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Found 69 results

  1. If Victorian horror and old school adventure games (ala the original Alone in the Dark) sound pleasing, A Room Beyond might be up your alley -- even the dark and spooky one. Previously released as an episodic and early access title, developer Rene Buhlig is now packaging the final product together on steam. The five original episodes are collected into one package, featuring classic point-and-click style gameplay. The story is ripped right out of an old Lovecraftian short story, with the player character awaking in a ritually decorated cave just outside a mysterious village that’s being hunted by an unseen threat from the woods. Check out the trailer for the full release and let us know what the abyss says once you’re done staring. If we don't hear from you by June 13 when the game releases, we'll assume the abyss is staring back at you. View full article
  2. If Victorian horror and old school adventure games (ala the original Alone in the Dark) sound pleasing, A Room Beyond might be up your alley -- even the dark and spooky one. Previously released as an episodic and early access title, developer Rene Buhlig is now packaging the final product together on steam. The five original episodes are collected into one package, featuring classic point-and-click style gameplay. The story is ripped right out of an old Lovecraftian short story, with the player character awaking in a ritually decorated cave just outside a mysterious village that’s being hunted by an unseen threat from the woods. Check out the trailer for the full release and let us know what the abyss says once you’re done staring. If we don't hear from you by June 13 when the game releases, we'll assume the abyss is staring back at you.
  3. The year is 1986 and Miami has found itself struggling against gangs, drugs, and the AIDS epidemic. One person per day is found murdered and hundreds go missing, overwhelming local police departments. Many of those people are never found, disappearing without a trace. Consuelo "Chelo" Martínez tracks down those ghosts to uncover the truth behind their disappearances. Ghosts of Miami tells the story of Chelo's sleuthing as she solves cases and makes a name for herself as a lady who can get things done. I had a chance to play through the demo of Ghosts of Miami this week and found myself really impressed. I'm not one who typically falls in love with visual novels. The limited degree of interactivity and the stylistic rut many fall into generally loses my interest. Not so with Ghosts of Miami. Developed by Pillow Fight, the team that made a name for themselves with 2015's We Know The Devil, Ghosts of Miami drips with 80s style. The dream pop art exudes charm and personality. While backgrounds have an ethereal, dream-like quality, the principle characters come alive. Their various facial expressions and poses render the cast instantly endearing and eye-catching. The animated opening alone demonstrates how much life Pillow Fight poured into Ghosts of Miami. There's a really passionate core to the game that its visuals thoroughly succeed in conveying. While style certainly contributes to the tone of Ghosts of Miami, writing remains the lifeblood of a visual novel. It needs to hold up to scrutiny. On that front, the title stands strong. Chelo herself presents a compelling protagonist as a sleuth who can take more morally ambiguous jobs because she lacks even a Private Investigator designation. The player feels her frustrations, insecurities, and fears via her dialogue or internal asides. The well realized supporting characters showcased in the demo pull their own weight, too. While the game itself will follow Chelo over the course of five cases, the demo only shows a part of her first case. She's hired by her landlord, Mrs. Woon, to find Grace Woon, her daughter who has been missing for two days. This first case proves to be an important one for Chelo, both because it could make or break her reputation, but also because it is her first case after quitting her gas station job and she really doesn't want to go back there. After setting the scene, Ghosts of Miami allows players to choose which lead they would like to follow up. The catch is that each lead takes time - Chelo only has time to visit three locations throughout the day - morning, afternoon, and evening. Do you go to Grace's favorite childhood spot? Check out her sketchy boyfriend? See if you can track down her best friend? Or do you put all that aside for now and see what your screw-up of a brother is up to this time? While visiting locations, players typically encounter new characters who can prove helpful, resistant, or clueless depending on the circumstance and the approach players choose to take. Like many visual novels, players will encounter helpful (or possibly distracting) love interests while solving mysteries. Players can rebuff these romantic advances to focus on work or blow off work to spend time with their new romance. Be warned! Spending too much time with those amorous connections could lead to disaster. The Ghosts of Miami has been Greenlit on Steam and it's definitely worth a look, especially if you're in the market for a different kind of game to spice things up in this year of great games. The full release of Ghosts of Miami is coming up sometime this summer. It will be available in English, Spanish, and Traditional Chinese. Pillow Fight is also working on additional accessibility options like screenreading, text-to-speech, and gamepad controls. I thoroughly enjoyed my time with Ghosts of Miami. The demo felt incredibly refreshing with its overpowering charm, stylish aesthetic, and well written dialogue. It made me want to spend more time in its world and characters over the course of just one in-game day. Keep an eye on this one. You can download the demo from the Ghosts of Miami website.
  4. The year is 1986 and Miami has found itself struggling against gangs, drugs, and the AIDS epidemic. One person per day is found murdered and hundreds go missing, overwhelming local police departments. Many of those people are never found, disappearing without a trace. Consuelo "Chelo" Martínez tracks down those ghosts to uncover the truth behind their disappearances. Ghosts of Miami tells the story of Chelo's sleuthing as she solves cases and makes a name for herself as a lady who can get things done. I had a chance to play through the demo of Ghosts of Miami this week and found myself really impressed. I'm not one who typically falls in love with visual novels. The limited degree of interactivity and the stylistic rut many fall into generally loses my interest. Not so with Ghosts of Miami. Developed by Pillow Fight, the team that made a name for themselves with 2015's We Know The Devil, Ghosts of Miami drips with 80s style. The dream pop art exudes charm and personality. While backgrounds have an ethereal, dream-like quality, the principle characters come alive. Their various facial expressions and poses render the cast instantly endearing and eye-catching. The animated opening alone demonstrates how much life Pillow Fight poured into Ghosts of Miami. There's a really passionate core to the game that its visuals thoroughly succeed in conveying. While style certainly contributes to the tone of Ghosts of Miami, writing remains the lifeblood of a visual novel. It needs to hold up to scrutiny. On that front, the title stands strong. Chelo herself presents a compelling protagonist as a sleuth who can take more morally ambiguous jobs because she lacks even a Private Investigator designation. The player feels her frustrations, insecurities, and fears via her dialogue or internal asides. The well realized supporting characters showcased in the demo pull their own weight, too. While the game itself will follow Chelo over the course of five cases, the demo only shows a part of her first case. She's hired by her landlord, Mrs. Woon, to find Grace Woon, her daughter who has been missing for two days. This first case proves to be an important one for Chelo, both because it could make or break her reputation, but also because it is her first case after quitting her gas station job and she really doesn't want to go back there. After setting the scene, Ghosts of Miami allows players to choose which lead they would like to follow up. The catch is that each lead takes time - Chelo only has time to visit three locations throughout the day - morning, afternoon, and evening. Do you go to Grace's favorite childhood spot? Check out her sketchy boyfriend? See if you can track down her best friend? Or do you put all that aside for now and see what your screw-up of a brother is up to this time? While visiting locations, players typically encounter new characters who can prove helpful, resistant, or clueless depending on the circumstance and the approach players choose to take. Like many visual novels, players will encounter helpful (or possibly distracting) love interests while solving mysteries. Players can rebuff these romantic advances to focus on work or blow off work to spend time with their new romance. Be warned! Spending too much time with those amorous connections could lead to disaster. The Ghosts of Miami has been Greenlit on Steam and it's definitely worth a look, especially if you're in the market for a different kind of game to spice things up in this year of great games. The full release of Ghosts of Miami is coming up sometime this summer. It will be available in English, Spanish, and Traditional Chinese. Pillow Fight is also working on additional accessibility options like screenreading, text-to-speech, and gamepad controls. I thoroughly enjoyed my time with Ghosts of Miami. The demo felt incredibly refreshing with its overpowering charm, stylish aesthetic, and well written dialogue. It made me want to spend more time in its world and characters over the course of just one in-game day. Keep an eye on this one. You can download the demo from the Ghosts of Miami website. View full article
  5. Released in 2004, Half-Life 2 ushered PC games into a new generation. It brought with it the highly flexible Source Engine (a game engine so versatile that highly modified versions of it are still used for modern AAA games like Titanfall), and necessitated PC users to install Steam (at the time a highly controversial move that helped launch the platform into ubiquity). The shooter focused on the adventures of scientist-turned-hero Gordan Freeman and his attempts to stay alive in a strange future in which humanity has been conquered by an alien race known as the Combine. Rise and shine, listeners. Rise and... shine... and let us know if you think Half-Life 2 remains one of the best games period well over a decade after release! Also, what is more fitting than an episode on the Half-Life series coming out a little later than intended? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Half-Life 2 'I Tried' by Redg (https://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02931) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! A Patreon has been created for those looking to support the show. You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  6. Released in 2004, Half-Life 2 ushered PC games into a new generation. It brought with it the highly flexible Source Engine (a game engine so versatile that highly modified versions of it are still used for modern AAA games like Titanfall), and necessitated PC users to install Steam (at the time a highly controversial move that helped launch the platform into ubiquity). The shooter focused on the adventures of scientist-turned-hero Gordan Freeman and his attempts to stay alive in a strange future in which humanity has been conquered by an alien race known as the Combine. Rise and shine, listeners. Rise and... shine... and let us know if you think Half-Life 2 remains one of the best games period well over a decade after release! Also, what is more fitting than an episode on the Half-Life series coming out a little later than intended? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Half-Life 2 'I Tried' by Redg (https://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02931) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! A Patreon has been created for those looking to support the show. You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  7. Hello everyone, Does anyone have a recommendation of some PC games that are rated Everyone-Teen that can be fun to stream and for the viewers? I'm thinking of Cook, Serve, Delicious or Stardew Valley. But any other recommendation will help. Thanks, Drexnot
  8. If there’s one lesson that 10 years of singing, instrument-playing, and dancing have taught me, it’s that the show must go on. The number of people I’ve seen take “break a leg” beyond pure metaphor, and still soldier on, genuinely astounds me. No matter the error, no matter the number of botched notes, or missed steps, you power through a performance with all you can, for surely the alternative is always worse. For a game so wrapped up in the power of music, it’s odd to see Klang (developed by the one-man team at Tinimations and composed by EDM guru Jordan Aguirre AKA “bLiNd”) take so much of its ethos to heart, and yet stumble on that one key point. As the cybergoth-inspired rave warrior, you’ll fight and headbang your way towards defeating the evil Soundlord Sonos in a world absolutely soaked with neon and musical minutia. Levels, many of which feel like they’re ripped from the stages of your favorite rock venue, pulse with each distinctive track’s beat. Streetlamps shaped like clef notes hang above your head as you dash on by. Each track helps to define the rhythm of combat or exploration. Enemies gather around you to lob carefully synchronized attacks, while a directional meter lets you know when to strike it back. Giant soundwave attacks demand you either leap or slide your way to safety, and it all comes together in the game’s later stages to create a beautiful maelstrom of action. The music is, as advertised, an amazing and eclectic mix of hard-hitting EDM and more tranquil house music beats. BLiNd’s work might not be for everyone (to say nothing of the genre as a whole), but the marriage between Tinimations’ aesthetic and composer Jordan Aguirre’s infectious rhythms are undeniably beautiful. Rather than a simple backdrop, the soundtrack plays a vital role in determining movement during combat and exploration. The heady thud-thud-thud of a classic EDM beat, coupled with a damaging force field that blinks on and off of a wall, dictates how you must traverse upwards using a classic wall jump maneuver. Much like a music aficionado might use a song’s rhythm to guess what’s coming next (think the “drop” in nearly any EDM song), so must the player, learning to duck and leap away from the next attack, or avoid the deadly searchlights of stationary enemies. The problem begins (and for the most part, ends) with how Klang’s gameplay manages to detract from the success of this marriage. Even for fans of gaming’s most difficult genres and franchises (twitch shooters, Dark Souls), Klang is an astonishingly difficult, often frustrating experience. What issues Klang’s demo had could easily be chalked up to an unfamiliarity with the game’s mechanics, but spread out over the two to four hours of available content, those issues become omnipresent. Even on the game’s lowest difficulty, and employing a “reflex mode” that briefly slows down time when taking significant damage, Klang’s frantic action and occasional one-hit kills proved to be way too much to handle. While the game is great about putting you back in the action almost immediately, you’ll die so often that it won’t feel like it matters, putting you in the position of getting frustrated, and thus unable to concentrate, leading to more deaths. While taking on one of the game’s bosses, I found myself stuck between his constant attacks, a deadly pit of energy behind me, and a continuous gust of wind that threatened to push me into it. I had already gotten used to the mechanics of leaping and ducking to avoid massive soundwave attacks from this boss, but while the game does give you a fair bit of health, all it took was one mismanaged jump (while also deflecting regular attacks) for me to lose my momentum and get swept into the pit. If it’s not the pit, it will be one of the countless, twitchy “security cameras” you must run by without being spotted once for fear of being zapped. If it’s not the cameras, it might be the rapidly dissipating platforms that only solidify once you’ve executed one of 30 precarious jump-deflect combos. If it’s not any one of those things, it will be some combination. You will die. Incredibly often. And as beautiful as bLiNd’s music is, as much as I’m dying to listen to it all over again, you will grow so familiar with the first 10-20 seconds of each track that they begin to lose their luster. Klang almost certainly plays to the kind of gamer that enjoys a ludicrously demanding experience. Unfortunately, the game’s unforgiving nature will likely sour the experience for anyone who doesn’t seek out such a thing. One of the worst things a musician can do is stop their performance after making one, or even many, simple mistakes. Acknowledging and walking back on a commitment always seems less impressive than powering through an understandable, if human, error. You won’t find room for any error, much less human. Beyond the split-second reaction times, its level design is also occasionally flawed. During a boss battle that incorporated cones of vision (and one-hit deaths for being seen), three raised platforms above the boss’ head felt like indicators that aerial attacks wouldn’t work. This turned out to be completely false. Aerial attacks were the only method, but the level design, plus a rapidly shifting enemy cone of vision, plus an unforgiving checkpoint system quickly turned the battle into something as frustrating as it was inventive. Klang’s brilliant soundtrack and unique brand of action platforming would come across as a much more cohesive package if we were able to appreciate it at length and as a whole, rather than gritting our teeth and praying for a checkpoint. For those who do feel up to the challenge, beyond the normal difficulty setting, beating the game unlocks a “Nightcore” mode (maybe don’t Google that) that allows you to play at an even higher difficulty. Conclusion: Klang still carries a sincere sense of recommendation, if only based on its incredibly inventive style and incorporation of music. We don’t often get a game, indie or otherwise, that has the courage to tackle music with such ingenuity. Tinimations’ and bLiNd’s passion shows in every single beat, but their own concept gets too caught up in its own noodling to allow for lesser players to enjoy it to its fullest extent. Klang was reviewed on PC and is now available on Steam. View full article
  9. Joseph Knoop

    Review: Klang

    If there’s one lesson that 10 years of singing, instrument-playing, and dancing have taught me, it’s that the show must go on. The number of people I’ve seen take “break a leg” beyond pure metaphor, and still soldier on, genuinely astounds me. No matter the error, no matter the number of botched notes, or missed steps, you power through a performance with all you can, for surely the alternative is always worse. For a game so wrapped up in the power of music, it’s odd to see Klang (developed by the one-man team at Tinimations and composed by EDM guru Jordan Aguirre AKA “bLiNd”) take so much of its ethos to heart, and yet stumble on that one key point. As the cybergoth-inspired rave warrior, you’ll fight and headbang your way towards defeating the evil Soundlord Sonos in a world absolutely soaked with neon and musical minutia. Levels, many of which feel like they’re ripped from the stages of your favorite rock venue, pulse with each distinctive track’s beat. Streetlamps shaped like clef notes hang above your head as you dash on by. Each track helps to define the rhythm of combat or exploration. Enemies gather around you to lob carefully synchronized attacks, while a directional meter lets you know when to strike it back. Giant soundwave attacks demand you either leap or slide your way to safety, and it all comes together in the game’s later stages to create a beautiful maelstrom of action. The music is, as advertised, an amazing and eclectic mix of hard-hitting EDM and more tranquil house music beats. BLiNd’s work might not be for everyone (to say nothing of the genre as a whole), but the marriage between Tinimations’ aesthetic and composer Jordan Aguirre’s infectious rhythms are undeniably beautiful. Rather than a simple backdrop, the soundtrack plays a vital role in determining movement during combat and exploration. The heady thud-thud-thud of a classic EDM beat, coupled with a damaging force field that blinks on and off of a wall, dictates how you must traverse upwards using a classic wall jump maneuver. Much like a music aficionado might use a song’s rhythm to guess what’s coming next (think the “drop” in nearly any EDM song), so must the player, learning to duck and leap away from the next attack, or avoid the deadly searchlights of stationary enemies. The problem begins (and for the most part, ends) with how Klang’s gameplay manages to detract from the success of this marriage. Even for fans of gaming’s most difficult genres and franchises (twitch shooters, Dark Souls), Klang is an astonishingly difficult, often frustrating experience. What issues Klang’s demo had could easily be chalked up to an unfamiliarity with the game’s mechanics, but spread out over the two to four hours of available content, those issues become omnipresent. Even on the game’s lowest difficulty, and employing a “reflex mode” that briefly slows down time when taking significant damage, Klang’s frantic action and occasional one-hit kills proved to be way too much to handle. While the game is great about putting you back in the action almost immediately, you’ll die so often that it won’t feel like it matters, putting you in the position of getting frustrated, and thus unable to concentrate, leading to more deaths. While taking on one of the game’s bosses, I found myself stuck between his constant attacks, a deadly pit of energy behind me, and a continuous gust of wind that threatened to push me into it. I had already gotten used to the mechanics of leaping and ducking to avoid massive soundwave attacks from this boss, but while the game does give you a fair bit of health, all it took was one mismanaged jump (while also deflecting regular attacks) for me to lose my momentum and get swept into the pit. If it’s not the pit, it will be one of the countless, twitchy “security cameras” you must run by without being spotted once for fear of being zapped. If it’s not the cameras, it might be the rapidly dissipating platforms that only solidify once you’ve executed one of 30 precarious jump-deflect combos. If it’s not any one of those things, it will be some combination. You will die. Incredibly often. And as beautiful as bLiNd’s music is, as much as I’m dying to listen to it all over again, you will grow so familiar with the first 10-20 seconds of each track that they begin to lose their luster. Klang almost certainly plays to the kind of gamer that enjoys a ludicrously demanding experience. Unfortunately, the game’s unforgiving nature will likely sour the experience for anyone who doesn’t seek out such a thing. One of the worst things a musician can do is stop their performance after making one, or even many, simple mistakes. Acknowledging and walking back on a commitment always seems less impressive than powering through an understandable, if human, error. You won’t find room for any error, much less human. Beyond the split-second reaction times, its level design is also occasionally flawed. During a boss battle that incorporated cones of vision (and one-hit deaths for being seen), three raised platforms above the boss’ head felt like indicators that aerial attacks wouldn’t work. This turned out to be completely false. Aerial attacks were the only method, but the level design, plus a rapidly shifting enemy cone of vision, plus an unforgiving checkpoint system quickly turned the battle into something as frustrating as it was inventive. Klang’s brilliant soundtrack and unique brand of action platforming would come across as a much more cohesive package if we were able to appreciate it at length and as a whole, rather than gritting our teeth and praying for a checkpoint. For those who do feel up to the challenge, beyond the normal difficulty setting, beating the game unlocks a “Nightcore” mode (maybe don’t Google that) that allows you to play at an even higher difficulty. Conclusion: Klang still carries a sincere sense of recommendation, if only based on its incredibly inventive style and incorporation of music. We don’t often get a game, indie or otherwise, that has the courage to tackle music with such ingenuity. Tinimations’ and bLiNd’s passion shows in every single beat, but their own concept gets too caught up in its own noodling to allow for lesser players to enjoy it to its fullest extent. Klang was reviewed on PC and is now available on Steam.
  10. Just a heads up for anyone interested. Square Enix is doing another surprise bundle for Easter. it's priced at 9.99 and includes 5 games with a value of over $80. The deal will run until March 20th with the games being revealed and delivered the following day. They did this around the holidays last year. That bundle included Lara Croft and the Temple of Osiris, Thief, Final Fantasy XIII, Life is Strange Ep 1, and Final Fantasy XIV. It also included 20% off a SE game, 10% off Life is Strange ep 2-4, and 10% off Just Cause 3. If you like Square Enix games or are looking for some giveaway games, this is great deal. Go here to purchase.
  11. Hey there, Extra Lifers! My name is Joshua, and I am an Extra Life veteran of about 5 years. Some of you may know me from the Live Chat team in years past, and others may know me as the President of the Orlando, FL guild. Over the years I've always created small guilds, channels, linkshells, what-have-yous in games that I either play regularly or plan on playing for Extra Life. I thought that it would be a cool idea to keep us connected while we game, especially coming up on Game Day. So, here's a list of the communities that I've made, and would LOVE you to add your own. Chances are, someone out there is playing the same game as you =p Here's a basic outline: Post the game, the applicable server, and the "owner" of the community along with your Extra Life community ID, and I'll edit this post and add it to the list. If you want to join a community listed, just get in contact with the recruiter. =) If the community has a specific "In-Game" type, list that too. (Linkshell, Player Channel, etc) MMORPG Communities: Final Fantasy XIV: Lamia Server "Extra Lifers" - Crysola Tsara (Novus'Olm / Joshua) - LinkshellGuild Wars 2: North America Megaserver "Extra Life Community <FTK>" - Crysola Tsara [novusolm.9032] (Novus'Olm / Joshua) - Casual/Communication Guild
  12. Two years after the release of Age of Empires II HD, Skybox Labs and Forgotten Empires have teamed up for their second Age of Empires expansion titled The African Kingdoms. Players can take control of the Berbers, Malians, Ethiopians, and Portuguese. Four unique campaigns focus on each of these civilizations with full voice-acting. The Berbers' campaign centers on the tale of Tariq ibn Ziyad; the Malian story follows the path of Sundjata; Portugal's missions relates events in the life of Francisco de Almeida; and the Ethiopian campaign follows the career of the legendary Queen Yodit. The two developers have also made improvements to the AI. Twenty-three new maps have been added, as well, encompassing balanced maps, real world locations, and randomized map types. Ten new terrain types make appearances. New units and technologies and a sudden death mode round out the additions The African Kingdoms make to Age of Empires II HD (along with numerous balancing improvements). The African Kingdoms expansion can be downloaded through Steam starting today.
  13. Two years after the release of Age of Empires II HD, Skybox Labs and Forgotten Empires have teamed up for their second Age of Empires expansion titled The African Kingdoms. Players can take control of the Berbers, Malians, Ethiopians, and Portuguese. Four unique campaigns focus on each of these civilizations with full voice-acting. The Berbers' campaign centers on the tale of Tariq ibn Ziyad; the Malian story follows the path of Sundjata; Portugal's missions relates events in the life of Francisco de Almeida; and the Ethiopian campaign follows the career of the legendary Queen Yodit. The two developers have also made improvements to the AI. Twenty-three new maps have been added, as well, encompassing balanced maps, real world locations, and randomized map types. Ten new terrain types make appearances. New units and technologies and a sudden death mode round out the additions The African Kingdoms make to Age of Empires II HD (along with numerous balancing improvements). The African Kingdoms expansion can be downloaded through Steam starting today. View full article
  14. A lone pod lands on a distant, inhospitable world under an unfamiliar star. A small group of colonists have come to tame a deadly new frontier. Planetbase tasks players with the construction of a facility that will allow these colonists to survive and eventually create a self-sustaining community. It’s a fairly topical release, coming days after NASA released a 36 page plan to put humans on Mars in the next couple decades as well as the recent critical and financial success of The Martian. Space colonization has become a part of the cultural zeitgeist and looks more and more like an impending reality. I don’t think it is a stretch to say we’re all interested in the inherent drama of inhabiting space, where one small mistake can spell doom for everyone involved. It represents perhaps the ultimate test of human will and ingenuity. A game that asks players to solve the problems of oxygen, food, shelter, and isolation (among other things) through brilliant base construction is a truly tantalizing prospect. Unfortunately, Planetbase stops just shy of realizing its full potential. The opening hours of base building are really quite great. Juggling the limited resources available at the outset with the immediate needs of shelter leads to some really moment-by-moment, do-or-die scenarios. Planetbase shines in those opening hours, capturing that elusive just-one-more-turn vibe that the best simulation games offer. As soon as the basic necessities are taken care of players need to begin working toward sustainability by building mines, processing plants, bio-domes, labs, and more. Simultaneously, players must expand the power grid and its support systems to be able to accommodate those structures. It is a tricky balance to maintain; if you don’t put enough resources toward the power and water grids, you could find your facility completely powered down and running out of oxygen. As you expand your facilities and become self-sustaining, you’ll be able to build a landing pad which allows for trade and population growth. Trading is the only way to obtain powerful new technologies through blueprints. New blueprints could mean being able to construct a massive solar array or gigantic wind turbine or it could be the ability to construct new robots to more efficiently perform menial tasks around the base. As all of this is going on, remember that you are usually only one poorly timed solar flare or meteor strike away from complete disaster. Random events could happen at any time around the base and result in some tense challenges. The problems with Planetbase seem relatively minor at first, but slowly magnify as the base grows and more colonists enter the mix. On the game’s Steam page, developer Madruga Works claims Planetbase has been beta tested, but there are so many little things that should have been caught and fixed prior to release. Trading is slow and grinds the game to a halt while you click several hundred times to finish your late game transactions. For some reason, colonists can’t sleep in beds when a room is not powered. Access to vitally important UI options, like bringing systems to a minimal power state or putting the base on high alert for a solar flare, feels inconveniently put behind two or three clicks, when it could be readily available. Let’s really dive into the minor annoyances with trading. When a trade ship arrives, players can exchange excess resources for different items their base might need or for new technologies. One of the things that can be traded is a currency simply referred to as coins. You can earn coins by allowing visitors into your base for some space tourism and then use those coins to even out trading transactions. However, heaven help you if you earn a lot of coins and want to use those to pay for the entirety of a transaction. You can only offer one coin every time you click and coins are only worth one in space currency. That means if something costs 600 units of space currency, you will have to click 600 times to pay for it entirely in coins. That’s just irritating and could be fixed with some simple UI tweaking to allow for typing how many units of each thing you wish to trade. However, that’s just a small, easily fixed issue. A much more pressing and complicated problem is that of the colonists’ AI. Early on, it functions adequately. However, once Planetbase enters its mid-game the AI becomes frustrating in the extreme. There are several different types of colonists: Engineers, medics, biologists, workers, and guards. While workers can mine and process raw materials, engineers are the only type of colonist that can use those materials to create more complex objects like guns or spare parts to fix power systems. As the game progresses being able to fix your solar panels and wind turbines becomes incredibly important. Without power, everyone dies very quickly. However, sometimes the AI just decides to take a break for a while. I watched in horror as one by one my power generators deteriorated and shut down while my engineers stood around the room where they could be making spare parts. They had the material in the machines, the room was the number one priority in the base, and the simply stood by as all non-essential rooms were powered down and then even oxygen systems were taken offline to maintain power in that one room. As everyone began asphyxiating, one engineer finally started making the much needed spare part until even that room powered down, leaving him to die cold and alone. That anecdote repeated itself several times with slight variations throughout my time with Planetbase, but there are also several other strange problems. As my base grew larger and larger, some colonists would choose to don space suits and make their way around an entire mountain and across a plain to reach a different part of my base rather than walk inside the base to their destination. I’d see robots broken in the middle of nowhere or get notified that a colonist had suffocated only to see them fallen prone, alone in the middle of a hostile wasteland. Watching AI make decisions this bad is like watching the dignity of the human race curl up into a fetal position and cry. An even larger problem was the priorities the AI seemed to have. Even if you have a room prioritized, the most control you have over colonists, many will simply drop what they are doing to carry supplies to a trade ship if you have struck a deal or decided to construct several items in a room. This can throw off a precious balance and leads to starvation or power loss, destabilizing the entire colony for practically no reason at all. All of these issues make the colonists of Planetbase feel more like lemmings than capable space settlers. What should feel like triumphant achievement in the face of adversity feels more like wrestling with esoteric systems. At one point, I lost all of my biologists, but had plenty of workers and engineers. Unfortunately, biologists are the only type of colonist that can cultivate and maintain crops, so all of my settlers shortly died from starvation. As smart and as capable as an engineer or worker might be, they apparently couldn’t handle even poorly attempting to grow crops. All of this frustration compounds when you finally work around all of these issues to reach the late game and find relatively few interesting things to do. Only a handful of technologies exist for players to obtain from the randomized trading ships. Even the technologies that you can acquire aren’t all that interesting or exotic; most are just bigger versions of the things you could build before. Random events start to feel repetitive due to the small pool of circumstances that can occur. There are some minor goals, like getting a population of over 300, but no rewards or cool things that happen if you manage that feat other than a small box being checked. It feels like a lot of struggle for a disappointing payoff. Conclusion: Planetbase begins brimming with hope and good ideas. It captured my imagination and filled me with such enthusiasm that I spent hours grinding through irritation to see if different environments or events might reignite the promise of the early game. Unfortunately, they do not. Planetbase feels like a game that should be an early access title, working through kinks and refining both the AI and UI while adding more mid and end-game content. If Planetbase was a work in progress I could forgive its faults, but as a fully priced title on Steam for $19.99? Not so much. Planetbase is available now for PC.
  15. A lone pod lands on a distant, inhospitable world under an unfamiliar star. A small group of colonists have come to tame a deadly new frontier. Planetbase tasks players with the construction of a facility that will allow these colonists to survive and eventually create a self-sustaining community. It’s a fairly topical release, coming days after NASA released a 36 page plan to put humans on Mars in the next couple decades as well as the recent critical and financial success of The Martian. Space colonization has become a part of the cultural zeitgeist and looks more and more like an impending reality. I don’t think it is a stretch to say we’re all interested in the inherent drama of inhabiting space, where one small mistake can spell doom for everyone involved. It represents perhaps the ultimate test of human will and ingenuity. A game that asks players to solve the problems of oxygen, food, shelter, and isolation (among other things) through brilliant base construction is a truly tantalizing prospect. Unfortunately, Planetbase stops just shy of realizing its full potential. The opening hours of base building are really quite great. Juggling the limited resources available at the outset with the immediate needs of shelter leads to some really moment-by-moment, do-or-die scenarios. Planetbase shines in those opening hours, capturing that elusive just-one-more-turn vibe that the best simulation games offer. As soon as the basic necessities are taken care of players need to begin working toward sustainability by building mines, processing plants, bio-domes, labs, and more. Simultaneously, players must expand the power grid and its support systems to be able to accommodate those structures. It is a tricky balance to maintain; if you don’t put enough resources toward the power and water grids, you could find your facility completely powered down and running out of oxygen. As you expand your facilities and become self-sustaining, you’ll be able to build a landing pad which allows for trade and population growth. Trading is the only way to obtain powerful new technologies through blueprints. New blueprints could mean being able to construct a massive solar array or gigantic wind turbine or it could be the ability to construct new robots to more efficiently perform menial tasks around the base. As all of this is going on, remember that you are usually only one poorly timed solar flare or meteor strike away from complete disaster. Random events could happen at any time around the base and result in some tense challenges. The problems with Planetbase seem relatively minor at first, but slowly magnify as the base grows and more colonists enter the mix. On the game’s Steam page, developer Madruga Works claims Planetbase has been beta tested, but there are so many little things that should have been caught and fixed prior to release. Trading is slow and grinds the game to a halt while you click several hundred times to finish your late game transactions. For some reason, colonists can’t sleep in beds when a room is not powered. Access to vitally important UI options, like bringing systems to a minimal power state or putting the base on high alert for a solar flare, feels inconveniently put behind two or three clicks, when it could be readily available. Let’s really dive into the minor annoyances with trading. When a trade ship arrives, players can exchange excess resources for different items their base might need or for new technologies. One of the things that can be traded is a currency simply referred to as coins. You can earn coins by allowing visitors into your base for some space tourism and then use those coins to even out trading transactions. However, heaven help you if you earn a lot of coins and want to use those to pay for the entirety of a transaction. You can only offer one coin every time you click and coins are only worth one in space currency. That means if something costs 600 units of space currency, you will have to click 600 times to pay for it entirely in coins. That’s just irritating and could be fixed with some simple UI tweaking to allow for typing how many units of each thing you wish to trade. However, that’s just a small, easily fixed issue. A much more pressing and complicated problem is that of the colonists’ AI. Early on, it functions adequately. However, once Planetbase enters its mid-game the AI becomes frustrating in the extreme. There are several different types of colonists: Engineers, medics, biologists, workers, and guards. While workers can mine and process raw materials, engineers are the only type of colonist that can use those materials to create more complex objects like guns or spare parts to fix power systems. As the game progresses being able to fix your solar panels and wind turbines becomes incredibly important. Without power, everyone dies very quickly. However, sometimes the AI just decides to take a break for a while. I watched in horror as one by one my power generators deteriorated and shut down while my engineers stood around the room where they could be making spare parts. They had the material in the machines, the room was the number one priority in the base, and the simply stood by as all non-essential rooms were powered down and then even oxygen systems were taken offline to maintain power in that one room. As everyone began asphyxiating, one engineer finally started making the much needed spare part until even that room powered down, leaving him to die cold and alone. That anecdote repeated itself several times with slight variations throughout my time with Planetbase, but there are also several other strange problems. As my base grew larger and larger, some colonists would choose to don space suits and make their way around an entire mountain and across a plain to reach a different part of my base rather than walk inside the base to their destination. I’d see robots broken in the middle of nowhere or get notified that a colonist had suffocated only to see them fallen prone, alone in the middle of a hostile wasteland. Watching AI make decisions this bad is like watching the dignity of the human race curl up into a fetal position and cry. An even larger problem was the priorities the AI seemed to have. Even if you have a room prioritized, the most control you have over colonists, many will simply drop what they are doing to carry supplies to a trade ship if you have struck a deal or decided to construct several items in a room. This can throw off a precious balance and leads to starvation or power loss, destabilizing the entire colony for practically no reason at all. All of these issues make the colonists of Planetbase feel more like lemmings than capable space settlers. What should feel like triumphant achievement in the face of adversity feels more like wrestling with esoteric systems. At one point, I lost all of my biologists, but had plenty of workers and engineers. Unfortunately, biologists are the only type of colonist that can cultivate and maintain crops, so all of my settlers shortly died from starvation. As smart and as capable as an engineer or worker might be, they apparently couldn’t handle even poorly attempting to grow crops. All of this frustration compounds when you finally work around all of these issues to reach the late game and find relatively few interesting things to do. Only a handful of technologies exist for players to obtain from the randomized trading ships. Even the technologies that you can acquire aren’t all that interesting or exotic; most are just bigger versions of the things you could build before. Random events start to feel repetitive due to the small pool of circumstances that can occur. There are some minor goals, like getting a population of over 300, but no rewards or cool things that happen if you manage that feat other than a small box being checked. It feels like a lot of struggle for a disappointing payoff. Conclusion: Planetbase begins brimming with hope and good ideas. It captured my imagination and filled me with such enthusiasm that I spent hours grinding through irritation to see if different environments or events might reignite the promise of the early game. Unfortunately, they do not. Planetbase feels like a game that should be an early access title, working through kinks and refining both the AI and UI while adding more mid and end-game content. If Planetbase was a work in progress I could forgive its faults, but as a fully priced title on Steam for $19.99? Not so much. Planetbase is available now for PC. View full article
  16. Hey guys! My husband and I will be hosting a Halloween Horror Stream on Halloween day to get you hyped for your Halloween night festivities! We will be in costume, myself as the Cheshire Cat, and we will be playing Amnesia: The Dark Descent. We will start at 1pm and play until we can't take it anymore. The game is approximately 9 hours long, so we are aiming to beat it! Hope to see you there! www.twitch.tv/mokinns *Is anyone else doing something special for Halloween? I know Zyaldar has done his horror stream, so if you are doing one as well you should share it below!*
  17. Brigador is an isometric, fast-paced shooter that has players taking command of various mechs with two very simple goals: Destroy the orbital guns that protect the outer colony of Solo Nobre and then escape the city. When the game launches in Early Access this October, players will have access to 15 playable vehicles and 25 weapons with which they can rain destruction across the city and its defenders. Indie developer Stellar Jockeys plans to double the number of weapons and vehicles before Brigador exits Early Access. Players can also select pilots from any of the three warring factions, each one with unique advantages when it comes to facing down overwhelming odds. Each successful escape earns in-game currency that can be used to purchase new pilots, vehicles, and weapons. Each level is different and requires a shift in tactics. Do you go in guns blazing and level the entire city (which you can do in Brigador's destructible environments)? Or do you adopt a more refined approach and only take out what's absolutely necessary? The choice is up to the player. Planning on going to PAX Prime? Brigador will be there, too! Anyone who stops by Stellar Jockeys' booth will be able to get some hands on with a demo build of the title. Players who can successfully complete the demo contract will even be given a free copy of the game. Brigador releases on Steam Early Access October 20.
  18. Brigador is an isometric, fast-paced shooter that has players taking command of various mechs with two very simple goals: Destroy the orbital guns that protect the outer colony of Solo Nobre and then escape the city. When the game launches in Early Access this October, players will have access to 15 playable vehicles and 25 weapons with which they can rain destruction across the city and its defenders. Indie developer Stellar Jockeys plans to double the number of weapons and vehicles before Brigador exits Early Access. Players can also select pilots from any of the three warring factions, each one with unique advantages when it comes to facing down overwhelming odds. Each successful escape earns in-game currency that can be used to purchase new pilots, vehicles, and weapons. Each level is different and requires a shift in tactics. Do you go in guns blazing and level the entire city (which you can do in Brigador's destructible environments)? Or do you adopt a more refined approach and only take out what's absolutely necessary? The choice is up to the player. Planning on going to PAX Prime? Brigador will be there, too! Anyone who stops by Stellar Jockeys' booth will be able to get some hands on with a demo build of the title. Players who can successfully complete the demo contract will even be given a free copy of the game. Brigador releases on Steam Early Access October 20. View full article
  19. If you haven't heard of Titan Souls yet, you are missing out. Conceived of as an entry in the Ludum Dare game jam back in 2013, the idea stuck with creators Mark Foster, David Fenn, and Andrew Gleeson. Together, they decided that they would make Titan Souls a full game. And make it, they did! It releases on April 14. Until then, you can try your hand at mastering the demo they've put together that remasters their original game jam prototype. The core idea of Titan Souls is that you are armed with a bow and only one arrow. You can slay the bosses in one shot, but they can also kill you instantly if one of their attacks connects. Titan Souls revolves around carefully timing and positioning attacks. It is intense and more than a little nerve-racking in the best possible way. You can download the demo on the Steam Store page for if you're curious. Titan Souls releases on April 14 for PC, Mac, PlayStation 4, and PS Vita.
  20. If you haven't heard of Titan Souls yet, you are missing out. Conceived of as an entry in the Ludum Dare game jam back in 2013, the idea stuck with creators Mark Foster, David Fenn, and Andrew Gleeson. Together, they decided that they would make Titan Souls a full game. And make it, they did! It releases on April 14. Until then, you can try your hand at mastering the demo they've put together that remasters their original game jam prototype. The core idea of Titan Souls is that you are armed with a bow and only one arrow. You can slay the bosses in one shot, but they can also kill you instantly if one of their attacks connects. Titan Souls revolves around carefully timing and positioning attacks. It is intense and more than a little nerve-racking in the best possible way. You can download the demo on the Steam Store page for if you're curious. Titan Souls releases on April 14 for PC, Mac, PlayStation 4, and PS Vita. View full article
  21. Developer Switchblade Monkeys has added a fifth playable character, a new map, 4v4 game types, and a new Deathmatch mode to their Early Access title on Steam. The dev team will also be extending their Early Access sale. The gigantic update to Secret Ponchos introduces the sword-wielding Matador, who gracefully moves around the battlefield dodging and deflecting bullets. 4v4 matches have also been added to Domination mode along with an all-new Deathmatch that pits players against each other with no respawns. Finally, players can shoot up a new map that recreates the turmoil of character Kid Red's burned out homestead. Normally I am loath to include purchasing details for an Early Access title, but in this case there is a sale involved so I'm bending my rules. From now until August 19th, Secret Ponchos is available on Steam Early Access for 40% off normal price and people who purchase the Early Access version will receive another copy of the game to share with a friend. For those of you curious about the gameplay, check in on the Secret Ponchos Twitch stream that will be going on until 9PM Pacific today. There is currently no solid release date for Secret Ponchos, but it is expected to release either at the end of this year or early 2015 for both PC and PlayStation 4.
  22. Developer Switchblade Monkeys has added a fifth playable character, a new map, 4v4 game types, and a new Deathmatch mode to their Early Access title on Steam. The dev team will also be extending their Early Access sale. The gigantic update to Secret Ponchos introduces the sword-wielding Matador, who gracefully moves around the battlefield dodging and deflecting bullets. 4v4 matches have also been added to Domination mode along with an all-new Deathmatch that pits players against each other with no respawns. Finally, players can shoot up a new map that recreates the turmoil of character Kid Red's burned out homestead. Normally I am loath to include purchasing details for an Early Access title, but in this case there is a sale involved so I'm bending my rules. From now until August 19th, Secret Ponchos is available on Steam Early Access for 40% off normal price and people who purchase the Early Access version will receive another copy of the game to share with a friend. For those of you curious about the gameplay, check in on the Secret Ponchos Twitch stream that will be going on until 9PM Pacific today. There is currently no solid release date for Secret Ponchos, but it is expected to release either at the end of this year or early 2015 for both PC and PlayStation 4. View full article
  23. In the midst of all the E3 craziness, I had an appointment with the digital distribution company Green Man Gaming. Due to scheduling mishaps that appointment never occurred, but we managed to track down Green Man's EVP of marketing Darren Cairns for a pleasant (and very green) post-E3 interview. ---- How did Green Man Gaming (GMG) begin? Green Man Gaming launched on 10th May 2010 after Paul Sulyok (CEO & Founder) and Lee Packham (EVP Engineering and Co-Founder) wanted to create a digital store loosely based on an eBay and iTunes model, but for gaming - letting people sell the games in their library. As digital game downloads are becoming the dominant and preferred way for people to get their games, Green Man Gaming began leading millions of gamers through the transition from traditional retail purchases into a new digital era. What does GMG offer that sets it apart from competitors like Steam or GOG.com? We know that modern core gamers care about their games, no matter what platform that they play them on. Our service allows gamers to buy games and content across a range of platforms which makes us very different to retailers like Steam and GOG. Green Man Gaming also collects and uses a level of gameplay data that no other commercial retailer has. Valve has data about Steam, Sony has data about PlayStation, Microsoft has data about Xbox; Green Man Gaming has data about all of them. We then use this behavioural data (based on tracked in-game activity, rather than just purchasing or browsing history) to accurately target core gamers with offers and tailored messages that they need and want. Our strength that sets us apart from other retailers, is that we sell what gamers want, how they want (allowing game access and activation across a range of platforms including Steam, Uplay, Origin, other first party platforms, or by our own Capsule client). Combined with our strong Playfire Community, that becomes a larger offer for gamers that is more than just a sale. GMG Acquired Playfire in 2012. Have you seen a boost in users with the inclusion of more social elements into your platform (i.e. achievements, stat tracking)? Being a member of the Playfire community means gamers can track their gameplay and what their friends are playing, join leaderboards, see what other members are excited about on Playfire Buzz, and create Want lists that we can then make great offers on when those games go on sale. The strength of our community comes from their engagement and we've seen a huge boost in users as gamers are signing up to our Playfire Rewards BETA. By linking their Steam account (with other platforms coming very soon), Playfire Members are eligible to earn Green Man Gaming Credit by playing games! Users don’t have to originally buy their games from Green Man Gaming; they simply have to play those games that Playfire attaches rewards to for the chance to earn up to £5 (Edit: About $8.55 US) Green Man Gaming credit (which is converted into local currency depending on a user’s location). This credit can then be spent towards anything on the Green Man Gaming site. Have you found that offering store credit for social participation on GMG uniquely benefits your business? How does that work? We reward people with Green Man Gaming Credit that can only be used on our service, which we know successfully reduces the cost of gaming for those involved. We feel there is a value exchange that benefits both the user and Green Man Gaming. Our users benefits from earning GMG Credit by simply playing the games they love, and we benefit from learning more about their gaming habits and style as they play. We can use this knowledge to target users with more relevant offers based on the way they play games, and help them to discover more games to love. It works! GMG is the number two digital platform in the world. Are there any plans in the work to dethrone Steam to reach number one? I guess this also harkens back to my second question. How do you compete with something like Steam when they seemingly hold such a significant market share? Steam has well over 75 million users, and as we have an official API from Valve, we think of Steam as one of our allies. We understand that many gamers feel comfortable accessing their games through Steam. However, our offering is quite different to Steam, and we are seeing the number of people using Green Man Gaming to access non-Steam games rapidly increasing, as they prefer our range of download options and opportunities to earn Green Man Gaming Credit. We are going to keep focusing on creating something very special here at Green Man Gaming. We are using billions of game data points and user behaviour knowledge to continually improve the user experience for all our customers, and this will never change. We currently sell over 4500 titles across 185 territories, and are working with over 350 official publishing partners to offer even more than just a sale in the future - bringing more great titles, more great deals, and coming soon, very special Playfire Rewards to millions of gamers around the world. ---- A big thank you to Darren Cairns for taking the time to talk with us and to Tracy McGarrigan for being patient and helping to facilitate this interview!
  24. In the midst of all the E3 craziness, I had an appointment with the digital distribution company Green Man Gaming. Due to scheduling mishaps that appointment never occurred, but we managed to track down Green Man's EVP of marketing Darren Cairns for a pleasant (and very green) post-E3 interview. ---- How did Green Man Gaming (GMG) begin? Green Man Gaming launched on 10th May 2010 after Paul Sulyok (CEO & Founder) and Lee Packham (EVP Engineering and Co-Founder) wanted to create a digital store loosely based on an eBay and iTunes model, but for gaming - letting people sell the games in their library. As digital game downloads are becoming the dominant and preferred way for people to get their games, Green Man Gaming began leading millions of gamers through the transition from traditional retail purchases into a new digital era. What does GMG offer that sets it apart from competitors like Steam or GOG.com? We know that modern core gamers care about their games, no matter what platform that they play them on. Our service allows gamers to buy games and content across a range of platforms which makes us very different to retailers like Steam and GOG. Green Man Gaming also collects and uses a level of gameplay data that no other commercial retailer has. Valve has data about Steam, Sony has data about PlayStation, Microsoft has data about Xbox; Green Man Gaming has data about all of them. We then use this behavioural data (based on tracked in-game activity, rather than just purchasing or browsing history) to accurately target core gamers with offers and tailored messages that they need and want. Our strength that sets us apart from other retailers, is that we sell what gamers want, how they want (allowing game access and activation across a range of platforms including Steam, Uplay, Origin, other first party platforms, or by our own Capsule client). Combined with our strong Playfire Community, that becomes a larger offer for gamers that is more than just a sale. GMG Acquired Playfire in 2012. Have you seen a boost in users with the inclusion of more social elements into your platform (i.e. achievements, stat tracking)? Being a member of the Playfire community means gamers can track their gameplay and what their friends are playing, join leaderboards, see what other members are excited about on Playfire Buzz, and create Want lists that we can then make great offers on when those games go on sale. The strength of our community comes from their engagement and we've seen a huge boost in users as gamers are signing up to our Playfire Rewards BETA. By linking their Steam account (with other platforms coming very soon), Playfire Members are eligible to earn Green Man Gaming Credit by playing games! Users don’t have to originally buy their games from Green Man Gaming; they simply have to play those games that Playfire attaches rewards to for the chance to earn up to £5 (Edit: About $8.55 US) Green Man Gaming credit (which is converted into local currency depending on a user’s location). This credit can then be spent towards anything on the Green Man Gaming site. Have you found that offering store credit for social participation on GMG uniquely benefits your business? How does that work? We reward people with Green Man Gaming Credit that can only be used on our service, which we know successfully reduces the cost of gaming for those involved. We feel there is a value exchange that benefits both the user and Green Man Gaming. Our users benefits from earning GMG Credit by simply playing the games they love, and we benefit from learning more about their gaming habits and style as they play. We can use this knowledge to target users with more relevant offers based on the way they play games, and help them to discover more games to love. It works! GMG is the number two digital platform in the world. Are there any plans in the work to dethrone Steam to reach number one? I guess this also harkens back to my second question. How do you compete with something like Steam when they seemingly hold such a significant market share? Steam has well over 75 million users, and as we have an official API from Valve, we think of Steam as one of our allies. We understand that many gamers feel comfortable accessing their games through Steam. However, our offering is quite different to Steam, and we are seeing the number of people using Green Man Gaming to access non-Steam games rapidly increasing, as they prefer our range of download options and opportunities to earn Green Man Gaming Credit. We are going to keep focusing on creating something very special here at Green Man Gaming. We are using billions of game data points and user behaviour knowledge to continually improve the user experience for all our customers, and this will never change. We currently sell over 4500 titles across 185 territories, and are working with over 350 official publishing partners to offer even more than just a sale in the future - bringing more great titles, more great deals, and coming soon, very special Playfire Rewards to millions of gamers around the world. ---- A big thank you to Darren Cairns for taking the time to talk with us and to Tracy McGarrigan for being patient and helping to facilitate this interview! View full article
  25. CD Projeckt RED, the developer behind The Witcher series and Good Old Games, is kicking off E3 with an early press conference, which you can watch right here. The livestream begins at 11am Pacific (2pm Eastern). They're teasing more about The Witcher 3, a new trailer/in-game footage, and a big announcement for GOG.com. Maybe we'll hear something about Cyberpunk 2077? You can watch the livestream of the press conference on thewitcher.com/stream, GOG.com/stream, or right here in the player below. UPDATE: The press conference is over. There were a number of bombshells dropped, so let's cover them for those of you who didn't have a chance to watch live. - The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt will release February 24th, 2015 - The boxed versions of the game will contain a map, soundtrack, the official "Witcher Universe - The Compendium," stickers, and a protective sleeve - Collector's Editions will come with all of the goodies of the boxed game along with a 200 page art book, a Witcher medallion, a SteelBook box, inner and outer containment boxes, and an awesome 33x24x26cm, hand-painted, Polystoone statue of Geralt of Rivia slaying a griffin (there is a neat little marketing/making of video, as well) - Additionally, pre-orders will come with two priority beta keys for The Witcher Adventure Game, a digital board game for PC, Andorid, and iOS that will have both single and multiplayer modes (though the beta will only have multiplayer) - The press conference ended with CD Projeckt RED announcing that they would be launching a digital distribution platform called GOG Galaxy. Galaxy will have many of the same features as the Steam platform, minus DRM, any online requirement (unless your game happens to require online to function like an MMO or if you want to connect to update achievements and chat with friends), cross-play will allow players to game with friends who have bought their games on other platforms. The goal of the platform is to provide users with the most convenient and fair ways of playing their games while being completely optional. This could finally be some real competition for Steam.
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