Showing results for tags 'ps4'. - Extra Life Community Hub Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'ps4'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Extra Life News
    • Extra Life Updates
    • Best Practices
    • Community Content
    • Why I Extra Life
    • Fundraising
    • Contests
  • Gaming News
  • Features
  • Podcast

Discussions

  • Extra Life Discussions
    • General Extra Life Discussion
    • Local Extra Lifers
    • Fundraising Ideas
    • Live Streaming Tips & Tricks
    • Official Extra Life Stream Team Discussion
    • Extra Life JSON Code Discussion & Sharing
    • Extra Life United
    • Extra Life Q & A
  • Articles & Extra Life Announcements
    • Announcements
  • Official Extra Life Guilds
    • Guild information and Discussion
    • Canada
    • Northeastern US
    • Southeastern US
    • Central US
    • Western US
  • Gaming Discussions
  • Other Stuff
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Recent Posts

Calendars

  • Extra Life Community Calendar
  • Extra Life Stream Team
  • Akron Guild
  • Albany Guild
  • Albuquerque Guild
  • Anchorage Guild
  • Atlanta Guild
  • Austin Guild
  • Bakersfield Guild
  • Baltimore Guild
  • Birmingham Guild
  • Boston Guild
  • Burlington Guild
  • Buffalo Guild
  • Calgary, AB Guild
  • Morgantown Guild
  • Charlottesville Guild
  • Chicago Guild
  • Cincinnati Guild
  • Cleveland Guild
  • Columbia, MO Guild
  • Columbus, OH Guild
  • Dallas Guild
  • Dayton Guild
  • Denver Guild
  • Des Moines Guild
  • Detroit Guild
  • Edmonton, AB Guild
  • Fargo-Valley City Guild
  • Fresno Guild
  • Ft. Worth Guild
  • Gainesville-Tallahassee Guild
  • Grand Rapids Guild
  • Halifax, NS Guild
  • Hamilton, ON Guild
  • Hartford Guild
  • Hershey Guild
  • Hudson Valley Guild
  • Houston Guild
  • Indianapolis Guild
  • Jacksonville Guild
  • Kansas City Guild
  • Knoxville Guild
  • Lansing Guild
  • London, ON Guild
  • Los Angeles Guild
  • Milwaukee / Madison Guild
  • Minneapolis / Twin Cities Guild
  • Montreal / Quebec City Guild
  • Nashville Guild
  • Newark Guild
  • NYC & Long Island Guild
  • Oakland / San Francisco Guild
  • Omaha Guild
  • Orange County Guild
  • Orlando Guild
  • Ottawa, ON Guild
  • Philadelphia Guild
  • Phoenix Guild
  • Pittsburgh Guild
  • Portland, OR Guild
  • Portland, ME Guild
  • Raleigh-Durham Guild
  • Richmond Guild
  • Sacramento Guild
  • Salt Lake City Guild
  • San Antonio Guild
  • San Diego Guild
  • San Juan, PR Guild
  • Saskatchewan Guild
  • Seattle Guild
  • Spokane Guild
  • Springfield-Champaign, IL Guild
  • Springfield, MA Guild
  • St. Louis Guild
  • Syracuse Guild
  • Tampa / St. Petersburg Guild
  • Toronto, ON Guild
  • Vancouver, BC Guild
  • Washington DC Guild
  • Winnipeg, MB Guild
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Events
  • Extra Life Akron's Events

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Hospital


Location


Why I "Extra Life"


Interests


Twitter


Instagram


Twitch


Mixer


Discord


Blizzard Battletag


Nintendo ID


PSN ID


Steam


Origin


Xbox Gamertag

Found 510 results

  1. With Dying Light, Techland really knew what they were doing on a technical level. Environments brim with the detritus of humanity exuding the sense of recent occupation. Character models are lovingly rendered, while zombies are appropriately freaky and grotesque. The gameplay ranges from frantic first-person parkour traversal to stealthy infiltration accompanied by satisfying melee combat and functional gunplay. If that’s all you are looking for, Dying Light will no doubt satisfy you. However, if you are looking for anything else, an intriguing or thought-provoking story, context that validates the gameplay, memorable music, fleshed out characters, anything, you’ll probably want to look elsewhere. Credit where credit is due, Techland designed Dying Light incredibly well. The open world is full of things to climb onto, slide under, jump over, swim through, etc. Players can tackle the problem of going from Point A to Point B in just about whatever manner they choose. The parkour style of movement feels smooth and natural. Dying Light provides the basic mechanics of movement from the start, instead of restricting core abilities behind level progression. Traversal feels complete and powerful from the beginning, but becomes even more empowering and fun after unlocking abilities like ground slides or jumping onto and over enemies. The heart of Dying Light lies in open and unrestricted freerunning through the playground Techland created. It feels like a next-gen experience. On top of the exhilaration of sprinting through zombie hordes, the combat system feels great. Dying Light takes some pains to remind players that they are only human by beginning at feasible levels of strength. Stamina will only allow for four or five swings of standard weapons, though that number increases as players level by simply doing things like fighting or running or completing quests. Leveling will also open up new skills that can be used in combat like a heavy attack or a spin attack. Combat itself is fairly simple, only becoming more complex as more abilities become available. Fighting mostly consists of whacking zombies or people with pipes, table legs, whatever happens to be on hand. Before settling into a comfortable groove, scavenging and creating better weapons will be a top priority for most players. Sure, by the time players see the credits roll they’ll be a zombie hunter with potent abilities and gear, but the road to get to that advanced point is long. There are also guns in Dying Light, though the game generally frowns on their use. Guns tend to be very powerful, but have the significant drawback of being very loud, attracting more zombies. The clunky targeting system also discourages the use of firearms. Only when confronted with other gun wielding humans did I feel compelled to use my frugal ammo supply. Otherwise, Molotov cocktails solved almost every seemingly insurmountable enemy I encountered. Melee and improvised weapons were clearly intended to be the core of Dying Light’s combat, so don’t go into Dying Light expecting a lot of running and gunning. Techland layered a day-night cycle over the traversal and combat to spice up the experience and keep players on their toes. During the night, significantly stronger zombies stalk the streets. These monsters call for either a stealthy approach or a non-stop sprint to the nearest safe house. During the night, players connected to the internet might be invaded by another player as a zombie and matched up with three others as survivors to compete against each other. The mode seems to be designed in the 4v1 mindset popular these days. Unfortunately, I had a pretty terrible experience with this game mode. As I was about to turn in a quest, I was refused access to a safe zone and informed that I had been invaded. Cool! Unfortunately, I was not matched up with any other survivors. Invading zombies are made vulnerable with a UV light and only then can they be killed. Invaders seem to be generally faster than a normal player unless made vulnerable. They can also insta-kill normal players. This session resulted in me dying repeatedly for about ten minutes until I figured out how to quit the match. I then turned off the multiplayer aspect and never went back. All of this takes place within a world into which teams of artists clearly poured thousands of hours. Abandoned apartments feel lived in, only recently abandoned in a panic. Flies buzz wildly over rotting corpses. Fish swim lazily in the water, gaping aquatically as players pass them by. Lighting changes drastically from day to night, dynamically changing the aesthetic of the world. For a game titled Dying LIGHT, I am glad they nailed lighting. As for the character models, Every important character has a distinct look, although it is very easy for anyone not involved in the main plot to just blend together after a while (that isn’t entirely on the artists, but we’ll get more into that later). The zombies deserve a nod as well. The average roving dead looks incredibly creepy up close. The effect becomes especially unnerving in dark, confined spaces. The special zombies are a different matter. When these variant types of zombies come into play, it appears bizarre that they all hold the same weapons or are outfitted with the same armor. Why is every single slightly larger zombie armed with a piece of rebar and concrete? Despite the technical proficiency apparent in much of its design, Dying Light demonstrates why video games can’t just rely on entertaining gameplay and lovingly rendered environments. The story is an unwieldy mess of clichés and action-dude-isms. Most of the characters exist only as bare sketches of what could be considered functional. In fact, almost every single idea in Dying Light that might be interesting is quietly brushed aside to get to the next pretext that sends the player moving throughout the quarantined city of Harran. *Spoilers follow* In fact, let’s start with Harran. Where is it? That might seem like a simple question, but the reality is that we are never given a reference point. As a fictional city, that’s kind of the point, but without knowing where it is supposed to be we’re left with this strange, context-less city. I actually looked it up on the game’s Wikipedia page to make sure Dying Light actually took place on Earth rather than a different planet or reality. It appears that it is a city-state on the coast of the Mediterranean somewhere near Turkey. Why is this important or why might we care about this in the context of the game? Because the political ramifications of a major city like Harran becoming the epicenter of a potentially apocalyptic zombie outbreak would be important and interesting. However, in-game Harran seems to be completely isolated from the outside world, aside from airdrops of supplies and a miracle drug that stops infected survivors from becoming biters. The opening cinematic tells us that no one knows if people are even still alive in the city. This is the setting for the entire game and it begs so many questions: How was Harran so easily quarantined? Did it involve some sort of unethical application of military force? Why does that quarantine appear to be run by an organization unaffiliated with Harran’s political leadership? Who is in charge? Why can no one confirm that there are still survivors? Why aren’t survivors being airlifted out of the quarantine if they have a medicine that indefinitely keeps people from becoming zombies? Why does it seem to have an airforce that is willing to destroy the city-state? Attempting to answer any of these questions could have provided some great insight into the situation in which Kyle Crane finds himself. Enter our protagonist, Kyle Crane, another one of those faceless, blank slates onto which players are supposed to project themselves. Nebulously described as an “operative,” Crane works for the Global Relief Effort (GRE), the organization that airdrops food and medicine into Harran. He apparently enters Dying Light with no past or connections to the outside world. At no point do we hear him talk about a family or friends or why he accepted a mission to go into a zombie infested city alone. He makes no decisions for himself, instead allowing himself and the plot to be propelled by the people giving him orders. Crane’s mission is to infiltrate the groups of survivors in Harran (groups that GRE apparently knows about, despite the opening cinematic’s words to the contrary) and discover who holds a file that contains information which could destroy the world in the wrong hands. None of the survivors who rescue him question why he airdropped into the city, who he is, where he came from, or any other circumstance of his existence. He seems to win everyone over after sharing his name, lying about being a tourist, and doing helpful chores. Crane’s value to everyone around him stems from what he can do physically, not from any virtue he may or may not possess. He offers no insight into events other than enabling other characters to dump exposition to the player. Crane’s sole character trait seems to be making frustrated quips and remarks after people tell him to go do something unpleasant. We get almost no information about the Global Relief Effort. From the name, it presumably operates globally. Dying Light describes GRE as a humanitarian organization at some point. That’s about all we have to go on, but so much is left strangely unexplained. Why does a single humanitarian organization handle the entire operation of supplying food and medicine to a massive city? It seems to me that having an entire city quarantined would at least summon three or four, maybe some human rights groups to oversee that nothing fishy was going on, possibly a UN envoy. Why does a humanitarian organization have or even need secret operatives? I’d be fine with this if it ever satisfyingly tied into the plot at all, but it doesn’t. Why would they expect one operative to be fine in the middle of a city overrun with zombies? No, seriously why would GRE expect this? Kyle Crane might be the most competent person in the universe, but he is one guy in a city with a population in the hundreds of thousands, almost all of which are now walking dead. What reasonable person would think that he’d be able to get the job done? In fact, at one point it seemed like GRE was both willing and able to bomb the entire city into ash. How on earth are they able to keep up the façade of being a humanitarian organization if they are able to call in massive airstrikes to level the city that they alone seem to control? Am I on crazy pills? Jade Aldemir plays a prominent role in Dying Light as a super competent former kickboxing champion-turned-survivor. Contrasting nicely with Crane’s never-addressed past, we learn quite a bit about Jade. She has a strong sense of family, probably resulting from the loss of her parents at the beginning of the outbreak, which causes her to be very protective of her younger brother, Rahim. That bit of information alone makes Jade more compelling than our protagonist, but there’s more! Crane’s arrival results in the death of one of her friends among the survivors, adding additional traumas on top of what it must be like to lose your entire city. She was already a great fighter before the outbreak, hence her great survival skills and respect she receives from the group. As a bonus, she has emotions other than irritation and yelling, which seem to be the only two our protagonist knows (yelling counts as an emotion for Crane). Looking back over the events of Dying Light, It seems clear to me that Jade should have been the protagonist, dealing with life in the quarantine zone as the outbreak occurred and later contacted by the GRE to carry out the world saving mission. Instead, Dying Light gradually disempowers Jade by the slowly killing off everyone she holds dear before Rais, our main antagonist, finally kidnaps and kills her. Her final act heroically saves Crane’s worthless life at the cost of her own. Her character was a fantastic opportunity for a compelling protagonist. Instead, she is ultimately made into an object for the player to retrieve from Rais as part of an ego struggle between protagonist and antagonist. Oh, Rais. This was the character that was supposed to present an ideological counterpoint to Kyle Crane, the man almost with no idea, let alone an ideology. Rais apparently worked with the GRE at one point, but went crazy after his brother was killed and became a weird, violent warlord in Harran. He justifies this life choice by spouting philosophical musings that may or may not pertain to the given scenario and taking up a vicious rivalry with Crane. I think Techland meant for Rais to lend the rest of the game an intellectual core that it otherwise lacks. He has a few good lines about how Crane has no agency and just does what he’s told, but those glimpses of the writers saying something true never amount to anything remotely substantial. They feel like moments of clarity in the midst of a fever dream. By extension, Rais comes off as a violent, verbose buffoon, rather than anything remotely memorable. I can honestly say that if I wasn’t writing a review of Dying Light right now that I would have almost completely forgotten about everything in the story. It left no impression on me other than one of crushing boredom and irritation. Sitting through hours of this game’s plot tainted the fun I had during the gameplay portions, eventually killing all desire to attempt side quests. Minor setbacks that normally wouldn’t have bothered me became agonizing. The map system sometimes doesn’t work properly or is otherwise unhelpful. The lack of fast travel during the campaign proved to be incredibly irritating (I get why, I was just very ready to see the credits roll). Also, accidentally brushing the PS4 touchpad brings up the menu screen for some reason. All of my frustration with Dying Light’s narrative finally culminated and almost broke me during the home stretch when I kept missing a critical jump and repeatedly respawned at a checkpoint where I had to “calm down” a zombie child, an in-game euphemism for the deeply disturbing act of killing a zombie child. This unscripted gameplay moment affected me more strongly than any portion of the central narrative and as I repeated it over and over, I felt sick. I questioned why the profoundly disquieting nature of dealing with the undead wasn’t dealt with more, why none of the characters encountered in the main campaign seemed to think of the living dead as anything other than an obstacle. There were so many moral quandaries with the act I was forced to repeat, and yet not even quipping, irritated Crane seemed to give it a second thought. It was a moment that could have meant or said something insightful and instead it was ignored like all the other narrative opportunities presented in Dying Light. It was a potent moment of horror at what I was doing to progress, so casually and thoughtlessly invoked for shock value. A game that so insensitively and nonchalantly raised something so powerful for shock value without reaching for a deeper meaning felt almost like a narrative betrayal. As I finally made that tenuous jump and crossed the threshold of a new checkpoint, I realized that I had come to loath almost everything about the context provided for Dying Light’s gameplay and visuals. Conclusion: There is so much to love about Dying Light, so much potential for zombie-infested stories. It presents a world full of danger and provides a wide array of abilities with which to players can fight or flee. Gorgeous visions of human decay permeate Harran, interspersed with pockets of hope within surviving communities. Large scale systems work together to move and motivate vast hordes of biters. These elements all function smoothly and provide a solid core experience. While the gameplay, visuals, and overall game design can more than pull their own weight, the tepid, vapid, torrid narrative drags those positive elements down into the muck. I highly respect Techland as a developer for their work on the criminally underrated Call of Juarez: Gunslinger. However, their writing team managed to almost single-handedly kill my enthusiasm for the experience. If you’re still on the fence about Dying Light, wait until it inevitably goes on sale for $20-$30. The gameplay will entertain you, but you'll suffer through the story. Dying Light is available now for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. View full article
  2. While the general response to the PlayStation 4 has been one of enthusiasm and approval, one of the complaints that consistently comes from PS4 owners is that the 500 GB hard drive just doesn't cut it. Unfortunately, replacing the internal hard drive on the PS4 with a larger one can be an expensive proposition with limited options. Nyko's new peripheral, the Data Bank, will expand the PS4's compatibility with different hard drives and (hopefully) save consumers some money. The PlayStation 4 typically only accepts 2.5-inch hard drives. 2.5-inch hard drives tend to be $30-$40 more expensive than their 3.5-inch counterparts, which are more common. Nyko's Data Bank replaces the top cover of the PS4 and allows for more room for the larger drive. No price has yet been announced, so it remains to be seen if Nyko's device will end up saving your wallet all that much. The Data Bank i currently scheduled for a release sometime during the first half of 2015.
  3. While the general response to the PlayStation 4 has been one of enthusiasm and approval, one of the complaints that consistently comes from PS4 owners is that the 500 GB hard drive just doesn't cut it. Unfortunately, replacing the internal hard drive on the PS4 with a larger one can be an expensive proposition with limited options. Nyko's new peripheral, the Data Bank, will expand the PS4's compatibility with different hard drives and (hopefully) save consumers some money. The PlayStation 4 typically only accepts 2.5-inch hard drives. 2.5-inch hard drives tend to be $30-$40 more expensive than their 3.5-inch counterparts, which are more common. Nyko's Data Bank replaces the top cover of the PS4 and allows for more room for the larger drive. No price has yet been announced, so it remains to be seen if Nyko's device will end up saving your wallet all that much. The Data Bank i currently scheduled for a release sometime during the first half of 2015. View full article
  4. Hawk announced the new PlayStation 4 skateboarding title during Sony's CES keynote speech. As exciting as that announcement might be, there are no additional details about the game, not even a title. We know it will release this year and that it will come to PlayStation 4. There was no word on whether it will be exclusive to PS4, leaving open the possibility that Tony Hawk might make its way to other systems. Heck, we don't even know if it will be a downloadable or physical release. Some speculate that Activision and Sony have cut a marketing deal reminiscent of Destiny's Sony exclusive advertising. Of course, it is a bit too soon to jump to any conclusions with the limited information available. It's enough for now to know that Tony Hawk 2015 exists.
  5. Hawk announced the new PlayStation 4 skateboarding title during Sony's CES keynote speech. As exciting as that announcement might be, there are no additional details about the game, not even a title. We know it will release this year and that it will come to PlayStation 4. There was no word on whether it will be exclusive to PS4, leaving open the possibility that Tony Hawk might make its way to other systems. Heck, we don't even know if it will be a downloadable or physical release. Some speculate that Activision and Sony have cut a marketing deal reminiscent of Destiny's Sony exclusive advertising. Of course, it is a bit too soon to jump to any conclusions with the limited information available. It's enough for now to know that Tony Hawk 2015 exists. View full article
  6. Beginning January 13th, PlayStation will be launching a subscription for their PlayStation Now streaming service. PlayStation owners can currently only pay to rent individual titles for differing period of time ranging from four hours to ninety days at prices that vary from as little as $1.99 to $14.99. Subscribers will have access to every PlayStation Now title for as long as they remain subscribed. PlayStation plans to implement two subscription bundles. One month will cost customers $19.99. Alternatively, a three month package will run $44.99. PlayStation points out that if the price seems steep, the service grants access to over 100 titles from the PlayStation 3's library. For the skeptical, PlayStation is offering a seven-day free trial. The subscription will be rolled out on PlayStation 4 before making its way to other systems and devices. To celebrate the launch of the subscription service, a free PlayStation Now theme will be available for PS4 users in early January. Downloading the theme before the end of January will automatically enter PS4 owners into a drawing for a shot at netting a one-year subscription to PlayStation Now. PlayStation Now has been criticized for having inflated prices and being a bit jittery or sluggish when it come to responding to inputs. Is a subscription plan the solution? Does this announcement make you more interested in using PlayStation Now?
  7. Beginning January 13th, PlayStation will be launching a subscription for their PlayStation Now streaming service. PlayStation owners can currently only pay to rent individual titles for differing period of time ranging from four hours to ninety days at prices that vary from as little as $1.99 to $14.99. Subscribers will have access to every PlayStation Now title for as long as they remain subscribed. PlayStation plans to implement two subscription bundles. One month will cost customers $19.99. Alternatively, a three month package will run $44.99. PlayStation points out that if the price seems steep, the service grants access to over 100 titles from the PlayStation 3's library. For the skeptical, PlayStation is offering a seven-day free trial. The subscription will be rolled out on PlayStation 4 before making its way to other systems and devices. To celebrate the launch of the subscription service, a free PlayStation Now theme will be available for PS4 users in early January. Downloading the theme before the end of January will automatically enter PS4 owners into a drawing for a shot at netting a one-year subscription to PlayStation Now. PlayStation Now has been criticized for having inflated prices and being a bit jittery or sluggish when it come to responding to inputs. Is a subscription plan the solution? Does this announcement make you more interested in using PlayStation Now? View full article
  8. Bandai Namco has announced that a new Godzilla game will be rampaging to PS3 and PS4 next year. The new game starring the terror of Tokyo will include appearances by many of Godzilla's familiar enemies, like King Ghidorah, Mothra, and Mechagodzilla. Other than that, this game looks a bit perplexing. Apparently players will control Godzilla with the goal of trampling through cities and foes to destroy Energy Generators and collect G-Energy. All of this will be done with a "Movie-Style Camera Angle System" which sounds like something a vengeful camera god would come up with scourge the lands with confusing camera controls. Whatever the case, I do enjoy the humorous take on the game in the trailer, which might be a good indication that the game won't take itself too seriously. I'm probably in the minority of people who will definitely be looking forward to whatever weird concoction of gameplay Godzilla ends up being.
  9. Bandai Namco has announced that a new Godzilla game will be rampaging to PS3 and PS4 next year. The new game starring the terror of Tokyo will include appearances by many of Godzilla's familiar enemies, like King Ghidorah, Mothra, and Mechagodzilla. Other than that, this game looks a bit perplexing. Apparently players will control Godzilla with the goal of trampling through cities and foes to destroy Energy Generators and collect G-Energy. All of this will be done with a "Movie-Style Camera Angle System" which sounds like something a vengeful camera god would come up with scourge the lands with confusing camera controls. Whatever the case, I do enjoy the humorous take on the game in the trailer, which might be a good indication that the game won't take itself too seriously. I'm probably in the minority of people who will definitely be looking forward to whatever weird concoction of gameplay Godzilla ends up being. View full article
  10. Just when people thought their time on Pandora might be taking a hiatus, Telltale swoops in with a trailer that teases the first episode of their Borderlands series. Unfortunately, the trailer doesn't give any hints as to a release date, but it looks like Telltale is still planning to release it in 2014. While we were shown a preview of the first episode in action back during E3, the first episode finally has a name: Zero Sum. Additionally, we now know the official casting details, final casting details. The season will feature Troy Baker as Rhys, Laura Bailey as Fiona, Chris Hardwick as Vaughn, Erin Yvette as Sasha, Patrick Warburton as Vasquez, and Dameon Clarke reprising his role as Handsome Jack. We can also confirm that there will be five total episodes of the Tales from the Borderlands series. Tales from the Borderland will be available on PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, Xbox One, and PC, with some slight variations in price. It looks like the console versions will retail at around $4.99 per episode with season pass options for $19.99. The PC version will be a season pass for $24.99. Android and iOS devices will also see the first episode of the Telltale's Borderlands before the year is out.
  11. Just when people thought their time on Pandora might be taking a hiatus, Telltale swoops in with a trailer that teases the first episode of their Borderlands series. Unfortunately, the trailer doesn't give any hints as to a release date, but it looks like Telltale is still planning to release it in 2014. While we were shown a preview of the first episode in action back during E3, the first episode finally has a name: Zero Sum. Additionally, we now know the official casting details, final casting details. The season will feature Troy Baker as Rhys, Laura Bailey as Fiona, Chris Hardwick as Vaughn, Erin Yvette as Sasha, Patrick Warburton as Vasquez, and Dameon Clarke reprising his role as Handsome Jack. We can also confirm that there will be five total episodes of the Tales from the Borderlands series. Tales from the Borderland will be available on PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, Xbox One, and PC, with some slight variations in price. It looks like the console versions will retail at around $4.99 per episode with season pass options for $19.99. The PC version will be a season pass for $24.99. Android and iOS devices will also see the first episode of the Telltale's Borderlands before the year is out. View full article
  12. Destiny fans, mark December 9 on your calendars. Titled "The Dark Below," the expansion adds several story missions, an additional strike, and a new raid. The story missions and strike revolve around the Hive's god, Crota. That name might be familiar to Destiny players from the mission where players wield the Sword of Crota (notable for being the only mission in the game where players do something other than shoot everything). This new content will be accessible by talking with a new NPC in Tower named Eris. PlayStation owners will have access to an exclusive, limited time strike called "The Unyielding Mind," though no word yet on exactly when that will release. Beyond new missions, Bungie is adding some quality of life adjustments. The level cap will be raised from 30 to 32 and five more bounty slots will be opened up. New weapons and gear are also on their way. The standalone price of the expansion is $19.99, while the season pass for Destiny's DLC is $34.99.
  13. Destiny fans, mark December 9 on your calendars. Titled "The Dark Below," the expansion adds several story missions, an additional strike, and a new raid. The story missions and strike revolve around the Hive's god, Crota. That name might be familiar to Destiny players from the mission where players wield the Sword of Crota (notable for being the only mission in the game where players do something other than shoot everything). This new content will be accessible by talking with a new NPC in Tower named Eris. PlayStation owners will have access to an exclusive, limited time strike called "The Unyielding Mind," though no word yet on exactly when that will release. Beyond new missions, Bungie is adding some quality of life adjustments. The level cap will be raised from 30 to 32 and five more bounty slots will be opened up. New weapons and gear are also on their way. The standalone price of the expansion is $19.99, while the season pass for Destiny's DLC is $34.99. View full article
  14. Jack Gardner

    Review: Chariot

    For those of you that aren’t old enough to remember, there was once a mysterious video game feature called “local co-op” that dominated every gaming system known to man (except PC). For a long while, family and friends could bond by sharing a couch and enjoying the finer aspects of jolly cooperation. Then the internet happened and it seemed like the ways of local co-op would be lost forever to the ravages of time. With the rise of internet co-op, precious few video games even bothered to include the option to play with a physically present friend. In the midst of local co-op’s Dark Age*, a beacon of hope signaled that some developers still revered the old ways. Frima Games’ Chariot champions local co-op, emphasizing teamwork and creative problem solving. In fact, if it has one major drawback it is that such an emphasis is placed on the local co-op that playing through Chariot in single-player can feel a bit hollow. Chariot was reviewed on PlayStation 4. Chariot is a platformer that relies on increasingly complex puzzles built into its levels. Creatively making use of deceptively simple mechanics is required to progress. Players can sling a rope to either side of the chariot with one button and pull it forward or let the line grow slack with two others. Combine the rope mechanics with jumping and that constitutes the core of the player’s puzzle-solving arsenal. To further complicate matters, these mechanics are applied in different ways depending on the various environments players will encounter. The introductory caves give players a great opportunity to grasp the basics, but each new area, like the frictionless ice caverns or the lava-filled magma grottos, present their own unique challenges. Each level is fairly open and allows for a great deal of exploration. Intrepid players will be rewarded with valuable loot as well as precious item blueprints. Blueprints allow a friendly skeleton merchant to create useful items and upgrades for the chariot. Certain blueprints, like the royal lantern upgrade, are required to make progress into other areas of Chariot. To find the most powerful items and rarest treasures, players will need to grab a friend to play by their side. Many will be impossible to obtain for solo players. Co-op is the soul of Chariot and it is only when playing co-op that the full potential of Chariot shines through. There is no online co-op option; players will need to be physically present with each other. While it is possible to complete the game alone, it will be less frustrating to tackle the core story with a friend. During my solo time with Chariot, there were numerous instances when I wished I had a co-op buddy to provide backup on some of the trickier platforming challenges. When I was playing co-op, everything seemed to fall into place and, while there were still a number of falls and slip ups, everyone seemed to have a great time. I have mixed feelings about Chariot’s enemies. Called Looters, the small pool of antagonists don’t constitute a direct threat to the player; they’re only interested in stealing treasure from the chariot. At worst they pose an annoying inconvenience. Each player has an attack that can be used to fend off the attackers, either a sword or a slingshot depending on the choice of character. The problem is that Looters almost feel obligatory, as if Frima felt they had to include enemies because a platformer needs them otherwise it isn’t a real platformer. I can see why they might want to include enemies as a way of amping up the tension in tricky areas and to make the two characters feel distinct. It would have been a bold decision, but I think Chariot would have benefitted from a complete lack of enemies. The combat itself isn’t thrilling or complicated; most situations where enemies appear can be solved by standing on the chariot and mashing the attack button. These instances felt forced and broke the sense of flow that I had derived from the Looter-less sections. It wasn’t a huge problem, but it was a source of irritation. On top of satisfying exploration and mechanics, Chariot tells a simple story about a princess who, along with her fiancée, seeks to inter her father’s remains in a royal sepulcher**. The problem is that her father’s ghost haunts the wheeled coffin, aka the titular chariot, and demands a more suitable resting place as well as a hoard of treasure worthy of his kingly station. Chariot does a number of really refreshing and interesting thing with its simple premise. It is a welcome change of pace to see a leading lady in a platformer. This is clearly important given that I had to spend five or six minutes explaining to my six-year-old nephew/co-op buddy that the main character was, in fact, a woman. That really shouldn’t have to be so alien a concept as to invite a child’s incredulity. Chariot also succeeds in being an amusing, if not laugh out loud, experience. The voice acting for the king is perfectly petulant and demanding and, while it can get grating after repeated platforming failures, generally left me with a smile on my face. I’m somewhat tempted to dig into an analysis of Chariot’s messages regarding death and acceptance, but that can wait for an article all its own. Suffice it to say that there are more complicated and interesting things going on beneath Chariot’s surface than its friendly and cheerful exterior would imply. Chariot’s aesthetic perfectly complements its content. Though the premise, to be perfectly blunt, is to find a place to bury the protagonist’s dead father, Chariot manages to sidestep how potentially disturbing that could be by implementing an aesthetic that feels friendly and inviting. Colors really pop and every environment feels distinct. It has a painted, fairy-tale feel, as if it was adapted from a children’s bedtime story. The layered score lulls players into a state of zen as they make progress and roll the chariot on toward the next sepulcher. For those of you that aren’t old enough to remember, there was once a mysterious video game feature called “local co-op” that dominated every gaming system known to man (except PC). For a long while, family and friends could bond by sharing a couch and enjoying the finer aspects of jolly cooperation. Then the internet happened and it seemed like the ways of local co-op would be lost forever to the ravages of time. With the rise of internet co-op, precious few video games even bothered to include the option to play with a physically present friend. In the midst of local co-op’s Dark Age*, a beacon of hope signaled that some developers still revered the old ways. Frima Games’ Chariot champions local co-op, emphasizing teamwork and creative problem solving. In fact, if it has one major drawback it is that such an emphasis is placed on the local co-op that playing through Chariot in single-player can feel a bit hollow. Conclusion: Chariot is a great indie title that is best enjoyed with a friend or on a date night with a significant other. It emphasizes teamwork and problem solving with a minimum of violence. It is a great game for kids and adults alike as the challenges require some brainpower, but not to a frustrating degree. It also raises some introductory themes that deal with death and could lead to interesting conversations with children old enough to tackle such issues. I’m always a fan of games that take relatively simple mechanics and use them in stimulating ways. Chariot does this exceedingly well. It is a lovingly crafted, beautiful platformer that can be appreciated by all ages. Chariot is currently available on PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. It will be coming to PC at an as yet unannounced time. * Fun fact: I’m guilty of perpetuating a common misconception regarding the time period that people have frequently termed Europe’s Dark Age. In fact, it was not nearly as devoid of activity, learning, or progress as people tend to believe (see beginning of The Importance of the Middle Ages). Or, for those of you with less patience for academic writing, here is a Cracked article. ** Chariot deserves credit for teaching me that I have been mispronouncing ‘sepulcher’ for years.
  15. For those of you that aren’t old enough to remember, there was once a mysterious video game feature called “local co-op” that dominated every gaming system known to man (except PC). For a long while, family and friends could bond by sharing a couch and enjoying the finer aspects of jolly cooperation. Then the internet happened and it seemed like the ways of local co-op would be lost forever to the ravages of time. With the rise of internet co-op, precious few video games even bothered to include the option to play with a physically present friend. In the midst of local co-op’s Dark Age*, a beacon of hope signaled that some developers still revered the old ways. Frima Games’ Chariot champions local co-op, emphasizing teamwork and creative problem solving. In fact, if it has one major drawback it is that such an emphasis is placed on the local co-op that playing through Chariot in single-player can feel a bit hollow. Chariot was reviewed on PlayStation 4. Chariot is a platformer that relies on increasingly complex puzzles built into its levels. Creatively making use of deceptively simple mechanics is required to progress. Players can sling a rope to either side of the chariot with one button and pull it forward or let the line grow slack with two others. Combine the rope mechanics with jumping and that constitutes the core of the player’s puzzle-solving arsenal. To further complicate matters, these mechanics are applied in different ways depending on the various environments players will encounter. The introductory caves give players a great opportunity to grasp the basics, but each new area, like the frictionless ice caverns or the lava-filled magma grottos, present their own unique challenges. Each level is fairly open and allows for a great deal of exploration. Intrepid players will be rewarded with valuable loot as well as precious item blueprints. Blueprints allow a friendly skeleton merchant to create useful items and upgrades for the chariot. Certain blueprints, like the royal lantern upgrade, are required to make progress into other areas of Chariot. To find the most powerful items and rarest treasures, players will need to grab a friend to play by their side. Many will be impossible to obtain for solo players. Co-op is the soul of Chariot and it is only when playing co-op that the full potential of Chariot shines through. There is no online co-op option; players will need to be physically present with each other. While it is possible to complete the game alone, it will be less frustrating to tackle the core story with a friend. During my solo time with Chariot, there were numerous instances when I wished I had a co-op buddy to provide backup on some of the trickier platforming challenges. When I was playing co-op, everything seemed to fall into place and, while there were still a number of falls and slip ups, everyone seemed to have a great time. I have mixed feelings about Chariot’s enemies. Called Looters, the small pool of antagonists don’t constitute a direct threat to the player; they’re only interested in stealing treasure from the chariot. At worst they pose an annoying inconvenience. Each player has an attack that can be used to fend off the attackers, either a sword or a slingshot depending on the choice of character. The problem is that Looters almost feel obligatory, as if Frima felt they had to include enemies because a platformer needs them otherwise it isn’t a real platformer. I can see why they might want to include enemies as a way of amping up the tension in tricky areas and to make the two characters feel distinct. It would have been a bold decision, but I think Chariot would have benefitted from a complete lack of enemies. The combat itself isn’t thrilling or complicated; most situations where enemies appear can be solved by standing on the chariot and mashing the attack button. These instances felt forced and broke the sense of flow that I had derived from the Looter-less sections. It wasn’t a huge problem, but it was a source of irritation. On top of satisfying exploration and mechanics, Chariot tells a simple story about a princess who, along with her fiancée, seeks to inter her father’s remains in a royal sepulcher**. The problem is that her father’s ghost haunts the wheeled coffin, aka the titular chariot, and demands a more suitable resting place as well as a hoard of treasure worthy of his kingly station. Chariot does a number of really refreshing and interesting thing with its simple premise. It is a welcome change of pace to see a leading lady in a platformer. This is clearly important given that I had to spend five or six minutes explaining to my six-year-old nephew/co-op buddy that the main character was, in fact, a woman. That really shouldn’t have to be so alien a concept as to invite a child’s incredulity. Chariot also succeeds in being an amusing, if not laugh out loud, experience. The voice acting for the king is perfectly petulant and demanding and, while it can get grating after repeated platforming failures, generally left me with a smile on my face. I’m somewhat tempted to dig into an analysis of Chariot’s messages regarding death and acceptance, but that can wait for an article all its own. Suffice it to say that there are more complicated and interesting things going on beneath Chariot’s surface than its friendly and cheerful exterior would imply. Chariot’s aesthetic perfectly complements its content. Though the premise, to be perfectly blunt, is to find a place to bury the protagonist’s dead father, Chariot manages to sidestep how potentially disturbing that could be by implementing an aesthetic that feels friendly and inviting. Colors really pop and every environment feels distinct. It has a painted, fairy-tale feel, as if it was adapted from a children’s bedtime story. The layered score lulls players into a state of zen as they make progress and roll the chariot on toward the next sepulcher. For those of you that aren’t old enough to remember, there was once a mysterious video game feature called “local co-op” that dominated every gaming system known to man (except PC). For a long while, family and friends could bond by sharing a couch and enjoying the finer aspects of jolly cooperation. Then the internet happened and it seemed like the ways of local co-op would be lost forever to the ravages of time. With the rise of internet co-op, precious few video games even bothered to include the option to play with a physically present friend. In the midst of local co-op’s Dark Age*, a beacon of hope signaled that some developers still revered the old ways. Frima Games’ Chariot champions local co-op, emphasizing teamwork and creative problem solving. In fact, if it has one major drawback it is that such an emphasis is placed on the local co-op that playing through Chariot in single-player can feel a bit hollow. Conclusion: Chariot is a great indie title that is best enjoyed with a friend or on a date night with a significant other. It emphasizes teamwork and problem solving with a minimum of violence. It is a great game for kids and adults alike as the challenges require some brainpower, but not to a frustrating degree. It also raises some introductory themes that deal with death and could lead to interesting conversations with children old enough to tackle such issues. I’m always a fan of games that take relatively simple mechanics and use them in stimulating ways. Chariot does this exceedingly well. It is a lovingly crafted, beautiful platformer that can be appreciated by all ages. Chariot is currently available on PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. It will be coming to PC at an as yet unannounced time. * Fun fact: I’m guilty of perpetuating a common misconception regarding the time period that people have frequently termed Europe’s Dark Age. In fact, it was not nearly as devoid of activity, learning, or progress as people tend to believe (see beginning of The Importance of the Middle Ages). Or, for those of you with less patience for academic writing, here is a Cracked article. ** Chariot deserves credit for teaching me that I have been mispronouncing ‘sepulcher’ for years. View full article
  16. What are stories? Conventional wisdom will tell you that stories are something along the lines of people describing a series of events with beginnings, middles, and endings. Usually, they tend to be interesting and sometimes they’re even factual. In fact, if we really want to boil stories down to their basics, they’re just the relation of events, real or imagined, to another person. It is one of the fundamental ways in which we communicate with one another. Though everyone tells stories, some people find it to be a necessity. For those individuals, writing novels, directing movies, developing games, become compulsions. Stephen King probably hasn’t written 85 novels, novellas, non-fiction books, short stories, and assorted other works just for the mountains of money (though I’m sure that didn’t hurt his productivity). I’d hazard a guess that he feels a need to write that can’t be satisfied. Maybe I’m going a bit too far out on a limb to guess at what motivates King’s prolific writing, but I know that I write short stories to clearly articulate ideas I have trouble sharing in casual conversation. That’s part of the reason why I write for a living, too. The Vanishing of Ethan Carter was reviewed on PC. Maybe it is that background that helped me latch onto The Vanishing of Ethan Carter. In many ways, Ethan Carter is about stories and why we use them to make sense of the world around us. In a much more obvious way, Ethan Carter is a young boy who has gone missing. Before he went missing, Ethan was writing to the detective Paul Prospero who decides to investigate the strange circumstances around the boy’s disappearance. As the game begins, Paul arrives in Red Creek Valley with a mind to solve the mystery of the missing child. However, it quickly becomes apparent that there is more going on in Red Creek Valley than a simple kidnapping or runaway when players discover the severed legs and body of a murdered man. Things only seem to grow stranger from there, though I won’t go into more detail in an effort to preserve the mystery of The Vanishing of Ethan Carter. Paul Prospero has a keen eye for crime solving, aided in part by an affinity for the supernatural. Examining evidence and reconstructing crime scenes allows the detective to visualize the events leading up to the murder and provides hints as to where the next piece in the puzzle might be. This element could have been very gimmicky, and in a way it is, but it worked in making me feel like an investigator. It helped me buy into the mystery. I think that’s the most important part of enjoying and understanding Ethan Carter; you need to be able to accept the central mystery and ponder over the bizarre set of clues that are scattered throughout the beautiful scenic landscape of Red Creek Valley. The Vanishing of Ethan carter is a deliberately slow burn. The walking speed is realistically sluggish, though there is a button that allows for sprinting for players that are in a hurry. The pace invites those with more patience to observe the effort that indie studio The Astronauts put in to make the environment come alive. Birds send lonely, mournful cries across the wide waters of Red Creek, ringing out against a backdrop of trees that have shifted colors in preparation for winter. The audio and visuals complement each other perfectly and can change on a dime if the situation calls for it. As players progress, it becomes very clear just how wide of a range The Astronauts have in terms of the kinds of games they could deliver in the future. Beyond superficial qualities like the way everything appears and sounds, the level design on display is also of a very high caliber. Though Ethan Carter is in reality rather constrained and linear, it rarely feel that way. A thick illusion of openness pervades the experience. Environments are cleverly designed to draw players toward their next objective in a number of subtle ways. Sometimes a unique tree will draw you down to the left or an unusual building will compel you to abandon the train tracks that you’ve been following. At several points I found myself thinking that there were entire unexplored areas, until I deliberately backtracked to satisfy my curiosity and found that they contained nothing but more wilderness. The slow pace of Ethan Carter also allows players time to consider the implications of the various situations they come across. Are they real? Is something beyond mortal experience casting a malevolent shadow over Red Creek Valley? What does it all mean, both in the context of the game and as an outsider looking to take meaning from it? While some of these questions are resolved by the time the credits roll, others are not and those are the ones we need to answer for ourselves. The Vanishing of Ethan Carter resembles games like The Stanley Parable or Gone Home that present an environment for players to explore and investigate. The core mechanical difference between the three is that Ethan Carter contains a number of simple puzzles and murders that require some thought and interaction. Some of you might remember that last year I wrote about my experience with Gone Home. While I applauded that it was trying something unique in the gaming space, it ultimately failed to resonate with me, despite the amount of effort that The Fullbright Company put into crafting the experience. It fell short because the solution to Gone Home’s mystery seemed obvious and the story one that, while not common in games, didn’t strike me as particularly compelling. I feel the opposite about The Vanishing of Ethan Carter. It is a layered tale full of unexpected twists, wonder, suspense, and horror. When I finished I had to pace around the room thinking about what had happened for a good twenty minutes. For me, the experience rang true and I felt the payoff of having heavily invested myself into a narrative that had decided to end in a bold fashion. Without spoilers, it takes real creative guts to end a video game the way The Astronauts chose to bring Ethan Carter to a conclusion. Will there be people who respond to The Vanishing of Ethan Carter the same way that I felt about Gone Home? Absolutely. Like Gone Home before it, Ethan Carter stands almost entirely upon the strength of its narrative and will illicit different subjective reactions from players. As for me, I thought The Vanishing of Ethan Carter was some of the finest storytelling in video games. Conclusion: The Vanishing of Ethan Carter is a must play for anyone who fancies themselves interested in video games as an artistic medium for stories. A rich, finely crafted environment awaits, full of surprises and riddles waiting to be solved. Players looking for action or mindless fun should seek out other games. The Vanishing of Ethan Carter could be called many things, but I don’t know that I could label it as a “fun” experience. It is enjoyable, certainly, but not fun in the traditional sense that many associate with video games. I don’t know that I’ll be playing it again in the near future, but I do know that I won’t be forgetting my time in Red Creek Valley anytime soon. The Vanishing of Ethan Carter is currently available on PC and will be coming to PlayStation 4 sometime in 2015.
  17. What are stories? Conventional wisdom will tell you that stories are something along the lines of people describing a series of events with beginnings, middles, and endings. Usually, they tend to be interesting and sometimes they’re even factual. In fact, if we really want to boil stories down to their basics, they’re just the relation of events, real or imagined, to another person. It is one of the fundamental ways in which we communicate with one another. Though everyone tells stories, some people find it to be a necessity. For those individuals, writing novels, directing movies, developing games, become compulsions. Stephen King probably hasn’t written 85 novels, novellas, non-fiction books, short stories, and assorted other works just for the mountains of money (though I’m sure that didn’t hurt his productivity). I’d hazard a guess that he feels a need to write that can’t be satisfied. Maybe I’m going a bit too far out on a limb to guess at what motivates King’s prolific writing, but I know that I write short stories to clearly articulate ideas I have trouble sharing in casual conversation. That’s part of the reason why I write for a living, too. The Vanishing of Ethan Carter was reviewed on PC. Maybe it is that background that helped me latch onto The Vanishing of Ethan Carter. In many ways, Ethan Carter is about stories and why we use them to make sense of the world around us. In a much more obvious way, Ethan Carter is a young boy who has gone missing. Before he went missing, Ethan was writing to the detective Paul Prospero who decides to investigate the strange circumstances around the boy’s disappearance. As the game begins, Paul arrives in Red Creek Valley with a mind to solve the mystery of the missing child. However, it quickly becomes apparent that there is more going on in Red Creek Valley than a simple kidnapping or runaway when players discover the severed legs and body of a murdered man. Things only seem to grow stranger from there, though I won’t go into more detail in an effort to preserve the mystery of The Vanishing of Ethan Carter. Paul Prospero has a keen eye for crime solving, aided in part by an affinity for the supernatural. Examining evidence and reconstructing crime scenes allows the detective to visualize the events leading up to the murder and provides hints as to where the next piece in the puzzle might be. This element could have been very gimmicky, and in a way it is, but it worked in making me feel like an investigator. It helped me buy into the mystery. I think that’s the most important part of enjoying and understanding Ethan Carter; you need to be able to accept the central mystery and ponder over the bizarre set of clues that are scattered throughout the beautiful scenic landscape of Red Creek Valley. The Vanishing of Ethan carter is a deliberately slow burn. The walking speed is realistically sluggish, though there is a button that allows for sprinting for players that are in a hurry. The pace invites those with more patience to observe the effort that indie studio The Astronauts put in to make the environment come alive. Birds send lonely, mournful cries across the wide waters of Red Creek, ringing out against a backdrop of trees that have shifted colors in preparation for winter. The audio and visuals complement each other perfectly and can change on a dime if the situation calls for it. As players progress, it becomes very clear just how wide of a range The Astronauts have in terms of the kinds of games they could deliver in the future. Beyond superficial qualities like the way everything appears and sounds, the level design on display is also of a very high caliber. Though Ethan Carter is in reality rather constrained and linear, it rarely feel that way. A thick illusion of openness pervades the experience. Environments are cleverly designed to draw players toward their next objective in a number of subtle ways. Sometimes a unique tree will draw you down to the left or an unusual building will compel you to abandon the train tracks that you’ve been following. At several points I found myself thinking that there were entire unexplored areas, until I deliberately backtracked to satisfy my curiosity and found that they contained nothing but more wilderness. The slow pace of Ethan Carter also allows players time to consider the implications of the various situations they come across. Are they real? Is something beyond mortal experience casting a malevolent shadow over Red Creek Valley? What does it all mean, both in the context of the game and as an outsider looking to take meaning from it? While some of these questions are resolved by the time the credits roll, others are not and those are the ones we need to answer for ourselves. The Vanishing of Ethan Carter resembles games like The Stanley Parable or Gone Home that present an environment for players to explore and investigate. The core mechanical difference between the three is that Ethan Carter contains a number of simple puzzles and murders that require some thought and interaction. Some of you might remember that last year I wrote about my experience with Gone Home. While I applauded that it was trying something unique in the gaming space, it ultimately failed to resonate with me, despite the amount of effort that The Fullbright Company put into crafting the experience. It fell short because the solution to Gone Home’s mystery seemed obvious and the story one that, while not common in games, didn’t strike me as particularly compelling. I feel the opposite about The Vanishing of Ethan Carter. It is a layered tale full of unexpected twists, wonder, suspense, and horror. When I finished I had to pace around the room thinking about what had happened for a good twenty minutes. For me, the experience rang true and I felt the payoff of having heavily invested myself into a narrative that had decided to end in a bold fashion. Without spoilers, it takes real creative guts to end a video game the way The Astronauts chose to bring Ethan Carter to a conclusion. Will there be people who respond to The Vanishing of Ethan Carter the same way that I felt about Gone Home? Absolutely. Like Gone Home before it, Ethan Carter stands almost entirely upon the strength of its narrative and will illicit different subjective reactions from players. As for me, I thought The Vanishing of Ethan Carter was some of the finest storytelling in video games. Conclusion: The Vanishing of Ethan Carter is a must play for anyone who fancies themselves interested in video games as an artistic medium for stories. A rich, finely crafted environment awaits, full of surprises and riddles waiting to be solved. Players looking for action or mindless fun should seek out other games. The Vanishing of Ethan Carter could be called many things, but I don’t know that I could label it as a “fun” experience. It is enjoyable, certainly, but not fun in the traditional sense that many associate with video games. I don’t know that I’ll be playing it again in the near future, but I do know that I won’t be forgetting my time in Red Creek Valley anytime soon. The Vanishing of Ethan Carter is currently available on PC and will be coming to PlayStation 4 sometime in 2015. View full article
  18. Pier Solar and the Great Architects, the HD remake of 2010 original that was exclusive to the Sega Mega Drive, is due on September 30th for PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, Ouya, and PC. Pier Solar HD is a direct result of a successful Kickstarter campaign that ran back in 2012. In addition to a release on PS4, PS3, and PC, WaterMelon will also be releasing the RPG on Xbox One, Wii U, and Sega Dreamcast, though the release dates of those versions will be announced next month after they've received certification. I'm gonna be honest, I've been looking forward to playing Pier Solar HD for a long time. Never having had a Sega Mega Drive, I wasn't able to play the original retro release of Pier Solar which made me sad as a big fan of classic RPGs. This news really makes me happy!
  19. Pier Solar and the Great Architects, the HD remake of 2010 original that was exclusive to the Sega Mega Drive, is due on September 30th for PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, Ouya, and PC. Pier Solar HD is a direct result of a successful Kickstarter campaign that ran back in 2012. In addition to a release on PS4, PS3, and PC, WaterMelon will also be releasing the RPG on Xbox One, Wii U, and Sega Dreamcast, though the release dates of those versions will be announced next month after they've received certification. I'm gonna be honest, I've been looking forward to playing Pier Solar HD for a long time. Never having had a Sega Mega Drive, I wasn't able to play the original retro release of Pier Solar which made me sad as a big fan of classic RPGs. This news really makes me happy! View full article
  20. Following a partially successful Kickstarter campaign two years ago, Hidden Path Entertainment has released their eagerly awaited tower defense title to the public. Does the sequel live up to the expectations created by the success of Defense Grid: The Awakening? Given the pedigree of Hidden Path, a studio made up of industry veterans behind titles like Age of Empires II and Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, it should come as no surprise that Defense Grid 2 is a very enjoyable game. However, I know there might be a few of you out there thinking something along the lines of, “It might be fun, but there are a lot of fun tower defense games out there on the internet for free.” And that’s true. I’m not a stranger to freely available tower defense titles. I remember a period of several days doing nothing but playing Kingdom Rush when I should have been writing my thesis. With games like Desktop Tower Defense or Kingdom Rush: Frontiers existing in the wilds of the web and the cheap mobile game space, the question we need to ask about Defense Grid 2 is if it is worth the $24.99 price of admission. Upon first booting up Defense Grid 2, players can dive into either the campaign or multiplayer. Choosing either will open a dazzlingly vast array of options, game modes, and ways to play. The campaign contains a prologue/tutorial and twenty missions spread out over five chapters. Each mission takes place on a unique map with the option to play through them in either story mode or in any one of the eleven other modes that place differing restrictions or conditions on gameplay. There are also four levels of difficulty to tailor how much of a challenge a player might desire. None of the missions are locked, meaning a player frustrated with a particularly irritating level can simply proceed to the next one. The multiplayer options are equally as diverse. Players can battle each other online in a mode called “DG Fighter” where aliens destroyed on one player’s side of the map appear on the other player’s side and vice versa. There is also the option to team up and tackle the campaign missions and their various game modes in co-op. Finally, players work together to defend against aliens on maps that restrict where each player can build towers. Leaderboards are integrated throughout the game, so you’ll always know who did better in multiplayer and can strive to achieve higher and higher scores. There is also a meatier story than one might expect from a tower defense game. Set in a future where advanced AIs control the defense grids of various planets, Defense Grid 2 tasks players with activating the various towers that can be built on the grids in order to fend off alien invasions. As players progress through the story missions, the various AI characters will interact with each other, arguing, cracking wise, and generally being a pleasant distraction after you’ve set up the perfect defense and can watch wave after wave of alien forces crash into your impenetrable wall of towers. The voice acting for the various characters is well done and their accented dialogue is delightful. I appreciated the additional context and sense of urgency that they story provided, but I was never entirely clear on what was happening or why. Luckily, tower defense games typically rely on the strength of their gameplay rather than their narratives, so this never really became an issue. When it comes to the actual gameplay, Defense Grid 2 is a well-oiled machine. There are ten different tower types to choose from, each with unique abilities and upgrades. There is even a tower you can build that allows you to build a different tower on top of it! In order to progress through the campaign, players are required to learn how to place their towers to efficiently funnel alien invaders. Before every mission abilities can be equipped to their towers on top of the other upgrades available while in-game. I was able to play both the PC and PlayStation 4 versions of Defense Grid 2 and I have to say that I immensely prefer a gamepad to a mouse and keyboard control scheme. The screen is locked to wherever the cursor is pointing regardless of whether you are using a controller or a mouse. It feels unnatural with a mouse, but makes complete sense with a controller. The weakest parts of Defense Grid 2 lie in the soundtrack and aesthetic choices. Much of the music is on a short loop and can get repetitive during long gameplay sessions. I would recommend that players go into the settings and turning off the music and listening to some of their own groovy tunes. As for the aesthetic, Defense Grid 2 has a lot of great enemy designs and the maps have an interesting architecture to them, but the camera is zoomed so far away that I could rarely tell what aliens my towers were fighting unless they was very large. Even then I still had no idea what these things looked like until I went into the Alien Encyclopedia contained in the extras menu. The other problem is harder to pinpoint, but I think it boils down to most of the maps containing a preponderance of grey. It makes all of the different layouts blend together into a visually boring lump. The graphical quality on each of these maps is very high and clearly a lot of work went into making them the most detailed maps that the tower defense genre has to offer, but it is undermined by the decision to have so many grey surfaces. I understand that it was a decision made for the sake of clarity, but it was a choice that ultimately led to a game full of detailed environments that make use of an uninteresting color palate. The camera is never this close during gameplay. Conclusion: Is Defense Grid 2 a fun game? Absolutely. It stands well above its free competitors in every respect. The core mechanics are rock solid and the numerous game modes are enough to keep the most avid tower defense fans engrossed for weeks. I had a great time playing through its campaign and messing around with the multiplayer. That being said, I find it hard to recommend with a price tag of $24.99. If you love tower defense games or enjoyed the first Defense Grid, Defense Grid 2 is a must buy, but for a general audience I would recommend picking it up when it hits $10 or less. Defense Grid 2 was reviewed on PlayStation 4 and is currently available for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One.
  21. Following a partially successful Kickstarter campaign two years ago, Hidden Path Entertainment has released their eagerly awaited tower defense title to the public. Does the sequel live up to the expectations created by the success of Defense Grid: The Awakening? Given the pedigree of Hidden Path, a studio made up of industry veterans behind titles like Age of Empires II and Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, it should come as no surprise that Defense Grid 2 is a very enjoyable game. However, I know there might be a few of you out there thinking something along the lines of, “It might be fun, but there are a lot of fun tower defense games out there on the internet for free.” And that’s true. I’m not a stranger to freely available tower defense titles. I remember a period of several days doing nothing but playing Kingdom Rush when I should have been writing my thesis. With games like Desktop Tower Defense or Kingdom Rush: Frontiers existing in the wilds of the web and the cheap mobile game space, the question we need to ask about Defense Grid 2 is if it is worth the $24.99 price of admission. Upon first booting up Defense Grid 2, players can dive into either the campaign or multiplayer. Choosing either will open a dazzlingly vast array of options, game modes, and ways to play. The campaign contains a prologue/tutorial and twenty missions spread out over five chapters. Each mission takes place on a unique map with the option to play through them in either story mode or in any one of the eleven other modes that place differing restrictions or conditions on gameplay. There are also four levels of difficulty to tailor how much of a challenge a player might desire. None of the missions are locked, meaning a player frustrated with a particularly irritating level can simply proceed to the next one. The multiplayer options are equally as diverse. Players can battle each other online in a mode called “DG Fighter” where aliens destroyed on one player’s side of the map appear on the other player’s side and vice versa. There is also the option to team up and tackle the campaign missions and their various game modes in co-op. Finally, players work together to defend against aliens on maps that restrict where each player can build towers. Leaderboards are integrated throughout the game, so you’ll always know who did better in multiplayer and can strive to achieve higher and higher scores. There is also a meatier story than one might expect from a tower defense game. Set in a future where advanced AIs control the defense grids of various planets, Defense Grid 2 tasks players with activating the various towers that can be built on the grids in order to fend off alien invasions. As players progress through the story missions, the various AI characters will interact with each other, arguing, cracking wise, and generally being a pleasant distraction after you’ve set up the perfect defense and can watch wave after wave of alien forces crash into your impenetrable wall of towers. The voice acting for the various characters is well done and their accented dialogue is delightful. I appreciated the additional context and sense of urgency that they story provided, but I was never entirely clear on what was happening or why. Luckily, tower defense games typically rely on the strength of their gameplay rather than their narratives, so this never really became an issue. When it comes to the actual gameplay, Defense Grid 2 is a well-oiled machine. There are ten different tower types to choose from, each with unique abilities and upgrades. There is even a tower you can build that allows you to build a different tower on top of it! In order to progress through the campaign, players are required to learn how to place their towers to efficiently funnel alien invaders. Before every mission abilities can be equipped to their towers on top of the other upgrades available while in-game. I was able to play both the PC and PlayStation 4 versions of Defense Grid 2 and I have to say that I immensely prefer a gamepad to a mouse and keyboard control scheme. The screen is locked to wherever the cursor is pointing regardless of whether you are using a controller or a mouse. It feels unnatural with a mouse, but makes complete sense with a controller. The weakest parts of Defense Grid 2 lie in the soundtrack and aesthetic choices. Much of the music is on a short loop and can get repetitive during long gameplay sessions. I would recommend that players go into the settings and turning off the music and listening to some of their own groovy tunes. As for the aesthetic, Defense Grid 2 has a lot of great enemy designs and the maps have an interesting architecture to them, but the camera is zoomed so far away that I could rarely tell what aliens my towers were fighting unless they was very large. Even then I still had no idea what these things looked like until I went into the Alien Encyclopedia contained in the extras menu. The other problem is harder to pinpoint, but I think it boils down to most of the maps containing a preponderance of grey. It makes all of the different layouts blend together into a visually boring lump. The graphical quality on each of these maps is very high and clearly a lot of work went into making them the most detailed maps that the tower defense genre has to offer, but it is undermined by the decision to have so many grey surfaces. I understand that it was a decision made for the sake of clarity, but it was a choice that ultimately led to a game full of detailed environments that make use of an uninteresting color palate. The camera is never this close during gameplay. Conclusion: Is Defense Grid 2 a fun game? Absolutely. It stands well above its free competitors in every respect. The core mechanics are rock solid and the numerous game modes are enough to keep the most avid tower defense fans engrossed for weeks. I had a great time playing through its campaign and messing around with the multiplayer. That being said, I find it hard to recommend with a price tag of $24.99. If you love tower defense games or enjoyed the first Defense Grid, Defense Grid 2 is a must buy, but for a general audience I would recommend picking it up when it hits $10 or less. Defense Grid 2 was reviewed on PlayStation 4 and is currently available for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. View full article
  22. Final Fantasy Type-0 HD, the high-definition remake of the highly acclaimed PSP exclusive original, will be making its way to the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One next year along with the demo for the first newly numbered Final Fantasy title in nearly four years. Currently slated for a March 17, 2015 release in North America, Final Fantasy Type-0 HD follows the adventures of a group of elite military cadets known as Class Zero as they become embroiled in a massive war. It is generally regarded as one of the best Final Fantasy titles in years, so it is great to see it being released on more platforms. However, for many Final Fantasy fans the remake of Type-0 is just an added bonus to the Final Fantasy XV demo with which it will be packaged.
  23. Final Fantasy Type-0 HD, the high-definition remake of the highly acclaimed PSP exclusive original, will be making its way to the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One next year along with the demo for the first newly numbered Final Fantasy title in nearly four years. Currently slated for a March 17, 2015 release in North America, Final Fantasy Type-0 HD follows the adventures of a group of elite military cadets known as Class Zero as they become embroiled in a massive war. It is generally regarded as one of the best Final Fantasy titles in years, so it is great to see it being released on more platforms. However, for many Final Fantasy fans the remake of Type-0 is just an added bonus to the Final Fantasy XV demo with which it will be packaged. View full article
  24. A new trailer has been revealed for Capcom's Deep Down, shedding more light on the mysterious ending of last year's teaser. Is... is Deep Down a game about playing as a person who is playing a video game? Maybe I'm misinterpreting the trailer, but regardless Capcom has certainly grabbed my interest.
  25. A new trailer has been revealed for Capcom's Deep Down, shedding more light on the mysterious ending of last year's teaser. Is... is Deep Down a game about playing as a person who is playing a video game? Maybe I'm misinterpreting the trailer, but regardless Capcom has certainly grabbed my interest. View full article
×
×
  • Create New...