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Found 506 results

  1. Fresh off of seeing Crash Bandicoot's swell in popularity following the release of the Crash Bandicoot N.Sane Trilogy, Sony seems to be angling MediEvil to be their next big blast from the past. The franchise ran from 1998-2005 and consists of MediEvil and MediEvil 2 (MediEvil: Resurrection, too, if you count a remake of the original as another installment). Though there have been some re-releases of the titles on PSN and a few appearances by series protagonist Sir Daniel Fortesque in Sony projects like Everybody's Golf 2 and PlayStation All-Stars Battle Royale. The undead series might be one of the lesser known Sony properties, but clearly one that the company feels deserves another chance to find an audience. MediEvil stars Sir Dan, a gifted storyteller given the station of knight and made honorary captain of the Royal Battalion, which turns out to be a real bone-head move when an evil wizard named Zarok returns from exile and tried to wage war against the kingdom. Sir Dan dies immediately from an arrow to the eye... only to be resurrected centuries later when Zarok, who was defeated previously, pops up again to cast a spell resurrecting an undead army. The only one in the kingdom gifted with undeath and a thirst to prove himself a hero, Sir Daniel Fortesque takes up his sword and sets off to save the land from the undead menace. MediEvil comes from the same vein of action-platformers that formed the backbone of late 90s video games in Crash Bandicoot, Mario 64, or Spyro the Dragon. While it might not have been a smashing hit at the time, perhaps it can make more of a splash twenty years later with a new coat of paint? So far, not much is known about the resurrection of MediEvil. It's coming to the PlayStation 4 in 4K and it will likely be out in the next year or so. It's unclear whether this remaster will include the full MediEvil series or if it will only be the first game. How do we all feel about MediEvil remaster? View full article
  2. Fresh off of seeing Crash Bandicoot's swell in popularity following the release of the Crash Bandicoot N.Sane Trilogy, Sony seems to be angling MediEvil to be their next big blast from the past. The franchise ran from 1998-2005 and consists of MediEvil and MediEvil 2 (MediEvil: Resurrection, too, if you count a remake of the original as another installment). Though there have been some re-releases of the titles on PSN and a few appearances by series protagonist Sir Daniel Fortesque in Sony projects like Everybody's Golf 2 and PlayStation All-Stars Battle Royale. The undead series might be one of the lesser known Sony properties, but clearly one that the company feels deserves another chance to find an audience. MediEvil stars Sir Dan, a gifted storyteller given the station of knight and made honorary captain of the Royal Battalion, which turns out to be a real bone-head move when an evil wizard named Zarok returns from exile and tried to wage war against the kingdom. Sir Dan dies immediately from an arrow to the eye... only to be resurrected centuries later when Zarok, who was defeated previously, pops up again to cast a spell resurrecting an undead army. The only one in the kingdom gifted with undeath and a thirst to prove himself a hero, Sir Daniel Fortesque takes up his sword and sets off to save the land from the undead menace. MediEvil comes from the same vein of action-platformers that formed the backbone of late 90s video games in Crash Bandicoot, Mario 64, or Spyro the Dragon. While it might not have been a smashing hit at the time, perhaps it can make more of a splash twenty years later with a new coat of paint? So far, not much is known about the resurrection of MediEvil. It's coming to the PlayStation 4 in 4K and it will likely be out in the next year or so. It's unclear whether this remaster will include the full MediEvil series or if it will only be the first game. How do we all feel about MediEvil remaster?
  3. Atlus announced yesterday that Vanillaware's unique action-RPG Dragon's Crown would be making its way to the PlayStation 4 early next year with a grip of improvements over the original. Dragon's Crown takes place in the same fantasy world as Vanillaware's previous titles, GrimGrimoire and Odin Sphere. It stars a cast of six characters in a side-scrolling melee reminiscent of the Golden Axe arcade titles mixed with more modern RPG mechanics. Players had to face down a myriad of dungeons to uncover the secrets of the titular Dragon's Crown. It can be played solo or co-op with up to four players, Gauntlet style. It made a significant splash in the lead up to its PlayStation 3 and Vita release for its exaggerated, extreme art style. Dragon's Crown Pro will give the original a face-lift with 4K resolution and updated artwork compatible with that increased fidelity. The soundtrack has been remastered with a live orchestra to imbue the action with a more robust soundscape. It's really a boon to any gamers out there looking for a new co-op experience to enjoy with friends. Dragon's Crown Pro will be available for the PlayStation 4 sometime Spring 2018. View full article
  4. Atlus announced yesterday that Vanillaware's unique action-RPG Dragon's Crown would be making its way to the PlayStation 4 early next year with a grip of improvements over the original. Dragon's Crown takes place in the same fantasy world as Vanillaware's previous titles, GrimGrimoire and Odin Sphere. It stars a cast of six characters in a side-scrolling melee reminiscent of the Golden Axe arcade titles mixed with more modern RPG mechanics. Players had to face down a myriad of dungeons to uncover the secrets of the titular Dragon's Crown. It can be played solo or co-op with up to four players, Gauntlet style. It made a significant splash in the lead up to its PlayStation 3 and Vita release for its exaggerated, extreme art style. Dragon's Crown Pro will give the original a face-lift with 4K resolution and updated artwork compatible with that increased fidelity. The soundtrack has been remastered with a live orchestra to imbue the action with a more robust soundscape. It's really a boon to any gamers out there looking for a new co-op experience to enjoy with friends. Dragon's Crown Pro will be available for the PlayStation 4 sometime Spring 2018.
  5. In the year 21XX, Mega Man was reborn as Mega Man X, a robotic bounty hunter taking on the robo-criminals of the future. The X series spanned three console generations before its final entry in 2005 with Mega Man X8. Next summer all eight games will be available for the first time on modern systems (there was a Mega Man X Collection on the GameCube and PlayStation 2, but it only included the first six games of the series). While more information has been promised in the next several months, there are definitely still some questions. Capcom has made a habit of releasing some robust collections, breaking up the mainline Mega Man series into two packages. The Mega Man Legacy Collection included the first six games of the franchise, followed by The Mega Man Legacy Collection 2, which held Mega Man 7-10. Does this mean X will get a similar treatment with X 1-4 as one bundle and X 5-8 as another? Or perhaps all in one bundle? It also isn't outside the realm of possibility that Capcom might see fit to release them all individually. However Capcom decides to do it... MORE MEGA MAN X! That's always a good thing. Look forward to seeing X on Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC sometime next summer. View full article
  6. In the year 21XX, Mega Man was reborn as Mega Man X, a robotic bounty hunter taking on the robo-criminals of the future. The X series spanned three console generations before its final entry in 2005 with Mega Man X8. Next summer all eight games will be available for the first time on modern systems (there was a Mega Man X Collection on the GameCube and PlayStation 2, but it only included the first six games of the series). While more information has been promised in the next several months, there are definitely still some questions. Capcom has made a habit of releasing some robust collections, breaking up the mainline Mega Man series into two packages. The Mega Man Legacy Collection included the first six games of the franchise, followed by The Mega Man Legacy Collection 2, which held Mega Man 7-10. Does this mean X will get a similar treatment with X 1-4 as one bundle and X 5-8 as another? Or perhaps all in one bundle? It also isn't outside the realm of possibility that Capcom might see fit to release them all individually. However Capcom decides to do it... MORE MEGA MAN X! That's always a good thing. Look forward to seeing X on Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC sometime next summer.
  7. The Blue Bomber has just turned 30 years old and Capcom has given everyone's favorite robotic defender a gift: The surprise announcement of Mega Man 11! The new Capcom title aims to take the series in a bold new direction. While Mega Man 9 and 10 adopted the retro aesthetic of the original NES classics, Mega Man 11 makes use of 3D models and lighting to give the decades old franchise a new coat of paint. On top of that, the gameplay clips shown on the 30th anniversary livestream put on by Capcom offered glimpses at a handful of Mega Man's new powers. Charged shots, the return of Rush the robo-dog, an ability to summon a series of brick cubes on top of enemies, and an impressive ability that seems to temporarily supercharge Mega Man round out a few of the fun tools players will have at their disposal. Oh, and newcomers to the series who find the traditional difficulty daunting can take refuge in a lower difficulty mode (and those looking for additional challenge might just find more demanding modes). Capcom reassured fans who might be put off by the visual tweaks saying, "with an expert development team at Capcom, many of whom have been working at the company since the early 8-bit era, we’re revitalizing and revolutionizing Mega Man for a new generation while keeping the series’ tight classic gameplay and the heart of our beloved hero intact. Veterans can expect the series’ signature challenge, and we’re inviting new players to the mix with a variety of difficulty options to choose from in the game." Mega Man 11 is coming to Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC in late 2018. View full article
  8. The Blue Bomber has just turned 30 years old and Capcom has given everyone's favorite robotic defender a gift: The surprise announcement of Mega Man 11! The new Capcom title aims to take the series in a bold new direction. While Mega Man 9 and 10 adopted the retro aesthetic of the original NES classics, Mega Man 11 makes use of 3D models and lighting to give the decades old franchise a new coat of paint. On top of that, the gameplay clips shown on the 30th anniversary livestream put on by Capcom offered glimpses at a handful of Mega Man's new powers. Charged shots, the return of Rush the robo-dog, an ability to summon a series of brick cubes on top of enemies, and an impressive ability that seems to temporarily supercharge Mega Man round out a few of the fun tools players will have at their disposal. Oh, and newcomers to the series who find the traditional difficulty daunting can take refuge in a lower difficulty mode (and those looking for additional challenge might just find more demanding modes). Capcom reassured fans who might be put off by the visual tweaks saying, "with an expert development team at Capcom, many of whom have been working at the company since the early 8-bit era, we’re revitalizing and revolutionizing Mega Man for a new generation while keeping the series’ tight classic gameplay and the heart of our beloved hero intact. Veterans can expect the series’ signature challenge, and we’re inviting new players to the mix with a variety of difficulty options to choose from in the game." Mega Man 11 is coming to Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC in late 2018.
  9. The indie title Mulaka has been gathering some buzz in recent months. The action-adventure game follows the shaman Sukurúame as he races to battle the otherworldly powers corrupting his homeland. Developer Lienzo created Mulaka in the hope that their game will be both enjoyable for players and also teach about the Tarahumara culture. Sukurúame and Mulaka are based largely on the Tarahumara, a people indigenous to northern Mexico. The Tarahumara were known for their stamina and ability to run vast distances in the sprawling landscape they called home, but they were far more than that. To help players better understand the beating cultural heart of Mulaka, Lienzo has launched the first episode of a three part educational series about the Tarahumara. Mulaka draws from the legends and myths passed down by the Tarahumara to create a visually unique world full of incredible demigods and magic - all grounded in real-world locations and beliefs. Lienzo hopes that giving the Tarahumara people a story within a modern game will help to shad some light on a culture many people might never have heard of otherwise. "Even though I didn't know the mythology, it is still part of the city I live in, and the state and the country I live in. So I really feel proud that we can get to share part of this amazing culture with the world," says Lienzo's lead developer Adolfo Rico. The next two videos will be coming soon. Expect to see them go up sometime before Mulaka's early 2018 release on PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch. View full article
  10. The indie title Mulaka has been gathering some buzz in recent months. The action-adventure game follows the shaman Sukurúame as he races to battle the otherworldly powers corrupting his homeland. Developer Lienzo created Mulaka in the hope that their game will be both enjoyable for players and also teach about the Tarahumara culture. Sukurúame and Mulaka are based largely on the Tarahumara, a people indigenous to northern Mexico. The Tarahumara were known for their stamina and ability to run vast distances in the sprawling landscape they called home, but they were far more than that. To help players better understand the beating cultural heart of Mulaka, Lienzo has launched the first episode of a three part educational series about the Tarahumara. Mulaka draws from the legends and myths passed down by the Tarahumara to create a visually unique world full of incredible demigods and magic - all grounded in real-world locations and beliefs. Lienzo hopes that giving the Tarahumara people a story within a modern game will help to shad some light on a culture many people might never have heard of otherwise. "Even though I didn't know the mythology, it is still part of the city I live in, and the state and the country I live in. So I really feel proud that we can get to share part of this amazing culture with the world," says Lienzo's lead developer Adolfo Rico. The next two videos will be coming soon. Expect to see them go up sometime before Mulaka's early 2018 release on PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch.
  11. Praise the sun! Okami makes the jump to current-gen consoles this December. The Capcom published critically acclaimed action-adventure game originally released for the PlayStation 2 back in 2006. Since then, it has been ported to Wii and PlayStation 3. Now, Clover Studio's classic will be available in HD with the option to switch between a more modern widescreen presentation or the original 4:3 ratio. In Okami, players become Amaterasu, the goddess of the sun who becomes a white wolf and sets off on a quest to defeat Orochi, an eight-headed demon bent on destroying the world of Nippon. Okami HD releases on December 12 for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. View full article
  12. Praise the sun! Okami makes the jump to current-gen consoles this December. The Capcom published critically acclaimed action-adventure game originally released for the PlayStation 2 back in 2006. Since then, it has been ported to Wii and PlayStation 3. Now, Clover Studio's classic will be available in HD with the option to switch between a more modern widescreen presentation or the original 4:3 ratio. In Okami, players become Amaterasu, the goddess of the sun who becomes a white wolf and sets off on a quest to defeat Orochi, an eight-headed demon bent on destroying the world of Nippon. Okami HD releases on December 12 for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One.
  13. The recently released Elex is, quite simply, a painful slog of an RPG. At turns charmingly sloppy and infuriatingly obtuse, it feels like a bumbled combination of Dark Souls, The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt, and Mad Max. Elex stands as proof that you can create a world that pits magic Vikings, drugged up wasteland raiders, technologically advanced religious zealots, and magically enhanced super mutants against one another and somehow still render it all boring. How does it accomplish this feat? Read on. Elex takes a step in the wrong direction right off the bat with its protagonist. Commander Jax takes on the central role of this adventure. He's part of the Albs, a society of enhanced mutants that have purged themselves of all emotion in exchange for the massive power granted by a substance known as elex. However, we don't know any of that as in the opening seconds we see Jax's sci-fi fighter jet get shot down by unknown people for unknown reasons. The backstory to this scene gets inexplicably doled out in small doses via flashbacks to years before the events of the game. We have a protagonist without emotional responses to anything and a blank backstory. Jax does have one interesting spark of characterization, though. Severed from his connection to his fellow Albs, Jax slowly begins to either regain a connection to his emotions or not depending how the player behaves. Unfortunately, that aspect of the character never really feels explored, leaving Jax an incredibly bland and uninteresting lead. After being shot down in enemy territory, emotionless Jax embarks on a quest to get revenge. A bland protagonist might be something a game could survive if the supporting cast can shoulder the extra weight. Elex's writing and NPCs simply can't bear that burden. The dialogue hamstrings any attempt to build up other characters. The very first interaction the player has with an NPC results in that character explaining several times in the same dialogue tree that the player can find supplies in the nearby town. Did you know you could get supplies in town? Hey, no worries, you can get supplies in town. You can take some jobs and gear up in town. It never really becomes better as the game progresses, either. Sometimes characters will seemingly glitch over dialogue or have wild mood swings between dialogue options. One of the NPC companions went from feeling neutral towards Jax to idolizing him over the course of one conversation on one sidequest. On a different quest, I selected a seemingly innocuous dialogue option that prompted an NPC to attempt to murder Jax - and the game warned me after I killed him that the game had been altered significantly. Combat stands as one of the weakest elements of Elex. Despite existing in a world of hand grenades and plasma rifles, melee weapons serve as the primary way players deal damage in the world. Those who want to rely on ranged attacks will quickly find them weak, especially early on, and this can quickly lead to being mauled on all sides. That leaves players to rely on melee or the various faction abilities. In order to access magic, psionic powers, or chemical augments players will have to ally themselves with one of the game's three factions: the Berserkers, the Clerics, or the Outlaws. If you haven't allied with one of the three groups, generic combat will be the only option available. That leaves melee, which seems to be aiming for a Dark Souls-like rhythm, but fails spectacularly. Players must manage their stamina to make sure they can dodge or defend against enemy attack patterns. If attacks are properly managed, a special attack can be performed to deal critical damage. These attacks locks Jax into prolonged animations that frequently miss their target, leaving him vulnerable. This can be a huge problem in a game where even low level enemies on the easiest difficulty can take a player from full life to death in a handful of attacks. With such life and death stakes, the spotty hit detection becomes an unending source of irritation. I died several times from attacks that hit a visible distance away from Jax's character model. Important note: For a very, very, very long time after beginning the game, Jax will be weak. If you truly want to explore the open world of Elex and meet the other factions, you will encounter enemies capable of instantly killing Jax. Those deaths might occur with little to no warning, too, as many enemies are simply leveled higher from the initial areas - meaning you'll only know that they are different from the enemies you've defeated handily before when you get close enough to target them and see a skull by their names. Jax's weakness might be remedied by an empowering leveling system. The leveling system in Elex somehow manages to be a convoluted mess. Each level gives you 10 points to spend on character attributes and a learning point that can be spent at the various trainers throughout the world to learn new active and passive abilities. Attribute requirements are tied to each ability and each piece of armor and weapon in the game. If you want to have better armor, you need to gain a new level and put points into the required attributes. I'm sure there must be mid-tier weapons somewhere in Elex, but I couldn't find anything that seemed meaningfully different or more powerful from the blunt axe I found during the first hour of the game after having played the game for over a dozen hours. The weapons that I did manage to scrounge up all had requirements far beyond what I could equip. So, naturally, I put points into those areas to try to be able to use something better than that axe. The downside of that approach was that I couldn't put points into things like constitution, which meant I couldn't equip better armor or shields. Even when I finally managed to have the points in dexterity and strength required to shoot a plasma rifle, I was sorely disappointed to learn that at best it only tickled most enemies. This led me to a the following conclusion: In the world of Elex a level 0 blunt axe is somehow more powerful and effective than using a plasma rifle that requires 50 dexterity and 30 strength. Elex's story offers a great degree of flexibility. That flexibility goes to waste in a world that squanders a lot of intriguing concepts and potential by linking it with bland characters and fetch quests that exist to waste time. I bring that up to point out that Elex asks players to join one of the factions - but a player looking to make an informed decision without faffing about in the area with magic Vikings forever will have to make their way through almost certain death to reach the Clerics and the Outlaws to see if joining them might be preferable. A single sidequest might require fifteen minutes of running through the wilderness. Traveling between settlements could take much longer. Dying en route puts you back at the point of the game's last autosave, which can result in hours of lost time. To alleviate this, fast travel teleportation pads exist throughout the world. However, they can also be easy to miss and remain deactivated if the player doesn't walk on top of them. This problem even seems to be recognized in the game design since one of the generic abilities (with insanely high requirements) reveals all of the teleportation pads in the world. I would not recommend Elex to anyone. It manages to trick the player into forgetting about its frustrations by playing the way one would expect from a middle-of-the-road RPG with grand ambitions, but it invariably falls into some new pitfall included in the game either by poorly conceived design or by complete accident. The setting holds a great deal of promise, but the narrative often finds itself too caught up in world building to remember that compelling characters are necessary. The dialogue manages to be uniformly atrocious and grating. The visuals look great from a distance, but closer inspection reveals a lot of characters and environments to be pretty ugly. Glitches routinely pop up - one time I initiated a conversation with an NPC and Jax teleported halfway through the ceiling and remained trapped there after the conversation finished. Other than an intriguing premise and a fun trailer, Elex has very little going for it. Elex is available for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. View full article
  14. The recently released Elex is, quite simply, a painful slog of an RPG. At turns charmingly sloppy and infuriatingly obtuse, it feels like a bumbled combination of Dark Souls, The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt, and Mad Max. Elex stands as proof that you can create a world that pits magic Vikings, drugged up wasteland raiders, technologically advanced religious zealots, and magically enhanced super mutants against one another and somehow still render it all boring. How does it accomplish this feat? Read on. Elex takes a step in the wrong direction right off the bat with its protagonist. Commander Jax takes on the central role of this adventure. He's part of the Albs, a society of enhanced mutants that have purged themselves of all emotion in exchange for the massive power granted by a substance known as elex. However, we don't know any of that as in the opening seconds we see Jax's sci-fi fighter jet get shot down by unknown people for unknown reasons. The backstory to this scene gets inexplicably doled out in small doses via flashbacks to years before the events of the game. We have a protagonist without emotional responses to anything and a blank backstory. Jax does have one interesting spark of characterization, though. Severed from his connection to his fellow Albs, Jax slowly begins to either regain a connection to his emotions or not depending how the player behaves. Unfortunately, that aspect of the character never really feels explored, leaving Jax an incredibly bland and uninteresting lead. After being shot down in enemy territory, emotionless Jax embarks on a quest to get revenge. A bland protagonist might be something a game could survive if the supporting cast can shoulder the extra weight. Elex's writing and NPCs simply can't bear that burden. The dialogue hamstrings any attempt to build up other characters. The very first interaction the player has with an NPC results in that character explaining several times in the same dialogue tree that the player can find supplies in the nearby town. Did you know you could get supplies in town? Hey, no worries, you can get supplies in town. You can take some jobs and gear up in town. It never really becomes better as the game progresses, either. Sometimes characters will seemingly glitch over dialogue or have wild mood swings between dialogue options. One of the NPC companions went from feeling neutral towards Jax to idolizing him over the course of one conversation on one sidequest. On a different quest, I selected a seemingly innocuous dialogue option that prompted an NPC to attempt to murder Jax - and the game warned me after I killed him that the game had been altered significantly. Combat stands as one of the weakest elements of Elex. Despite existing in a world of hand grenades and plasma rifles, melee weapons serve as the primary way players deal damage in the world. Those who want to rely on ranged attacks will quickly find them weak, especially early on, and this can quickly lead to being mauled on all sides. That leaves players to rely on melee or the various faction abilities. In order to access magic, psionic powers, or chemical augments players will have to ally themselves with one of the game's three factions: the Berserkers, the Clerics, or the Outlaws. If you haven't allied with one of the three groups, generic combat will be the only option available. That leaves melee, which seems to be aiming for a Dark Souls-like rhythm, but fails spectacularly. Players must manage their stamina to make sure they can dodge or defend against enemy attack patterns. If attacks are properly managed, a special attack can be performed to deal critical damage. These attacks locks Jax into prolonged animations that frequently miss their target, leaving him vulnerable. This can be a huge problem in a game where even low level enemies on the easiest difficulty can take a player from full life to death in a handful of attacks. With such life and death stakes, the spotty hit detection becomes an unending source of irritation. I died several times from attacks that hit a visible distance away from Jax's character model. Important note: For a very, very, very long time after beginning the game, Jax will be weak. If you truly want to explore the open world of Elex and meet the other factions, you will encounter enemies capable of instantly killing Jax. Those deaths might occur with little to no warning, too, as many enemies are simply leveled higher from the initial areas - meaning you'll only know that they are different from the enemies you've defeated handily before when you get close enough to target them and see a skull by their names. Jax's weakness might be remedied by an empowering leveling system. The leveling system in Elex somehow manages to be a convoluted mess. Each level gives you 10 points to spend on character attributes and a learning point that can be spent at the various trainers throughout the world to learn new active and passive abilities. Attribute requirements are tied to each ability and each piece of armor and weapon in the game. If you want to have better armor, you need to gain a new level and put points into the required attributes. I'm sure there must be mid-tier weapons somewhere in Elex, but I couldn't find anything that seemed meaningfully different or more powerful from the blunt axe I found during the first hour of the game after having played the game for over a dozen hours. The weapons that I did manage to scrounge up all had requirements far beyond what I could equip. So, naturally, I put points into those areas to try to be able to use something better than that axe. The downside of that approach was that I couldn't put points into things like constitution, which meant I couldn't equip better armor or shields. Even when I finally managed to have the points in dexterity and strength required to shoot a plasma rifle, I was sorely disappointed to learn that at best it only tickled most enemies. This led me to a the following conclusion: In the world of Elex a level 0 blunt axe is somehow more powerful and effective than using a plasma rifle that requires 50 dexterity and 30 strength. Elex's story offers a great degree of flexibility. That flexibility goes to waste in a world that squanders a lot of intriguing concepts and potential by linking it with bland characters and fetch quests that exist to waste time. I bring that up to point out that Elex asks players to join one of the factions - but a player looking to make an informed decision without faffing about in the area with magic Vikings forever will have to make their way through almost certain death to reach the Clerics and the Outlaws to see if joining them might be preferable. A single sidequest might require fifteen minutes of running through the wilderness. Traveling between settlements could take much longer. Dying en route puts you back at the point of the game's last autosave, which can result in hours of lost time. To alleviate this, fast travel teleportation pads exist throughout the world. However, they can also be easy to miss and remain deactivated if the player doesn't walk on top of them. This problem even seems to be recognized in the game design since one of the generic abilities (with insanely high requirements) reveals all of the teleportation pads in the world. I would not recommend Elex to anyone. It manages to trick the player into forgetting about its frustrations by playing the way one would expect from a middle-of-the-road RPG with grand ambitions, but it invariably falls into some new pitfall included in the game either by poorly conceived design or by complete accident. The setting holds a great deal of promise, but the narrative often finds itself too caught up in world building to remember that compelling characters are necessary. The dialogue manages to be uniformly atrocious and grating. The visuals look great from a distance, but closer inspection reveals a lot of characters and environments to be pretty ugly. Glitches routinely pop up - one time I initiated a conversation with an NPC and Jax teleported halfway through the ceiling and remained trapped there after the conversation finished. Other than an intriguing premise and a fun trailer, Elex has very little going for it. Elex is available for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.
  15. The Steven Universe games are strange beasts. Save the Light releases tomorrow for PlayStation 4 and November 3 for Xbox One. It serves as a direct sequel to Attack the Light, which released on Android and iOS. That's the exact opposite of how most game series tend to work. On top of that, Save the Light will be the 15th game involving the characters from Steven Universe. Strangely, or perhaps less strange for fans of the hugely popular Cartoon Network series, the console adaptation of the franchise looks to be incredibly well put together. The aesthetic remains true to the show by adopting an almost Paper Mario-like style. The combat system also appears to be something that fans of classic RPGs and newcomers alike could enjoy with a variety of special moves, summon-like fusion forms, and unique battle mechanics that freshen up the hybrid real-time and turn-based battles. Steven, Garnet, Pearl, Amethyst, Connie, Greg, and Peridot all join forces to save the light tomorrow on PS4 and November 3 on Xbox One. View full article
  16. The Steven Universe games are strange beasts. Save the Light releases tomorrow for PlayStation 4 and November 3 for Xbox One. It serves as a direct sequel to Attack the Light, which released on Android and iOS. That's the exact opposite of how most game series tend to work. On top of that, Save the Light will be the 15th game involving the characters from Steven Universe. Strangely, or perhaps less strange for fans of the hugely popular Cartoon Network series, the console adaptation of the franchise looks to be incredibly well put together. The aesthetic remains true to the show by adopting an almost Paper Mario-like style. The combat system also appears to be something that fans of classic RPGs and newcomers alike could enjoy with a variety of special moves, summon-like fusion forms, and unique battle mechanics that freshen up the hybrid real-time and turn-based battles. Steven, Garnet, Pearl, Amethyst, Connie, Greg, and Peridot all join forces to save the light tomorrow on PS4 and November 3 on Xbox One.
  17. Natsume is gearing up for the launch of Harvest Moon: Light of Hope, the first game in the franchise's 20 year history to release on PC. Though Light of Hope will also release for Nintendo Switch and PlayStation 4, the PC version has been finished ahead of schedule and will release this year with the console versions following in 2018. "Due to the hard work of our team, development for Harvest Moon: Light of Hope for PC ran ahead of schedule, allowing us to release the game early to PC players," said Hiro Maekawa, President & CEO of Natsume. "We have enjoyed creating an all-new game that honors 20 years of Harvest Moon, and what's more, the franchise will finally be available for the first time on PC, something fans have long asked for!" Light of Hope has players shipwrecked and washed up in a small harbor town devastated by the same storm that sunk the player's ship. With a small farm, players can help to rebuild the town and rekindle the lighthouse. Natsume has been trying to put the past two decades of Harvest Moon on full display in the newest game with familiar faces from previous titles making appearances along with the familiar gameplay players have been itching for. The newest and most interesting mechanic is the ability to slowly unlock the town by repairing its damaged structures, bringing new opportunities and characters with each repaired building. A point of contention among some fans, Light of Hope will be making use of what Natsume has dubbed a retro plus aesthetic. The visuals aim to recapture an SNES feel while putting a modern twist on everything. Some vocal fans haven't been too pleased with the aesthetic, but the graphics undoubtedly look unique. In celebration of the series' 20th anniversary, Natsume has decided to hold a drawing contest on their Facebook page. They want fans to submit original drawings of their favorite Harvest Moon characters, animals, and events before 2017 comes to a close. Fifteen winners will be chosen, and each will receive some special Natsume prizes. Harvest Moon: Light of Hope releases on November 14 for PC and early 2018 for PS4 and Switch. View full article
  18. Natsume is gearing up for the launch of Harvest Moon: Light of Hope, the first game in the franchise's 20 year history to release on PC. Though Light of Hope will also release for Nintendo Switch and PlayStation 4, the PC version has been finished ahead of schedule and will release this year with the console versions following in 2018. "Due to the hard work of our team, development for Harvest Moon: Light of Hope for PC ran ahead of schedule, allowing us to release the game early to PC players," said Hiro Maekawa, President & CEO of Natsume. "We have enjoyed creating an all-new game that honors 20 years of Harvest Moon, and what's more, the franchise will finally be available for the first time on PC, something fans have long asked for!" Light of Hope has players shipwrecked and washed up in a small harbor town devastated by the same storm that sunk the player's ship. With a small farm, players can help to rebuild the town and rekindle the lighthouse. Natsume has been trying to put the past two decades of Harvest Moon on full display in the newest game with familiar faces from previous titles making appearances along with the familiar gameplay players have been itching for. The newest and most interesting mechanic is the ability to slowly unlock the town by repairing its damaged structures, bringing new opportunities and characters with each repaired building. A point of contention among some fans, Light of Hope will be making use of what Natsume has dubbed a retro plus aesthetic. The visuals aim to recapture an SNES feel while putting a modern twist on everything. Some vocal fans haven't been too pleased with the aesthetic, but the graphics undoubtedly look unique. In celebration of the series' 20th anniversary, Natsume has decided to hold a drawing contest on their Facebook page. They want fans to submit original drawings of their favorite Harvest Moon characters, animals, and events before 2017 comes to a close. Fifteen winners will be chosen, and each will receive some special Natsume prizes. Harvest Moon: Light of Hope releases on November 14 for PC and early 2018 for PS4 and Switch.
  19. Extinction made a definite impression when it appeared at this year's E3. Players take on the role of Avil, the last Sentinel of his world, as he fights to prevent humanity's annihilation at the hands of an army of towering ogres. The Attack on Titan-like size disparity between the ogres and Avil leads to really interesting logistical problems - how do you best climb an angry skyscraper bent on killing you? The new gameplay trailer from Iron Galaxy showcases the different ogres, a lore tease, and some of Avil's handy acrobatic moves. Extinction is separated into multiple levels where Avil must defend his city against waves of ogre invaders. These ogres are able to completely destroy the environment - if Avil sits back to do nothing, the city could be completely leveled. In order to fight them, Avil will need to dash through city streets, climb towers, and use whatever the environment can provide to take down the ogres. Ogres come in all kinds of different variations. Some are heavily armored, others have light armor, but massive weapons. The gameplay trailer alludes to numerous other types of ogres that haven't yet been revealed, but we see hulking red brutes and ogres with barbed wire and bones around their piece of armor, hinting that what we have seen so far is only the tip of the ogre-sized iceberg. Extinction will be available on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC early 2018. View full article
  20. Extinction made a definite impression when it appeared at this year's E3. Players take on the role of Avil, the last Sentinel of his world, as he fights to prevent humanity's annihilation at the hands of an army of towering ogres. The Attack on Titan-like size disparity between the ogres and Avil leads to really interesting logistical problems - how do you best climb an angry skyscraper bent on killing you? The new gameplay trailer from Iron Galaxy showcases the different ogres, a lore tease, and some of Avil's handy acrobatic moves. Extinction is separated into multiple levels where Avil must defend his city against waves of ogre invaders. These ogres are able to completely destroy the environment - if Avil sits back to do nothing, the city could be completely leveled. In order to fight them, Avil will need to dash through city streets, climb towers, and use whatever the environment can provide to take down the ogres. Ogres come in all kinds of different variations. Some are heavily armored, others have light armor, but massive weapons. The gameplay trailer alludes to numerous other types of ogres that haven't yet been revealed, but we see hulking red brutes and ogres with barbed wire and bones around their piece of armor, hinting that what we have seen so far is only the tip of the ogre-sized iceberg. Extinction will be available on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC early 2018.
  21. Telltale Games has revealed the release date and trailer for the upcoming part two of Batman: The Enemy Within. Titled 'The Pact,' the second episode of the five episode series focuses on the aftermath of a mysterious assassin's latest handiwork. Explosions across Gotham shake the city to its very core. Batman attempts to track down the culprits behind these misdeeds, but finds himself up against a foe that might even stump the Dark Knight himself. Meanwhile, John Doe traps Bruce Wayne in a complicated scheme - and the only way out is to follow it through. Beginning with episode two, Telltale will be launching all episodes on all platforms simultaneously. We reached out to Telltale for clarification on whether that simultaneous release schedule will extend to other Telltale game series or if it is limited to The Enemy Within. We will update with an answer. Episode Two 'The Pact' launches October 3 on Xbox One, PlayStation 4, PC, and Mac. In addition, the first two episodes of the series will become available on iOS and Android-based devices that same day. The boxed version, which Telltale has taken to calling the 'Season Pass Disc,' will also release in stores on October 3. The disc unlocks all previous episodes as well as all future episodes as they release. View full article
  22. Telltale Games has revealed the release date and trailer for the upcoming part two of Batman: The Enemy Within. Titled 'The Pact,' the second episode of the five episode series focuses on the aftermath of a mysterious assassin's latest handiwork. Explosions across Gotham shake the city to its very core. Batman attempts to track down the culprits behind these misdeeds, but finds himself up against a foe that might even stump the Dark Knight himself. Meanwhile, John Doe traps Bruce Wayne in a complicated scheme - and the only way out is to follow it through. Beginning with episode two, Telltale will be launching all episodes on all platforms simultaneously. We reached out to Telltale for clarification on whether that simultaneous release schedule will extend to other Telltale game series or if it is limited to The Enemy Within. We will update with an answer. Episode Two 'The Pact' launches October 3 on Xbox One, PlayStation 4, PC, and Mac. In addition, the first two episodes of the series will become available on iOS and Android-based devices that same day. The boxed version, which Telltale has taken to calling the 'Season Pass Disc,' will also release in stores on October 3. The disc unlocks all previous episodes as well as all future episodes as they release.
  23. The premise seems so simple - build your own theme park with dinosaurs and make it as safe as possible - how has it never been done before? Well, it has been done before. Jurassic Park III: Park Builder, Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis, and Jurassic Park Builder all tackled the same situation. However, those games all seemed to fall somewhat short of the dream players had of running a dino park while making sure life doesn't find a way. What makes Jurassic World Evolution different? Well, without more information, there aren't any specifics that back up the impression that this time we might finally get a game that fully capitalizes on the premise of a dinosaur theme park. However, the ray of hope comes in the form of the developer: Frontier Developments. Frontier has been on a bit of a roll in recent years. They created Elite: Dangerous, the sprawling space-faring sim, and Planet Coaster, a theme park construction simulator. Both titles were very well received, which bodes well for Jurassic World Evolution. Not only that, but Frontier worked on park management sims (RollerCoaster Tycoon and Thrillville franchises) for much of the early to mid 2000s. Their team possesses a wellspring of experience when it comes to creating the ideal Jurassic Park sim. What we do know is that players will be running a more modern version of Jurassic Park, Jurassic World, as seen in the recent soft reboot of the film franchise. Players will be in charge of creating new dinosaurs to show off to the public, creating additional attractions, sealing up the containment areas with the best tech available, researching new improvements to the park, and creating contingency plans in case life finds a way. Jurassic World Evolution releases sometime during summer 2018 on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. View full article
  24. The premise seems so simple - build your own theme park with dinosaurs and make it as safe as possible - how has it never been done before? Well, it has been done before. Jurassic Park III: Park Builder, Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis, and Jurassic Park Builder all tackled the same situation. However, those games all seemed to fall somewhat short of the dream players had of running a dino park while making sure life doesn't find a way. What makes Jurassic World Evolution different? Well, without more information, there aren't any specifics that back up the impression that this time we might finally get a game that fully capitalizes on the premise of a dinosaur theme park. However, the ray of hope comes in the form of the developer: Frontier Developments. Frontier has been on a bit of a roll in recent years. They created Elite: Dangerous, the sprawling space-faring sim, and Planet Coaster, a theme park construction simulator. Both titles were very well received, which bodes well for Jurassic World Evolution. Not only that, but Frontier worked on park management sims (RollerCoaster Tycoon and Thrillville franchises) for much of the early to mid 2000s. Their team possesses a wellspring of experience when it comes to creating the ideal Jurassic Park sim. What we do know is that players will be running a more modern version of Jurassic Park, Jurassic World, as seen in the recent soft reboot of the film franchise. Players will be in charge of creating new dinosaurs to show off to the public, creating additional attractions, sealing up the containment areas with the best tech available, researching new improvements to the park, and creating contingency plans in case life finds a way. Jurassic World Evolution releases sometime during summer 2018 on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.
  25. I'm doing my first stream for Extra Life on 9/1, and my first stream overall. I'm going to be streaming from the PS4, and I'd like to be able to have group chat in during the stream. Does anybody know of a way to do this?
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