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Found 72 results

  1. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice exists as a fundamentally different beast than what many players might expect from the developers who brought them Dark Souls and Bloodborne. FromSoftware manages to infuse the stealth-action game with a lot of the same trimmings and style as their previous action-RPGs, but take Sekiro in an almost entirely different direction. Diverging from their incredibly successful formula to try something new represented a substantial risk. However, Hidetaka Miyazaki and his team pulled off the impossible and created an experience that will surely stick with players for years to come - provided they can adapt to Sekiro's punishing gameplay mechanics. Sekiro tells the story of an honorable (or perhaps dishonorable, depending on your choices) shinobi, a ninja in service to a young boy named Lord Kuro. Of course, a FromSoftware game these days needs an element of the mystic and Lord Kuro also happens to be the Divine Heir, someone blessed with blood that prevents him from ever dying. Of course, that blood makes him the target of every power-hungry figure who yearns for immortality. The lands of Ashina in feudal Japan find themselves overrun with hostile forces and Lord Kuro captured shortly after the game begins. Our titular hero, Sekiro, must use all of his cunning and swordsmanship to rescue his master and follow the Iron Code of the shinobi. In his quest to secure Lord Kuro and follow the boy's orders, Sekiro contends with far more than human adversaries. Ghosts, gods, demons, and creatures straight out of Japanese folklore rise to stop him and spread chaos throughout the land. Learning how to deal with all of these threats, both mundane and supernatural, as just one man armed with a sword and a handful of shinobi tools would be quite the challenge under a Dark Souls-like system of death. You will die. That's an inescapable fact about Sekiro. However, Lord Kuro gave his loyal shinobi the gift of his blood, bestowing the ability to resurrect from the point of death to give another chance at emerging victorious from battle. And what battles you will have to endure and survive. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice focuses on the back and forth of clashing swords. You won't be able to dodge roll around most attacks or play it safe. Instead the highly lethal combat encourages players to stand toe to toe with adversaries, timing blocks and counters to overcome enemies in a way that would feel right at home in the life or death struggles that play such an important role in Akira Kurosawa's films. In this way, combat becomes more of a dance, blades singing through the air as they strike against flesh and steel. Players who can pick up on the pattern of attacks, the pacing of the dance, will find that Sekiro takes on an almost rhythm game-like feel. Sekiro rewards players for timing blocks and dodges right by turning them into deflections or counters, moves that help open enemies up for attacks. This makes the ability to time moves properly incredibly important. It also often means that running around and avoiding attacks while waiting for an opening is just not enough to make much progress. In fact, most of the boss encounters early on are specifically designed to crush that approach to combat out of players. Clever use of shinobi tools, knowing when to disengage, and recognizing when the time has come to stand your ground and fight head-on all prove integral to standing in triumph over foes. Always remember that Sekiro was built with more verticality in mind than Dark Souls or Bloodborne, so keep an eye out for grappling locations, especially in boss fights. They could open the door for a quick escape or a devastating counterattack. Of course, mastering the basic combat only prepares players for the unexpected challenges that are to come. The world of Sekiro is one where a human with a sharp mind and skilled with a blade can fight on equal terms with gods and demons. The mechanics introduced in the early game apply when fighting colossal beasts and otherworldly threats, though adapting to those animations and rhythms can prove to be a true challenge. Contending with magic and restless undead might seem to put Sekiro on uneven footing, but as players progress, they can use skill points to unlock new combos and techniques to help them compete against even immortal adversaries. Beyond combat, Sekiro has much to offer in terms of narrative. For the past several games, FromSoftware has told stories heavy on lore and world-building without much of a focus on the main protagonist outside of the role they fill within that detailed world. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice takes a different approach, opting to have a named protagonist with clearly articulated wants and desires, and supporting characters who all relate to him. This, more than anything else, helps Sekiro to feel more grounded than any of Hidetaka Miyazaki's other projects over the last several years. The grounded experience is further reinforced by the fact that the setting is one in which humans not only survive but thrive. Some of the most interesting enemies and encounters aren't big in scope, just two highly competent humans fighting one another in a life or death struggle. Since the narrative frames those human struggles in a more intimate and personal way, the player gets pulled into that fight, too. It simply feels more "real." We are continually reminded throughout the game that dragons, gods, demons, and ghosts are all aberrations; creatures and creations that pervert the natural cycle of the world - or exist outside of it. That brings us to one of the more interesting elements of Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice: Religion. Whereas Dark Souls had bonfires and Bloodborne had lanterns, Sekiro has carvings of Buddha. In fact, Buddha and Buddhist imagery appear numerous times throughout Sekiro and understanding Buddhist philosophy can deepen the understanding of the narrative. For example, a major part of the central conflict raging at the heart of most FromSoftware games has been that holding onto something that will inevitably be lost can only cause suffering; it cannot actually satisfy. In Dark Souls, that something is Gwyn's Age of Fire and the curse placed upon humanity to force them into continuing the cycle over and over again. In Sekiro, the human pursuit of immortality represents a complete abandonment of the natural cycle of death and reincarnation. Sekiro's ability to die and resurrect is shown as useful but also something that spreads disease and suffering onto others. Those who have allowed themselves to become infested with immortal worms become undying and monstrous. The mission to create a god who could bestow eternal life sacrifices untold numbers of children to form one imperfect idol. In Buddhist terms, the dissatisfaction that these characters feel with their impending deaths are part of what is known as dukkha, the suffering and unsatisfying nature of a temporary existence. The way that they deal with that, however, is to wander far in search of an escape, a way to make their temporary state permanent rather than to pursue the eight-fold path and exit the cycle of reincarnation. Sekiro depicts the folly of such a wrong-headed approach to dealing with dukkha and the pain that can be inflicted on others by such an attempt. What interests me the most about Sekiro's depiction of Buddhism comes down to how its included so boldly in the game itself. Not many games are willing to show anything more than a fictional religion for fear that it might alienate some of the consumer base. In Sekiro, however, players pray at Buddha statues to fast-travel, level up, and more. The imagery is carved into the environments. Characters talk about Buddha, too. In fact, one of the main characters can't seem to stop carving Buddhas. One of the most important items players collect over their time spent in Sekiro are Buddhist prayer beads. There are even several cutscenes depicting the earnest prayers of our protagonist. That's bold and fascinating. How often have you seen a Muslim in prayer in a video game? Or a Christian? I honestly don't know that I have ever seen a protagonist in a video game pray in relation to a religion that exists in the real world. Video games are art and religion seems to be one of those areas that video games haven't yet gone in-depth, so this could be a sign of things to come. Conclusion: Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice stands apart from the Soulsborne games. The highly lethal approach to combat seems suited for the mechanics and message the developers were going for. Encounters with enemies feel fair, with tight controls responding well to the rhythm of battle; even normal enemies sometimes achieve the satisfying back-and-forth trading of blows often reserved for mini-bosses. The world doesn't stop surprising right up until the end, especially if you aren't familiar with Japanese folklore. The main complaint about Sekiro's gameplay would be the functional but shoddy stealth system. A sequel seems almost inevitable at this point and further refinements to sneaking and related abilities would go a long way toward making it feel more robust. Perhaps sneaking through an enemy city and avoiding the non-violent civilians? Experiencing Sekiro's visuals feels like a treat for the eyes. The lighting and level design often lead to moments that feel cinematic and the day-night cycle that progresses as main story objectives are achieved lends each location a new experience when you begin backtracking looking for secrets (something you should definitely do). The music in Sekiro failed to live up to the standards of the visuals, but it doesn't actively detract from the game in any major way. It just doesn't stand out. However, the sound design almost completely makes up for the lackluster score. Blades clashing, otherworldly howls, the melancholy notes of ethereal instruments floating through the air, Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice knows how to characterize its enemies and struggles by sound alone. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice should absolutely be on your gaming wishlist if you have any love for FromSoftware titles or action games in general. It doesn't get much better than this. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice was reviewed on PC and is available now on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  2. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice exists as a fundamentally different beast than what many players might expect from the developers who brought them Dark Souls and Bloodborne. FromSoftware manages to infuse the stealth-action game with a lot of the same trimmings and style as their previous action-RPGs, but take Sekiro in an almost entirely different direction. Diverging from their incredibly successful formula to try something new represented a substantial risk. However, Hidetaka Miyazaki and his team pulled off the impossible and created an experience that will surely stick with players for years to come - provided they can adapt to Sekiro's punishing gameplay mechanics. Sekiro tells the story of an honorable (or perhaps dishonorable, depending on your choices) shinobi, a ninja in service to a young boy named Lord Kuro. Of course, a FromSoftware game these days needs an element of the mystic and Lord Kuro also happens to be the Divine Heir, someone blessed with blood that prevents him from ever dying. Of course, that blood makes him the target of every power-hungry figure who yearns for immortality. The lands of Ashina in feudal Japan find themselves overrun with hostile forces and Lord Kuro captured shortly after the game begins. Our titular hero, Sekiro, must use all of his cunning and swordsmanship to rescue his master and follow the Iron Code of the shinobi. In his quest to secure Lord Kuro and follow the boy's orders, Sekiro contends with far more than human adversaries. Ghosts, gods, demons, and creatures straight out of Japanese folklore rise to stop him and spread chaos throughout the land. Learning how to deal with all of these threats, both mundane and supernatural, as just one man armed with a sword and a handful of shinobi tools would be quite the challenge under a Dark Souls-like system of death. You will die. That's an inescapable fact about Sekiro. However, Lord Kuro gave his loyal shinobi the gift of his blood, bestowing the ability to resurrect from the point of death to give another chance at emerging victorious from battle. And what battles you will have to endure and survive. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice focuses on the back and forth of clashing swords. You won't be able to dodge roll around most attacks or play it safe. Instead the highly lethal combat encourages players to stand toe to toe with adversaries, timing blocks and counters to overcome enemies in a way that would feel right at home in the life or death struggles that play such an important role in Akira Kurosawa's films. In this way, combat becomes more of a dance, blades singing through the air as they strike against flesh and steel. Players who can pick up on the pattern of attacks, the pacing of the dance, will find that Sekiro takes on an almost rhythm game-like feel. Sekiro rewards players for timing blocks and dodges right by turning them into deflections or counters, moves that help open enemies up for attacks. This makes the ability to time moves properly incredibly important. It also often means that running around and avoiding attacks while waiting for an opening is just not enough to make much progress. In fact, most of the boss encounters early on are specifically designed to crush that approach to combat out of players. Clever use of shinobi tools, knowing when to disengage, and recognizing when the time has come to stand your ground and fight head-on all prove integral to standing in triumph over foes. Always remember that Sekiro was built with more verticality in mind than Dark Souls or Bloodborne, so keep an eye out for grappling locations, especially in boss fights. They could open the door for a quick escape or a devastating counterattack. Of course, mastering the basic combat only prepares players for the unexpected challenges that are to come. The world of Sekiro is one where a human with a sharp mind and skilled with a blade can fight on equal terms with gods and demons. The mechanics introduced in the early game apply when fighting colossal beasts and otherworldly threats, though adapting to those animations and rhythms can prove to be a true challenge. Contending with magic and restless undead might seem to put Sekiro on uneven footing, but as players progress, they can use skill points to unlock new combos and techniques to help them compete against even immortal adversaries. Beyond combat, Sekiro has much to offer in terms of narrative. For the past several games, FromSoftware has told stories heavy on lore and world-building without much of a focus on the main protagonist outside of the role they fill within that detailed world. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice takes a different approach, opting to have a named protagonist with clearly articulated wants and desires, and supporting characters who all relate to him. This, more than anything else, helps Sekiro to feel more grounded than any of Hidetaka Miyazaki's other projects over the last several years. The grounded experience is further reinforced by the fact that the setting is one in which humans not only survive but thrive. Some of the most interesting enemies and encounters aren't big in scope, just two highly competent humans fighting one another in a life or death struggle. Since the narrative frames those human struggles in a more intimate and personal way, the player gets pulled into that fight, too. It simply feels more "real." We are continually reminded throughout the game that dragons, gods, demons, and ghosts are all aberrations; creatures and creations that pervert the natural cycle of the world - or exist outside of it. That brings us to one of the more interesting elements of Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice: Religion. Whereas Dark Souls had bonfires and Bloodborne had lanterns, Sekiro has carvings of Buddha. In fact, Buddha and Buddhist imagery appear numerous times throughout Sekiro and understanding Buddhist philosophy can deepen the understanding of the narrative. For example, a major part of the central conflict raging at the heart of most FromSoftware games has been that holding onto something that will inevitably be lost can only cause suffering; it cannot actually satisfy. In Dark Souls, that something is Gwyn's Age of Fire and the curse placed upon humanity to force them into continuing the cycle over and over again. In Sekiro, the human pursuit of immortality represents a complete abandonment of the natural cycle of death and reincarnation. Sekiro's ability to die and resurrect is shown as useful but also something that spreads disease and suffering onto others. Those who have allowed themselves to become infested with immortal worms become undying and monstrous. The mission to create a god who could bestow eternal life sacrifices untold numbers of children to form one imperfect idol. In Buddhist terms, the dissatisfaction that these characters feel with their impending deaths are part of what is known as dukkha, the suffering and unsatisfying nature of a temporary existence. The way that they deal with that, however, is to wander far in search of an escape, a way to make their temporary state permanent rather than to pursue the eight-fold path and exit the cycle of reincarnation. Sekiro depicts the folly of such a wrong-headed approach to dealing with dukkha and the pain that can be inflicted on others by such an attempt. What interests me the most about Sekiro's depiction of Buddhism comes down to how its included so boldly in the game itself. Not many games are willing to show anything more than a fictional religion for fear that it might alienate some of the consumer base. In Sekiro, however, players pray at Buddha statues to fast-travel, level up, and more. The imagery is carved into the environments. Characters talk about Buddha, too. In fact, one of the main characters can't seem to stop carving Buddhas. One of the most important items players collect over their time spent in Sekiro are Buddhist prayer beads. There are even several cutscenes depicting the earnest prayers of our protagonist. That's bold and fascinating. How often have you seen a Muslim in prayer in a video game? Or a Christian? I honestly don't know that I have ever seen a protagonist in a video game pray in relation to a religion that exists in the real world. Video games are art and religion seems to be one of those areas that video games haven't yet gone in-depth, so this could be a sign of things to come. Conclusion: Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice stands apart from the Soulsborne games. The highly lethal approach to combat seems suited for the mechanics and message the developers were going for. Encounters with enemies feel fair, with tight controls responding well to the rhythm of battle; even normal enemies sometimes achieve the satisfying back-and-forth trading of blows often reserved for mini-bosses. The world doesn't stop surprising right up until the end, especially if you aren't familiar with Japanese folklore. The main complaint about Sekiro's gameplay would be the functional but shoddy stealth system. A sequel seems almost inevitable at this point and further refinements to sneaking and related abilities would go a long way toward making it feel more robust. Perhaps sneaking through an enemy city and avoiding the non-violent civilians? Experiencing Sekiro's visuals feels like a treat for the eyes. The lighting and level design often lead to moments that feel cinematic and the day-night cycle that progresses as main story objectives are achieved lends each location a new experience when you begin backtracking looking for secrets (something you should definitely do). The music in Sekiro failed to live up to the standards of the visuals, but it doesn't actively detract from the game in any major way. It just doesn't stand out. However, the sound design almost completely makes up for the lackluster score. Blades clashing, otherworldly howls, the melancholy notes of ethereal instruments floating through the air, Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice knows how to characterize its enemies and struggles by sound alone. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice should absolutely be on your gaming wishlist if you have any love for FromSoftware titles or action games in general. It doesn't get much better than this. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice was reviewed on PC and is available now on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  3. There will also be an open beta beginning May 19. Who else is ready to throw down fisticuffs with the heroes and villains from across Blizzard's history? At launch, Heroes of the Storm will contain over thirty playable characters and seven different battlefields. Each battleground will be unique with different goals and challenges. Post-launch, players can expect to see more heroes and maps being added, along with a variety of skins and mounts. The open beta will follow the conclusion of the Heroes of the Dorm collegiate eSports tournament. Students from over 400 schools will be participating with hundreds of thousands of dollars in tuition on the line. The championship will be held on April 26 at the Shrine Auditorium and Expo Hall in LA. It will also be televised live in prime time on ESPN. More details should be available as the event approaches. Heroes of the Storm will be launching on June 2 for PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  4. FromSoftware dropped a new cinematic trailer for Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice showing off a bit of narrative as opposed to flashy combat. The beautiful flashback provides a glimpse at how protagonist Sekiro came under the tutelage of his grizzled mentor, the Owl. We see the Owl adopting an adolescent Sekiro in the aftermath of a bloody battle. Though brief, the scene highlights Sekiro’s more straightforward approach to storytelling as opposed to the vague narratives of the Souls series. First teased at the 2017 Game Awards, Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice made its full unveiling during E3 2018. Taking place during the war-ridden Sengoku period of Japan, players control Sekiro, a one-armed shinobi who wields multi-functional prosthetic limb. After enemies leave Sekiro for dead and abduct a young lord he’s sworn to protect, the warrior must hunt down those responsible. Though it shares similar DNA to Dark Souls and Bloodborne, Sekiro's gameplay emphasizes speed, stealth, and verticality via a grappling hook used to scale structures Look for Sekiro: Shadows Die twice when it launches March 22 for PS4, Xbox One, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  5. FromSoftware dropped a new cinematic trailer for Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice showing off a bit of narrative as opposed to flashy combat. The beautiful flashback provides a glimpse at how protagonist Sekiro came under the tutelage of his grizzled mentor, the Owl. We see the Owl adopting an adolescent Sekiro in the aftermath of a bloody battle. Though brief, the scene highlights Sekiro’s more straightforward approach to storytelling as opposed to the vague narratives of the Souls series. First teased at the 2017 Game Awards, Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice made its full unveiling during E3 2018. Taking place during the war-ridden Sengoku period of Japan, players control Sekiro, a one-armed shinobi who wields multi-functional prosthetic limb. After enemies leave Sekiro for dead and abduct a young lord he’s sworn to protect, the warrior must hunt down those responsible. Though it shares similar DNA to Dark Souls and Bloodborne, Sekiro's gameplay emphasizes speed, stealth, and verticality via a grappling hook used to scale structures Look for Sekiro: Shadows Die twice when it launches March 22 for PS4, Xbox One, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  6. Bungie has issued an update on its official channels announcing that they will be splitting from the partnership with Activision that birthed the Destiny franchise. The almost decade-long deal has changed quite a bit since it was first announced, and it seems like the two companies have decided to part ways, though nothing is set in stone quite yet. Bungie initially partnered after it broke free from Microsoft in a bid to create something entirely new after years spent developing the Halo series. The developer had supposedly been working on the idea for Destiny for some time, but needed a publishing partner to make it happen. They turned to Activision to help them secure the funding necessary to make their vision a reality. However, as these things go, Activision initially envisioned Destiny and future sequels receiving yearly updates, DLC, and more. Word is that Activision was unhappy with the pace of development on Destiny and its expansions. This led to years of raised tensions between Bungie and its publisher. With that in mind, Bungie posted to the company website today that they were in the early stages of extracting themselves from the partnership they've maintained with Activision since 2010. Despite the difficulties behind-the-scenes, Bungie's announcement thanked Activision for their eight-year partnership which has led to Destiny becoming a recognizable force in the industry and public landscape. Part of the statement clarified the future of both Bungie and Activision: We have enjoyed a successful eight-year run and would like to thank Activision for their partnership on Destiny. Looking ahead, we’re excited to announce plans for Activision to transfer publishing rights for Destiny to Bungie. With our remarkable Destiny community, we are ready to publish on our own, while Activision will increase their focus on owned IP projects. The planned transition process is already underway in its early stages, with Bungie and Activision both committed to making sure the handoff is as seamless as possible. In other words, Bungie will assume full creative and publishing control of Destiny and become an independent developer. They will be able to publish whatever they please for PC platforms and will be free to work on their own with console manufacturers to get their games onto various devices. Activision, meanwhile, will be freed up to focus on its own projects. This feels like a positive move for both companies, though it does leave Activision in a strange place where its only major franchise will be Call of Duty. If popularity for that game series dips, they could be in a really tight place with such an open publishing slate. For Bungie and everyone who has followed their development history, this is an exciting and risky time. While they will be continuing to work on Destiny for the foreseeable future, their departure from Activision probably means that they will be able to work on other game concepts - and gamers should be excited to see more games from the people who brought Halo and Destiny into the world. All things come to an end, but something even better might be just around the corner. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  7. Bungie has issued an update on its official channels announcing that they will be splitting from the partnership with Activision that birthed the Destiny franchise. The almost decade-long deal has changed quite a bit since it was first announced, and it seems like the two companies have decided to part ways, though nothing is set in stone quite yet. Bungie initially partnered after it broke free from Microsoft in a bid to create something entirely new after years spent developing the Halo series. The developer had supposedly been working on the idea for Destiny for some time, but needed a publishing partner to make it happen. They turned to Activision to help them secure the funding necessary to make their vision a reality. However, as these things go, Activision initially envisioned Destiny and future sequels receiving yearly updates, DLC, and more. Word is that Activision was unhappy with the pace of development on Destiny and its expansions. This led to years of raised tensions between Bungie and its publisher. With that in mind, Bungie posted to the company website today that they were in the early stages of extracting themselves from the partnership they've maintained with Activision since 2010. Despite the difficulties behind-the-scenes, Bungie's announcement thanked Activision for their eight-year partnership which has led to Destiny becoming a recognizable force in the industry and public landscape. Part of the statement clarified the future of both Bungie and Activision: We have enjoyed a successful eight-year run and would like to thank Activision for their partnership on Destiny. Looking ahead, we’re excited to announce plans for Activision to transfer publishing rights for Destiny to Bungie. With our remarkable Destiny community, we are ready to publish on our own, while Activision will increase their focus on owned IP projects. The planned transition process is already underway in its early stages, with Bungie and Activision both committed to making sure the handoff is as seamless as possible. In other words, Bungie will assume full creative and publishing control of Destiny and become an independent developer. They will be able to publish whatever they please for PC platforms and will be free to work on their own with console manufacturers to get their games onto various devices. Activision, meanwhile, will be freed up to focus on its own projects. This feels like a positive move for both companies, though it does leave Activision in a strange place where its only major franchise will be Call of Duty. If popularity for that game series dips, they could be in a really tight place with such an open publishing slate. For Bungie and everyone who has followed their development history, this is an exciting and risky time. While they will be continuing to work on Destiny for the foreseeable future, their departure from Activision probably means that they will be able to work on other game concepts - and gamers should be excited to see more games from the people who brought Halo and Destiny into the world. All things come to an end, but something even better might be just around the corner. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  8. For a limited amount of time, PC gamers can download Destiny 2 for free. Beginning today, people logging onto battle.net will be able to snag Bungie and Activision's FPS with the click of a button. This offer continues until November 18. To avoid anyone trying to game the system for more than one copy, any new battle.net accounts created during this period will be required to enable Blizzard's SMS Protect feature before claiming the game If you've already picked up Destiny 2 on PC, you'll be given an exclusive in-game emblem that commemorates Destiny 2 being available for a full year on Battle.net. The emblem, however, won't be available until December. From November 9-11 players will be able to try out Destiny 2: Forsaken's new 4v4 Gambit mode without purchasing the expansion. “We know Destiny players that want to play on PC expect an amazing experience, whether it’s on their own or with their friends -- so, our paramount concern was to keep the discerning requirements of the PC community in mind, and welcoming the Battle.net and Bungie PC communities together,” said Steve Cotton, Bungie's game director for the Forsaken expansion. He added, “With this gift we look forward to seeing new Guardians in our universe.” You can redeem Destiny 2 as a gift by following this link. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  9. For a limited amount of time, PC gamers can download Destiny 2 for free. Beginning today, people logging onto battle.net will be able to snag Bungie and Activision's FPS with the click of a button. This offer continues until November 18. To avoid anyone trying to game the system for more than one copy, any new battle.net accounts created during this period will be required to enable Blizzard's SMS Protect feature before claiming the game If you've already picked up Destiny 2 on PC, you'll be given an exclusive in-game emblem that commemorates Destiny 2 being available for a full year on Battle.net. The emblem, however, won't be available until December. From November 9-11 players will be able to try out Destiny 2: Forsaken's new 4v4 Gambit mode without purchasing the expansion. “We know Destiny players that want to play on PC expect an amazing experience, whether it’s on their own or with their friends -- so, our paramount concern was to keep the discerning requirements of the PC community in mind, and welcoming the Battle.net and Bungie PC communities together,” said Steve Cotton, Bungie's game director for the Forsaken expansion. He added, “With this gift we look forward to seeing new Guardians in our universe.” You can redeem Destiny 2 as a gift by following this link. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  10. The route to an official announcement of the Spyro Reignited Trilogy has been long and confusing. Back in February, Kotaku sources revealed that the game would be coming with an announcement in March for a release in late 2018. Then a Target PR rep accidentally dished on the title just two weeks ago. We now have an official reveal and trailer along with a release date. It turns out that the manager of the Ask Target twitter account didn't have the most recent information on the upcoming trilogy dubbing it the Spyro Treasure Trilogy. It could be that was the working title for Activision's remaster project or it may have been changed at the last minute which led to a delay in the official reveal to early April. Spyro returns in the Spyro Reignited Trilogy which remasters Spyro the Dragon, Spyro 2: Ripto's Rage!, and Spyro: Year of the Dragon. The games have been given an entirely new set of assets based on the original characters and locations from the PlayStation 1 classics. The collection honestly looks like a completely different series of games in the best way possible. As a nod to the original Spyro reveal, players who have the Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy on the PS4 can input the following code on the title screen for Crash Bandicoot 3: Warped (↑ ↑ ↓ ↓ ← → ← → square) to watch the trailer for the Spyro Reignited Trilogy (or you can just watch it below). The trilogy was remastered by Toys for Bob and includes revamped environments, modernized controls, and fully recreated cinematics. The team even managed to bring back Tom Kenny, who voiced Spyro in Ripto's Rage! and Year of the Dragon, to rerecord his roles as well as the dialogue for the first title in the series. “We’re deeply passionate about staying true to the legacy of the original three Spyro games with the Spyro Reignited Trilogy,” said Paul Yan, the chief creative officer at Toys for Bob. “We’ve poured a lot of love into making the personalities and worlds feel just like fans remember them, while also keeping the game collection surprisingly fresh with lush, high definition detail. We’re bringing back the Spyro we all fell in love with 20 years ago.” The Spyro Reignited Trilogy will release on September 21 on PS4 and Xbox One. View full article
  11. The route to an official announcement of the Spyro Reignited Trilogy has been long and confusing. Back in February, Kotaku sources revealed that the game would be coming with an announcement in March for a release in late 2018. Then a Target PR rep accidentally dished on the title just two weeks ago. We now have an official reveal and trailer along with a release date. It turns out that the manager of the Ask Target twitter account didn't have the most recent information on the upcoming trilogy dubbing it the Spyro Treasure Trilogy. It could be that was the working title for Activision's remaster project or it may have been changed at the last minute which led to a delay in the official reveal to early April. Spyro returns in the Spyro Reignited Trilogy which remasters Spyro the Dragon, Spyro 2: Ripto's Rage!, and Spyro: Year of the Dragon. The games have been given an entirely new set of assets based on the original characters and locations from the PlayStation 1 classics. The collection honestly looks like a completely different series of games in the best way possible. As a nod to the original Spyro reveal, players who have the Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy on the PS4 can input the following code on the title screen for Crash Bandicoot 3: Warped (↑ ↑ ↓ ↓ ← → ← → square) to watch the trailer for the Spyro Reignited Trilogy (or you can just watch it below). The trilogy was remastered by Toys for Bob and includes revamped environments, modernized controls, and fully recreated cinematics. The team even managed to bring back Tom Kenny, who voiced Spyro in Ripto's Rage! and Year of the Dragon, to rerecord his roles as well as the dialogue for the first title in the series. “We’re deeply passionate about staying true to the legacy of the original three Spyro games with the Spyro Reignited Trilogy,” said Paul Yan, the chief creative officer at Toys for Bob. “We’ve poured a lot of love into making the personalities and worlds feel just like fans remember them, while also keeping the game collection surprisingly fresh with lush, high definition detail. We’re bringing back the Spyro we all fell in love with 20 years ago.” The Spyro Reignited Trilogy will release on September 21 on PS4 and Xbox One.
  12. Overwatch has been teasing a new hero for a few days now. Following the recent cosmetics update Blizzard put out a short story update to the Overwatch lore vault. The new addition detailed a mission gone awry that had resulted in a severely injured Torbjörn rescued by Reinhardt. The aftermath of Reinhardt's heroism resulted in a letter penned by Torbjörn to his wife Ingrid. The letter reassures Ingrid that he made it out of harm's way and will be coming home soon... and that Reinhardt will be the one to name their daughter. That daughter is the new hero joining Overwatch: Brigitte Lindholm. Brigitte's abilities haven't been detailed, but from her new origin video we can guess that she will fit into a hardy support character meant to heal or reinforce allies on the battlefield while also able to take some damage by herself. No release date has been given for Brigitte's update, but players can expect to see her fighting for Overwatch in the near future.
  13. Overwatch has been teasing a new hero for a few days now. Following the recent cosmetics update Blizzard put out a short story update to the Overwatch lore vault. The new addition detailed a mission gone awry that had resulted in a severely injured Torbjörn rescued by Reinhardt. The aftermath of Reinhardt's heroism resulted in a letter penned by Torbjörn to his wife Ingrid. The letter reassures Ingrid that he made it out of harm's way and will be coming home soon... and that Reinhardt will be the one to name their daughter. That daughter is the new hero joining Overwatch: Brigitte Lindholm. Brigitte's abilities haven't been detailed, but from her new origin video we can guess that she will fit into a hardy support character meant to heal or reinforce allies on the battlefield while also able to take some damage by herself. No release date has been given for Brigitte's update, but players can expect to see her fighting for Overwatch in the near future. View full article
  14. The co-founders and heads of Sledgehammer Games, the developer behind Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare and Call of Duty: WWII as well as some key elements of Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3. Michael Condrey and Glen Schofield got their start at EA Redwood Shores and made a name for themselves by creating the legendary survival horror title Dead Space. The success of Dead Space spurred EA to spin Redwood Shores off into Visceral Games, a more independent subsidiary of EA's stable of studios (which has since been closed down by EA). While that change went down, Condrey and Schofield left and founded Sledgehammer Games, which became one of three studios working under Activision to churn out yearly Call of Duty releases. The news of their departure comes as a bit of a shock considering that Call of Duty: WWII was the best selling game of 2017. However, it doesn't appear that the duo has left on bad terms. In fact, it seems that they left to pursue bigger opportunities at Activision itself. In statements Activision provided to Kotaku, Schofield wrote, "Activision has offered me the opportunity to focus my energy on something I’m very passionate about, exploring new game ideas for the company. It’s something I just couldn’t pass up." Condrey expressed his gratitude to the men and women working at Sledgehammer Games and explained that he would also be making the leap to his former publisher, "I am looking forward to starting a new chapter of my career with Activision. I couldn’t be more excited for the future of Sledgehammer Games and look forward to seeing Aaron lead the studio to new heights." This move doesn't seem like it will affect the release of future Call of Duty titles. Condrey and Schofield have left Aaron Halon, the former senior development director at Sledgehammer, in charge of the studio. The 2018 Call of Duty title is being developed by Treyarch.
  15. The co-founders and heads of Sledgehammer Games, the developer behind Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare and Call of Duty: WWII as well as some key elements of Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3. Michael Condrey and Glen Schofield got their start at EA Redwood Shores and made a name for themselves by creating the legendary survival horror title Dead Space. The success of Dead Space spurred EA to spin Redwood Shores off into Visceral Games, a more independent subsidiary of EA's stable of studios (which has since been closed down by EA). While that change went down, Condrey and Schofield left and founded Sledgehammer Games, which became one of three studios working under Activision to churn out yearly Call of Duty releases. The news of their departure comes as a bit of a shock considering that Call of Duty: WWII was the best selling game of 2017. However, it doesn't appear that the duo has left on bad terms. In fact, it seems that they left to pursue bigger opportunities at Activision itself. In statements Activision provided to Kotaku, Schofield wrote, "Activision has offered me the opportunity to focus my energy on something I’m very passionate about, exploring new game ideas for the company. It’s something I just couldn’t pass up." Condrey expressed his gratitude to the men and women working at Sledgehammer Games and explained that he would also be making the leap to his former publisher, "I am looking forward to starting a new chapter of my career with Activision. I couldn’t be more excited for the future of Sledgehammer Games and look forward to seeing Aaron lead the studio to new heights." This move doesn't seem like it will affect the release of future Call of Duty titles. Condrey and Schofield have left Aaron Halon, the former senior development director at Sledgehammer, in charge of the studio. The 2018 Call of Duty title is being developed by Treyarch. View full article
  16. People have been wondering for years when Blizzard would be revisiting Warcraft in its original RTS form. For years the studio has played coy or even outright denied that they were working on either a remaster or a new entry in the venerable strategy series. To this day, there are players around the world that play Warcraft III in both for fun and in official tournaments. Some of those pro players found themselves invited to a secret event in the United States that they were allowed to hint at, but not discuss directly. GoodGame.ru managed to catch the player known as Happy in Serbia along with fellow pro Hawk while they were seeking visas to travel to the US for that mysterious event. Happy released the following statement: A little about the "surprise". While I can not disclose the details, I was allowed to hint. At the end of this month there will be a certain event (offline) - what will be there is still a secret. Because all this event will take place in the US - I will need to make a visa. /.../ I can not reveal the big details yet. But I was told, soon announcement. While some might have hoped that Warcraft IV might be the reveal, a major patch released for Warcraft III last year combined with Blizzard's previous statements implying that balancing out the original release would be necessary before a remaster. With the recent remaster of the original StarCraft and a number of the biggest Warcraft III pros around the world travelling to a secret event, all signs seem to point toward the imminent announcement of a Warcraft III remaster.
  17. People have been wondering for years when Blizzard would be revisiting Warcraft in its original RTS form. For years the studio has played coy or even outright denied that they were working on either a remaster or a new entry in the venerable strategy series. To this day, there are players around the world that play Warcraft III in both for fun and in official tournaments. Some of those pro players found themselves invited to a secret event in the United States that they were allowed to hint at, but not discuss directly. GoodGame.ru managed to catch the player known as Happy in Serbia along with fellow pro Hawk while they were seeking visas to travel to the US for that mysterious event. Happy released the following statement: A little about the "surprise". While I can not disclose the details, I was allowed to hint. At the end of this month there will be a certain event (offline) - what will be there is still a secret. Because all this event will take place in the US - I will need to make a visa. /.../ I can not reveal the big details yet. But I was told, soon announcement. While some might have hoped that Warcraft IV might be the reveal, a major patch released for Warcraft III last year combined with Blizzard's previous statements implying that balancing out the original release would be necessary before a remaster. With the recent remaster of the original StarCraft and a number of the biggest Warcraft III pros around the world travelling to a secret event, all signs seem to point toward the imminent announcement of a Warcraft III remaster. View full article
  18. First Person Shooters have a certain ability. They can raise our blood pressure, help us invent new ways to flip tables, but most of all they have the ability to bring us together. Aww. This is a phenomenon that the creators of the new Call of Duty entry WWII seem to be well aware of and made the center of their new trailer "“Reassemble!” which launched on October 15. In it, we see a tropey but self-aware story using the plotline of the gang getting back together for one more hit, but this time it's for the return of the game. "Haven't you heard? Call of Duty is going back to World War II baby," the inciting member says to a squad member, "we gotta get the guys back together," he replies. The ensuing scenes include the gathering of the squad through various settings. It's endearing and seems to be translating well for fans, at least so far. As of publishing this article, the like/dislike ratio sits at 17,000 likes to 1,000 dislikes. Significantly better than Call of Duty trailers have faired in the past. The Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare Reveal Trailer currently has a bitter ratio of 581,000 likes to 3 million dislikes. Ouch. The WWII launch trailer is at 1 million likes to 97,000 dislikes, by the way, possibly showing tempered expectations. Call of Duty: World War II launches November 3 to PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC. How do you feel about Call of Duty returning to WWII? Are your hopes high for the latest installment? Let us know in the comments below.
  19. First Person Shooters have a certain ability. They can raise our blood pressure, help us invent new ways to flip tables, but most of all they have the ability to bring us together. Aww. This is a phenomenon that the creators of the new Call of Duty entry WWII seem to be well aware of and made the center of their new trailer "“Reassemble!” which launched on October 15. In it, we see a tropey but self-aware story using the plotline of the gang getting back together for one more hit, but this time it's for the return of the game. "Haven't you heard? Call of Duty is going back to World War II baby," the inciting member says to a squad member, "we gotta get the guys back together," he replies. The ensuing scenes include the gathering of the squad through various settings. It's endearing and seems to be translating well for fans, at least so far. As of publishing this article, the like/dislike ratio sits at 17,000 likes to 1,000 dislikes. Significantly better than Call of Duty trailers have faired in the past. The Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare Reveal Trailer currently has a bitter ratio of 581,000 likes to 3 million dislikes. Ouch. The WWII launch trailer is at 1 million likes to 97,000 dislikes, by the way, possibly showing tempered expectations. Call of Duty: World War II launches November 3 to PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC. How do you feel about Call of Duty returning to WWII? Are your hopes high for the latest installment? Let us know in the comments below. View full article
  20. Destiny 2 is just over two months away, arriving Sept. 6. Bungie is in the process of preparing existing Destiny players for the big move over by gradually winding things down in the original, starting by ending services for crucible events. A recent post on Bungie’s blog revealed that Destiny’s Iron Banner and Trials of Osiris are coming to a close in the coming months. The modes are entering “hibernation before reemerging to spread their beautiful wings in unexpected ways in Destiny 2,” the post reads. Fans should mark Aug. 1 as the date for the final Iron Banner. The last Trials of Osiris event will take place Aug. 11. Bungie also explained how Destiny accomplishments will be reflected in the upcoming sequel. Namely, dedicated Guardians will be awarded memorialization emblems for completing specific events during Destiny's lifetime. Some of these can only be earned by those who were present from the game’s launch or at the start of Year 2, but others are currently still achievable. If you’re looking to earn those emblems, Bungie states players have until Aug. 1 to do so before the data is frozen in preparation for Destiny 2. Bungie's full post goes into greater detail about the types of memorialization emblems players can earn as well as details on how to earn an Age of Triumph t-shirt. You can check it out here. For more on Destiny 2, check out the title's E3 2017 trailer, a comprehensive rundown of its features and Jack Gardner's take on the game's shift in tone. View full article
  21. Destiny 2 is just over two months away, arriving Sept. 6. Bungie is in the process of preparing existing Destiny players for the big move over by gradually winding things down in the original, starting by ending services for crucible events. A recent post on Bungie’s blog revealed that Destiny’s Iron Banner and Trials of Osiris are coming to a close in the coming months. The modes are entering “hibernation before reemerging to spread their beautiful wings in unexpected ways in Destiny 2,” the post reads. Fans should mark Aug. 1 as the date for the final Iron Banner. The last Trials of Osiris event will take place Aug. 11. Bungie also explained how Destiny accomplishments will be reflected in the upcoming sequel. Namely, dedicated Guardians will be awarded memorialization emblems for completing specific events during Destiny's lifetime. Some of these can only be earned by those who were present from the game’s launch or at the start of Year 2, but others are currently still achievable. If you’re looking to earn those emblems, Bungie states players have until Aug. 1 to do so before the data is frozen in preparation for Destiny 2. Bungie's full post goes into greater detail about the types of memorialization emblems players can earn as well as details on how to earn an Age of Triumph t-shirt. You can check it out here. For more on Destiny 2, check out the title's E3 2017 trailer, a comprehensive rundown of its features and Jack Gardner's take on the game's shift in tone.
  22. Today, it was announced that Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered will be released as a standalone game. The wait will be short, as it comes out on June 27 for digital download and physical retail. However, this date only pertains to the PlayStation 4. PC and Xbox One releases aren't off the table–the end of the launch trailer states "first on PS4" suggesting a release to more platforms in the future. The remaster will be in "true high-definition, featuring enhanced textures, rendering, [and] high-dynamic range lighting." Its price tag will be $39.99. Originally, Call of Duty 4 released in 2007 to PC, Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3. This is not the first release for the remaster, as it arrived last fall with a small caveat: players had to have Inifinite Warfare to run it. Simply put, in Activision's words, "you must own Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare in order to get Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered." What do you think about the remaster being released as a standalone? Should it have been released as such last year? View full article
  23. Today, it was announced that Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered will be released as a standalone game. The wait will be short, as it comes out on June 27 for digital download and physical retail. However, this date only pertains to the PlayStation 4. PC and Xbox One releases aren't off the table–the end of the launch trailer states "first on PS4" suggesting a release to more platforms in the future. The remaster will be in "true high-definition, featuring enhanced textures, rendering, [and] high-dynamic range lighting." Its price tag will be $39.99. Originally, Call of Duty 4 released in 2007 to PC, Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3. This is not the first release for the remaster, as it arrived last fall with a small caveat: players had to have Inifinite Warfare to run it. Simply put, in Activision's words, "you must own Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare in order to get Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered." What do you think about the remaster being released as a standalone? Should it have been released as such last year?
  24. Call of Duty's big return to the second world war arrives November 3, and Sledgehammer Games has a new highlight reel showing off the game's grounded yet exciting flow in multiplayer. The trailer does a good job running home the fact that death can come from all directions, including from above thanks to the aerial bombardments of enemy fighter planes. While the time period means the that the game lacks the high-tech verticality and maneuverability of the near-future entries, Sledgehammer's heavy focus on the pure grit and pandemonium of humanity's greatest conflict gives multiplayer a visceral edge that was absent in recent Call of Duty titles. Are you looking forward to Call of Duty WWII? How do you feel about a return to more antiquated setting and combat? View full article
  25. Call of Duty's big return to the second world war arrives November 3, and Sledgehammer Games has a new highlight reel showing off the game's grounded yet exciting flow in multiplayer. The trailer does a good job running home the fact that death can come from all directions, including from above thanks to the aerial bombardments of enemy fighter planes. While the time period means the that the game lacks the high-tech verticality and maneuverability of the near-future entries, Sledgehammer's heavy focus on the pure grit and pandemonium of humanity's greatest conflict gives multiplayer a visceral edge that was absent in recent Call of Duty titles. Are you looking forward to Call of Duty WWII? How do you feel about a return to more antiquated setting and combat?
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