can even dismember an enemy with a strong attack and use that limb as a weapon. So, yes, you can beat an enemy to death with their own arm. This can also happen to the player, so take care not to lose your main combat arm (though this usually results in death, players can actually heal and survive such a wound)! As players complete quests given to them by the gods, they will earn funeral coins that can be used to unlock skills for the levels they have accumulated so far. Those skills include the expected combat abilities and magic enhancements one might expect, but they also offer crafting recipes that enable players to build things like campfires, weapons, and ships. Sailing becomes a big part of exploring the world once players advance through the initial areas of the game. Though boats crafting begins with dinky rafts, players will eventually be able to build longships that can hold up to 8 players or even warships that house 16 players. These structures will be able to house ballisti to combat sea monsters and rival vessels. Surviving the environmental dangers of the world can prove to be as harrowing as the enemies that roam the land. Natural hazards like blizzards or meteor showers courtesy of Loki make surviving the world a harrowing and random experience. Savvy players will be able to take advantage of these survival challenges to defeat potent enemies. Players are encouraged to explore the world to find powerful artifacts and weapons. I managed to steal a longship and sailed to another island on the horizon. The island appeared to be an ancient fortress. As I explored the ruins, one of the developers assured me that normally a powerful giant would have been in that location to defend the mysterious sword thrust into the center of the structure. Of course, I stole the sword and made my way back to the ship to continue my adventures on the mainland. The sword I had found sliced through enemies that had previously proved to be formidable threats, downing even giants in one or two hits. There are many of these artifacts and tools hidden around the world, some in locations that don't even appear on the world map. Of course, Rune is still in alpha, so the occasional graphical glitches and draw distance goofs are forgivable. Some of the gameplay mechanics still feel a bit rough, with skill trees in need of expansion and some wonky physics, but at the end of the day Rune is about having awesome moments like climbing onto the thatched roof of a small fishing village hut and leaping onto two enemies with a spear, impaling both of them. Or, alternatively, fleeing from a giant while armed only with the arm of an undead warrior you used in a failed attempt to kill it. Rune entered its closed beta testing phase earlier this week. Players can enter to win access to the closed beta by signing up for Human Head's newsletter. The game will exit closed beta later this year and enter Early Access on Steam at which point players can go through the game solo or join dedicated PvP or PvE servers. Currently the team is focused on PC, but there's always the possibility of a console release. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  4. Human Head Studios came onto many gamer's radars in 2006 with the release of Prey. With a strong emphasis on Cherokee culture and outside-the-box shooting mechanics, the game was different than anything that had come before; in many ways its success hasn't been duplicated since. The sequel, Prey 2, was cancelled after a very troubled period of development, leaving the team to go back to the drawing board. The company decided to go both forward with a completely new project, see the fascinating debut of The Quiet Man, and backward to revisit a project that had long been in the works at Human Head. While Prey put the studio on the map, its history goes back farther than 2006. Rune, an action adventure title that takes place across the realms of Norse mythology, released at the turn of the millennium, and now the Wisconsin-based studio wants to return to their world of gods, magic, and mythological mayhem. I was able to sit down with the developers and an alpha build of the new Rune for about an hour, peppering them with questions. The experience kicked off with a character creation process where players can tweak an avatar to their hearts' content. Gender, skin color, scars, tattoos, all of the major customization options players have come to expect are included, along with all of the corresponding sliders that govern muscle mass and facial structure. Each newly minted Norse warrior must dedicate themselves to a deity of their choice: Odin, Thor, Freya, or Loki. Though Rune might lack Ragnarok in its name, the end times of its in-game world are at hand. The prophecy regarding the end of the world states that it must end with the death of gods. Loki, fearing his demise, has spirited himself away, prolonging the chaos of the apocalypse. In order to stop the end of all things, players must fight across the world of Midgard, gaining power and glory for their god while uncovering Loki's machinations. Of course, it's the apocalypse and the dead are rising to do battle, opportunists raid villages, and giants roam the lands searching for humans to crush. While Rune can be played solo, the game has been designed to support up to 64 players running around a world at the same time. This will, ideally, lead to players cooperating or turning against one another while trying to bring glory to their gods. The world itself offers differently leveled sections that are suited to higher or lower level play, which should result in players of similar levels being pitted against one another. The build I played only had myself and one other person in it, so it's hard to specify exactly how social and gameplay interactions will shake out in the wild. Combat in Rune revolves around directional inputs. Holding forward while attacking creates a different move than holding to the side or backward and each melee weapon offers its own moveset. Players can also perform plunging attacks from above, use consumables like magic runes, or running attacks. Each weapon can be thrown at enemies, too. This can prove to be ineffective or very effective depending on the type of weapon thrown. These Norse warriors can even dismember an enemy with a strong attack and use that limb as a weapon. So, yes, you can beat an enemy to death with their own arm. This can also happen to the player, so take care not to lose your main combat arm (though this usually results in death, players can actually heal and survive such a wound)! As players complete quests given to them by the gods, they will earn funeral coins that can be used to unlock skills for the levels they have accumulated so far. Those skills include the expected combat abilities and magic enhancements one might expect, but they also offer crafting recipes that enable players to build things like campfires, weapons, and ships. Sailing becomes a big part of exploring the world once players advance through the initial areas of the game. Though boats crafting begins with dinky rafts, players will eventually be able to build longships that can hold up to 8 players or even warships that house 16 players. These structures will be able to house ballisti to combat sea monsters and rival vessels. Surviving the environmental dangers of the world can prove to be as harrowing as the enemies that roam the land. Natural hazards like blizzards or meteor showers courtesy of Loki make surviving the world a harrowing and random experience. Savvy players will be able to take advantage of these survival challenges to defeat potent enemies. Players are encouraged to explore the world to find powerful artifacts and weapons. I managed to steal a longship and sailed to another island on the horizon. The island appeared to be an ancient fortress. As I explored the ruins, one of the developers assured me that normally a powerful giant would have been in that location to defend the mysterious sword thrust into the center of the structure. Of course, I stole the sword and made my way back to the ship to continue my adventures on the mainland. The sword I had found sliced through enemies that had previously proved to be formidable threats, downing even giants in one or two hits. There are many of these artifacts and tools hidden around the world, some in locations that don't even appear on the world map. Of course, Rune is still in alpha, so the occasional graphical glitches and draw distance goofs are forgivable. Some of the gameplay mechanics still feel a bit rough, with skill trees in need of expansion and some wonky physics, but at the end of the day Rune is about having awesome moments like climbing onto the thatched roof of a small fishing village hut and leaping onto two enemies with a spear, impaling both of them. Or, alternatively, fleeing from a giant while armed only with the arm of an undead warrior you used in a failed attempt to kill it. Rune entered its closed beta testing phase earlier this week. Players can enter to win access to the closed beta by signing up for Human Head's newsletter. The game will exit closed beta later this year and enter Early Access on Steam at which point players can go through the game solo or join dedicated PvP or PvE servers. Currently the team is focused on PC, but there's always the possibility of a console release. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  5. Roberts Space Industries has been working on Star Citizen since the success of their Kickstarter campaign back in 2012. After five years, the framework of their ambitious space MMO seems to be falling into place. For the better part of the past year, Star Citizen has been sitting in alpha version 2.6, which allowed for limited travel around a space station testing ground that laid out some of the core principles that would be present in the final game. 3.0 drastically expands the scope to include a collection of moons and a planetoid with various outposts, wrecks, and space ports along with more mechanics and opportunities out in the 'verse. The 3.0 update introduces trade as a functional mechanic that was impossible in 2.6. Players can now purchase goods that are physically stored in their ship and transport them to different locations in to try to corner the market. Of course, that also opens up the opportunity for less scrupulous players to become the fledgling universe's first space pirates. Outside of habitable settlements, where weapons are disabled, anything goes. The final vision of Star Citizen will offer players the chance to become bounty hunters to track and capture or kill lawbreakers, which will hopefully balance out piracy. Of course, if players are making money then they need something to spend it on. Players can buy new parts for their ships, fancy handheld guns, snazzy new jumpsuits, or new casual clothes. All of that relies on 3.0's new shopping system that allows all of those goods to be purchased for the first time. The addition of navigable moons represents the first public steps of Star Citizen toward its end goal of a universe full of planets to explore. The moons are each distinct, offering different environments, locations, and opportunities. For the first time, players will be able to set foot on the surface of an alien world and perhaps find ruins worth scavenging or missions to complete. These locations consist of Cellin, the moon of dormant volcanoes, Daymar, a desert-like moon, and Yela, an icy rock floating in the black. A new landing zone has been added on the planetoid of Delamar called Levski, a ramshackle, converted mining colony teased in previous Star Citizen promotional videos. That doesn't mean 3.0's launch has been smooth. The patch caused many players to struggle with the game's memory requirements, rendering it unplayable for some who had found 2.6 to be manageable. The game is certainly still in an alpha state so, while it shows a lot of promise and has become one of the largest crowdfunding operations in history, take all of its potential with some grains of salt and temper your expectations. 3.0 is not even close to what the final version of Star Citizen will be - you can just see some of the foundations being laid. A lot of optimization still needs to be done. 3.0 stands as the first of Roberts Space Industries' scheduled quarterly releases. From now on, the game will be updated at the end of every quarter of the year with new features, ships, and locations. The latest version comes with a new launcher that allows future updates to be downloaded without downloading the entire game over again, streamlining the updating process for Star Citizen's space-faring fans. A lot of other minor improvements are included with 3.0 and you can read about them in the full change log on Star Citizen's website. There's no solid release date for when to expect Star Citizen to exit development, so the final product is likely still years away from completion. That being said, it's pretty amazing to see a project so ambitious to keep making progress. Who knows what surprises Roberts Space Industries has in store once the basic mechanics and universal building blocks are finally settled into place?
  6. Roberts Space Industries has been working on Star Citizen since the success of their Kickstarter campaign back in 2012. After five years, the framework of their ambitious space MMO seems to be falling into place. For the better part of the past year, Star Citizen has been sitting in alpha version 2.6, which allowed for limited travel around a space station testing ground that laid out some of the core principles that would be present in the final game. 3.0 drastically expands the scope to include a collection of moons and a planetoid with various outposts, wrecks, and space ports along with more mechanics and opportunities out in the 'verse. The 3.0 update introduces trade as a functional mechanic that was impossible in 2.6. Players can now purchase goods that are physically stored in their ship and transport them to different locations in to try to corner the market. Of course, that also opens up the opportunity for less scrupulous players to become the fledgling universe's first space pirates. Outside of habitable settlements, where weapons are disabled, anything goes. The final vision of Star Citizen will offer players the chance to become bounty hunters to track and capture or kill lawbreakers, which will hopefully balance out piracy. Of course, if players are making money then they need something to spend it on. Players can buy new parts for their ships, fancy handheld guns, snazzy new jumpsuits, or new casual clothes. All of that relies on 3.0's new shopping system that allows all of those goods to be purchased for the first time. The addition of navigable moons represents the first public steps of Star Citizen toward its end goal of a universe full of planets to explore. The moons are each distinct, offering different environments, locations, and opportunities. For the first time, players will be able to set foot on the surface of an alien world and perhaps find ruins worth scavenging or missions to complete. These locations consist of Cellin, the moon of dormant volcanoes, Daymar, a desert-like moon, and Yela, an icy rock floating in the black. A new landing zone has been added on the planetoid of Delamar called Levski, a ramshackle, converted mining colony teased in previous Star Citizen promotional videos. That doesn't mean 3.0's launch has been smooth. The patch caused many players to struggle with the game's memory requirements, rendering it unplayable for some who had found 2.6 to be manageable. The game is certainly still in an alpha state so, while it shows a lot of promise and has become one of the largest crowdfunding operations in history, take all of its potential with some grains of salt and temper your expectations. 3.0 is not even close to what the final version of Star Citizen will be - you can just see some of the foundations being laid. A lot of optimization still needs to be done. 3.0 stands as the first of Roberts Space Industries' scheduled quarterly releases. From now on, the game will be updated at the end of every quarter of the year with new features, ships, and locations. The latest version comes with a new launcher that allows future updates to be downloaded without downloading the entire game over again, streamlining the updating process for Star Citizen's space-faring fans. A lot of other minor improvements are included with 3.0 and you can read about them in the full change log on Star Citizen's website. There's no solid release date for when to expect Star Citizen to exit development, so the final product is likely still years away from completion. That being said, it's pretty amazing to see a project so ambitious to keep making progress. Who knows what surprises Roberts Space Industries has in store once the basic mechanics and universal building blocks are finally settled into place? View full article
  7. Indie developer DEKDEV's Path to the Sky is an interesting project, to say the least. It's a roguelike platformer with procedural world generation, a day-night cycle, weather, and its own physics engine. The premise is simple, too: Get to the top. The teaser is no longer available for viewing. DEKEDEV describes the story of his game thusly: In Path to the Sky, you'll play the role of a hired crewman aboard a spice trading vessel sailing the Indian Ocean during the 17th century. While on route, the ship is sacked and plundered by buccaneers. The vessel is sunk and its crew is lost to the sea. Alone, you find yourself stranded on the beach of an unknown island. This is where the adventure begins. Players will have to fight their way up to the top of the island, gaining items and powers along the way while facing ever more aggresive and deadly birds of prey. The set up is simple, the mechanics look solid, and I'm definitely itching to play it. People interested in pre-ordering Path to the Sky for PC or Mac can do so on the developer's website. Pre-orders will grant acces to the game as soon as it enters beta.
  8. Indie developer DEKDEV's Path to the Sky is an interesting project, to say the least. It's a roguelike platformer with procedural world generation, a day-night cycle, weather, and its own physics engine. The premise is simple, too: Get to the top. The teaser is no longer available for viewing. DEKEDEV describes the story of his game thusly: In Path to the Sky, you'll play the role of a hired crewman aboard a spice trading vessel sailing the Indian Ocean during the 17th century. While on route, the ship is sacked and plundered by buccaneers. The vessel is sunk and its crew is lost to the sea. Alone, you find yourself stranded on the beach of an unknown island. This is where the adventure begins. Players will have to fight their way up to the top of the island, gaining items and powers along the way while facing ever more aggresive and deadly birds of prey. The set up is simple, the mechanics look solid, and I'm definitely itching to play it. People interested in pre-ordering Path to the Sky for PC or Mac can do so on the developer's website. Pre-orders will grant acces to the game as soon as it enters beta. View full article
  9. Up until this point, Star Citizen has basically been known as that one crowdsourced game that raised over $40 million for its development. Cloud Imperium Games took the opportunity at PAX East to show off where all that money went, and it is pretty impressive. Star Citizen is being released in separate pieces called modules. The live demo showed off many interesting aspects of the gameplay in the first module which introduces refined space sim combat. Interesting features like the implementation of G-forces that pile up and can cause the player character to black out if too many maneuvers are taken too quickly. Various ship components can be damaged and impair ship performance. There are still a bit of time to secure access to the alpha release of Star Citizen. To purchase early access, head over to the store on the Star Citizen website. View full article
  10. Up until this point, Star Citizen has basically been known as that one crowdsourced game that raised over $40 million for its development. Cloud Imperium Games took the opportunity at PAX East to show off where all that money went, and it is pretty impressive. Star Citizen is being released in separate pieces called modules. The live demo showed off many interesting aspects of the gameplay in the first module which introduces refined space sim combat. Interesting features like the implementation of G-forces that pile up and can cause the player character to black out if too many maneuvers are taken too quickly. Various ship components can be damaged and impair ship performance. There are still a bit of time to secure access to the alpha release of Star Citizen. To purchase early access, head over to the store on the Star Citizen website.
  11. The alpha version of Galactic Civilizations III is hitting Steam on March 27. What kinds of galaxy-altering actions should you expect to be able to do in the most recent build of the game? Galactic Civilizations III is a turn-based strategy game, kinda like Sid Meier's Civilization, but in space with aliens and lasers. The video shows off the way ships will move across the galaxy to explore, colonize, and wage war. While the military aspects of the game seem to be fully implemented or nearly finished, the alpha will be missing several key features like diplomacy, ship designer, and colony development. These features should be added soon as the game moves into beta and inches closer to final release. Strategy fans, keep your eyes on this one. Fun fact: the guy narrating this video, Adam Biesenner, is awesome. View full article
  12. The alpha version of Galactic Civilizations III is hitting Steam on March 27. What kinds of galaxy-altering actions should you expect to be able to do in the most recent build of the game? Galactic Civilizations III is a turn-based strategy game, kinda like Sid Meier's Civilization, but in space with aliens and lasers. The video shows off the way ships will move across the galaxy to explore, colonize, and wage war. While the military aspects of the game seem to be fully implemented or nearly finished, the alpha will be missing several key features like diplomacy, ship designer, and colony development. These features should be added soon as the game moves into beta and inches closer to final release. Strategy fans, keep your eyes on this one. Fun fact: the guy narrating this video, Adam Biesenner, is awesome.
  13. Hey there, space cowboys! A new trailer has decloaked for the space exploration and ship building game, Wayward Terran Frontier. Wayward Terran Frontier launched its Kickstarter campaign on the 16th and has raised about $7,000 of the $50,000 they're looking for. The finished game looks to support online multiplayer, co-op ship design, fleets, random deep space encounters, trading missions, and a dynamic storytelling system, just to name a few of the ambitious goals Frontier has made for itself. You can check out the Kickstarter page, or download a free Alpha build of the game if any of this piques your interest. View full article
  14. Hey there, space cowboys! A new trailer has decloaked for the space exploration and ship building game, Wayward Terran Frontier. Wayward Terran Frontier launched its Kickstarter campaign on the 16th and has raised about $7,000 of the $50,000 they're looking for. The finished game looks to support online multiplayer, co-op ship design, fleets, random deep space encounters, trading missions, and a dynamic storytelling system, just to name a few of the ambitious goals Frontier has made for itself. You can check out the Kickstarter page, or download a free Alpha build of the game if any of this piques your interest.
  15. Developer Klei has a knack for creating games with distinct visual flair, like Mark of the Ninja and Don't Starve (which is free this month for PS+ members). The title they are currently working on, Invisible, Inc. (formerly known as Incognita), follows in those games' footsteps, with a striking, shadowed art style that captures the feeling of covert actions. The new trailer released today shows off Klei's first attempt at turn-based gameplay and it looks pretty solid, which is a good sign in an Alpha build. Players control a team of special agents as they infiltrate facilities and carry out mission as sneakily as possible. If this looks interesting to you, you can purchase early access to Invisible, Inc. on the Klei website. (Note: while the early access will be through Steam, you cannot purchase access to the Alpha through Steam. It must be bought on the Klei website.) View full article
  16. Developer Klei has a knack for creating games with distinct visual flair, like Mark of the Ninja and Don't Starve (which is free this month for PS+ members). The title they are currently working on, Invisible, Inc. (formerly known as Incognita), follows in those games' footsteps, with a striking, shadowed art style that captures the feeling of covert actions. The new trailer released today shows off Klei's first attempt at turn-based gameplay and it looks pretty solid, which is a good sign in an Alpha build. Players control a team of special agents as they infiltrate facilities and carry out mission as sneakily as possible. If this looks interesting to you, you can purchase early access to Invisible, Inc. on the Klei website. (Note: while the early access will be through Steam, you cannot purchase access to the Alpha through Steam. It must be bought on the Klei website.)
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