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Found 510 results

  1. The studio behind the Blood Bowl franchise, Cyanide Studio, has announced that they will be making a turn-based tactical game out of the classic Warhammer 40K board game. So, what's a space hulk? These behemoths are essentially giant lumps of stuff that have mashed together after travelling through Warhammer 40K's version of faster-than-light travel. They can be a single, massive ship or dozens of ships and asteroids all stuck together for untold millennia. They're typically twisted by the experience, leading many who enter space hulks to either never return or emerge changed for the worse. In particular, there are a race of being found in space hulks known as Genestealers who can pose an existential threat to any being they encounter. Space Hulk was first adapted to video games back in 1993, received another game in 1995, and then sat dormant for over a decade until the release of the tactical indie game Space Hulk in 2013. Since that initial heart beat, we received Space Hulk: Deathwing in 2016 which abandoned tactics to focus on frantic FPS gameplay. Now it seems that Cyanide Studio wants to bring the series back to its tactical roots. Space Hulk: Tactics will house two campaigns from opposing sides. Players can choose between playing as the Terminator Space Marines tasked with exploring and cleansing an enigmatic space hulk or as the Genestealers attempting to wipe out the intruders into their domain. Cyanide Studio has said that both campaigns will have a heavy focus on narrative; I'm not sure how that will work on the Genestealer side, but I'm interested in finding out. The big addition to Space Hulk: Tactics is adapting the board game with the addition of cards that help to customize and upgrade your soldiers prior to each mission or match. They'll help players survive and possibly turn the tide of battle in a moment of desperation. There will also be an online competitive multiplayer mode, a map creation tool, and the ability to share maps online. Space Hulk: Tactics will release sometime in 2018 for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC. For those of you itching for more info, publisher Focus Home Interactive will be holding a press conference later this month to discuss the title at length. View full article
  2. You might not remember much about Kursk, an adventure game announced two years ago. Jujubee, the studio developing it, has been largely silent about the project after the reveal generated a considerable amount of criticism for its focus on the tragic sinking of the titular submarine in 2000, which resulted in the loss of all 118 sailors. The studio responded to those criticizing Kursk with the following statement: We would like to clarify a few things about our upcoming game "KURSK", because we see that there are some concerns. We are fully aware that this tragedy was a very painful topic for the Russian society and we can assure you that the game will be made with all the respect. There are many movies and books about current, very often painful events and we feel that games are now also a form of art and that the time has come for our industry to talk about serious and real topics. "KURSK" will be a game for the mature audience that can appreciate a deep storyline and our main goal is to do it right, without offending anyone. We hope that the final game will put all concerns to rest and that players will realize how much bravery it takes to live and work on a submarine. Many critics remained unconvinced, however, which may explain why the studio has been silent for two years. But now they're back with more information on their secretive project. Their announcement dubs Kursk the first "adventure-documentary game" in the history of video games. The claim that Kursk will be the first game ever to focus on a historical event is inaccurate, but Jujubee does seem to be aiming for historical accuracy with some embellishments. The additional details about Kursk's storyline reveal that it focuses on a character who didn't exist. Kursk will put players into the shoes of a fictional spy tasked with obtaining information on the Shkval supercavitating torpedoes, real torpedoes that the governments of the world had taken a keen interest in around the time of the incident. Players will be able to explore the submarine, Moscow, and the town of Vidyayevo, all locations which played pivotal roles in the lead up to the tragedy. Jujubee has implemented a variety of mechanics throughout the game to help bolster its narrative and help it stand out from what it sees as more conventional, repetitive games. Kursk's expected length sits at about ten hours. Michał Stępień, CEO at Jujubee, expressed his belief that Kursk would be a complex, nuanced story that would leave people better educated about the event and honor those who lost their lives saying: We think that the time has come to tell true stories. It’s fascinating how much our industry has evolved over the last dozen or so years. Games are becoming more and more complex, they offer an incredible audiovisual experience and let us immerse ourselves in virtual reality, but we should expect something more from them. As developers, we realize how much time users spend with our products, but we often fail to remember the responsibility connected to it. We can make games something more than just exciting entertainment. Games can become a tool not unlike books or films. They can help us develop, educate us, broaden our horizons, and provoke discussions that go far beyond the world of video games. We believe that KURSK will be precisely that kind of creation. It’s a game that brings the Russian submarine crew’s tragic story to the fore while maintaining all the advantages of sandbox gameplay. We’d like players not only to feel an integral part of the world we’re creating, but also to be inspired by the facts of this fascinating, if not dramatic story. The game will look at the story of the Kursk in a very comprehensive way. We aim for realism and as much immersion as possible. The player will not only have the opportunity to feel like a member of a submarine crew, but they will also be able to influence the story through their choices, including moral ones. The decisions they make will have a significant impact on the ending of the game, and there’ll be several of them Following the release of Kursk later this year, Jujubee has announced two expansions for the game. The first will be titled Kengir and will detail the events of the Kengir labor camp uprising in 1954 and the escape of one of the prisoners held there. The choice of subject matter for the DLC shows that Jujubee will not be shying away from potentially touchy topics going forward. The second DLC brings VR support in 4K and beyond. Kursk has no set release date, but it will be releasing on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC sometime in 2018.
  3. You might not remember much about Kursk, an adventure game announced two years ago. Jujubee, the studio developing it, has been largely silent about the project after the reveal generated a considerable amount of criticism for its focus on the tragic sinking of the titular submarine in 2000, which resulted in the loss of all 118 sailors. The studio responded to those criticizing Kursk with the following statement: We would like to clarify a few things about our upcoming game "KURSK", because we see that there are some concerns. We are fully aware that this tragedy was a very painful topic for the Russian society and we can assure you that the game will be made with all the respect. There are many movies and books about current, very often painful events and we feel that games are now also a form of art and that the time has come for our industry to talk about serious and real topics. "KURSK" will be a game for the mature audience that can appreciate a deep storyline and our main goal is to do it right, without offending anyone. We hope that the final game will put all concerns to rest and that players will realize how much bravery it takes to live and work on a submarine. Many critics remained unconvinced, however, which may explain why the studio has been silent for two years. But now they're back with more information on their secretive project. Their announcement dubs Kursk the first "adventure-documentary game" in the history of video games. The claim that Kursk will be the first game ever to focus on a historical event is inaccurate, but Jujubee does seem to be aiming for historical accuracy with some embellishments. The additional details about Kursk's storyline reveal that it focuses on a character who didn't exist. Kursk will put players into the shoes of a fictional spy tasked with obtaining information on the Shkval supercavitating torpedoes, real torpedoes that the governments of the world had taken a keen interest in around the time of the incident. Players will be able to explore the submarine, Moscow, and the town of Vidyayevo, all locations which played pivotal roles in the lead up to the tragedy. Jujubee has implemented a variety of mechanics throughout the game to help bolster its narrative and help it stand out from what it sees as more conventional, repetitive games. Kursk's expected length sits at about ten hours. Michał Stępień, CEO at Jujubee, expressed his belief that Kursk would be a complex, nuanced story that would leave people better educated about the event and honor those who lost their lives saying: We think that the time has come to tell true stories. It’s fascinating how much our industry has evolved over the last dozen or so years. Games are becoming more and more complex, they offer an incredible audiovisual experience and let us immerse ourselves in virtual reality, but we should expect something more from them. As developers, we realize how much time users spend with our products, but we often fail to remember the responsibility connected to it. We can make games something more than just exciting entertainment. Games can become a tool not unlike books or films. They can help us develop, educate us, broaden our horizons, and provoke discussions that go far beyond the world of video games. We believe that KURSK will be precisely that kind of creation. It’s a game that brings the Russian submarine crew’s tragic story to the fore while maintaining all the advantages of sandbox gameplay. We’d like players not only to feel an integral part of the world we’re creating, but also to be inspired by the facts of this fascinating, if not dramatic story. The game will look at the story of the Kursk in a very comprehensive way. We aim for realism and as much immersion as possible. The player will not only have the opportunity to feel like a member of a submarine crew, but they will also be able to influence the story through their choices, including moral ones. The decisions they make will have a significant impact on the ending of the game, and there’ll be several of them Following the release of Kursk later this year, Jujubee has announced two expansions for the game. The first will be titled Kengir and will detail the events of the Kengir labor camp uprising in 1954 and the escape of one of the prisoners held there. The choice of subject matter for the DLC shows that Jujubee will not be shying away from potentially touchy topics going forward. The second DLC brings VR support in 4K and beyond. Kursk has no set release date, but it will be releasing on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC sometime in 2018. View full article
  4. Indie developer Spotlightor partnered with Zodiac Interactive to bring their 2017 Xbox One critical darling to PC and PlayStation 4. Candleman: The Complete Journey releases today for PC and will be coming to PS4 later this year. The indie hit stars a little candle-man who can only burn for 10 seconds as he chases a strange light in the distance. His pursuit takes him through a wide variety of light-based environments and challenges. Magic a light combine to create a visually compelling adventure that's at times enchanting and other times ominous. The Complete Journey will release with a time challenge mode, better performance and framerate over the original, and 4K support. The Lost Light DLC that came to the Xbox One version will be included in The Complete Journey, too. A re-release will probably help Candleman see a bit more attention, especially now that heavy hitting platformers like Mario Odyssey have hit and receded. Candleman: The Complete Journey is now available on Xbox One and PC and will be released on PlayStation 4 later this year.
  5. Indie developer Spotlightor partnered with Zodiac Interactive to bring their 2017 Xbox One critical darling to PC and PlayStation 4. Candleman: The Complete Journey releases today for PC and will be coming to PS4 later this year. The indie hit stars a little candle-man who can only burn for 10 seconds as he chases a strange light in the distance. His pursuit takes him through a wide variety of light-based environments and challenges. Magic a light combine to create a visually compelling adventure that's at times enchanting and other times ominous. The Complete Journey will release with a time challenge mode, better performance and framerate over the original, and 4K support. The Lost Light DLC that came to the Xbox One version will be included in The Complete Journey, too. A re-release will probably help Candleman see a bit more attention, especially now that heavy hitting platformers like Mario Odyssey have hit and receded. Candleman: The Complete Journey is now available on Xbox One and PC and will be released on PlayStation 4 later this year. View full article
  6. Sharpwood isn't a particularly welcoming place for a newcomer. The temperatures routinely fall below freezing, the people are hard, and opportunities seem hard to come by. People are friendly to those they know and suspicious or dismissive of those they don't. Sharpwood is also a place of tradition - and not all of those traditions are good ones, especially not when economic pressures are slowly twisting people into untenable positions. Into this place walks Lilly Reed, Sharpwood's new sheriff. She's tasked with maintaining the peace in a town that doesn't trust her with officers under her command who don't respect her. Reed has a job to do cleaning up the various smugglers and gangs while contending with populists who don't take too kindly to outsiders. As if all of that wasn't enough, a stranger named Warren Nash appears around the same time as Reed that could prove to be the savior of the town or its downfall. Players will step into Lilly Reed's shoes to deal with the various problems plaguing Sharpwood. One part adventure game with an emphasis on tough decisions and one part management sim, Reed will have to balance the officers she sends out on calls with their prejudices, personalities, skills, and equipment. Each case will have pivotal moments for Reed and the player and those moments will have consequences down the line, sometimes consequences of the life or death variety. This Is the Police 2 will be released later this year for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC.
  7. Sharpwood isn't a particularly welcoming place for a newcomer. The temperatures routinely fall below freezing, the people are hard, and opportunities seem hard to come by. People are friendly to those they know and suspicious or dismissive of those they don't. Sharpwood is also a place of tradition - and not all of those traditions are good ones, especially not when economic pressures are slowly twisting people into untenable positions. Into this place walks Lilly Reed, Sharpwood's new sheriff. She's tasked with maintaining the peace in a town that doesn't trust her with officers under her command who don't respect her. Reed has a job to do cleaning up the various smugglers and gangs while contending with populists who don't take too kindly to outsiders. As if all of that wasn't enough, a stranger named Warren Nash appears around the same time as Reed that could prove to be the savior of the town or its downfall. Players will step into Lilly Reed's shoes to deal with the various problems plaguing Sharpwood. One part adventure game with an emphasis on tough decisions and one part management sim, Reed will have to balance the officers she sends out on calls with their prejudices, personalities, skills, and equipment. Each case will have pivotal moments for Reed and the player and those moments will have consequences down the line, sometimes consequences of the life or death variety. This Is the Police 2 will be released later this year for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC. View full article
  8. Sega has had a long-running series of arcade titles in Japan that have players piloting mechs through tense battles. The series, titled Border Break, got its start in 2009 and will finally see a console release later this year as a free-to-play game with microtransactions involving in-game items. Unfortunately, for now it seems that Border Break will be limited to the Japanese market, but an English localization isn't out of the question. Border Break focuses on 10v10 mech battles across a variety of maps. Each mech can be customized for visual flair and new stats. There are four main weapon types for players to learn and specialize in: Assault (for a balance between mobility and firepower), Heavy Fire (for firepower), Raid (for pure firepower at a cost), and Support (for healing and light damage). Battles can be against the computer, casually against other players, or in ranked matches for honor and glory. How microtransactions will affect the game remain to be seen. Given that Border Break seems to offer a great deal of customization for individual mechs, it's not out of the question that certain parts or upgrades could be locked behind a paywall. It might also fall into the camp of cosmetic payments. For now, it's pretty exciting that Sega has decided on a console release. A story mode also makes its debut in the console release. Border Break will tell the tale of a young woman named Hati who desires revenge as she pilots her mech against, among others, Managar, a crack ace. The story details have been left somewhat vague, but we know that Hati will be assisted by a woman named Mikoto and that the cast will be quite expansive beyond those three. The cast will be filled out with characters created by a pool of popular Japanese illustrators. Overall, Border Break looks like a really interesting project that would be awesome to see come to the West, especially if the microtransactions prove to be unobtrusive. We can always use more mech action! Border Break will release sometime later this year.
  9. Sega has had a long-running series of arcade titles in Japan that have players piloting mechs through tense battles. The series, titled Border Break, got its start in 2009 and will finally see a console release later this year as a free-to-play game with microtransactions involving in-game items. Unfortunately, for now it seems that Border Break will be limited to the Japanese market, but an English localization isn't out of the question. Border Break focuses on 10v10 mech battles across a variety of maps. Each mech can be customized for visual flair and new stats. There are four main weapon types for players to learn and specialize in: Assault (for a balance between mobility and firepower), Heavy Fire (for firepower), Raid (for pure firepower at a cost), and Support (for healing and light damage). Battles can be against the computer, casually against other players, or in ranked matches for honor and glory. How microtransactions will affect the game remain to be seen. Given that Border Break seems to offer a great deal of customization for individual mechs, it's not out of the question that certain parts or upgrades could be locked behind a paywall. It might also fall into the camp of cosmetic payments. For now, it's pretty exciting that Sega has decided on a console release. A story mode also makes its debut in the console release. Border Break will tell the tale of a young woman named Hati who desires revenge as she pilots her mech against, among others, Managar, a crack ace. The story details have been left somewhat vague, but we know that Hati will be assisted by a woman named Mikoto and that the cast will be quite expansive beyond those three. The cast will be filled out with characters created by a pool of popular Japanese illustrators. Overall, Border Break looks like a really interesting project that would be awesome to see come to the West, especially if the microtransactions prove to be unobtrusive. We can always use more mech action! Border Break will release sometime later this year. View full article
  10. After almost a year and a half of development, Slipgate Studios will be bringing their adult-oriented action-platformer to the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, as well as updating the PC release with a host of finalized content. The release marks the culmination of promises made during the late 2016 Kickstarter campaign that introduced the world to Rad Rodgers. Conceived as a project to pay homage to the platformers of the late 80s and mid 90s, Rad Rodgers stars a child bearing the titular moniker who finds himself sucked into a video game world. With the help of Dusty, Rad's out-dated console which now has a face and a foul-mouth (voiced by Duke Nukem voice actor Jon St. John), Rad Rodgers becomes involved in a mission to save the First World, a jungle suffering from a corrupting disease. The first chapter of Rad Rodger's adventures comes with over five weapons that allow Rad and Dusty to blast, punch, and blaze their way through the First World. Explosions and hot platforming action are accompanied by a fresh take on retro platforming soundtracks composed by Andrew Hulshult, complete with synthesizers and a driving pace. Occasional glitches might occur in-game, which give Dusty a time to shine. The aged gaming console can then enter a mind-bending area behind the scenes called the Pixelverse where he can attempt to repair the glitch. While Rad Rodgers will be appearing on consoles for the first time, the PC version has been out since the tail-end of 2016. Those who already own Rad Rodgers will see an update that adds a huge collection of new stuff to the core game. Several new levels will be added along with new boss encounters, four new enemies, and redesigned puzzles. Players will be able to unlock hats as they progress throughout Rodger's adventures, meaning players will be able to customize Rad with over twenty different hats. Leaderboards will allow players around the world to strive to achieve the high scores on each level. Slipgate Studios have also added the Excalibat, a weapon previously seen in Rise of the Triad. As it does have a decidedly adult sense of humor, the game presents the option to bleep out objectionable language and replace the copious amounts of blood generated in-game with purple goop. The PC update releases alongside the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One versions of Rad Rodgers on February 21.
  11. After almost a year and a half of development, Slipgate Studios will be bringing their adult-oriented action-platformer to the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, as well as updating the PC release with a host of finalized content. The release marks the culmination of promises made during the late 2016 Kickstarter campaign that introduced the world to Rad Rodgers. Conceived as a project to pay homage to the platformers of the late 80s and mid 90s, Rad Rodgers stars a child bearing the titular moniker who finds himself sucked into a video game world. With the help of Dusty, Rad's out-dated console which now has a face and a foul-mouth (voiced by Duke Nukem voice actor Jon St. John), Rad Rodgers becomes involved in a mission to save the First World, a jungle suffering from a corrupting disease. The first chapter of Rad Rodger's adventures comes with over five weapons that allow Rad and Dusty to blast, punch, and blaze their way through the First World. Explosions and hot platforming action are accompanied by a fresh take on retro platforming soundtracks composed by Andrew Hulshult, complete with synthesizers and a driving pace. Occasional glitches might occur in-game, which give Dusty a time to shine. The aged gaming console can then enter a mind-bending area behind the scenes called the Pixelverse where he can attempt to repair the glitch. While Rad Rodgers will be appearing on consoles for the first time, the PC version has been out since the tail-end of 2016. Those who already own Rad Rodgers will see an update that adds a huge collection of new stuff to the core game. Several new levels will be added along with new boss encounters, four new enemies, and redesigned puzzles. Players will be able to unlock hats as they progress throughout Rodger's adventures, meaning players will be able to customize Rad with over twenty different hats. Leaderboards will allow players around the world to strive to achieve the high scores on each level. Slipgate Studios have also added the Excalibat, a weapon previously seen in Rise of the Triad. As it does have a decidedly adult sense of humor, the game presents the option to bleep out objectionable language and replace the copious amounts of blood generated in-game with purple goop. The PC update releases alongside the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One versions of Rad Rodgers on February 21. View full article
  12. We'll finally be seeing From Software games on the Nintendo Switch! To close out their Nintendo Direct Mini presentation today, Nintendo revealed the first trailer for Dark Souls Remastered, a rework of the original Dark Souls that aims to revamp the game on a technical level for more modern hardware. That doesn't mean that Dark Souls Remastered will only be available on the Nintendo Switch (though what an exclusive that would be). The remaster will also be releasing on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Each version of the game will have its own improvements as follows: PlayStation 4/Xbox One (1080p, 60 fps) PlayStation 4 Pro/Xbox One X (Upscaled 4K, 60 fps) PC (Native 4K, all textures 2K unconverted, 60 fps) Nintendo Switch (TV mode: 1080p, 30 fps; Handheld mode: 720p 30 fps) In addition, there will be some improvements to the backend systems that supported the original Dark Souls release. The password matchmaking from Bloodborne and Dark Souls 3 will be integrated into Dark Souls Remastered, which should make it easier to connect with specific friends for online play. For that matter, the number of people who can enter the same world has been upped from four to six. In a break from how From Software has supported online play in the past, the developer will now have dedicated servers for online play rather than peer-to-peer connections. All of this should invigorate and smooth the online Dark Souls experience for both newcomers and veterans alike. Dark Souls Remastered releases on May 25 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC, and Switch.
  13. We'll finally be seeing From Software games on the Nintendo Switch! To close out their Nintendo Direct Mini presentation today, Nintendo revealed the first trailer for Dark Souls Remastered, a rework of the original Dark Souls that aims to revamp the game on a technical level for more modern hardware. That doesn't mean that Dark Souls Remastered will only be available on the Nintendo Switch (though what an exclusive that would be). The remaster will also be releasing on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Each version of the game will have its own improvements as follows: PlayStation 4/Xbox One (1080p, 60 fps) PlayStation 4 Pro/Xbox One X (Upscaled 4K, 60 fps) PC (Native 4K, all textures 2K unconverted, 60 fps) Nintendo Switch (TV mode: 1080p, 30 fps; Handheld mode: 720p 30 fps) In addition, there will be some improvements to the backend systems that supported the original Dark Souls release. The password matchmaking from Bloodborne and Dark Souls 3 will be integrated into Dark Souls Remastered, which should make it easier to connect with specific friends for online play. For that matter, the number of people who can enter the same world has been upped from four to six. In a break from how From Software has supported online play in the past, the developer will now have dedicated servers for online play rather than peer-to-peer connections. All of this should invigorate and smooth the online Dark Souls experience for both newcomers and veterans alike. Dark Souls Remastered releases on May 25 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC, and Switch. View full article
  14. The latest episode of Dragon Ball Super brought out some rivalry in its leading voice actors leading to a "fight." Christopher Sabat and Sean Schemmel voice Vegeta and Goku, respectively. Following the events portrayed on the most recent episode of Dragon Ball Super, Sabat took to Twitter to express his excitement over Vegeta's role in the episode. This was met with some ribbing from Schemmel that quickly escalated into an all-out Twitter war. The end result was Sabat asking Twitter if they wanted the #SuperSaiyanShowdown to go down. Over 14,000 people voted 98% in favor of the showdown. Which led to Sabat formally issuing his challenge to Schemmel - a duel to the death in the upcoming Dragonball FighterZ. The Dragonball fighting title will release on January 26 for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Who will you root for? Kakarot or the Prince of All Saiyans?
  15. The latest episode of Dragon Ball Super brought out some rivalry in its leading voice actors leading to a "fight." Christopher Sabat and Sean Schemmel voice Vegeta and Goku, respectively. Following the events portrayed on the most recent episode of Dragon Ball Super, Sabat took to Twitter to express his excitement over Vegeta's role in the episode. This was met with some ribbing from Schemmel that quickly escalated into an all-out Twitter war. The end result was Sabat asking Twitter if they wanted the #SuperSaiyanShowdown to go down. Over 14,000 people voted 98% in favor of the showdown. Which led to Sabat formally issuing his challenge to Schemmel - a duel to the death in the upcoming Dragonball FighterZ. The Dragonball fighting title will release on January 26 for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Who will you root for? Kakarot or the Prince of All Saiyans? View full article
  16. The Astronauts have announced that The Vanishing of Ethan Carter will be coming to Xbox One with Xbox One X support. Not only that, but this version will come with a new game mode for the atmospheric adventure title. The studio, which is currently working on the recently teased Witchfire, released The Vanishing of Ethan Carter back in 2014 to a great deal of praise. It managed to snag a BAFTA Game Innovation award for its photogrammetry-assisted environments. The Astronauts believe that those environments will finally have a chance to breathe properly in 4K HD. To that end, the Xbox One version of Ethan Carter comes with a Free Roam mode at the request of fans. Players will be able to simply explore the gorgeous environments without having to worry about solving murders or being accosted by ethereal visions. The Vanishing of Ethan Carter launches on January 19 for Xbox One.
  17. The Astronauts have announced that The Vanishing of Ethan Carter will be coming to Xbox One with Xbox One X support. Not only that, but this version will come with a new game mode for the atmospheric adventure title. The studio, which is currently working on the recently teased Witchfire, released The Vanishing of Ethan Carter back in 2014 to a great deal of praise. It managed to snag a BAFTA Game Innovation award for its photogrammetry-assisted environments. The Astronauts believe that those environments will finally have a chance to breathe properly in 4K HD. To that end, the Xbox One version of Ethan Carter comes with a Free Roam mode at the request of fans. Players will be able to simply explore the gorgeous environments without having to worry about solving murders or being accosted by ethereal visions. The Vanishing of Ethan Carter launches on January 19 for Xbox One. View full article
  18. King Art Games released an episodic adventure series back in 2013 called The Raven - Legacy of a Master Thief. This year, King Art returns to its mystery to remaster it for modern consoles and give it a new coat of paint for the PC crowd. This new version will simply be called The Raven Remastered. The Raven focuses on unraveling the mystery behind the theft of a ruby from the British Museum in 1964. In its place was found a raven feather, the calling card of a master thief who disappeared without a trace years earlier. The ruby is one of a pair - the second is sent to Cairo for exhibition under the watchful eye of the player character, the bumbling constable Anton Jakob Zellner. Zellner quickly finds himself embroiled in a mystery that he had only ever encountered in his beloved mystery novels, complete with a debonair sleuthing rival in the form of Nicolas Legrand. When The Raven released five years ago, it received praise for its voice acting and narrative, as well as some criticism for its reliance on outdated adventure game mechanics. Perhaps those mechanics have improved with age? The remaster offers improved animations, a revamped lighting system, and new hair rendering all in HD. It also adds French, Spanish and Simplified Chinese support for the first time, which comes in addition to the already available German, Russian, Polish and Italian localizations. The trailer released to announce the upcoming remaster seems to oscillate between appropriately moody lighting showing off the improvements made and some... less visually appealing moments as seen in the thumbnail for the trailer. Can you keep the Eye of the Sphinx safe on its long journey to Cairo when The Raven Remastered releases on March 13 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC?
  19. King Art Games released an episodic adventure series back in 2013 called The Raven - Legacy of a Master Thief. This year, King Art returns to its mystery to remaster it for modern consoles and give it a new coat of paint for the PC crowd. This new version will simply be called The Raven Remastered. The Raven focuses on unraveling the mystery behind the theft of a ruby from the British Museum in 1964. In its place was found a raven feather, the calling card of a master thief who disappeared without a trace years earlier. The ruby is one of a pair - the second is sent to Cairo for exhibition under the watchful eye of the player character, the bumbling constable Anton Jakob Zellner. Zellner quickly finds himself embroiled in a mystery that he had only ever encountered in his beloved mystery novels, complete with a debonair sleuthing rival in the form of Nicolas Legrand. When The Raven released five years ago, it received praise for its voice acting and narrative, as well as some criticism for its reliance on outdated adventure game mechanics. Perhaps those mechanics have improved with age? The remaster offers improved animations, a revamped lighting system, and new hair rendering all in HD. It also adds French, Spanish and Simplified Chinese support for the first time, which comes in addition to the already available German, Russian, Polish and Italian localizations. The trailer released to announce the upcoming remaster seems to oscillate between appropriately moody lighting showing off the improvements made and some... less visually appealing moments as seen in the thumbnail for the trailer. Can you keep the Eye of the Sphinx safe on its long journey to Cairo when The Raven Remastered releases on March 13 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC? View full article
  20. I caved. I didn't know what I was getting myself into, but I'd been hearing for years about this niche Japanese game and how great it was. It looked weird. A cartoon bear featured heavily in a lot of the images I'd seen from the title. What was it about? What kind of a game was it? I had no idea. Based solely on the recommendations of friends and colleagues, I picked up Danganronpa: Trigger Happy Havoc and took my first steps into a strange new world. Danganronpa might just be one of the oddest games I've played. It's equal parts mystery novel, adventure game, and courtroom drama with all of those disparate elements coming together in a way that makes sense. It contains horror and violence, but can turn on a dime to be comedic and slapstick. The game uses every trick it can manage within the tight confines of its gameplay to bring the player through the full gauntlet of human emotion. Completing an episode of Danganronpa can be an absolutely draining experience - not because of difficult gameplay, but because the game demands empathy from the player. It needs the player to see and feel through the eyes of the characters; a daunting task that many games never accomplish. If you don't already have some idea of what the game is about and the previous paragraph sounded interesting to you, stop reading and go play it on PS Vita or the remaster of the first two games that released on PC and PlayStation 4. It's best to go in blind with as few expectations as possible to allow the game to allow you into the lives of the various characters. If you've played it already or aren't planning to play, but still have some curiosity, read on! So what is Danganronpa? Ostensibly, the scenario revolves around Makoto Naegi, a typical Japanese high school student who has been accepted into Hope's Peak Academy, the most rigorous and prestigious school in the country. The people accepted into the school have to display "ultimate" skills in a given field. Makoto, unable to manifest any remarkable talents, receives his acceptance when he wins a raffle, proving himself to be the "ultimate lucky student." On the first day of school, Makoto feels nervous, knowing that the other students will have excelled in various fields while he seemingly possesses no expertise of his own. Gathering up his courage, he steps through the doors of Hope's Peak... only for everything to go dark as he loses awareness of his surroundings. He awakens some time later within a twisted version of the school. The doors and windows have all been sealed from the inside by huge sheets of heavy metal. The only way in or out of the school seems to be a gigantic vault door that has been locked. Strangest of all, the entire school seems empty with the exception of a handful of students. These classmates introduce themselves to one another, discovering that they have all had an experience similar to Makoto's loss of consciousness. Each of these new characters begins going through different emotional beats in to reaction the sudden change in their perception. Before the strange situation can be fully processed, a voice calls out to them through the school's intercoms. A high-pitched, lilting voice that simultaneously encompasses playfulness and death. The unnerving voice tells the group of students to assemble in the gym. Lacking any alternative, the newest class at Hope's Peak Academy follows their instructions. In the gym they meet with the main antagonist of Danganronpa: A robotic, black and white stuffed bear that goes by the name Monokuma. This strange creature lays out the predicament with which the students must now contend. The building has been sealed, completely and utterly. Monokuma is the only one capable of unlocking the colossal vault door covering the one entrance and exit. They can either live within the school with all of their needs met for the rest of their lives or they can be the last one standing in a "killing game." To win, a student would need to murder one of their classmates and then successfully pin the murder on another student following an investigation and trial conducted by the remaining members of the class. With that announcement, Danganronpa begins in earnest. The core gameplay consists of living life alongside the fourteen other students, investigating murders, and conducting class trials to determine who was responsible. The normal day-to-day life in the school consists of seeking out the characters you find the most interesting and engaging them in conversation to learn more about their wants and desires. This actually has a gameplay benefit beyond informing the subsequent stories that unfold. Gaining a character's trust unlocks abilities and skills that can be used during trials to give the player an edge in the mini-games and logic puzzles. Each conversation ends with the option to give a character a gift, which they may or may not like, further affecting Makoto's standing with that individual. These interactions seem pretty mundane, but they are a really subtle and effective way of investing the player into the story and characters, which makes the twists and turns of the murder cases become all the more interesting and fraught with genuine emotional energy. You never know if the person you invested time into could be the next victim... or the next murderer. Each murder is followed by a shift in the nature of the game. The students become investigators, looking for clues in various parts of the school. This serves as a bit of a farewell to each of the slain characters as Makoto observes the murder scenes and follows up on leads. It's a sad, somber, and sometimes perplexing affair as both the characters on screen and the player struggle with loss after loss while also attempting to piece together clues to prove who committed the crime. All of this concludes with a class trial which plays out as a series of logic puzzles where the player literally needs to poke holes in incomplete or inaccurate accounts of events, argue against other classmates in rhythmic rhetorical battles, and piece together new clues on the fly from unexpected evidence presented by the other students. The stakes are high, too, as the penalty for failing to uncover the true killer is the death of the entire class while the murderer goes free. With these three modes of play you wind up with Danganronpa, a strange amalgamation of Sherlock Holmes mystery, slice of life visual novel, and Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney. A game with just that as an elevator pitch might be good. Danganronpa doesn't settle for just being good and it does that by engendering empathy. Empathy is difficult. Empathy requires making a connection with another person to the point that you can understand what they are going through. It's not to be confused with sympathy, which involves caring for and feeling bad for someone, but ultimately being unable to understand their feelings and situation on a fundamental level. Empathy involves taking the time and expending the energy necessary to know someone enough to understand them and, to a certain degree, forgive them. It doesn't mean excusing actions that have hurt yourself or others, but it does entail connecting on some level with the person behind that hurt and understanding their humanity. I'm going to take a bit of what might seem to be a detour here, but bear with me. When I was growing up, one of my best friends in the whole world hurt me with a lie. Then it became several lies. Ultimately, it spiraled into an uncomfortably loud conversation in the halls of our school where we parted ways angrily. He refused to see things from my perspective and I refused to consider things from his. It seems a little thing now in retrospect, but at the time the hurt went deep and it caked my heart in an icy sheen of bitterness, a protective layer of despair. In time, that veneer faded and I was left with the understanding that my failure to empathize and forgive cost me one of the most important friendships I had ever had because I found the task to be more than my pride and perceived injury could bare. The point I'm trying to make with this bumbling example is that empathy is really, truly difficult - and it also might be the most important skill to possess in a life surrounded by other people. Danganronpa understands empathy on a fundamental level and structures itself around doing everything it can to help players empathize with its characters. Talking and gift-giving are small, seemingly meaningless gestures, but they serve a similar purpose to naming XCOM soldiers. Suddenly the player isn't just investing in the mechanics of the game, but also investing meaning into the characters themselves. Giving the right gift means that the player has taken the time to learn about the character and gone through the effort of using that information to make an informed gifting decision. It's a conscious effort to consider things from that character's perspective. For all of the murder that happens in Danganronpa, it never asks you to hate any member of the cast. For all of the deceptions and sometimes cruel violence, the player is asked to engage with everyone, victims and murderers both, as a fellow flawed human being. We learn about each character, we spend time with them, and eventually we discover their failures. Even when the murderers are finally unmasked, Danganronpa takes the difficult and morally complex path of allowing them to remain human. They aren't othered or given an out, they are achingly, disturbingly human, stuck in the same awful situation as everyone else. You feel for them as they meet their elaborately ironic executions at the hands (paws?) of Monokuma. Ultimately, Danganronpa stands as an ideological battlefield. On one side holds the belief that life is an absurd, meaningless wasteland with suffering and death as the constant background noise to all things. The other side contends that life has worth proportional to our love for others aside from ourselves, even for the people who have wrong wronged us. And I suppose when you get down to it, empathy depends on allowing one's self to love other people. Hope's Peak Academy mirrors life, often in uncomfortable ways. We are all born into a world full of strangers and asked to exist for as long as possible. We never know if the people we befriend and love might one day be on the giving or receiving end of awfulness from one of their fellow humans - an eventuality that we all encounter in our lives at some point. The best we can do, the hope that Danganronpa presents to its players, is to meet that hurt with a courageous empathy that does not give into bitter despair. It is the hope that we can put in the effort, the very real work, to understand the antagonists of our own stories and in that understanding find a way forward that isn't mired in the mistakes of the past.
  21. I caved. I didn't know what I was getting myself into, but I'd been hearing for years about this niche Japanese game and how great it was. It looked weird. A cartoon bear featured heavily in a lot of the images I'd seen from the title. What was it about? What kind of a game was it? I had no idea. Based solely on the recommendations of friends and colleagues, I picked up Danganronpa: Trigger Happy Havoc and took my first steps into a strange new world. Danganronpa might just be one of the oddest games I've played. It's equal parts mystery novel, adventure game, and courtroom drama with all of those disparate elements coming together in a way that makes sense. It contains horror and violence, but can turn on a dime to be comedic and slapstick. The game uses every trick it can manage within the tight confines of its gameplay to bring the player through the full gauntlet of human emotion. Completing an episode of Danganronpa can be an absolutely draining experience - not because of difficult gameplay, but because the game demands empathy from the player. It needs the player to see and feel through the eyes of the characters; a daunting task that many games never accomplish. If you don't already have some idea of what the game is about and the previous paragraph sounded interesting to you, stop reading and go play it on PS Vita or the remaster of the first two games that released on PC and PlayStation 4. It's best to go in blind with as few expectations as possible to allow the game to allow you into the lives of the various characters. If you've played it already or aren't planning to play, but still have some curiosity, read on! So what is Danganronpa? Ostensibly, the scenario revolves around Makoto Naegi, a typical Japanese high school student who has been accepted into Hope's Peak Academy, the most rigorous and prestigious school in the country. The people accepted into the school have to display "ultimate" skills in a given field. Makoto, unable to manifest any remarkable talents, receives his acceptance when he wins a raffle, proving himself to be the "ultimate lucky student." On the first day of school, Makoto feels nervous, knowing that the other students will have excelled in various fields while he seemingly possesses no expertise of his own. Gathering up his courage, he steps through the doors of Hope's Peak... only for everything to go dark as he loses awareness of his surroundings. He awakens some time later within a twisted version of the school. The doors and windows have all been sealed from the inside by huge sheets of heavy metal. The only way in or out of the school seems to be a gigantic vault door that has been locked. Strangest of all, the entire school seems empty with the exception of a handful of students. These classmates introduce themselves to one another, discovering that they have all had an experience similar to Makoto's loss of consciousness. Each of these new characters begins going through different emotional beats in to reaction the sudden change in their perception. Before the strange situation can be fully processed, a voice calls out to them through the school's intercoms. A high-pitched, lilting voice that simultaneously encompasses playfulness and death. The unnerving voice tells the group of students to assemble in the gym. Lacking any alternative, the newest class at Hope's Peak Academy follows their instructions. In the gym they meet with the main antagonist of Danganronpa: A robotic, black and white stuffed bear that goes by the name Monokuma. This strange creature lays out the predicament with which the students must now contend. The building has been sealed, completely and utterly. Monokuma is the only one capable of unlocking the colossal vault door covering the one entrance and exit. They can either live within the school with all of their needs met for the rest of their lives or they can be the last one standing in a "killing game." To win, a student would need to murder one of their classmates and then successfully pin the murder on another student following an investigation and trial conducted by the remaining members of the class. With that announcement, Danganronpa begins in earnest. The core gameplay consists of living life alongside the fourteen other students, investigating murders, and conducting class trials to determine who was responsible. The normal day-to-day life in the school consists of seeking out the characters you find the most interesting and engaging them in conversation to learn more about their wants and desires. This actually has a gameplay benefit beyond informing the subsequent stories that unfold. Gaining a character's trust unlocks abilities and skills that can be used during trials to give the player an edge in the mini-games and logic puzzles. Each conversation ends with the option to give a character a gift, which they may or may not like, further affecting Makoto's standing with that individual. These interactions seem pretty mundane, but they are a really subtle and effective way of investing the player into the story and characters, which makes the twists and turns of the murder cases become all the more interesting and fraught with genuine emotional energy. You never know if the person you invested time into could be the next victim... or the next murderer. Each murder is followed by a shift in the nature of the game. The students become investigators, looking for clues in various parts of the school. This serves as a bit of a farewell to each of the slain characters as Makoto observes the murder scenes and follows up on leads. It's a sad, somber, and sometimes perplexing affair as both the characters on screen and the player struggle with loss after loss while also attempting to piece together clues to prove who committed the crime. All of this concludes with a class trial which plays out as a series of logic puzzles where the player literally needs to poke holes in incomplete or inaccurate accounts of events, argue against other classmates in rhythmic rhetorical battles, and piece together new clues on the fly from unexpected evidence presented by the other students. The stakes are high, too, as the penalty for failing to uncover the true killer is the death of the entire class while the murderer goes free. With these three modes of play you wind up with Danganronpa, a strange amalgamation of Sherlock Holmes mystery, slice of life visual novel, and Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney. A game with just that as an elevator pitch might be good. Danganronpa doesn't settle for just being good and it does that by engendering empathy. Empathy is difficult. Empathy requires making a connection with another person to the point that you can understand what they are going through. It's not to be confused with sympathy, which involves caring for and feeling bad for someone, but ultimately being unable to understand their feelings and situation on a fundamental level. Empathy involves taking the time and expending the energy necessary to know someone enough to understand them and, to a certain degree, forgive them. It doesn't mean excusing actions that have hurt yourself or others, but it does entail connecting on some level with the person behind that hurt and understanding their humanity. I'm going to take a bit of what might seem to be a detour here, but bear with me. When I was growing up, one of my best friends in the whole world hurt me with a lie. Then it became several lies. Ultimately, it spiraled into an uncomfortably loud conversation in the halls of our school where we parted ways angrily. He refused to see things from my perspective and I refused to consider things from his. It seems a little thing now in retrospect, but at the time the hurt went deep and it caked my heart in an icy sheen of bitterness, a protective layer of despair. In time, that veneer faded and I was left with the understanding that my failure to empathize and forgive cost me one of the most important friendships I had ever had because I found the task to be more than my pride and perceived injury could bare. The point I'm trying to make with this bumbling example is that empathy is really, truly difficult - and it also might be the most important skill to possess in a life surrounded by other people. Danganronpa understands empathy on a fundamental level and structures itself around doing everything it can to help players empathize with its characters. Talking and gift-giving are small, seemingly meaningless gestures, but they serve a similar purpose to naming XCOM soldiers. Suddenly the player isn't just investing in the mechanics of the game, but also investing meaning into the characters themselves. Giving the right gift means that the player has taken the time to learn about the character and gone through the effort of using that information to make an informed gifting decision. It's a conscious effort to consider things from that character's perspective. For all of the murder that happens in Danganronpa, it never asks you to hate any member of the cast. For all of the deceptions and sometimes cruel violence, the player is asked to engage with everyone, victims and murderers both, as a fellow flawed human being. We learn about each character, we spend time with them, and eventually we discover their failures. Even when the murderers are finally unmasked, Danganronpa takes the difficult and morally complex path of allowing them to remain human. They aren't othered or given an out, they are achingly, disturbingly human, stuck in the same awful situation as everyone else. You feel for them as they meet their elaborately ironic executions at the hands (paws?) of Monokuma. Ultimately, Danganronpa stands as an ideological battlefield. On one side holds the belief that life is an absurd, meaningless wasteland with suffering and death as the constant background noise to all things. The other side contends that life has worth proportional to our love for others aside from ourselves, even for the people who have wrong wronged us. And I suppose when you get down to it, empathy depends on allowing one's self to love other people. Hope's Peak Academy mirrors life, often in uncomfortable ways. We are all born into a world full of strangers and asked to exist for as long as possible. We never know if the people we befriend and love might one day be on the giving or receiving end of awfulness from one of their fellow humans - an eventuality that we all encounter in our lives at some point. The best we can do, the hope that Danganronpa presents to its players, is to meet that hurt with a courageous empathy that does not give into bitter despair. It is the hope that we can put in the effort, the very real work, to understand the antagonists of our own stories and in that understanding find a way forward that isn't mired in the mistakes of the past. View full article
  22. An intriguing indie adventure game has appeared on the horizon. Today, french indie studio Big Bad Wolf revealed The Council, an episodic adventure game set to launch this February. The new entry in the genre offers players the opportunity to make difficult choices that will have "permanent, long-lasting consequences." Aside from being a narrative adventure game in the same vein as Telltale's work, what exactly is The Council? Set in 1793, players become Louis de Richet who journeys to the private island estate of Lord Mortimer after receiving a cryptic invitation. Gentlemen and women from across the world seem to have been invited, as well. George Washington and Napoleon Bonaparte count themselves among Lord Mortimer's guests. Those who operate the levers of power in the world have all assembled for a mysterious purpose... and suddenly a murder interrupts the gathering. Everyone seems to have their own schemes and plots, but the players will have to uncover the mysteries of the island and guests while discovering the true nature of The Council. Big Bad Wolf has developed a new system for navigating conversations that they're promising will be unique. The Social Influence system relies on players to use skill and various resources to come out on top and achieve ideal outcomes. Those resources will be gathered during exploration segments that also provide opportunities for players to learn the weaknesses of the other island guests. Should an encounter be failed, there's no game over screen in The Council. Instead, player choices are permanent and can result in physical disfigurement, mental trauma, or (rarely) boons that will hinder or help players for the rest of the game. As players proceed, they will have opportunities for Richet to hone his skills. Perhaps the diplomatic approach appeals to you? Maybe history or science would make worthy allies? Or could it be that detective skills are what will make the difference? Over 15 skills are available, adding an almost RPG-like dimension to The Council. These skills will allow players to explore the island their own way, uncovering dark secrets as they progress into Lord Mortimer's abode. The Council’s first of five episodes, titled 'The Mad Ones,' arrives on PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One in February, 2018. View full article
  23. An intriguing indie adventure game has appeared on the horizon. Today, french indie studio Big Bad Wolf revealed The Council, an episodic adventure game set to launch this February. The new entry in the genre offers players the opportunity to make difficult choices that will have "permanent, long-lasting consequences." Aside from being a narrative adventure game in the same vein as Telltale's work, what exactly is The Council? Set in 1793, players become Louis de Richet who journeys to the private island estate of Lord Mortimer after receiving a cryptic invitation. Gentlemen and women from across the world seem to have been invited, as well. George Washington and Napoleon Bonaparte count themselves among Lord Mortimer's guests. Those who operate the levers of power in the world have all assembled for a mysterious purpose... and suddenly a murder interrupts the gathering. Everyone seems to have their own schemes and plots, but the players will have to uncover the mysteries of the island and guests while discovering the true nature of The Council. Big Bad Wolf has developed a new system for navigating conversations that they're promising will be unique. The Social Influence system relies on players to use skill and various resources to come out on top and achieve ideal outcomes. Those resources will be gathered during exploration segments that also provide opportunities for players to learn the weaknesses of the other island guests. Should an encounter be failed, there's no game over screen in The Council. Instead, player choices are permanent and can result in physical disfigurement, mental trauma, or (rarely) boons that will hinder or help players for the rest of the game. As players proceed, they will have opportunities for Richet to hone his skills. Perhaps the diplomatic approach appeals to you? Maybe history or science would make worthy allies? Or could it be that detective skills are what will make the difference? Over 15 skills are available, adding an almost RPG-like dimension to The Council. These skills will allow players to explore the island their own way, uncovering dark secrets as they progress into Lord Mortimer's abode. The Council’s first of five episodes, titled 'The Mad Ones,' arrives on PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One in February, 2018.
  24. Code Vein has been on our radar since its mysterious tease and subsequent reveal. If there were any doubts about the inspiration Bandai Namco took from From Software's Bloodborne, there can't be much more after seeing the latest trailer. "We fight, we drink blood, revive, and then fight some more. Our lives are pretty much one endless loop." This quote from the trailer refers to the vampyric apocalypse the main characters find themselves struggling against. However, it also sums up the mechanics of Code Vein, which thrusts players into the role of a newly turned vampire who must fight and drink blood in order to retain sanity in a world wrecked by a mysterious cataclysm. The quote could also be interpreted to mean a nod toward Bloodborne, a game that might also be summarized as, "fight, blood, revive, repeat." However, it seems apparent that Code Vein has taken pains to distance itself from those comparisons. While there's certainly some gothic inspiration in the art design, it's tuned down in favor of a more jagged, ruinous apocalypse. The characters also retain their anime-inspired designs, a feature that extends into the animated opening created by studio ufotable. Not only that, but the soundtrack as showcased in the trailers to date seems to be a mixture of operatic Final Fantasy and dark rock. The previous trailer offered up a sweepingly orchestrated score, which stands in stark contrast with the latest soundscape. The newest trailer features the opening theme of Code Vein, the track 'Underworld' by a band called Vamps. Code Vein is set to release sometime in 2018 on PC, PlayStation 4, and PC. View full article
  25. Code Vein has been on our radar since its mysterious tease and subsequent reveal. If there were any doubts about the inspiration Bandai Namco took from From Software's Bloodborne, there can't be much more after seeing the latest trailer. "We fight, we drink blood, revive, and then fight some more. Our lives are pretty much one endless loop." This quote from the trailer refers to the vampyric apocalypse the main characters find themselves struggling against. However, it also sums up the mechanics of Code Vein, which thrusts players into the role of a newly turned vampire who must fight and drink blood in order to retain sanity in a world wrecked by a mysterious cataclysm. The quote could also be interpreted to mean a nod toward Bloodborne, a game that might also be summarized as, "fight, blood, revive, repeat." However, it seems apparent that Code Vein has taken pains to distance itself from those comparisons. While there's certainly some gothic inspiration in the art design, it's tuned down in favor of a more jagged, ruinous apocalypse. The characters also retain their anime-inspired designs, a feature that extends into the animated opening created by studio ufotable. Not only that, but the soundtrack as showcased in the trailers to date seems to be a mixture of operatic Final Fantasy and dark rock. The previous trailer offered up a sweepingly orchestrated score, which stands in stark contrast with the latest soundscape. The newest trailer features the opening theme of Code Vein, the track 'Underworld' by a band called Vamps. Code Vein is set to release sometime in 2018 on PC, PlayStation 4, and PC.
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