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Found 4 results

  1. Greg Johnson, the original designer of ToeJam and Earl, and his new Humanature Studios launched a Kickstarter for ToeJam and Earl: Back in the Groove in early 2015 that managed to surpass its funding goal with $508,637. For much of 2016, the developers had been silently working on the game with sporadic updates, but yesterday the studio broke their silence. Humanature Studios has announced that Adult Swim Games would be publishing the title for PC and consoles. The new game follows ToeJam and Earl after they steal the Rapmaster Rocketship to joyride around space with their ladyfriends, Latisha and Lawanda. Unfortunately, while joyriding they press the Big, Red Button (never press the big, red button!) which opens a black hole, hurling their ship across the cosmos and scattering their ship across a strange planet. Back in the Groove tries to capture the nostalgia of the original console titles while presenting the series in a new, updated light for those who never had the opportunity to play the older games. Players can choose from one of nine playable characters: ToeJam, Earl, Latisha, Lewanda, GeekJam, Peabo, and Earl’s mom, Flo. Back in the Groove also features couch co-op and online co-op so players can tackle the randomly generated worlds, funk zones, and secret locations. The soundtrack consists of 13 remixed songs from the original games and 13 wholly original songs making it a tasty treat for those who dug the original tracks. ToeJam and Earl: Back in the Groove releases for PC and consoles sometime in 2017. View full article
  2. Greg Johnson, the original designer of ToeJam and Earl, and his new Humanature Studios launched a Kickstarter for ToeJam and Earl: Back in the Groove in early 2015 that managed to surpass its funding goal with $508,637. For much of 2016, the developers had been silently working on the game with sporadic updates, but yesterday the studio broke their silence. Humanature Studios has announced that Adult Swim Games would be publishing the title for PC and consoles. The new game follows ToeJam and Earl after they steal the Rapmaster Rocketship to joyride around space with their ladyfriends, Latisha and Lawanda. Unfortunately, while joyriding they press the Big, Red Button (never press the big, red button!) which opens a black hole, hurling their ship across the cosmos and scattering their ship across a strange planet. Back in the Groove tries to capture the nostalgia of the original console titles while presenting the series in a new, updated light for those who never had the opportunity to play the older games. Players can choose from one of nine playable characters: ToeJam, Earl, Latisha, Lewanda, GeekJam, Peabo, and Earl’s mom, Flo. Back in the Groove also features couch co-op and online co-op so players can tackle the randomly generated worlds, funk zones, and secret locations. The soundtrack consists of 13 remixed songs from the original games and 13 wholly original songs making it a tasty treat for those who dug the original tracks. ToeJam and Earl: Back in the Groove releases for PC and consoles sometime in 2017.
  3. Headlander’s concept of becoming a disembodied head that controls interchangeable, disposable bodies took some getting used to. Many games have trained me to value self-preservation, but Headlander is the literal example of the philosophy to fight like you’re in someone else’s body. Recklessly throwing yourself into a hail of lasers is A-okay; there’s always another empty vessel to hijack nearby. It's a strange premise, but after playing the demo it's a concept with promise. At its core, Headlander is a Metroidvania. Players explore labyrinthine levels by either rocketing through the air as the mute severed head, or by docking your head onto a robotic body. Gaining new abilities to access previously barred areas is key, and reaching such places often requires the literal use of your head. Sometimes you’ll have to send your floating noggin into narrow air ducts to find additional rooms and secrets, or plug yourself into a computer terminal to open sealed doors. The action is satisfying thanks to its emphasis on landing tricky headshots. Lasers can be fired straight ahead, but Headlander heavily encourages players to carefully aim their shots (using a handy laser sight) to ricochet beams to hit enemies from difficult vantage points. Successfully executing a headshot by having a laser bounce off of two or three carefully plotted points felt slick and gratifying. Various upgrades help mix up the arsenal with new abilities. The power-up presented in the demo was a suction ability used to suck up and carry objects and, best of all, rip the heads off enemies. There are also other strategies that come into play. At one point I neutralized an enemy’s attack by placing myself directly in its line of fire, then ejected to another suit on the opposite side, thus turning my previous body into an improvised barrier to block the enemy’s shots. Another fun tactic is ditching soon-to-explode bodies among a group of adversaries. There's something oddly gleeful in going "whatever!" and taking new bodies when your old ones outlive their usefulness. Humanoid suits aren’t the only objects ripe for hijacking. Players can plug their heads into several machines to serve a variety of purposes. An example I encountered was a tiny tunnel accessible only to small maintenance droids (anything else was turned away by the sassy A.I. door control). After recalling seeing such a machine in a previous room, I returned to it and plugged myself into it which allowed me to proceed through the hatch. The full game features machines like vacuum cleaners and even a dog-like robot. With its groovy 70’s era sci-fi (including a grainy film filter), Double Fine’s trademark humor, and a wacky approach to exploration and puzzle-solving, Headlander is shaping up to be one of the more unique takes on the Metroidvania out there. I had a fun time with it and look forward to seeing how the headless concept expands further into the game. Those looking forward to playing won’t have to lose their heads waiting forever. Headlander is planned to release later this summer on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. View full article
  4. Headlander’s concept of becoming a disembodied head that controls interchangeable, disposable bodies took some getting used to. Many games have trained me to value self-preservation, but Headlander is the literal example of the philosophy to fight like you’re in someone else’s body. Recklessly throwing yourself into a hail of lasers is A-okay; there’s always another empty vessel to hijack nearby. It's a strange premise, but after playing the demo it's a concept with promise. At its core, Headlander is a Metroidvania. Players explore labyrinthine levels by either rocketing through the air as the mute severed head, or by docking your head onto a robotic body. Gaining new abilities to access previously barred areas is key, and reaching such places often requires the literal use of your head. Sometimes you’ll have to send your floating noggin into narrow air ducts to find additional rooms and secrets, or plug yourself into a computer terminal to open sealed doors. The action is satisfying thanks to its emphasis on landing tricky headshots. Lasers can be fired straight ahead, but Headlander heavily encourages players to carefully aim their shots (using a handy laser sight) to ricochet beams to hit enemies from difficult vantage points. Successfully executing a headshot by having a laser bounce off of two or three carefully plotted points felt slick and gratifying. Various upgrades help mix up the arsenal with new abilities. The power-up presented in the demo was a suction ability used to suck up and carry objects and, best of all, rip the heads off enemies. There are also other strategies that come into play. At one point I neutralized an enemy’s attack by placing myself directly in its line of fire, then ejected to another suit on the opposite side, thus turning my previous body into an improvised barrier to block the enemy’s shots. Another fun tactic is ditching soon-to-explode bodies among a group of adversaries. There's something oddly gleeful in going "whatever!" and taking new bodies when your old ones outlive their usefulness. Humanoid suits aren’t the only objects ripe for hijacking. Players can plug their heads into several machines to serve a variety of purposes. An example I encountered was a tiny tunnel accessible only to small maintenance droids (anything else was turned away by the sassy A.I. door control). After recalling seeing such a machine in a previous room, I returned to it and plugged myself into it which allowed me to proceed through the hatch. The full game features machines like vacuum cleaners and even a dog-like robot. With its groovy 70’s era sci-fi (including a grainy film filter), Double Fine’s trademark humor, and a wacky approach to exploration and puzzle-solving, Headlander is shaping up to be one of the more unique takes on the Metroidvania out there. I had a fun time with it and look forward to seeing how the headless concept expands further into the game. Those looking forward to playing won’t have to lose their heads waiting forever. Headlander is planned to release later this summer on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.
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