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Found 69 results

  1. The major mobile developer Shift Up announced today that they would be entering the AAA game market with a project currently going under the code name Project EVE. Shift Up gained traction and found success with their gacha mobile game Destiny Child. One of the major talents that the South Korean company touted for Destiny Child comes in the form of Hyung-Tae Kim, an artist who made waves in the industry for his work designing characters for Magna Carta and, more famously, the MMORPG Blade & Soul. Kim's emphasis on visually appealing design has garnered an extensive following in the gaming industry of both fans and detractors. Not much is currently known about Project EVE itself. The game is being made in Unreal Engine 4 and will release worldwide for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC (currently slated for Steam). It's expected to be a single-player action-RPG set in a post-apocalyptic world. There certainly seem to be influences from Nier: Automata with robotic women, a desolated world, and the action-RPG focus. The team working on Project EVE has been made up primarily of developers who worked on Blade & Soul, though the studio continues to seek more developers to expand their workforce. Currently, there's no known release window for Project EVE. However, players can get a first look at the in-engine graphical presentation, one of the character designs, and a small taste of the futuristic end of the world in the trailer above. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  2. The major mobile developer Shift Up announced today that they would be entering the AAA game market with a project currently going under the code name Project EVE. Shift Up gained traction and found success with their gacha mobile game Destiny Child. One of the major talents that the South Korean company touted for Destiny Child comes in the form of Hyung-Tae Kim, an artist who made waves in the industry for his work designing characters for Magna Carta and, more famously, the MMORPG Blade & Soul. Kim's emphasis on visually appealing design has garnered an extensive following in the gaming industry of both fans and detractors. Not much is currently known about Project EVE itself. The game is being made in Unreal Engine 4 and will release worldwide for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC (currently slated for Steam). It's expected to be a single-player action-RPG set in a post-apocalyptic world. There certainly seem to be influences from Nier: Automata with robotic women, a desolated world, and the action-RPG focus. The team working on Project EVE has been made up primarily of developers who worked on Blade & Soul, though the studio continues to seek more developers to expand their workforce. Currently, there's no known release window for Project EVE. However, players can get a first look at the in-engine graphical presentation, one of the character designs, and a small taste of the futuristic end of the world in the trailer above. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  3. Following a giveaway on Humble Bundle and a heavy discount during the holiday sales, the Lego versions of The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit have been pulled from Steam as well as the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 digital storefronts. These aren't the first games to disappear from digital marketplaces recently. Following the collapse of Telltale Games, many of their high-profile adventure games also vanished from the Steam store. Reddit user SuperMoonkey first spotted the delisting. While it's still possible to access the web pages for both Lego: The Lord of the Rings and Lego: The Hobbit, neither game can be purchased on any platform. The only way to play these games now is to purchase physical copies - or wait until they return in a digital form, if they ever do. While it might seem strange that these two games would be removed, there's been some speculation as to the reasons why. The biggest cause of delistings on digital stores comes down to licensing. Publishers that put out games often have a certain time limit on how long they are able to sell products based on films or that contain certain music tracks. Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment has the rights to create games based on the world of Middle-Earth, but those are different from the rights to creating games based on Peter Jackson's film adaptations of Tolkien's work. Though Warner Bros. has yet to clarify the exact situation, it's entirely possible that they have different licensing terms for the world of Middle-Earth and the Jackson films. The film licenses might have expired, leaving the publisher with the rights to the games based on the world but not the films. This would explain the removal of Lego: The Lord of the Rings and Lego: The Hobbit, but not games like Middle-Earth Shadow of Mordor and Shadow of War. We'll let you know if Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment releases an update on the situation. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  4. Following a giveaway on Humble Bundle and a heavy discount during the holiday sales, the Lego versions of The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit have been pulled from Steam as well as the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 digital storefronts. These aren't the first games to disappear from digital marketplaces recently. Following the collapse of Telltale Games, many of their high-profile adventure games also vanished from the Steam store. Reddit user SuperMoonkey first spotted the delisting. While it's still possible to access the web pages for both Lego: The Lord of the Rings and Lego: The Hobbit, neither game can be purchased on any platform. The only way to play these games now is to purchase physical copies - or wait until they return in a digital form, if they ever do. While it might seem strange that these two games would be removed, there's been some speculation as to the reasons why. The biggest cause of delistings on digital stores comes down to licensing. Publishers that put out games often have a certain time limit on how long they are able to sell products based on films or that contain certain music tracks. Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment has the rights to create games based on the world of Middle-Earth, but those are different from the rights to creating games based on Peter Jackson's film adaptations of Tolkien's work. Though Warner Bros. has yet to clarify the exact situation, it's entirely possible that they have different licensing terms for the world of Middle-Earth and the Jackson films. The film licenses might have expired, leaving the publisher with the rights to the games based on the world but not the films. This would explain the removal of Lego: The Lord of the Rings and Lego: The Hobbit, but not games like Middle-Earth Shadow of Mordor and Shadow of War. We'll let you know if Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment releases an update on the situation. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  5. The deep sea survival game Subnautica is free for a limited time through the Epic Games Launcher. This follows closely on the heels of Epic's announcement of an Epic digital distribution service that begins with their launcher. And even better? Epic says they will be releasing a free game every two weeks until the end of 2019! Subnautica debuted to the world four years ago as an Early Access title through Steam. After years of additional development, the seafaring title released fully in January of this year. The game places players in a dire survival scenario: Their spaceship has crashed, seemingly with all hands either lost or dead. Players end up having to fend for themselves on an uncharted ocean world. Securing resources, salvaging gear, upgrading equipment, researching upgrades, and constructing a base of operations all become engrossing activities. It only recently launched on consoles, and unfortunately the free version seems to be exclusive to PC for now. Announced via Epic Games, the company has launched its year-long free game service with Subnautica, an offer which will disappear on December 27 to be replaced by a new free title. The service itself is free - all that you need to do to download the free biweekly game is to download the Epic Games Launcher and download the free title from there. From that point on, it's yours to keep with no strings attached. While a schedule of the games coming to the platform have yet to be announced, we do know that the next game heading to Epic users for free will be Team Meat's classic platformer Super Meat Boy. This move to distribute free games doesn't come out of the goodness of Epic Games' heart, however. The company is making an effort to capitalize on the 200 million people who play Fortnite through their service, a number that absolutely dwarfs juggernauts of the industry like Steam, which boasted a record 18.5 million users in January of this year. If even 10% of Epic's user base begins to use Epic Games as their go-to digital platform of choice, things could really begin to shake up in the slowly crowding digital distribution market. Undoubtedly, the allure of free games for an entire year will keep people opening up the Epic Games platform and building a collection of titles that could potentially include a few games they picked up on the storefront beyond the free games. It's a perfect way to rope in people who are already playing Fortnite and bring in new blood who want free games. Overall, this will likely accelerate some degree of competition between the biggest digital storefronts like Steam, Good Old Games, and Origin. With free games bringing in users and a better cost sharing arrangement than other platforms, Epic really does have a shot at securing a spot as not one of the most used but the most used digital games platforms in the world. This could be the beginning of an entirely different digital ecosystem. Be sure to grab Subnautica on PC before December 27! Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  6. The deep sea survival game Subnautica is free for a limited time through the Epic Games Launcher. This follows closely on the heels of Epic's announcement of an Epic digital distribution service that begins with their launcher. And even better? Epic says they will be releasing a free game every two weeks until the end of 2019! Subnautica debuted to the world four years ago as an Early Access title through Steam. After years of additional development, the seafaring title released fully in January of this year. The game places players in a dire survival scenario: Their spaceship has crashed, seemingly with all hands either lost or dead. Players end up having to fend for themselves on an uncharted ocean world. Securing resources, salvaging gear, upgrading equipment, researching upgrades, and constructing a base of operations all become engrossing activities. It only recently launched on consoles, and unfortunately the free version seems to be exclusive to PC for now. Announced via Epic Games, the company has launched its year-long free game service with Subnautica, an offer which will disappear on December 27 to be replaced by a new free title. The service itself is free - all that you need to do to download the free biweekly game is to download the Epic Games Launcher and download the free title from there. From that point on, it's yours to keep with no strings attached. While a schedule of the games coming to the platform have yet to be announced, we do know that the next game heading to Epic users for free will be Team Meat's classic platformer Super Meat Boy. This move to distribute free games doesn't come out of the goodness of Epic Games' heart, however. The company is making an effort to capitalize on the 200 million people who play Fortnite through their service, a number that absolutely dwarfs juggernauts of the industry like Steam, which boasted a record 18.5 million users in January of this year. If even 10% of Epic's user base begins to use Epic Games as their go-to digital platform of choice, things could really begin to shake up in the slowly crowding digital distribution market. Undoubtedly, the allure of free games for an entire year will keep people opening up the Epic Games platform and building a collection of titles that could potentially include a few games they picked up on the storefront beyond the free games. It's a perfect way to rope in people who are already playing Fortnite and bring in new blood who want free games. Overall, this will likely accelerate some degree of competition between the biggest digital storefronts like Steam, Good Old Games, and Origin. With free games bringing in users and a better cost sharing arrangement than other platforms, Epic really does have a shot at securing a spot as not one of the most used but the most used digital games platforms in the world. This could be the beginning of an entirely different digital ecosystem. Be sure to grab Subnautica on PC before December 27! Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  7. Players can now get their hands on 2084 a new first-person shooter with horror elements from the newly formed Feardemic development studio. The game follows the exploits of junior researcher Laura Lofi as she navigates an ever more deadly maze of horrors at the behest of her employer, Chiron Incorporated. Laura relies on hacking, gunplay, and her wits to stay one step ahead of the crazed hordes of infected civilians looking to nibble on the surviving members of society. Imprisoned by Chiron, possibly for her own safety, Laura will have to overcome the world of 2084 for a chance to see the outside world once again. 2084 delivers an aggressively bleak vision of the future. Set in the Fifth Polish Republic, a horrible plague has swept through the country and decimated the population. Even worse, the infected become violent killers willing to sacrifice their own lives just to rip apart those still untainted with the disease. The futuristic cyber enhancements the majority of the population has installed in their bodies compounds the issue, making modified humans even more dangerous in their delirious state. With Cyberpunk 2077 looming on the horizon, the dystopian techno-future has become all the rage. Feardmic's FPS, only now entering Steam's Early Access development phase, hopes to capitalize on that trend with a slick action experience and psychedelic, beautifully messy imagery. The team expects to fully release the commercial version sometime in 2020. That might seem like a long way, but the Feardemic will regularly update the game with more content, story, and gameplay expansions in the time between now and final release. The title will be discounted 15% for a limited time to encourage people to give it a shot during this Early Access period. Feardemic burst onto the scene last year and exists as a wholly owned property of Bloober Team SA, the company behind the critically well received Observer and Layers of Fear. The studio initially developed 2084 as part of a 72-hour game jam held within the company. The central hacking mechanic captured the team's attention since it forced players to think quickly and react when given the small window to gain the upperhand while blasting away at the zombified masses. The CEO of Feardemic, Martin Kawa, made a case for how far the game has come and where it will go saying, "The Early Access version of the game is fully functioning and we have been receiving great feedback from players on both the story mode and on Chiron’s endless training arena mode. In the latter, foes are numerous and ammunition is scarce, forcing players to hone their shooting skills and reaction times to gain an advantage and climb up the leaderboard.” The television-headed zombie-like enemies, the hacking in-combat mechanics, and the presentation of the story scenes in the Steam Early Access trailer all come across as incredibly compelling. Those touches put 2084 on an elevated playing field compared with the conga line of arena shooters that have released onto the Steam store over the years. There's effort and skill on display, though whether that pays off in a refined gameplay experience and cohesive narrative remains to be seen until the final release. Until then, Feardemic seems to have a solid grasp on a vision for 2084 and have added yet another worthwhile digital game to 2018's amazing year of video games. 2084 is available on PC through Steam Early Acce- oh, 2084! Like 1984, but a century ahead! I get it now! Neat. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  8. Players can now get their hands on 2084 a new first-person shooter with horror elements from the newly formed Feardemic development studio. The game follows the exploits of junior researcher Laura Lofi as she navigates an ever more deadly maze of horrors at the behest of her employer, Chiron Incorporated. Laura relies on hacking, gunplay, and her wits to stay one step ahead of the crazed hordes of infected civilians looking to nibble on the surviving members of society. Imprisoned by Chiron, possibly for her own safety, Laura will have to overcome the world of 2084 for a chance to see the outside world once again. 2084 delivers an aggressively bleak vision of the future. Set in the Fifth Polish Republic, a horrible plague has swept through the country and decimated the population. Even worse, the infected become violent killers willing to sacrifice their own lives just to rip apart those still untainted with the disease. The futuristic cyber enhancements the majority of the population has installed in their bodies compounds the issue, making modified humans even more dangerous in their delirious state. With Cyberpunk 2077 looming on the horizon, the dystopian techno-future has become all the rage. Feardmic's FPS, only now entering Steam's Early Access development phase, hopes to capitalize on that trend with a slick action experience and psychedelic, beautifully messy imagery. The team expects to fully release the commercial version sometime in 2020. That might seem like a long way, but the Feardemic will regularly update the game with more content, story, and gameplay expansions in the time between now and final release. The title will be discounted 15% for a limited time to encourage people to give it a shot during this Early Access period. Feardemic burst onto the scene last year and exists as a wholly owned property of Bloober Team SA, the company behind the critically well received Observer and Layers of Fear. The studio initially developed 2084 as part of a 72-hour game jam held within the company. The central hacking mechanic captured the team's attention since it forced players to think quickly and react when given the small window to gain the upperhand while blasting away at the zombified masses. The CEO of Feardemic, Martin Kawa, made a case for how far the game has come and where it will go saying, "The Early Access version of the game is fully functioning and we have been receiving great feedback from players on both the story mode and on Chiron’s endless training arena mode. In the latter, foes are numerous and ammunition is scarce, forcing players to hone their shooting skills and reaction times to gain an advantage and climb up the leaderboard.” The television-headed zombie-like enemies, the hacking in-combat mechanics, and the presentation of the story scenes in the Steam Early Access trailer all come across as incredibly compelling. Those touches put 2084 on an elevated playing field compared with the conga line of arena shooters that have released onto the Steam store over the years. There's effort and skill on display, though whether that pays off in a refined gameplay experience and cohesive narrative remains to be seen until the final release. Until then, Feardemic seems to have a solid grasp on a vision for 2084 and have added yet another worthwhile digital game to 2018's amazing year of video games. 2084 is available on PC through Steam Early Acce- oh, 2084! Like 1984, but a century ahead! I get it now! Neat. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  9. Epic Games is rolling in cash courtesy of Fortnite, the cool thing the kids are playing these days (or so some cool kids tell me). What exactly has it done with all of that moola? Use it to start a digital storefront designed to compete with the likes of Steam and Good Old Games. "For the past five years, we've been building tools enabling Epic to bring our games directly to players. We built the Epic Games launcher on PC and Mac featuring Fortnite and Unreal Engine; we built a worldwide digital commerce ecosystem supporting dozens of payment methods; and we gained great economies of scale thanks to Fortnite's growth," said Tim Sweeney in his initial announcement of the Epic Games Store. All of this has put Epic Games on track to launch their storefront. The main selling point that Epic Games wants everyone to be aware of is their dedication to showing fairness to developers who sell games on their platform. A major part of their announcement states that all developers will earn 88% of the revenue from sales on the Epic Games Store, a piece of information that was accompanied by a chart comparing an their 12-88 revenue split to Steam's 30-70 (or 30-55 in some cases) split. The graphic also makes it clear why Epic Games is pursuing a piece of the digital distribution market: Devs that make use of Unreal Engine 4 automatically pay 5% of their game's revenue to Epic, but if Epic sells those games on their own platform, they can up that cut to 12% regardless of game engine, all while getting good PR for sharing more revenue with developers who sell through their store. It's a win-win relationship for Epic and those who sell through them. Given that Epic now has strong ties to an entire generation of gamers through Fortnite and the Epic Games launcher, this makes complete sense. They have the technological infrastructure, a readily available pool of customers, and the unique position to reap larger profits while attracting more developers. Another benefit will be a more curated atmosphere that lacks on a service like Steam that has already opened the development floodgates for practically anything to make it onto the platform. Sweeney wrote that the service will help devs reach their players by giving users a newsfeed that will update with information and updates from developers. Developers will also be able to reach out to streamers, vloggers, and bloggers through Epic's Support-A-Creator program to help get the word out about up-and-coming indies. The somewhat murky part of this is that through this program content creators will be able to receive a cut of the revenue (determined by the developer) from purchases made using their referral links. The first 24 months of the service will see Epic Games covering the first 5% of the revenue shared with content creators, so that's pretty neat. Sweeney's announcement was a bit lacking in details regarding exactly when the service would launch, though more details will be coming on Thursday, December 6 during The Game Awards. The Epic Games Store will first launch for PC and Mac before spreading to Android devices and beyond over the next year. Are you excited for a new digital store in the mix? Is a bigger revenue share for the devs enough of an incentive for you as a customer to switch over to Epic? Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  10. Epic Games is rolling in cash courtesy of Fortnite, the cool thing the kids are playing these days (or so some cool kids tell me). What exactly has it done with all of that moola? Use it to start a digital storefront designed to compete with the likes of Steam and Good Old Games. "For the past five years, we've been building tools enabling Epic to bring our games directly to players. We built the Epic Games launcher on PC and Mac featuring Fortnite and Unreal Engine; we built a worldwide digital commerce ecosystem supporting dozens of payment methods; and we gained great economies of scale thanks to Fortnite's growth," said Tim Sweeney in his initial announcement of the Epic Games Store. All of this has put Epic Games on track to launch their storefront. The main selling point that Epic Games wants everyone to be aware of is their dedication to showing fairness to developers who sell games on their platform. A major part of their announcement states that all developers will earn 88% of the revenue from sales on the Epic Games Store, a piece of information that was accompanied by a chart comparing an their 12-88 revenue split to Steam's 30-70 (or 30-55 in some cases) split. The graphic also makes it clear why Epic Games is pursuing a piece of the digital distribution market: Devs that make use of Unreal Engine 4 automatically pay 5% of their game's revenue to Epic, but if Epic sells those games on their own platform, they can up that cut to 12% regardless of game engine, all while getting good PR for sharing more revenue with developers who sell through their store. It's a win-win relationship for Epic and those who sell through them. Given that Epic now has strong ties to an entire generation of gamers through Fortnite and the Epic Games launcher, this makes complete sense. They have the technological infrastructure, a readily available pool of customers, and the unique position to reap larger profits while attracting more developers. Another benefit will be a more curated atmosphere that lacks on a service like Steam that has already opened the development floodgates for practically anything to make it onto the platform. Sweeney wrote that the service will help devs reach their players by giving users a newsfeed that will update with information and updates from developers. Developers will also be able to reach out to streamers, vloggers, and bloggers through Epic's Support-A-Creator program to help get the word out about up-and-coming indies. The somewhat murky part of this is that through this program content creators will be able to receive a cut of the revenue (determined by the developer) from purchases made using their referral links. The first 24 months of the service will see Epic Games covering the first 5% of the revenue shared with content creators, so that's pretty neat. Sweeney's announcement was a bit lacking in details regarding exactly when the service would launch, though more details will be coming on Thursday, December 6 during The Game Awards. The Epic Games Store will first launch for PC and Mac before spreading to Android devices and beyond over the next year. Are you excited for a new digital store in the mix? Is a bigger revenue share for the devs enough of an incentive for you as a customer to switch over to Epic? Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  11. It seems that, though development on The Walking Dead: The Final Season will be finished by Skybound Entertainment, the demise of Telltale Games will result in some of their games being pulled from digital distribution. Some eagle-eyed observers have noticed a number of Telltale titles had become inaccessible recently. While it's possible that there's some coincidence and that the delisting isn't related to the studio's closure, this could be the beginning of a wider delisting campaign. The following games can no longer be found on Steam: Jurassic Park: The Game Tales of Monkey Island Episodes 1-5 Tales of Monkey Island Complete Pack Back to the Future: The Game Episodes 1-5 Back to the Future: The Game These titles can still be found on other digital storefronts like GOG, XBLA, and PSN, though for how much longer? Hopefully this turns out to be temporary as legal issues are resolved and the rights to all of these games go to new homes. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  12. It seems that, though development on The Walking Dead: The Final Season will be finished by Skybound Entertainment, the demise of Telltale Games will result in some of their games being pulled from digital distribution. Some eagle-eyed observers have noticed a number of Telltale titles had become inaccessible recently. While it's possible that there's some coincidence and that the delisting isn't related to the studio's closure, this could be the beginning of a wider delisting campaign. The following games can no longer be found on Steam: Jurassic Park: The Game Tales of Monkey Island Episodes 1-5 Tales of Monkey Island Complete Pack Back to the Future: The Game Episodes 1-5 Back to the Future: The Game These titles can still be found on other digital storefronts like GOG, XBLA, and PSN, though for how much longer? Hopefully this turns out to be temporary as legal issues are resolved and the rights to all of these games go to new homes. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  13. Frostpunk gives players the task of guiding the growth and survival of New London, the last city on Earth. In order to survive in the face of an unending winter that has largely wiped out humanity across the globe, the final remnants of the human race have turned to using the power of steam. Starting from a collection of shelters in a somewhat sheltered valley, players guide New London to greatness and sustainability by managing the expansion of the city, deciding on the policies regarding food, water, and the most precious resource of all: heat. Players will be responsible for deciding how heat is distributed throughout their city, a power that can mean the difference between life and death. As the city grows, more conflicts and problems will arise from the general population. Players will have to establish laws and policies that govern the populace. Do you prioritize healthcare or building maintenance? Do you make sure everyone is fed even at the cost of increasing police presence? Another wrinkle on top of everything else, the population has to have hope. Everyone in New London is well aware of the precarious nature of their survival. The more desperate the situation becomes, the less hope people have and the more likely the city is to revolt or have various problems. As players progress, small decisions will add up and lead to decision points that will alter the entirety of society forever. How far is too far to maintain order and stability in a city that represents the last shot at the survival of the species? Once players advance to a certain technological level they can explore the surrounding world by sending out expeditions into the blinding frozen wastes. These are risky endeavors that could go down in flames and ice or discover a treasure trove of new citizens, technology, or resources. It can be hard to get society to that higher tech level, but the higher end of the tech tree brings automated drones and airships that can be a huge boon to New London. Frostpunk releases on April 24 for PC . View full article
  14. Frostpunk gives players the task of guiding the growth and survival of New London, the last city on Earth. In order to survive in the face of an unending winter that has largely wiped out humanity across the globe, the final remnants of the human race have turned to using the power of steam. Starting from a collection of shelters in a somewhat sheltered valley, players guide New London to greatness and sustainability by managing the expansion of the city, deciding on the policies regarding food, water, and the most precious resource of all: heat. Players will be responsible for deciding how heat is distributed throughout their city, a power that can mean the difference between life and death. As the city grows, more conflicts and problems will arise from the general population. Players will have to establish laws and policies that govern the populace. Do you prioritize healthcare or building maintenance? Do you make sure everyone is fed even at the cost of increasing police presence? Another wrinkle on top of everything else, the population has to have hope. Everyone in New London is well aware of the precarious nature of their survival. The more desperate the situation becomes, the less hope people have and the more likely the city is to revolt or have various problems. As players progress, small decisions will add up and lead to decision points that will alter the entirety of society forever. How far is too far to maintain order and stability in a city that represents the last shot at the survival of the species? Once players advance to a certain technological level they can explore the surrounding world by sending out expeditions into the blinding frozen wastes. These are risky endeavors that could go down in flames and ice or discover a treasure trove of new citizens, technology, or resources. It can be hard to get society to that higher tech level, but the higher end of the tech tree brings automated drones and airships that can be a huge boon to New London. Frostpunk releases on April 24 for PC .
  15. You're on the run and every move counts. A shadow follows in your exact movements and pausing for too long to figure out a puzzle could prove deadly in the minimalist cat-and-mouse game Echoplex. Awarded Most Innovative Game and Best Art Direction at Lisboa Games Week IndieDome 2017, Echoplex offers players a set of 27 levels that weave their way through an FMV storyline full of mystery, intrigue, and horror. Since that showing last year, Output Games has revamped the user interface, added new puzzle mechanics, and tightened the gameplay. Echoplex puts players into the role of an engineer at the Clonochem Corporation manufacturing the strange and mysterious product Continuum. After calling a phone number he finds on a severed arm, he finds himself trapped in a simulation that continually loops and soon begins to fill with more versions of himself - until one of them begins to chase the original. That chase sits as the fundamental building block of Echoplex. Run over a switch that shuts a door? You might have to wait for the shadow following in your exact footsteps to trigger the switch again to move on. The founder and director at Output Games, Tyron van Vuuren had this to say about the unique FMV approach to storytelling: With Echoplex, we were looking for new ways to create a fully-realized world that carries emotional weight – something that only real actors can bring to a story. The game doesn’t come to a halt during cutscenes; instead, Echoplex allows players to get involved in the storytelling process – building their own interpretation of events as they piece things together. And although the cutscenes may look expensive, we had a very tight budget. Kudos to the visual effects team who worked hard to achieve those results. Echoplex is available beginning today for PC. View full article
  16. You're on the run and every move counts. A shadow follows in your exact movements and pausing for too long to figure out a puzzle could prove deadly in the minimalist cat-and-mouse game Echoplex. Awarded Most Innovative Game and Best Art Direction at Lisboa Games Week IndieDome 2017, Echoplex offers players a set of 27 levels that weave their way through an FMV storyline full of mystery, intrigue, and horror. Since that showing last year, Output Games has revamped the user interface, added new puzzle mechanics, and tightened the gameplay. Echoplex puts players into the role of an engineer at the Clonochem Corporation manufacturing the strange and mysterious product Continuum. After calling a phone number he finds on a severed arm, he finds himself trapped in a simulation that continually loops and soon begins to fill with more versions of himself - until one of them begins to chase the original. That chase sits as the fundamental building block of Echoplex. Run over a switch that shuts a door? You might have to wait for the shadow following in your exact footsteps to trigger the switch again to move on. The founder and director at Output Games, Tyron van Vuuren had this to say about the unique FMV approach to storytelling: With Echoplex, we were looking for new ways to create a fully-realized world that carries emotional weight – something that only real actors can bring to a story. The game doesn’t come to a halt during cutscenes; instead, Echoplex allows players to get involved in the storytelling process – building their own interpretation of events as they piece things together. And although the cutscenes may look expensive, we had a very tight budget. Kudos to the visual effects team who worked hard to achieve those results. Echoplex is available beginning today for PC.
  17. Kongregate announced today that it would be offering its own alternative to online storefronts like Steam and Good Old Games. If successful, Kartridge could prove to be a great alternative for smaller devs looking to have more control over their stores and to stand out from the tides of shovelware that has come to plague larger services. Kongregate has been something of a low-key industry force for over a decade now. The service launched in 2007 and managed to capitalize on the tail end of the height of free online Flash gaming. Over the years, it has managed to leverage its position in the industry to bill itself as a stepping stone for up and coming devs looking to break into the mobile and PC gaming markets. It was able to do this by slowly expanding into mobile publishing and using their Gamestop connection to leverage Steam publishing deals. Kartridge offers developers a platform that has no listing fees and the power to tailor their storefronts to suit their game. It will also include the social features that Kongregate has attempted to implement over the years on their website. "Playing on Kartridge will immerse gamers in a deeply social world; they'll earn rewards for playing their favorite games, collect customized achievements, and connect with other gamers through chat, forums, and additional social features," said Kongregate in their announcement. "They’ll share tips and strategies within newfound communities as they level up their accounts, earning rewards along the way. The Kartridge platform was designed to be a unique and robust experience for players to enjoy, with the end goal of making the platform as fun as the games people are playing." Perhaps the most enticing feature of Kartridge will be its promise to curate the content that makes it onto their store. With Steam opening the floodgates several years ago, there's now an entire subsection of YouTube and Twitch that focuses entirely on the lazy, awful and sometimes seedy underbelly of the releases pouring onto the platform. Kartridge will use a combination of an editorial team and a series of algorithms to "help surface titles that are getting lost in other marketplaces and [...] help players find new content they didn't know they'd love." The service isn't quite live yet, but it will be entering its beta testing phase in the near future. People interested in seeing what it will be all about can sign up for entry to the beta here. The service is slated to launch sometime this summer. View full article
  18. Kongregate announced today that it would be offering its own alternative to online storefronts like Steam and Good Old Games. If successful, Kartridge could prove to be a great alternative for smaller devs looking to have more control over their stores and to stand out from the tides of shovelware that has come to plague larger services. Kongregate has been something of a low-key industry force for over a decade now. The service launched in 2007 and managed to capitalize on the tail end of the height of free online Flash gaming. Over the years, it has managed to leverage its position in the industry to bill itself as a stepping stone for up and coming devs looking to break into the mobile and PC gaming markets. It was able to do this by slowly expanding into mobile publishing and using their Gamestop connection to leverage Steam publishing deals. Kartridge offers developers a platform that has no listing fees and the power to tailor their storefronts to suit their game. It will also include the social features that Kongregate has attempted to implement over the years on their website. "Playing on Kartridge will immerse gamers in a deeply social world; they'll earn rewards for playing their favorite games, collect customized achievements, and connect with other gamers through chat, forums, and additional social features," said Kongregate in their announcement. "They’ll share tips and strategies within newfound communities as they level up their accounts, earning rewards along the way. The Kartridge platform was designed to be a unique and robust experience for players to enjoy, with the end goal of making the platform as fun as the games people are playing." Perhaps the most enticing feature of Kartridge will be its promise to curate the content that makes it onto their store. With Steam opening the floodgates several years ago, there's now an entire subsection of YouTube and Twitch that focuses entirely on the lazy, awful and sometimes seedy underbelly of the releases pouring onto the platform. Kartridge will use a combination of an editorial team and a series of algorithms to "help surface titles that are getting lost in other marketplaces and [...] help players find new content they didn't know they'd love." The service isn't quite live yet, but it will be entering its beta testing phase in the near future. People interested in seeing what it will be all about can sign up for entry to the beta here. The service is slated to launch sometime this summer.
  19. A new VR game releasing today that pits players against a horde of increasingly silly zombies. Your only weapons? Your bare hands and anything else that might possibly be thrown as a projectile. Players will have to defend themselves by throwing items at the encroaching zombie horde - hopefully driving them back from a variety of ridiculous locations. In Throw Anything, players are able to grab items in their environment to appropriate them as thrown weapons. Of course, players might run short on throwables and might be forced to resort to breaking apart large items in their vicinity, or even use the NPCs around them in a pinch! The Early Access game launching on Steam today will include five levels for players to master. These levels are filled with zombies, four mid bosses, and five intimidating main bosses to overcome. Kalev Jung, the CEO of developer VisualLight released a statement saying, “Throw Anything is not for the faint of heart. Action tower defense takes on a whole new meaning in VR! Suddenly, the threat is right in front of you – and you need to be quick on your feet to avoid getting your face eaten.” Throw Anything will be available for HTC Vive starting today via Steam Early Access with PSVR and Oculus Rift support coming later this year. View full article
  20. A new VR game releasing today that pits players against a horde of increasingly silly zombies. Your only weapons? Your bare hands and anything else that might possibly be thrown as a projectile. Players will have to defend themselves by throwing items at the encroaching zombie horde - hopefully driving them back from a variety of ridiculous locations. In Throw Anything, players are able to grab items in their environment to appropriate them as thrown weapons. Of course, players might run short on throwables and might be forced to resort to breaking apart large items in their vicinity, or even use the NPCs around them in a pinch! The Early Access game launching on Steam today will include five levels for players to master. These levels are filled with zombies, four mid bosses, and five intimidating main bosses to overcome. Kalev Jung, the CEO of developer VisualLight released a statement saying, “Throw Anything is not for the faint of heart. Action tower defense takes on a whole new meaning in VR! Suddenly, the threat is right in front of you – and you need to be quick on your feet to avoid getting your face eaten.” Throw Anything will be available for HTC Vive starting today via Steam Early Access with PSVR and Oculus Rift support coming later this year.
  21. First-person puzzler/philosophical journey The Talos Principle received acclaim when it first released on PC in late 2014. After being ported to console and mobile, the game makes the next logical leap: virtual reality. The Talos Principle VR is available now on Steam for Oculus Rift and HTC Vive. According to developer Croteam, the game has been entirely redesigned for VR and features fully customizable controls. This version runs for $39.99 but owners of the original game receive a 25% discount (knocking it down to around $29.99). Additionally, the four-episode Road to Gehenna expansion is included with The Talos Principle VR. Any of you Oculus or Vive users plan on to taking a look at The Talos Principle? View full article
  22. First-person puzzler/philosophical journey The Talos Principle received acclaim when it first released on PC in late 2014. After being ported to console and mobile, the game makes the next logical leap: virtual reality. The Talos Principle VR is available now on Steam for Oculus Rift and HTC Vive. According to developer Croteam, the game has been entirely redesigned for VR and features fully customizable controls. This version runs for $39.99 but owners of the original game receive a 25% discount (knocking it down to around $29.99). Additionally, the four-episode Road to Gehenna expansion is included with The Talos Principle VR. Any of you Oculus or Vive users plan on to taking a look at The Talos Principle?
  23. Anyone else having fun playing this? Anyone interested in grouping up for said game?
  24. Sales can get any gamer excited, but Steam Sales are of a whole different caliber. The Steam Summer Sale is officially underway and will last until July 5. Prices for everything indie as well as AAA get significant cuts as high as 85 percent off. Perennial best-seller Grand Theft Auto V is 50 percent off at $29.99, Nier: Automata is 30 percent off at $41.99. What appears to be the best deal is Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor Game of the Year Edition–$3.99 after an 80 percent price cut. Franchise-wide sales are also taking place with Call of Duty titles being 0 to 50 percent off, the same goes for Final Fantasy titles. With the sales come the crowds and some users are experiencing issues with Steam itself. "Sorry, the Steam Store is experiencing some heavy load right now. Please try again later," one such error states. The hashtag #SteamSummerSale is ahem, picking up steam on Twitter. It's highly recommended (maybe when you encounter an error page) to peruse the various memes the tag has to offer. View full article
  25. Sales can get any gamer excited, but Steam Sales are of a whole different caliber. The Steam Summer Sale is officially underway and will last until July 5. Prices for everything indie as well as AAA get significant cuts as high as 85 percent off. Perennial best-seller Grand Theft Auto V is 50 percent off at $29.99, Nier: Automata is 30 percent off at $41.99. What appears to be the best deal is Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor Game of the Year Edition–$3.99 after an 80 percent price cut. Franchise-wide sales are also taking place with Call of Duty titles being 0 to 50 percent off, the same goes for Final Fantasy titles. With the sales come the crowds and some users are experiencing issues with Steam itself. "Sorry, the Steam Store is experiencing some heavy load right now. Please try again later," one such error states. The hashtag #SteamSummerSale is ahem, picking up steam on Twitter. It's highly recommended (maybe when you encounter an error page) to peruse the various memes the tag has to offer.
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