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Found 14 results

  1. Hey All, For the new year as per... I'll be continuing the chronology that is the Extra Life Partner Linked Humbled Bundlery for 2018! o/
  2. Not much is known about the remaster other than Blizzard has announced that it will be releasing next year. It's currently under the title Warcraft III Reforged. The game will be playable on the show floor at BlizzCon 2018. We'll update this if we learn more.
  3. Not much is known about the remaster other than Blizzard has announced that it will be releasing next year. It's currently under the title Warcraft III Reforged. The game will be playable on the show floor at BlizzCon 2018. We'll update this if we learn more. View full article
  4. herobyclicking

    Extra Life January 2018 Newsletter

    Hey Extra Lifers We want to take a minute to thank you one more time for participating in Extra Life and making miracles happen for families who desperately need them. Please know that you spent 2017 making a difference in the lives of so many families throughout North America. While we won't have the final fundraising total for the year to share with you until March, we're beyond thrilled to announce that so far, together we have raised over $10.6 million for the kids treated at Children's Miracle Network Hospitals! That is a huge accomplishment! Join us for another year of playing games to heal kids, sign up for Extra Life 2018. Sign Up for Extra Life 2018 The Extra Life community has been coming together in a truly wonderful way year after year. Sign up for Extra Life 2018 today to continue to make a difference in the lives of sick and injured kids across North America. Let’s all keep that energy going by pushing forward for fun, fellowship, and – as always…. For The Kids, Mike, Liz, Lou & Jeromy Team Extra Life Children's Miracle Network Hospitals
  5. aradiadarling

    Ideas For 2018

    Guildies! You guys are amazing and made 2017 a great year for Extra Life and Boston Children's Hospital, but us in leadership are already thinking towards 2018 and making next year even better! And this is where you come in. What sorts of things would you like to see from the Guild and Extra Life next year? Sound off in the comments with details. This guild would be nothing without you guys, so lets make 2018 the best year yet. <3
  6. Jack Gardner

    Review: Shadow of the Colossus (2018)

    Time moves slowly and inexorably forward. The world changes, and we grow old telling stories together. Those stories, the ones that stick with us, communicated something important to us. As a medium, game creators have spent decades learning how to put together ever more effective stories that can offer that thing of precious importance, that moment of beauty, clarity, success, failure. In a sea of stories, Shadow of the Colossus stands out as a fairy tale in the classic sense, and the remake by Bluepoint Games serves to enhance what was already a foundational piece of video game history. Shadow of the Colossus tells the tale of a young man named Wander who travels to the Forbidden Land, a landmass sealed off from the rest of the world. Using an enchanted sword, he strikes a deal with an enigmatic entity named Dormin who agrees to bring the woman he has brought with him back from the dead if he can complete an impossible task: Defeat 16 colossal incarnations of the towering stone statues that line the temple. Armed only with his magic sword, a bow with unlimited arrows, and his trusty horse Agro, Wander sets forth into a long-abandoned world of ruins and natural wonders to battle towering behemoths the size of skyscrapers. The simple, powerful set up allows the visuals, music, and gameplay tell the vast majority of the narrative. That open approach to storytelling led a lot of people, even the marketing team for Shadow of the Colossus, to interpret the adventure as one about true, undying love. Wander, after all, goes to incredible lengths for a woman with whom he has a close connection. However, playing through the remake, a version remade after over a decade, I realized that my perception of the game has shifted to seeing it more as a tale about loss and the inability to let go being an ultimately destructive force. That flexibility and changing interpretation feels interesting. It's a reminder of how much time has passed since I played Shadow of the Colossus in 2005. Back then, the question of whether video games were capable of being art was a hotly debated topic. The internet was on fire with hot takes about what it meant to be art and whether interactivity itself negated art. Now that the question has largely been settled, it feels liberating to be able to think, "okay, it's art, so what does that mean? What does all of this, as a piece of art, mean?" Everyone will have to struggle with loss at some point in their lives. It's not pleasant. It hurts. There's the impulse to yell and scream and gnash your teeth because you would do anything to have that person back in your life. And Shadow of the Colossus asks the seductive question: What if you could throw everything to the wind and bring that person back? What price would you pay? And at first, the answer seems obvious, heroic even. But as the game progresses and one by one the beautiful, deadly colossi, who were all minding their own business before Wander showed up, begin to take their toll. The feeling of triumph and accomplishment gives way to self-doubt. Is this the right thing? That question of meaning scratches at the fundamentals of what I believe make myths and fairy tales resonate across time. Because Shadow of the Colossus is art. To some it could be a tale of love, to others it could represent a cautionary tale about obsession, and playing the remake it brought to mind loss. Shadow of the Colossus manages to have the narrative flexibility to accommodate multiple interpretations, and that's a quality that can bestow a great deal of longevity to a piece of art. I'd argue that's at least partly why we are getting a remake of a game that's two-and-a-half generations of technology behind the current PlayStation console. It's a testament to the artistry of the original PlayStation 2 release of Shadow of the Colossus that the visuals largely hold up due to its adherence to a strong minimalist aesthetic that focuses on natural beauty. The entire production possesses a washed out quality that cleverly hides some of the deficient parts of the world as Wander and Agro make their way across the quiet plains and subdued forests. With the remake, none of the world needs to be hidden by visual tricks; flowing water glitters in the sunlight, grass sways with the wind, dust motes flit through the air. The effect of the increased focus on detail afforded by the technological leap and the original style is jaw-dropping. To put it bluntly, this remake of Shadow of the Colossus stands as one of the most beautiful games I have ever played. I found myself slowing to a walk to soak in the moments of natural beauty that made yet another outing in the Forbidden Land unforgettable. With the share function on the PlayStation 4, I constantly paused the action to fiddle with the newly added photo mode in pursuit of that perfect angle to show off Bluepoint's gorgeously rendered take on Team Ico's classic. It was a compulsion to ogle the work put into everything on screen and then share that with the world. If I had to nitpick the presentation, there were a few elements that felt a bit off. The biggest would be Wander's strange lack of facial animations. The update gave him somewhat of a baby face; not a huge problem, but slightly different from the original character model. His face seems to lack some degree of animation for reacting to events, something more noticeable with a built-in photo mode. Outside of cutscenes, Wander is content to stare passively into the distance, regardless of the circumstances. Wobbling on the ledge of a colossus-sized fall? Not even the faintest recognition of his own mortality. Lastly, and this might be one of the most nitpicky things of all, one of the subtle elements of the original release of Shadow of the Colossus was the slow shift that visualized Wander's fall from grace. As each colossi met its death, he became less human. Players saw that change happen bit by bit, witnessing horns sprout from his head and his skin turn pale and black veins appear on his body. The remake seems to only gradually make his skin paler until the very end when he suddenly has horns and horrific cracked skin. It would have been nice to have a subtler touch applied to his transformation to give it more of a build-up. All of that being said, the small issues present in the Shadow of the Colossus remake are an exceedingly small price to pay for an update that's otherwise a fan or newcomer's dream come true. An updated control scheme provides people frustrated with the PS2 controls a new way to play, while also retaining the retro layout available for those who have grown used to how the original played. Small additions to the game like a series of hidden coins that can be collected for a secret reward that have been scattered across the world to reward players who poke into every nook and cranny. Additional clarification has been added to some of the colossi themselves to show what can and cannot be climbed and grabbed. The same with some parts of the environment that now have grabbable surfaces to avoid frustrating falls. The gameplay remains as harrowing, exciting, and frustrating as ever. Players who found the camera a problem in the original will find similar issues here. Agro's AI enhanced controls will prove just as frustrating (or appropriate) as it was in 2005. Running up gigantic swords, struggling to maintain a grip on a gliding stone eagle high in the sky, or outsmarting walking artillery batteries all remain exhilarating, rendered more breath-taking by Bluepoint. Kow Otani's soaring track still sends chills up the spine, playing with the player's emotions, masterfully directing the the reaction players have at any given moment. As far as I could tell, the soundtrack remained unchanged, but I might have missed a few subtle alterations. The soundscape of Shadow of the Colossus remains one of the most cohesive pieces of the whole package, bringing all of the elements together with a neat bow. Conclusion: Shadow of the Colossus was already a phenomenal game that shaped an entire generation of people and helped solidify the acceptance of video games as an art form. The remake provides a face lift from the ground up that brings forth a whole new world of beauty that enhances a timeless story. If you missed out on the original on PS2 or the HD remaster on PS3, this is the definitive edition that you owe it to yourself to play. Shadow of the Colossus is available now for PlayStation 4.
  7. Time moves slowly and inexorably forward. The world changes, and we grow old telling stories together. Those stories, the ones that stick with us, communicated something important to us. As a medium, game creators have spent decades learning how to put together ever more effective stories that can offer that thing of precious importance, that moment of beauty, clarity, success, failure. In a sea of stories, Shadow of the Colossus stands out as a fairy tale in the classic sense, and the remake by Bluepoint Games serves to enhance what was already a foundational piece of video game history. Shadow of the Colossus tells the tale of a young man named Wander who travels to the Forbidden Land, a landmass sealed off from the rest of the world. Using an enchanted sword, he strikes a deal with an enigmatic entity named Dormin who agrees to bring the woman he has brought with him back from the dead if he can complete an impossible task: Defeat 16 colossal incarnations of the towering stone statues that line the temple. Armed only with his magic sword, a bow with unlimited arrows, and his trusty horse Agro, Wander sets forth into a long-abandoned world of ruins and natural wonders to battle towering behemoths the size of skyscrapers. The simple, powerful set up allows the visuals, music, and gameplay tell the vast majority of the narrative. That open approach to storytelling led a lot of people, even the marketing team for Shadow of the Colossus, to interpret the adventure as one about true, undying love. Wander, after all, goes to incredible lengths for a woman with whom he has a close connection. However, playing through the remake, a version remade after over a decade, I realized that my perception of the game has shifted to seeing it more as a tale about loss and the inability to let go being an ultimately destructive force. That flexibility and changing interpretation feels interesting. It's a reminder of how much time has passed since I played Shadow of the Colossus in 2005. Back then, the question of whether video games were capable of being art was a hotly debated topic. The internet was on fire with hot takes about what it meant to be art and whether interactivity itself negated art. Now that the question has largely been settled, it feels liberating to be able to think, "okay, it's art, so what does that mean? What does all of this, as a piece of art, mean?" Everyone will have to struggle with loss at some point in their lives. It's not pleasant. It hurts. There's the impulse to yell and scream and gnash your teeth because you would do anything to have that person back in your life. And Shadow of the Colossus asks the seductive question: What if you could throw everything to the wind and bring that person back? What price would you pay? And at first, the answer seems obvious, heroic even. But as the game progresses and one by one the beautiful, deadly colossi, who were all minding their own business before Wander showed up, begin to take their toll. The feeling of triumph and accomplishment gives way to self-doubt. Is this the right thing? That question of meaning scratches at the fundamentals of what I believe make myths and fairy tales resonate across time. Because Shadow of the Colossus is art. To some it could be a tale of love, to others it could represent a cautionary tale about obsession, and playing the remake it brought to mind loss. Shadow of the Colossus manages to have the narrative flexibility to accommodate multiple interpretations, and that's a quality that can bestow a great deal of longevity to a piece of art. I'd argue that's at least partly why we are getting a remake of a game that's two-and-a-half generations of technology behind the current PlayStation console. It's a testament to the artistry of the original PlayStation 2 release of Shadow of the Colossus that the visuals largely hold up due to its adherence to a strong minimalist aesthetic that focuses on natural beauty. The entire production possesses a washed out quality that cleverly hides some of the deficient parts of the world as Wander and Agro make their way across the quiet plains and subdued forests. With the remake, none of the world needs to be hidden by visual tricks; flowing water glitters in the sunlight, grass sways with the wind, dust motes flit through the air. The effect of the increased focus on detail afforded by the technological leap and the original style is jaw-dropping. To put it bluntly, this remake of Shadow of the Colossus stands as one of the most beautiful games I have ever played. I found myself slowing to a walk to soak in the moments of natural beauty that made yet another outing in the Forbidden Land unforgettable. With the share function on the PlayStation 4, I constantly paused the action to fiddle with the newly added photo mode in pursuit of that perfect angle to show off Bluepoint's gorgeously rendered take on Team Ico's classic. It was a compulsion to ogle the work put into everything on screen and then share that with the world. If I had to nitpick the presentation, there were a few elements that felt a bit off. The biggest would be Wander's strange lack of facial animations. The update gave him somewhat of a baby face; not a huge problem, but slightly different from the original character model. His face seems to lack some degree of animation for reacting to events, something more noticeable with a built-in photo mode. Outside of cutscenes, Wander is content to stare passively into the distance, regardless of the circumstances. Wobbling on the ledge of a colossus-sized fall? Not even the faintest recognition of his own mortality. Lastly, and this might be one of the most nitpicky things of all, one of the subtle elements of the original release of Shadow of the Colossus was the slow shift that visualized Wander's fall from grace. As each colossi met its death, he became less human. Players saw that change happen bit by bit, witnessing horns sprout from his head and his skin turn pale and black veins appear on his body. The remake seems to only gradually make his skin paler until the very end when he suddenly has horns and horrific cracked skin. It would have been nice to have a subtler touch applied to his transformation to give it more of a build-up. All of that being said, the small issues present in the Shadow of the Colossus remake are an exceedingly small price to pay for an update that's otherwise a fan or newcomer's dream come true. An updated control scheme provides people frustrated with the PS2 controls a new way to play, while also retaining the retro layout available for those who have grown used to how the original played. Small additions to the game like a series of hidden coins that can be collected for a secret reward that have been scattered across the world to reward players who poke into every nook and cranny. Additional clarification has been added to some of the colossi themselves to show what can and cannot be climbed and grabbed. The same with some parts of the environment that now have grabbable surfaces to avoid frustrating falls. The gameplay remains as harrowing, exciting, and frustrating as ever. Players who found the camera a problem in the original will find similar issues here. Agro's AI enhanced controls will prove just as frustrating (or appropriate) as it was in 2005. Running up gigantic swords, struggling to maintain a grip on a gliding stone eagle high in the sky, or outsmarting walking artillery batteries all remain exhilarating, rendered more breath-taking by Bluepoint. Kow Otani's soaring track still sends chills up the spine, playing with the player's emotions, masterfully directing the the reaction players have at any given moment. As far as I could tell, the soundtrack remained unchanged, but I might have missed a few subtle alterations. The soundscape of Shadow of the Colossus remains one of the most cohesive pieces of the whole package, bringing all of the elements together with a neat bow. Conclusion: Shadow of the Colossus was already a phenomenal game that shaped an entire generation of people and helped solidify the acceptance of video games as an art form. The remake provides a face lift from the ground up that brings forth a whole new world of beauty that enhances a timeless story. If you missed out on the original on PS2 or the HD remaster on PS3, this is the definitive edition that you owe it to yourself to play. Shadow of the Colossus is available now for PlayStation 4. View full article
  8. herobyclicking

    Room Share thread

    Here's the place to request or offer a room to share for Extra Life United. Consider sharing or asking about - Location of the hotel - Max Occupancy for the room - costs, fees, etc
  9. Heya Extra Lifers! If you haven't heard, we've teamed up with PLAYERUNKNOWN BATTLEGROUNDS this week for an incredible fundraising marathon for Children's Miracle Network Hospitals! Grab your frying pan and join us in supporting by signing up to stream from your personal channel or donate directly at www.extra-life.org/PUBG . You can watch this amazing event on twitch.tv/playBATTLEGROUNDS or twitch.tv/extralife4kids and support your favorite streamers and make a life saving donation for a local CMN Hospital. Event Starts: January 28th 9:00 PM PST January 29th 12:00 AM EST January 29th 6:00 AM CET Event Ends: February 2nd 8:59 PM PST February 2nd 11:59 PM EST February 3rd 4:59 AM CET For more information swing by the official PLAYERUNKNOWN BATTLEGROUNDS forum! #ThisIsBattleRoyaleForTheKids #EXTRALIFE View full article
  10. herobyclicking

    PUBG Extra Life Charity Event

    Heya Extra Lifers! If you haven't heard, we've teamed up with PLAYERUNKNOWN BATTLEGROUNDS this week for an incredible fundraising marathon for Children's Miracle Network Hospitals! Grab your frying pan and join us in supporting by signing up to stream from your personal channel or donate directly at www.extra-life.org/PUBG . You can watch this amazing event on twitch.tv/playBATTLEGROUNDS or twitch.tv/extralife4kids and support your favorite streamers and make a life saving donation for a local CMN Hospital. Event Starts: January 28th 9:00 PM PST January 29th 12:00 AM EST January 29th 6:00 AM CET Event Ends: February 2nd 8:59 PM PST February 2nd 11:59 PM EST February 3rd 4:59 AM CET For more information swing by the official PLAYERUNKNOWN BATTLEGROUNDS forum! #ThisIsBattleRoyaleForTheKids #EXTRALIFE
  11. Hey Extra Lifers We want to take a minute to thank you one more time for participating in Extra Life and making miracles happen for families who desperately need them. Please know that you spent 2017 making a difference in the lives of so many families throughout North America. While we won't have the final fundraising total for the year to share with you until March, we're beyond thrilled to announce that so far, together we have raised over $10.6 million for the kids treated at Children's Miracle Network Hospitals! That is a huge accomplishment! Join us for another year of playing games to heal kids, sign up for Extra Life 2018. Sign Up for Extra Life 2018 The Extra Life community has been coming together in a truly wonderful way year after year. Sign up for Extra Life 2018 today to continue to make a difference in the lives of sick and injured kids across North America. Let’s all keep that energy going by pushing forward for fun, fellowship, and – as always…. For The Kids, Mike, Liz, Lou & Jeromy Team Extra Life Children's Miracle Network Hospitals View full article
  12. Drum roll please....we're offer more opportunities in 2018 for YOU to get involved and share your talents to further grow our ATL Extra Life program. To top it off we're hoping to host an inaugural game day event in ATL this fall. To do this, we've created a few more guild committee positions----which greatly lessens the responsibilities per committee member, but ultimately boosts our extra life community and the kids we support! Lou, Liz, Mike, and the amazing Extra Life team at CMNH are also rolling out a few new national leadership structures in spring that we'll merge into our 2018 committee plan as well----making a more awesome---AND manageable--- way for more people to get involved in Extra Life without getting overwhelmed. The best part about this is: we have the opportunity to make it our own and create a committee that best serves the needs and interests of our ATL Extra Life community! This means if you're not 100% sold on all the aspects of one of the roles listed below...no problem! Share your interests in the application---and once we see where everyone's interests are, we'll adjust the outline below to best fit our community. Each of the positions in the attachment below are open and ready to be filled. We just need YOU to take a few minutes to complete the application below and email it to beth.agee@choa.org by Sunday, February 18 (NEW DATE!). The committee position descriptions are listed on page 2 and 3 of the attached 2018 committee document. Both of the docs below are also available on google docs. Please reach out to me via beth.agee@choa.org or 404.785.7366 with any questions. I'm looking forward to another incredible year with the Extra Life Atlanta community---and making an even bigger impact on our kids at Children's! Beth Agee Documents below also available here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1AsnscHvglsmBPU4496kqKRNZzUcjAs9M?usp=sharing 2018 Extra Life Committee Description.pdf 2018 Extra Life ATL Leadership Committee Application_CHOA.pdf
  13. KnightHarbinger

    ELU2018?

    So yeah.. ..deets..? ;0 ;~) o/
  14. Hello, D.C. friends! In the absence of an actively engaged Washington, D.C. Guild, we'd love to invite you to our 2018 Kickoff Event on February 3, 2018! We support Johns Hopkins Children's Center as our partner hospital, but we are first and foremost Extra Lifers who want to ensure the success of Extra Life as a whole. As such, we're covering events in the entire Baltimore/DC/NoVa area on behalf of both Johns Hopkins Children's Center and Children's National in hopes of growing fundraising for both hospitals until a strong guild presence is established in Washington, D.C. Whether you're new to Extra Life or an old timer, we'd love to meet you, share our story with you, and fill your tummy with a delicious free meal! Thanks to nominal efforts in the D.C. area, we've helped to grow Children's National's Extra Life presence as well as improve fundraising for Johns Hopkins Children's Center - and you were a part of that! We'd love to share in that success with you. We'd also love to include you in any future D.C. area events. Please RSVP on the event below if you would plan to come. We'd love to have you!
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