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Found 69 results

  1. CD Projeckt RED, the developer behind The Witcher series and Good Old Games, is kicking off E3 with an early press conference, which you can watch right here. The livestream begins at 11am Pacific (2pm Eastern). They're teasing more about The Witcher 3, a new trailer/in-game footage, and a big announcement for GOG.com. Maybe we'll hear something about Cyberpunk 2077? You can watch the livestream of the press conference on thewitcher.com/stream, GOG.com/stream, or right here in the player below. UPDATE: The press conference is over. There were a number of bombshells dropped, so let's cover them for those of you who didn't have a chance to watch live. - The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt will release February 24th, 2015 - The boxed versions of the game will contain a map, soundtrack, the official "Witcher Universe - The Compendium," stickers, and a protective sleeve - Collector's Editions will come with all of the goodies of the boxed game along with a 200 page art book, a Witcher medallion, a SteelBook box, inner and outer containment boxes, and an awesome 33x24x26cm, hand-painted, Polystoone statue of Geralt of Rivia slaying a griffin (there is a neat little marketing/making of video, as well) - Additionally, pre-orders will come with two priority beta keys for The Witcher Adventure Game, a digital board game for PC, Andorid, and iOS that will have both single and multiplayer modes (though the beta will only have multiplayer) - The press conference ended with CD Projeckt RED announcing that they would be launching a digital distribution platform called GOG Galaxy. Galaxy will have many of the same features as the Steam platform, minus DRM, any online requirement (unless your game happens to require online to function like an MMO or if you want to connect to update achievements and chat with friends), cross-play will allow players to game with friends who have bought their games on other platforms. The goal of the platform is to provide users with the most convenient and fair ways of playing their games while being completely optional. This could finally be some real competition for Steam. View full article
  2. The Kickstarter campaign for a new turn-based strategy RPG from the creator of XCOM has come to a close, breezing by its goal by a cool $30,000. 5,051 people pledged $210,854 in financial backing for Julian Gollop's Chaos Reborn. The game aims to provide a deep, fast-paced, tactical experience with player progression, multiplayer, and co-op. It has been greenlit on Steam and seems to be on track for an early 2015 on PC, Mac, and Linux. You can try the current online build or get in on some of the cool backing reward tiers for yourself on the Chaos Reborn website. View full article
  3. The Kickstarter campaign for a new turn-based strategy RPG from the creator of XCOM has come to a close, breezing by its goal by a cool $30,000. 5,051 people pledged $210,854 in financial backing for Julian Gollop's Chaos Reborn. The game aims to provide a deep, fast-paced, tactical experience with player progression, multiplayer, and co-op. It has been greenlit on Steam and seems to be on track for an early 2015 on PC, Mac, and Linux. You can try the current online build or get in on some of the cool backing reward tiers for yourself on the Chaos Reborn website.
  4. The critically acclaimed iOS indie adventure title Year Walk by developer Simogo is now available on PC and Mac via Steam. Adventure game aficionados and fans of creepiness, rejoice! Year Walk thrusts players into a beautiful, disturbing world set in Sweden during the 1800s. The protagonist is on a vision quest through a dark wood to get a glimpse of the future. Mythical monsters, confounding brain teasers, and bizarre sights await. The PC version boasts a few improvements over the mobile version. Some of the graphics have been overhauled and improved, new puzzles have been added, and a map now graces the game. Most importantly, the companion app that was meant to be downloaded and used along side the game to help work through the puzzles and decipher the myths and legends is now integrated directly into the game. Have any of you Extra Lifers out there played Year Walk? Planning on picking up the Steam version? View full article
  5. The critically acclaimed iOS indie adventure title Year Walk by developer Simogo is now available on PC and Mac via Steam. Adventure game aficionados and fans of creepiness, rejoice! Year Walk thrusts players into a beautiful, disturbing world set in Sweden during the 1800s. The protagonist is on a vision quest through a dark wood to get a glimpse of the future. Mythical monsters, confounding brain teasers, and bizarre sights await. The PC version boasts a few improvements over the mobile version. Some of the graphics have been overhauled and improved, new puzzles have been added, and a map now graces the game. Most importantly, the companion app that was meant to be downloaded and used along side the game to help work through the puzzles and decipher the myths and legends is now integrated directly into the game. Have any of you Extra Lifers out there played Year Walk? Planning on picking up the Steam version?
  6. Starting now, you can share your Steam library with up to five other Steam users on up to ten authorized devices. There are a few rules and exceptions to this library sharing business, so keep the following in mind if you are planning on opening up to your family or close friends. You must be online to play games that have been shared with you. There is no pick-and-choosing what you want to make available, your entire library must be shared. Due to third-party restrictions like codes or subscriptions, some shared games will not be accessible to those borrowing from a family member's library. Most importantly, both the lender and the borrower cannot play from the same library at the same time. The account holder will have unrestricted access to their own games, but the borrower will be given a few minutes before being kicked from their game if the lender decides they wish to play. Also, region-locked content will remain region-locked. With those caveats, this still sounds like a great step forward for digital content. In a way, this might recapture the feeling of taking a beloved game over to a friend's house to let them give it a try. It isn't exactly the same, but it is better than having your account locked to one or two computers. For instructions on how to enable sharing, refer to Valve's announcement: "To enable Family Library Sharing, first be sure you have Steam Guard security enabled via Steam > Settings > Account in the Steam Client. Then enable the sharing feature via Settings > Family, (or in Big Picture mode, Settings > Family Library Sharing,) where you'll also authorize specific computers and users to share." PC gaming crowd, what do you think of Family Sharing? Will you be making use of this feature? View full article
  7. Starting now, you can share your Steam library with up to five other Steam users on up to ten authorized devices. There are a few rules and exceptions to this library sharing business, so keep the following in mind if you are planning on opening up to your family or close friends. You must be online to play games that have been shared with you. There is no pick-and-choosing what you want to make available, your entire library must be shared. Due to third-party restrictions like codes or subscriptions, some shared games will not be accessible to those borrowing from a family member's library. Most importantly, both the lender and the borrower cannot play from the same library at the same time. The account holder will have unrestricted access to their own games, but the borrower will be given a few minutes before being kicked from their game if the lender decides they wish to play. Also, region-locked content will remain region-locked. With those caveats, this still sounds like a great step forward for digital content. In a way, this might recapture the feeling of taking a beloved game over to a friend's house to let them give it a try. It isn't exactly the same, but it is better than having your account locked to one or two computers. For instructions on how to enable sharing, refer to Valve's announcement: "To enable Family Library Sharing, first be sure you have Steam Guard security enabled via Steam > Settings > Account in the Steam Client. Then enable the sharing feature via Settings > Family, (or in Big Picture mode, Settings > Family Library Sharing,) where you'll also authorize specific computers and users to share." PC gaming crowd, what do you think of Family Sharing? Will you be making use of this feature?
  8. Steam sales are kind of a big deal in the world of video games and this season's is no exception with bargains like BioShock Infinite for $9.99 and Street Fighter IV for $4.99. Until December 3, tons of games will be marked down anywhere from 30%-90%. Basically, that means if you need some new PC games, head over to the Steam site and browse some bargains! View full article
  9. Steam sales are kind of a big deal in the world of video games and this season's is no exception with bargains like BioShock Infinite for $9.99 and Street Fighter IV for $4.99. Until December 3, tons of games will be marked down anywhere from 30%-90%. Basically, that means if you need some new PC games, head over to the Steam site and browse some bargains!
  10. People may have had their doubts about the Steam controller after its announcement, but Valve thinks it can change those attitudes and has released a video of the controller in action. The demonstration shows off the capabilities of the controller in traditionally gamepad inaccessible titles like Civilization V and Papers, Please, as well as more conventional titles like Portal 2 and Counter-Strike: Global Offensive. The results are actually pretty impressive and have us itching to spend some quality time with the device as well as SteamOS and one of those mysterious Steam boxes. This is a pretty big gamble for Valve and it will be interesting to see how this plays out for the company. Let's just hope that they get around to making Half-Life 3 sometime soon. View full article
  11. People may have had their doubts about the Steam controller after its announcement, but Valve thinks it can change those attitudes and has released a video of the controller in action. The demonstration shows off the capabilities of the controller in traditionally gamepad inaccessible titles like Civilization V and Papers, Please, as well as more conventional titles like Portal 2 and Counter-Strike: Global Offensive. The results are actually pretty impressive and have us itching to spend some quality time with the device as well as SteamOS and one of those mysterious Steam boxes. This is a pretty big gamble for Valve and it will be interesting to see how this plays out for the company. Let's just hope that they get around to making Half-Life 3 sometime soon.
  12. The third and final announcement from Valve this week revealed a controller to go along with their Steam Machines and SteamOS reveals. The Steam controller works with two trackpads on the left and right sides, as well as sixteen buttons Valve has designed (for the most part) to be used without lifting thumbs off the trackpads (which can both also be pressed as buttons). The backside of the controller has two long buttons that can be mapped to additional actions. The midsection of the controller is populated with four buttons and a touchscreen interface that can be customized depending on the game being played. Valve's touchscreen has a few special features unique to itself. The screen itself is a button, which allows users to swipe through numerous options before committing to any single one. This means that there can be a huge variety in the number of functions the touchscreen can provide, in addition to the other physical buttons on the controller. Due to the high degree of accuracy traditional PC games require, the controller does not feature conventional rumble technology. Instead it uses "a new generation of super-precise haptic feedback, employing dual linear resonant actuators." This means the controller can provide very precise rumble feedback without interfering with gameplay. The announcement also mentioned briefly that "as a parlour trick" the haptic rumble can ever convert the trackpads into speakers. Every button of this new gamepad can be remapped depending on the game users are interested in playing. Players will be able to share their favorite configurations with their friends and community. Eventually, the most popular controller layouts will be made into lists for other players to easily access. Finally, the controller, much like many of Valve's products, was designed to be taken apart and tinkered with by enterprising gamers: Just as the Steam Community and Workshop contributors currently deliver tremendous value via additions to software products on Steam, we believe that they will meaningfully contribute to the design of the Steam Controller. We plan to make tools available that will enable users to participate in all aspects of the experience, from industrial design to electrical engineering. We can’t wait to see what you come up with. That wraps up this week of Valve bombshells. SteamOS, Steam Boxes, and now a strange, new controller, together they have the potential to cause a number of huge waves in the industry and maybe even shift the policies of Microsoft, Sony, and Nintendo. What do you all think of these announcements? Good? Bad? Underwhelming? Exciting? Let us know in the comments! View full article
  13. The third and final announcement from Valve this week revealed a controller to go along with their Steam Machines and SteamOS reveals. The Steam controller works with two trackpads on the left and right sides, as well as sixteen buttons Valve has designed (for the most part) to be used without lifting thumbs off the trackpads (which can both also be pressed as buttons). The backside of the controller has two long buttons that can be mapped to additional actions. The midsection of the controller is populated with four buttons and a touchscreen interface that can be customized depending on the game being played. Valve's touchscreen has a few special features unique to itself. The screen itself is a button, which allows users to swipe through numerous options before committing to any single one. This means that there can be a huge variety in the number of functions the touchscreen can provide, in addition to the other physical buttons on the controller. Due to the high degree of accuracy traditional PC games require, the controller does not feature conventional rumble technology. Instead it uses "a new generation of super-precise haptic feedback, employing dual linear resonant actuators." This means the controller can provide very precise rumble feedback without interfering with gameplay. The announcement also mentioned briefly that "as a parlour trick" the haptic rumble can ever convert the trackpads into speakers. Every button of this new gamepad can be remapped depending on the game users are interested in playing. Players will be able to share their favorite configurations with their friends and community. Eventually, the most popular controller layouts will be made into lists for other players to easily access. Finally, the controller, much like many of Valve's products, was designed to be taken apart and tinkered with by enterprising gamers: Just as the Steam Community and Workshop contributors currently deliver tremendous value via additions to software products on Steam, we believe that they will meaningfully contribute to the design of the Steam Controller. We plan to make tools available that will enable users to participate in all aspects of the experience, from industrial design to electrical engineering. We can’t wait to see what you come up with. That wraps up this week of Valve bombshells. SteamOS, Steam Boxes, and now a strange, new controller, together they have the potential to cause a number of huge waves in the industry and maybe even shift the policies of Microsoft, Sony, and Nintendo. What do you all think of these announcements? Good? Bad? Underwhelming? Exciting? Let us know in the comments!
  14. Earlier this week, Valve dropped a knowledge bomb by unveiling SteamOS. Today they revealed that what was rumored to be a Steam Box will actually be multiple boxes from multiple manufacturers coming in 2014. While Valve hasn't said what companies will be creating the hardware, they have said that they will be coming next year and all will come running SteamOS. As a means of testing their own box, Valve will be giving away 300 beta machines to Steam users free of charge. "We have designed a high-performance prototype that’s optimized for gaming, for the living room, and for Steam. Of course, it’s also completely upgradable and open," read the announcement. Want to be eligible to be chosen for the beta? Just follow these simple steps: Before October 25, log in to Steam and then visit your quest page to track your current status towards beta test eligibility Join the Steam Universe community group Agree to the Steam Hardware Beta Terms and Conditions Make 10 Steam friends (if you haven't already) Create a public Steam Community profile (if you haven't already) Play a game using a gamepad in Big Picture mode If you have more questions regarding the box, there is a handy FAQ included in the Steam Machines announcement. There are still many unanswered questions related to the specs of Valve's beta box, who will be making the other boxes, etc. However, Valve is making it clear that these boxes will be highly modifiable. There is a third and final countdown for Friday and the last words of the Steam Machines announcement read: "Am I going to be using a mouse and a keyboard in the living-room? If you want. But Steam and SteamOS work well with gamepads, too. Stay tuned, though - we have some more to say very soon on the topic of input." Does this mean we will be seeing a Valve controller reveal? Stay tuned and we'll keep you up to date. What do you guys think of this turn of events? What do you make of Valve's plunge into hardware and operating systems? View full article
  15. Earlier this week, Valve dropped a knowledge bomb by unveiling SteamOS. Today they revealed that what was rumored to be a Steam Box will actually be multiple boxes from multiple manufacturers coming in 2014. While Valve hasn't said what companies will be creating the hardware, they have said that they will be coming next year and all will come running SteamOS. As a means of testing their own box, Valve will be giving away 300 beta machines to Steam users free of charge. "We have designed a high-performance prototype that’s optimized for gaming, for the living room, and for Steam. Of course, it’s also completely upgradable and open," read the announcement. Want to be eligible to be chosen for the beta? Just follow these simple steps: Before October 25, log in to Steam and then visit your quest page to track your current status towards beta test eligibility Join the Steam Universe community group Agree to the Steam Hardware Beta Terms and Conditions Make 10 Steam friends (if you haven't already) Create a public Steam Community profile (if you haven't already) Play a game using a gamepad in Big Picture mode If you have more questions regarding the box, there is a handy FAQ included in the Steam Machines announcement. There are still many unanswered questions related to the specs of Valve's beta box, who will be making the other boxes, etc. However, Valve is making it clear that these boxes will be highly modifiable. There is a third and final countdown for Friday and the last words of the Steam Machines announcement read: "Am I going to be using a mouse and a keyboard in the living-room? If you want. But Steam and SteamOS work well with gamepads, too. Stay tuned, though - we have some more to say very soon on the topic of input." Does this mean we will be seeing a Valve controller reveal? Stay tuned and we'll keep you up to date. What do you guys think of this turn of events? What do you make of Valve's plunge into hardware and operating systems?
  16. Valve's countdown has reached its conclusion and their announcement is *drumroll* a new, free operating system tailored for living room machines. SteamOS combines Linux and Steam into one super OS that exists in your living room. The basic concept of the operating system seems to be that it can operate on "any living room machine" and works to stream games, movies, television, music, etc. from your current Steam library to your television. This means that Valve will soon be adding the ability to purchase music, movies, and television shows to the Steam marketplace in addition to video games. The entire Steam library will be compatible with SteamOS, including all user-created content. Even user's friends lists will make the jump to the new operating system. As a result of a dedicated OS, Valve reports that they have, "achieved significant performance increases in graphics processing, and we’re now targeting audio performance and reductions in input latency at the operating system level." This seems to imply that less powerful devices could run more powerful games while running SteamOS. Besides allowing users to stream their entertainment library to their television, the new OS will allow users to create family accounts for their Steam. On paper, this will allow families to easily share their games among their household with separate achievement tracking and permissions for each family member. Don't want little Timmy to be playing Metro: Last Light? BOOM, that content is restricted from his family account. Tired of your significant other nabbing those achievements before you do? BAM, you both have separate accounts for the same library. The Steam Cloud allows for users to carry over their saved progress from their main machine to their living room, provides storage, and automatic updates on everything. According to Valve, the operating system will be free forever and will be available, licensing free, to hardware manufacturers. There are still many unanswered questions regarding SteamOS. Just what Valve means by "any living room machine" isn't clear quite yet. Does that mean I can download SteamOS onto a PS4 or Xbox One? Or will it require a dedicated living room PC? How much storage does the Steam Cloud provide? Exactly when will the SteamOS launch? When will Steam be opening their market for movies and music? Also, what is with the second countdown that began after the SteamOS announcement? I guess we will find out when the timer reaches zero on Wednesday. Until then, let dreams of a free Steam operating system that runs on your television dance in your head. You can read the full announcement here. View full article
  17. Valve's countdown has reached its conclusion and their announcement is *drumroll* a new, free operating system tailored for living room machines. SteamOS combines Linux and Steam into one super OS that exists in your living room. The basic concept of the operating system seems to be that it can operate on "any living room machine" and works to stream games, movies, television, music, etc. from your current Steam library to your television. This means that Valve will soon be adding the ability to purchase music, movies, and television shows to the Steam marketplace in addition to video games. The entire Steam library will be compatible with SteamOS, including all user-created content. Even user's friends lists will make the jump to the new operating system. As a result of a dedicated OS, Valve reports that they have, "achieved significant performance increases in graphics processing, and we’re now targeting audio performance and reductions in input latency at the operating system level." This seems to imply that less powerful devices could run more powerful games while running SteamOS. Besides allowing users to stream their entertainment library to their television, the new OS will allow users to create family accounts for their Steam. On paper, this will allow families to easily share their games among their household with separate achievement tracking and permissions for each family member. Don't want little Timmy to be playing Metro: Last Light? BOOM, that content is restricted from his family account. Tired of your significant other nabbing those achievements before you do? BAM, you both have separate accounts for the same library. The Steam Cloud allows for users to carry over their saved progress from their main machine to their living room, provides storage, and automatic updates on everything. According to Valve, the operating system will be free forever and will be available, licensing free, to hardware manufacturers. There are still many unanswered questions regarding SteamOS. Just what Valve means by "any living room machine" isn't clear quite yet. Does that mean I can download SteamOS onto a PS4 or Xbox One? Or will it require a dedicated living room PC? How much storage does the Steam Cloud provide? Exactly when will the SteamOS launch? When will Steam be opening their market for movies and music? Also, what is with the second countdown that began after the SteamOS announcement? I guess we will find out when the timer reaches zero on Wednesday. Until then, let dreams of a free Steam operating system that runs on your television dance in your head. You can read the full announcement here.
  18. What could Gabe Newell be planning? Is the Steam Box finally going to become a reality? Let's take a look at the facts. Last year, Valve released Big Picture for their digital distribution platform Steam, which allowed users to easily connect the service to their televisions. Even before Big Picture Valve has been quietly hiring people for hardware development, hardware that hasn't surfaced yet, though Gabe Newell has repeatedly assured the public that something is being worked on. Oh, and Valve has posted a countdown until 1 PM Eastern under the url store.steampowered.com/livingroom. The page teases that "The Steam Universe is Expanding in 2014" and a statement reading, "Last year, we shipped a software feature called Big Picture, a user-interface tailored for televisions and gamepads. This year we’ve been working on even more ways to connect the dots for customers who want Steam in the living-room. Soon, we’ll be adding you to our design process, so that you can help us shape the future of Steam." View full article
  19. What could Gabe Newell be planning? Is the Steam Box finally going to become a reality? Let's take a look at the facts. Last year, Valve released Big Picture for their digital distribution platform Steam, which allowed users to easily connect the service to their televisions. Even before Big Picture Valve has been quietly hiring people for hardware development, hardware that hasn't surfaced yet, though Gabe Newell has repeatedly assured the public that something is being worked on. Oh, and Valve has posted a countdown until 1 PM Eastern under the url store.steampowered.com/livingroom. The page teases that "The Steam Universe is Expanding in 2014" and a statement reading, "Last year, we shipped a software feature called Big Picture, a user-interface tailored for televisions and gamepads. This year we’ve been working on even more ways to connect the dots for customers who want Steam in the living-room. Soon, we’ll be adding you to our design process, so that you can help us shape the future of Steam."
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