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Found 816 results

  1. The city of Nivalis stands at a tipping point, though to the outside observer it appears to be ticking along much the same as it always has. That is, until one fateful night Rania makes a deliver for Cloudpunk, a delivery company with a special disregard for the law. Nivalis changed forever over the course of that night. Ion Lands has announced a new kind of cyberpunk game: Cloudpunk. It's a story-driven game featuring a colorful cast of characters both organic and synthetic. Players will have the towering city of Nivalis to explore either on foot or by hover car as they make delivers that touch the lives of people from every part of society. Decisions players make can change the course of the story and have long-term impact on residents of the city. Those who explore carefully and pay attention to the stories around them will be rewarded with access to hidden locations and additional or expanded narrative opportunities. Your name is Rania. This is your first night working for Cloudpunk, the semi-legal delivery company based in the sprawling city of Nivalis. You go everywhere, from the Marrow below to the spires that pierce the grey clouds high above before scraping the edge of the troposphere. No delivery job is too dangerous, and no one is faster than a Cloudpunk driver. Ion Lands Cloudpunk has an open-ended release window of sometime in 2019. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  2. For a limited amount of time, PC gamers can download Destiny 2 for free. Beginning today, people logging onto battle.net will be able to snag Bungie and Activision's FPS with the click of a button. This offer continues until November 18. To avoid anyone trying to game the system for more than one copy, any new battle.net accounts created during this period will be required to enable Blizzard's SMS Protect feature before claiming the game If you've already picked up Destiny 2 on PC, you'll be given an exclusive in-game emblem that commemorates Destiny 2 being available for a full year on Battle.net. The emblem, however, won't be available until December. From November 9-11 players will be able to try out Destiny 2: Forsaken's new 4v4 Gambit mode without purchasing the expansion. “We know Destiny players that want to play on PC expect an amazing experience, whether it’s on their own or with their friends -- so, our paramount concern was to keep the discerning requirements of the PC community in mind, and welcoming the Battle.net and Bungie PC communities together,” said Steve Cotton, Bungie's game director for the Forsaken expansion. He added, “With this gift we look forward to seeing new Guardians in our universe.” You can redeem Destiny 2 as a gift by following this link. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  3. For a limited amount of time, PC gamers can download Destiny 2 for free. Beginning today, people logging onto battle.net will be able to snag Bungie and Activision's FPS with the click of a button. This offer continues until November 18. To avoid anyone trying to game the system for more than one copy, any new battle.net accounts created during this period will be required to enable Blizzard's SMS Protect feature before claiming the game If you've already picked up Destiny 2 on PC, you'll be given an exclusive in-game emblem that commemorates Destiny 2 being available for a full year on Battle.net. The emblem, however, won't be available until December. From November 9-11 players will be able to try out Destiny 2: Forsaken's new 4v4 Gambit mode without purchasing the expansion. “We know Destiny players that want to play on PC expect an amazing experience, whether it’s on their own or with their friends -- so, our paramount concern was to keep the discerning requirements of the PC community in mind, and welcoming the Battle.net and Bungie PC communities together,” said Steve Cotton, Bungie's game director for the Forsaken expansion. He added, “With this gift we look forward to seeing new Guardians in our universe.” You can redeem Destiny 2 as a gift by following this link. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  4. Not much is known about the remaster other than Blizzard has announced that it will be releasing next year. It's currently under the title Warcraft III Reforged. The game will be playable on the show floor at BlizzCon 2018. We'll update this if we learn more.
  5. Not much is known about the remaster other than Blizzard has announced that it will be releasing next year. It's currently under the title Warcraft III Reforged. The game will be playable on the show floor at BlizzCon 2018. We'll update this if we learn more. View full article
  6. RimWorld exists as one of those strange Steam Early Access titles that has been around for over five years but only officially released in the last couple of weeks. In an age where many Early Access games wind up in limbo forever or sitting abandoned, it's refreshing to see one emerge from development in a completed state. In a way, the condition of Early Access can be summarized neatly by RimWorld itself; full of failures, stagnation, and occasionally triumph. Ludeon Studios has put together a game that can best be described as a cross between Prison Architect and the capricious elements that would throw wrenches into the perfectly made plans of a city designer in Sim City. Players are given a number of starting scenarios on a vast variety of randomized worlds. From there, their job is simple: Survive. Players must build shelter for their stranded people, secure food, invest in decorations, provide for entertainment, and also build up defenses. Neglecting any of these risks destruction from raiders, crazed animals, or internal mental breaks. Players can win their game by escaping the planet via spaceship, but reaching the point of building or finding a ship can be a laborious process. The learning curve of RimWorld can be a bit steep when first starting out. Though a tutorial mode teaches the basics, nothing quite beats the experience of learning by doing. I went through several settlements while familiarizing myself with the nuts and bolts of the game before I managed to create a sustainable base. On one early attempt I thought I had discovered a successful blueprint for a long-term base, but in an instant it was swept away by a roaring sheet of flame from an errant lightning strike in the dead heat of summer. I could only watch as my colonists slowly succumbed to the heat from the flames they feebly attempted to control. In the end, only one colonist survived to attempt a new life in the ruins of the old base. He drifted toward death ever so slowly until a raiding party arrived and captured him, dragging him off screen to lord only knows what fate. RimWorld's emergent narrative design leads to these stories of death, but it also creates fantastic tales of perseverance. Sometimes a freak storm can light fires all over the map, potentially surrounding your base with uncontrolled flames. Other times, your most skilled colonist could find themselves dying instantly to a cave-in or a poorly constructed roof might fall on top of your best shot leaving them blind. Pressing on despite the setbacks leads to a great story, a personal story, about winning against the odds. Of course, it might not be a glorious tale of survival, but players have some degree of control over the pacing of the story when selecting the parameters of their game. Each game has a specific style of emergent storytelling depending on the AI director that players choose during colony creation. Players looking for a leisurely pace or even just a pure building game can certainly find that in RimWorld, while those seeking a story that keeps them on their toes can select the most capricious of AI narrative designers. Each colonist has a story that builds as you make progress farther into the game itself. It's a story that begins with their short bio page. These pages give some information about where the colonist came from and what sorts of personality quirks, both good and bad, they possess.The next part is, as they say, written in blood. Each colonist can take damage to various internal organs and limbs. Rough encounters can sometimes leave a colonist without a lung or missing one or more limbs. Proceeding farther along the tech tree opens possibilities for prosthetic legs or bionic eyes, allowing grievously wounded colonists a chance to regain or even surpass their previous ability. By the end of my winning run, only one out of my twenty colonists lacked scars, only a handful more weren't missing at least one limb, and my most capable shot was basically Robocop with all but one limb replaced with robotic parts and two synthetic eyes. Each day, colonists need to rest, eat, experience the outdoors, take in beautiful surroundings, and have fun. Without those things being in order, they will quickly fall into depressive funks and even experience mental breakdowns. These breakdowns can range from wandering sadly around the map to running around trying to set the base ablaze, or even attempting to murder a fellow colonist. If particularly hopeless, a colonist might just attempt to leave. Of course, players can capture them by placing them in jail alongside any captured raiders. Once confined, players can begin the recruitment process to bring a wayward colonist back into the fold. All of this comes together to form a really interesting package. Managing the temperature indoors and providing power for various spaces like freezers to keep a stockpile of food handy can be a stumbling block early on, but RimWorld has a nice escalation of problems as it progresses. Eventually food becomes less of a problem, but generating enough power to sustain devices like high-tech labs or fabrication benches becomes a huge hurdle - especially when you need to make those parts to replace limbs, build weapons of war, or create a spaceship from scratch. From start to finish, RimWorld was designed to have the player hooked with one additional goal to work toward, regardless of circumstance. Conclusion: It took me 124 hours of playing RimWorld to see the credits roll. I had a great time trying to figure out the most optimal builds for bases and clever defensive fortifications. It's not a particularly intense experience. In fact, I found it to be quite relaxing despite the insane amount of time I invested into it. That lends itself to this "one more turn" mentality, common in games like Civilization, taking hold. Hours seem to slip by as each objective slowly reaches completion. There are nitty-gritty details to nitpick about RimWorld, like how the AI sometimes doesn't seem to prioritize events or scenarios despite the finest of tuning on the colonists work priority lists. However, the only real request I had was more research options and a faster in-game speed. I played mostly on the fastest speed possible and making progress still felt slow. Overall, RimWorld is great if you are the kind of person who can sit and imagine interesting bases or are looking for a game that forces you to make your own stories by putting you through trials and tribulations. RimWorld is now available on PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  7. RimWorld exists as one of those strange Steam Early Access titles that has been around for over five years but only officially released in the last couple of weeks. In an age where many Early Access games wind up in limbo forever or sitting abandoned, it's refreshing to see one emerge from development in a completed state. In a way, the condition of Early Access can be summarized neatly by RimWorld itself; full of failures, stagnation, and occasionally triumph. Ludeon Studios has put together a game that can best be described as a cross between Prison Architect and the capricious elements that would throw wrenches into the perfectly made plans of a city designer in Sim City. Players are given a number of starting scenarios on a vast variety of randomized worlds. From there, their job is simple: Survive. Players must build shelter for their stranded people, secure food, invest in decorations, provide for entertainment, and also build up defenses. Neglecting any of these risks destruction from raiders, crazed animals, or internal mental breaks. Players can win their game by escaping the planet via spaceship, but reaching the point of building or finding a ship can be a laborious process. The learning curve of RimWorld can be a bit steep when first starting out. Though a tutorial mode teaches the basics, nothing quite beats the experience of learning by doing. I went through several settlements while familiarizing myself with the nuts and bolts of the game before I managed to create a sustainable base. On one early attempt I thought I had discovered a successful blueprint for a long-term base, but in an instant it was swept away by a roaring sheet of flame from an errant lightning strike in the dead heat of summer. I could only watch as my colonists slowly succumbed to the heat from the flames they feebly attempted to control. In the end, only one colonist survived to attempt a new life in the ruins of the old base. He drifted toward death ever so slowly until a raiding party arrived and captured him, dragging him off screen to lord only knows what fate. RimWorld's emergent narrative design leads to these stories of death, but it also creates fantastic tales of perseverance. Sometimes a freak storm can light fires all over the map, potentially surrounding your base with uncontrolled flames. Other times, your most skilled colonist could find themselves dying instantly to a cave-in or a poorly constructed roof might fall on top of your best shot leaving them blind. Pressing on despite the setbacks leads to a great story, a personal story, about winning against the odds. Of course, it might not be a glorious tale of survival, but players have some degree of control over the pacing of the story when selecting the parameters of their game. Each game has a specific style of emergent storytelling depending on the AI director that players choose during colony creation. Players looking for a leisurely pace or even just a pure building game can certainly find that in RimWorld, while those seeking a story that keeps them on their toes can select the most capricious of AI narrative designers. Each colonist has a story that builds as you make progress farther into the game itself. It's a story that begins with their short bio page. These pages give some information about where the colonist came from and what sorts of personality quirks, both good and bad, they possess.The next part is, as they say, written in blood. Each colonist can take damage to various internal organs and limbs. Rough encounters can sometimes leave a colonist without a lung or missing one or more limbs. Proceeding farther along the tech tree opens possibilities for prosthetic legs or bionic eyes, allowing grievously wounded colonists a chance to regain or even surpass their previous ability. By the end of my winning run, only one out of my twenty colonists lacked scars, only a handful more weren't missing at least one limb, and my most capable shot was basically Robocop with all but one limb replaced with robotic parts and two synthetic eyes. Each day, colonists need to rest, eat, experience the outdoors, take in beautiful surroundings, and have fun. Without those things being in order, they will quickly fall into depressive funks and even experience mental breakdowns. These breakdowns can range from wandering sadly around the map to running around trying to set the base ablaze, or even attempting to murder a fellow colonist. If particularly hopeless, a colonist might just attempt to leave. Of course, players can capture them by placing them in jail alongside any captured raiders. Once confined, players can begin the recruitment process to bring a wayward colonist back into the fold. All of this comes together to form a really interesting package. Managing the temperature indoors and providing power for various spaces like freezers to keep a stockpile of food handy can be a stumbling block early on, but RimWorld has a nice escalation of problems as it progresses. Eventually food becomes less of a problem, but generating enough power to sustain devices like high-tech labs or fabrication benches becomes a huge hurdle - especially when you need to make those parts to replace limbs, build weapons of war, or create a spaceship from scratch. From start to finish, RimWorld was designed to have the player hooked with one additional goal to work toward, regardless of circumstance. Conclusion: It took me 124 hours of playing RimWorld to see the credits roll. I had a great time trying to figure out the most optimal builds for bases and clever defensive fortifications. It's not a particularly intense experience. In fact, I found it to be quite relaxing despite the insane amount of time I invested into it. That lends itself to this "one more turn" mentality, common in games like Civilization, taking hold. Hours seem to slip by as each objective slowly reaches completion. There are nitty-gritty details to nitpick about RimWorld, like how the AI sometimes doesn't seem to prioritize events or scenarios despite the finest of tuning on the colonists work priority lists. However, the only real request I had was more research options and a faster in-game speed. I played mostly on the fastest speed possible and making progress still felt slow. Overall, RimWorld is great if you are the kind of person who can sit and imagine interesting bases or are looking for a game that forces you to make your own stories by putting you through trials and tribulations. RimWorld is now available on PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  8. "A foot in the middle, a foot in the middle, a foot in the middle a foot in the middle a foot in the middleafootinthemiddleafootinthemiddleafootinthemiddleafoo-" Can you hear it? The call of Cthulhu scratching at your mind's door? Cyanide Studio's adaptation of Chaosium's tabletop RPG releases next week and the launch trailer shows some of the harrowing sights and sounds players can expect to encounter on the island of Darkwater. Following unexplained and uninvestigated happenings on the New England island that culminated in the death of Sarah Hawkins, P.I. Edward Pierce begins to dig for the truth. Pierce, a tortured alcoholic with PTSD, quickly finds himself wrapped up in a horrific plot and a world rapidly unraveling. The waking world begins to invert itself and reality itself starts to blend with dreams of horror. With distrustful locals and an eldritch entity rumbling from its slumber, players will have to do everything they can to maintain their sanity. Call of Cthulhu releases on October 30 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  9. "A foot in the middle, a foot in the middle, a foot in the middle a foot in the middle a foot in the middleafootinthemiddleafootinthemiddleafootinthemiddleafoo-" Can you hear it? The call of Cthulhu scratching at your mind's door? Cyanide Studio's adaptation of Chaosium's tabletop RPG releases next week and the launch trailer shows some of the harrowing sights and sounds players can expect to encounter on the island of Darkwater. Following unexplained and uninvestigated happenings on the New England island that culminated in the death of Sarah Hawkins, P.I. Edward Pierce begins to dig for the truth. Pierce, a tortured alcoholic with PTSD, quickly finds himself wrapped up in a horrific plot and a world rapidly unraveling. The waking world begins to invert itself and reality itself starts to blend with dreams of horror. With distrustful locals and an eldritch entity rumbling from its slumber, players will have to do everything they can to maintain their sanity. Call of Cthulhu releases on October 30 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  10. In late 2017, Davey Wreden, the creator of the comedy adventure game The Stanley Parable, released a game he developed with Ryan Roth, who worked on the music for games like Guacamelee 2, The Beginner's Guide, and Starseed Pilgrim. The result of their labors takes the form of Absolutely: A True Crime Story, a game about Keanu Reeves clearing his good name after being accused of murder. Of course, as one might expect from the person who helped bring the snark of the narrator to life in The Stanley Parable, Absolutely exists as a work of comedy. It has its crude moments, a few curse words and coarse content in the name of humor, but it makes for a great 5-10 minutes of your time that will brighten your day. After you begin the game, it becomes clear that the main hook of the game isn't actually exonerating Keanu Reeves. in fact, being Keanu Reeves is a joke largely because it presents a complete non sequitur. There's no meaning to being Keanu aside from the gentle tickling in ones brain at the idea of Keanu Reeves doing bad things. instead, players walk the streets of NoCrimesVille and convince kids to break the law. This escalates to Reeves going on a killing spree that culminates in either him evading the law or being sentenced to death for his crimes. Absolutely was made in RPG Maker and makes use of what appear to be pre-built assets and a few pictures of Keanu Reeves. Players primarily wander small environments and interact with people in a hilariously simple RPG battle system that funnels you toward the conclusion of this totally true crime story. If you're interested in playing Absolutely: A True Crime Story, you can find it for free on Ryan Roth's itch.io page. It's not a deep game and it has a sense of humor deeply rooted in nihilism; as a distraction and a deconstruction of the traditional RPG, it works really well. Check it out if you want to experience something out of left field. Note: Keanu Reeves is actually really nice and not a criminal in real life. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  11. In late 2017, Davey Wreden, the creator of the comedy adventure game The Stanley Parable, released a game he developed with Ryan Roth, who worked on the music for games like Guacamelee 2, The Beginner's Guide, and Starseed Pilgrim. The result of their labors takes the form of Absolutely: A True Crime Story, a game about Keanu Reeves clearing his good name after being accused of murder. Of course, as one might expect from the person who helped bring the snark of the narrator to life in The Stanley Parable, Absolutely exists as a work of comedy. It has its crude moments, a few curse words and coarse content in the name of humor, but it makes for a great 5-10 minutes of your time that will brighten your day. After you begin the game, it becomes clear that the main hook of the game isn't actually exonerating Keanu Reeves. in fact, being Keanu Reeves is a joke largely because it presents a complete non sequitur. There's no meaning to being Keanu aside from the gentle tickling in ones brain at the idea of Keanu Reeves doing bad things. instead, players walk the streets of NoCrimesVille and convince kids to break the law. This escalates to Reeves going on a killing spree that culminates in either him evading the law or being sentenced to death for his crimes. Absolutely was made in RPG Maker and makes use of what appear to be pre-built assets and a few pictures of Keanu Reeves. Players primarily wander small environments and interact with people in a hilariously simple RPG battle system that funnels you toward the conclusion of this totally true crime story. If you're interested in playing Absolutely: A True Crime Story, you can find it for free on Ryan Roth's itch.io page. It's not a deep game and it has a sense of humor deeply rooted in nihilism; as a distraction and a deconstruction of the traditional RPG, it works really well. Check it out if you want to experience something out of left field. Note: Keanu Reeves is actually really nice and not a criminal in real life. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  12. Dream Daddy, a dating sim about a cul-de-sac inhabited by a bevy of dads who may or may not be looking for romance, released last year for PCs. Computer gamers the world over rejoiced in the quality dating sim adventures of a dorky dad being a nerd with his daughter and finding love in the most unlikely places. It was quite good! Now, the PlayStation 4 is poised to receive a port of the best dad dating experience out there when Dream Daddy: Dadrector's Cut releases next week on October 30. The updated title restores content cut from the initial release of Dream Daddy, along with new sidequests, and a new mini game. Players will even be able to play through the various mini games on their own without trucking through the full dating sim itself. Basically, there will be more doggone derpy dad moments and that's always a good thing. The Dadrector's Cut will also be available as a free expansion to players who already own the game for PC, giving everyone an opportunity to hop into the pastel worlds of dads and daughters one more time. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  13. Dream Daddy, a dating sim about a cul-de-sac inhabited by a bevy of dads who may or may not be looking for romance, released last year for PCs. Computer gamers the world over rejoiced in the quality dating sim adventures of a dorky dad being a nerd with his daughter and finding love in the most unlikely places. It was quite good! Now, the PlayStation 4 is poised to receive a port of the best dad dating experience out there when Dream Daddy: Dadrector's Cut releases next week on October 30. The updated title restores content cut from the initial release of Dream Daddy, along with new sidequests, and a new mini game. Players will even be able to play through the various mini games on their own without trucking through the full dating sim itself. Basically, there will be more doggone derpy dad moments and that's always a good thing. The Dadrector's Cut will also be available as a free expansion to players who already own the game for PC, giving everyone an opportunity to hop into the pastel worlds of dads and daughters one more time. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  14. If you're looking for something you might have missed in the horror game genre, one of the more obscure coming out for this Halloween takes the form of The Witch's House MV, a remake of an RPG Maker game originally released in 2012. The Witch's House follows in the footsteps of Japanese RPG horror RPGs that were more common back in the 16-bit days before Resident Evil reshaped the genre forever. Expect tons of creepy puzzles, unnerving dialogue, and a more freakish tone than one might expect from an retro indie pixel affair. The Witch's House tells the story of a young girl who awakens in the middle of a forest with no memories and finds herself drawn toward the titular house. Inside, she finds many insidious and deadly traps, strange denizens, and an engaging mystery that pulls players inexorably into the inky heart of the witch's abode. Developer Frummy, who returned with a small team to remake the original work, explained the effort that went into the remake, "I’m happy to announce that we’re finally ready to release the game. The Witch’s House MV is an RPG Maker MV remake of the original game, which was released back in 2012. We remade all the graphics, including map tiles and character sprites, and worked hard to enhance the atmosphere and 2D beauty in The Witch’s House. It took us five times as many hours to create this version, but we feel like we’ve finally managed to satisfy ourselves." Those looking for more from the remake need not fear (or maybe they need fear extra?) - there's a new difficulty mode that promises to challenge even the most hardy of horror fanatics. Unlocked by reaching The Witch's House's true ending, players can go through the game again with challenges that all but assure a grueling and gruesome slog full of unexpected death and decay. Frummy also hinted that the new difficulty mode might unlock some new elements of the story for those who brave its challenges. The Witch's House MV releases October 31 for PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  15. If you're looking for something you might have missed in the horror game genre, one of the more obscure coming out for this Halloween takes the form of The Witch's House MV, a remake of an RPG Maker game originally released in 2012. The Witch's House follows in the footsteps of Japanese RPG horror RPGs that were more common back in the 16-bit days before Resident Evil reshaped the genre forever. Expect tons of creepy puzzles, unnerving dialogue, and a more freakish tone than one might expect from an retro indie pixel affair. The Witch's House tells the story of a young girl who awakens in the middle of a forest with no memories and finds herself drawn toward the titular house. Inside, she finds many insidious and deadly traps, strange denizens, and an engaging mystery that pulls players inexorably into the inky heart of the witch's abode. Developer Frummy, who returned with a small team to remake the original work, explained the effort that went into the remake, "I’m happy to announce that we’re finally ready to release the game. The Witch’s House MV is an RPG Maker MV remake of the original game, which was released back in 2012. We remade all the graphics, including map tiles and character sprites, and worked hard to enhance the atmosphere and 2D beauty in The Witch’s House. It took us five times as many hours to create this version, but we feel like we’ve finally managed to satisfy ourselves." Those looking for more from the remake need not fear (or maybe they need fear extra?) - there's a new difficulty mode that promises to challenge even the most hardy of horror fanatics. Unlocked by reaching The Witch's House's true ending, players can go through the game again with challenges that all but assure a grueling and gruesome slog full of unexpected death and decay. Frummy also hinted that the new difficulty mode might unlock some new elements of the story for those who brave its challenges. The Witch's House MV releases October 31 for PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  16. Lucas Pope, the dev behind the highly acclaimed indie title Papers, Please, brings us Return of the Obra Dinn. Enter a high seas murder mystery set in the 1807 when everything was black and white and made of pixels. As an insurance inspector armed with a mystical assessment tool, players are dispatched to investigate the Obra Dinn, a ship believed to have been lost at sea for five years. What has the ship been doing in its years at sea? What happened to the ship's company? Why has the vessel just sailed back into the port at Falmouth, seemingly under its own power without any crew? To answer all of these questions and solve the mysteries of the Obra Dinn, players have a watch-like device that has the ability to replay the scenarios surrounding an individual's death. Players will have to make clever use of the device's abilities to access new areas of the ship and, as befits an insurance investigator, identify the remains of each member of the crew, how they died, and who, if anyone, killed them. Almost four years ago, I gave my thoughts on a preview build of Return of the Obra Dinn. It wasn't a long build, but it left a lasting impression. The haunting visuals and beckoning mystery don't leave you easily. And now, Return of the Obra Dinn has silently sailed into the harbor of digital PC storefronts - check it out if you're looking for a gameplay experience like you've never had before. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  17. Lucas Pope, the dev behind the highly acclaimed indie title Papers, Please, brings us Return of the Obra Dinn. Enter a high seas murder mystery set in the 1807 when everything was black and white and made of pixels. As an insurance inspector armed with a mystical assessment tool, players are dispatched to investigate the Obra Dinn, a ship believed to have been lost at sea for five years. What has the ship been doing in its years at sea? What happened to the ship's company? Why has the vessel just sailed back into the port at Falmouth, seemingly under its own power without any crew? To answer all of these questions and solve the mysteries of the Obra Dinn, players have a watch-like device that has the ability to replay the scenarios surrounding an individual's death. Players will have to make clever use of the device's abilities to access new areas of the ship and, as befits an insurance investigator, identify the remains of each member of the crew, how they died, and who, if anyone, killed them. Almost four years ago, I gave my thoughts on a preview build of Return of the Obra Dinn. It wasn't a long build, but it left a lasting impression. The haunting visuals and beckoning mystery don't leave you easily. And now, Return of the Obra Dinn has silently sailed into the harbor of digital PC storefronts - check it out if you're looking for a gameplay experience like you've never had before. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  18. A PC adaptation of a Wii on-rails shooter that shifted the shooting mechanic into a typing mechanic in homage to a surreal 90s Dreamcast title doesn't sound like something that would turn out well. However, Typing of the Dead: Overkill inexplicably works. The quirky game asks players to improve their typing skills while also playing through a grindhouse schlock-fest of gore and f-bombs. Despite the educational nature of its mechanics, kids should definitely not play Typing of the Dead: Overkill. We can't stress that enough. But adults? You make your own choices and decide whether this C-tier romp through zombies and low-budget film cliches might just secretly be one of the best games of all-time. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Undertale 'Gaster's Legacy' by DS (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03761) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  19. A PC adaptation of a Wii on-rails shooter that shifted the shooting mechanic into a typing mechanic in homage to a surreal 90s Dreamcast title doesn't sound like something that would turn out well. However, Typing of the Dead: Overkill inexplicably works. The quirky game asks players to improve their typing skills while also playing through a grindhouse schlock-fest of gore and f-bombs. Despite the educational nature of its mechanics, kids should definitely not play Typing of the Dead: Overkill. We can't stress that enough. But adults? You make your own choices and decide whether this C-tier romp through zombies and low-budget film cliches might just secretly be one of the best games of all-time. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Undertale 'Gaster's Legacy' by DS (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03761) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  20. Frictional Games, the developers behind Penumbra and Soma, have released a free update for their most famous title to date. Amnesia: The Dark Descent revolutionized horror with its physics-based gameplay and use of tension to make it feel like an ominous presence constantly pursues the player as they progress through a haunted castle. It was so successful that the classic first-person horror game changed the way games handled horror for years. The update adds a hard mode to the game for veterans looking for a new experience while replaying their dark descent. The hard mode disables autosaves, but don't worry! Players can still save - in exchange for four tinderboxes, the items that allow players to light the very important torches that illuminate the environment and restore sanity. In hard mode, dropping to zero sanity will kill the player. There will also be fewer tinderboxes and oil refills. Monsters will be faster, more alert, stronger, and more persistent when it comes time for them to hunt. And those hunts? They'll be more dangerous than ever with the removal of music cues announcing their presence.... If you're planning on conquering that hard mode, good luck. Since its initial announcement last week for traditional PCs and Xbox One, the update has been slowly extended across other platforms like Mac and Linux. Currently, Frictional has partnered with Blit Works to bring the mode to PlayStation 4 in the near future. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  21. Frictional Games, the developers behind Penumbra and Soma, have released a free update for their most famous title to date. Amnesia: The Dark Descent revolutionized horror with its physics-based gameplay and use of tension to make it feel like an ominous presence constantly pursues the player as they progress through a haunted castle. It was so successful that the classic first-person horror game changed the way games handled horror for years. The update adds a hard mode to the game for veterans looking for a new experience while replaying their dark descent. The hard mode disables autosaves, but don't worry! Players can still save - in exchange for four tinderboxes, the items that allow players to light the very important torches that illuminate the environment and restore sanity. In hard mode, dropping to zero sanity will kill the player. There will also be fewer tinderboxes and oil refills. Monsters will be faster, more alert, stronger, and more persistent when it comes time for them to hunt. And those hunts? They'll be more dangerous than ever with the removal of music cues announcing their presence.... If you're planning on conquering that hard mode, good luck. Since its initial announcement last week for traditional PCs and Xbox One, the update has been slowly extended across other platforms like Mac and Linux. Currently, Frictional has partnered with Blit Works to bring the mode to PlayStation 4 in the near future. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  22. For those of you with long memories, Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San last graced this site back in 2016 as an interesting indie game dev project struggling to be finished. Almost two years later, developer Christophe Galati (ChrisDeneos on Twitter) has entered the final stretch of game development and shared the expected release date for Save Me Mr. Tako: October 30. With the help of the Nicalis gaming company, the game will also be released that day on Nintendo Switch. Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San stars the titular Mr. Tako, a mild-mannered octopus who gets wrapped up in the bitter war between octopi and humans. However, when push comes to shove, the brave ocean creature saves a drowning human. A fairy witnesses the act of heroism and grants him the ability to survive on land. With this newfound power, Mr. Tako takes it upon himself to scour the world for a way for both sides to put aside their grievances and live in peace. Designed as a loving tribute to the glory days of the Nintendo Game Boy, Save Me Mr. Tako transports players into a 2D world constructed out of four colors and big ambition. It consists of six different worlds that hide sixteen dungeons for Mr. Tako to explore and conquer on his quest for harmony. Expect to find plenty of side quests and puzzles sprinkled throughout the game, too. Players will also be able to swap game filters for different visual flair and colors as they progress. In addition to being able to survive on land, Mr. Tako can wear up different hats to take on different powers like the ability to shoot arrows. There are fifty such outfits throughout the game, each with an adorable costume change in store for Mr. Tako. Those are on top of Mr. Tako's ability to turn enemies into platforms with his ranged ink attacks. Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San releases on October 30 for Nintendo Switch and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  23. For those of you with long memories, Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San last graced this site back in 2016 as an interesting indie game dev project struggling to be finished. Almost two years later, developer Christophe Galati (ChrisDeneos on Twitter) has entered the final stretch of game development and shared the expected release date for Save Me Mr. Tako: October 30. With the help of the Nicalis gaming company, the game will also be released that day on Nintendo Switch. Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San stars the titular Mr. Tako, a mild-mannered octopus who gets wrapped up in the bitter war between octopi and humans. However, when push comes to shove, the brave ocean creature saves a drowning human. A fairy witnesses the act of heroism and grants him the ability to survive on land. With this newfound power, Mr. Tako takes it upon himself to scour the world for a way for both sides to put aside their grievances and live in peace. Designed as a loving tribute to the glory days of the Nintendo Game Boy, Save Me Mr. Tako transports players into a 2D world constructed out of four colors and big ambition. It consists of six different worlds that hide sixteen dungeons for Mr. Tako to explore and conquer on his quest for harmony. Expect to find plenty of side quests and puzzles sprinkled throughout the game, too. Players will also be able to swap game filters for different visual flair and colors as they progress. In addition to being able to survive on land, Mr. Tako can wear up different hats to take on different powers like the ability to shoot arrows. There are fifty such outfits throughout the game, each with an adorable costume change in store for Mr. Tako. Those are on top of Mr. Tako's ability to turn enemies into platforms with his ranged ink attacks. Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San releases on October 30 for Nintendo Switch and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  24. If you go into Life Is Strange 2 thinking it will be a similar journey to its predecessor you are going to be in for a shock. Life Is Strange 2 retains the same humanizing sensibilities and just slightly surreal world-building that made the town of Arcadia Bay come to life, but what it does with those strengths in the first episode looks very different. This change up will leave some people reeling and others deeply invested in where this story will be going as more episodes hit digital storefronts around the world. Roads plays very much like the previous Life Is Strange episodes before it. Players can walk around gorgeous environments that manage to find the beauty often hidden within the mundane and interact with objects or people, complete with a running internal monologue. When interacting with some items or character, players will have the opportunity to make choices that could affect what happens later on in ways ranging from whether a small token appears on a backpack to whether an entire town exists or not. That framework still functions as well as it ever did, though I particularly enjoyed its incarnation in Roads. Early in the episode, players have the opportunity to gather a collection of supplies, including money. That money is then used later on to buy food and other essentials from a gas station. Based on how much money you were able to scrounge in the beginning, players will face different pressures and choices about what to buy and what decisions seem to make the most sense. The way the team at Dontnod designed the scene leaves a lot of room for players to fill in the blanks for themselves and presents a great moral dilemma, the bread and butter of any narrative-heavy adventure game, in an original way. I will also say off the bat that The Awesome Adventures of Captain Spirit does not have a ton of overlap with the first episode of Life Is Strange 2, though it did tease some of its inciting incident. From what Dontnod has revealed so far, we can probably expect more Captain Spirit-related events in future episodes. Whereas the original Life Is Strange focused on the struggles of a young white girl in the early 2000s and her life in an aging coastal town on the decline, the sequel takes a look at the life of a young Hispanic boy named Sean Diaz living in the Seattle, Washington of 2016. At first, things seem like they will follow the same sleepy, nostalgic setup seen in Life Is Strange. It's near Halloween and the kids at the local high school are throwing a party, complete with all the pressures and concerns that go with that scene. However, a small disagreement with a neighbor kid escalates when punches are thrown and a police officer arrives, drawing his gun. When Sean's dad comes running out to see what's going on, the officer panics and shoots, killing Sean's father in front of both Sean and his 9-year-old brother Daniel. The trauma of the event causes Daniel to lash out with some unexplained power, sending a massive shockwave through the area that destroys parts of the surrounding homes, flips cars, and kills the officer and possibly the neighbor. Upon regaining consciousness, Sean takes in the situation and realizes that there's no explaining any of this away; running becomes the only thing that makes sense. So it is that Life Is Strange 2 becomes about hitting the road in the modern United States. As they travel, they encounter a small slice of people from across the socio-political spectrum. The first game painted a clear picture of Arcadia Bay, Oregon, but Life Is Strange 2, at least from the first episode, holds the larger ambition of reflecting the entire country. And that reflection doesn't pull punches. Perhaps most unexpectedly, the fluff of nostalgia that permeated the first Life Is Strange (and perhaps made some of its more disturbing moments palatable) has been replaced by a more immediate and applicable sense of time and place that, frankly, we aren't used to seeing in video games. It's surreal to hear characters throw slurs mixed with rhetoric about building a wall between the United States and Mexico or demonstrate a nonchalant attitude toward marijuana that reflects its legalization in Washington state. The veracity of these attitudes hits home as I have seen people act the same way in the real world. Especially when it comes to the uglier topics Roads touches on, the experience does not feel comfortable, but that's precisely the point. In some ways, it feels as though Life Is Strange 2 Episode 1 is having a conversation with the player. The developers must have been aware that some people would fall into the category that firmly believes games should be meaningless fun and wanted to subtly make the case that maybe some games should have more substance than just fun. Roads hits several extremely polarizing issues right off the bat, from police violence to racial prejudice, in such a way that it might shock people who aren't used to games that have pointed things to say about those subjects. Then, near the end of the episode, a character comments that, "Everything is political," both to the characters in their scene and also as if to directly address the player. And what are we supposed to do with that information? One of the closing conversations of the episode asks just that question. And the answer seems to be to continue pushing forward, whether that's for truth or for some kind of safe haven. Because that's all anyone can ever do. Conclusion: Life Is Strange 2's first episode blew me away. It manages to both be a heartfelt examination of the relationship between two brothers while unflinchingly engaging with incredibly weighty and difficult topics. It also doesn't leave the player with any easy answers or ways to address those issues in the real world. I suppose those might be coming in future episodes, but if I had to guess from how Roads played out we won't be presented with feel-good solutions. The story of the Diaz family left me constantly wondering what would happen next. While the episode ends with a somewhat concrete plan, I wouldn't be shocked if it veers off in completely unexpected directions. This episode manages to be equal parts gorgeous, funny, and searing all at the same time; gripping in such a way that you'll finish it in one sitting. It's going to be a long wait for Episode 2. Life Is Strange 2 Episode 1: Roads was reviewed on PC and is currently available for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  25. If you go into Life Is Strange 2 thinking it will be a similar journey to its predecessor you are going to be in for a shock. Life Is Strange 2 retains the same humanizing sensibilities and just slightly surreal world-building that made the town of Arcadia Bay come to life, but what it does with those strengths in the first episode looks very different. This change up will leave some people reeling and others deeply invested in where this story will be going as more episodes hit digital storefronts around the world. Roads plays very much like the previous Life Is Strange episodes before it. Players can walk around gorgeous environments that manage to find the beauty often hidden within the mundane and interact with objects or people, complete with a running internal monologue. When interacting with some items or character, players will have the opportunity to make choices that could affect what happens later on in ways ranging from whether a small token appears on a backpack to whether an entire town exists or not. That framework still functions as well as it ever did, though I particularly enjoyed its incarnation in Roads. Early in the episode, players have the opportunity to gather a collection of supplies, including money. That money is then used later on to buy food and other essentials from a gas station. Based on how much money you were able to scrounge in the beginning, players will face different pressures and choices about what to buy and what decisions seem to make the most sense. The way the team at Dontnod designed the scene leaves a lot of room for players to fill in the blanks for themselves and presents a great moral dilemma, the bread and butter of any narrative-heavy adventure game, in an original way. I will also say off the bat that The Awesome Adventures of Captain Spirit does not have a ton of overlap with the first episode of Life Is Strange 2, though it did tease some of its inciting incident. From what Dontnod has revealed so far, we can probably expect more Captain Spirit-related events in future episodes. Whereas the original Life Is Strange focused on the struggles of a young white girl in the early 2000s and her life in an aging coastal town on the decline, the sequel takes a look at the life of a young Hispanic boy named Sean Diaz living in the Seattle, Washington of 2016. At first, things seem like they will follow the same sleepy, nostalgic setup seen in Life Is Strange. It's near Halloween and the kids at the local high school are throwing a party, complete with all the pressures and concerns that go with that scene. However, a small disagreement with a neighbor kid escalates when punches are thrown and a police officer arrives, drawing his gun. When Sean's dad comes running out to see what's going on, the officer panics and shoots, killing Sean's father in front of both Sean and his 9-year-old brother Daniel. The trauma of the event causes Daniel to lash out with some unexplained power, sending a massive shockwave through the area that destroys parts of the surrounding homes, flips cars, and kills the officer and possibly the neighbor. Upon regaining consciousness, Sean takes in the situation and realizes that there's no explaining any of this away; running becomes the only thing that makes sense. So it is that Life Is Strange 2 becomes about hitting the road in the modern United States. As they travel, they encounter a small slice of people from across the socio-political spectrum. The first game painted a clear picture of Arcadia Bay, Oregon, but Life Is Strange 2, at least from the first episode, holds the larger ambition of reflecting the entire country. And that reflection doesn't pull punches. Perhaps most unexpectedly, the fluff of nostalgia that permeated the first Life Is Strange (and perhaps made some of its more disturbing moments palatable) has been replaced by a more immediate and applicable sense of time and place that, frankly, we aren't used to seeing in video games. It's surreal to hear characters throw slurs mixed with rhetoric about building a wall between the United States and Mexico or demonstrate a nonchalant attitude toward marijuana that reflects its legalization in Washington state. The veracity of these attitudes hits home as I have seen people act the same way in the real world. Especially when it comes to the uglier topics Roads touches on, the experience does not feel comfortable, but that's precisely the point. In some ways, it feels as though Life Is Strange 2 Episode 1 is having a conversation with the player. The developers must have been aware that some people would fall into the category that firmly believes games should be meaningless fun and wanted to subtly make the case that maybe some games should have more substance than just fun. Roads hits several extremely polarizing issues right off the bat, from police violence to racial prejudice, in such a way that it might shock people who aren't used to games that have pointed things to say about those subjects. Then, near the end of the episode, a character comments that, "Everything is political," both to the characters in their scene and also as if to directly address the player. And what are we supposed to do with that information? One of the closing conversations of the episode asks just that question. And the answer seems to be to continue pushing forward, whether that's for truth or for some kind of safe haven. Because that's all anyone can ever do. Conclusion: Life Is Strange 2's first episode blew me away. It manages to both be a heartfelt examination of the relationship between two brothers while unflinchingly engaging with incredibly weighty and difficult topics. It also doesn't leave the player with any easy answers or ways to address those issues in the real world. I suppose those might be coming in future episodes, but if I had to guess from how Roads played out we won't be presented with feel-good solutions. The story of the Diaz family left me constantly wondering what would happen next. While the episode ends with a somewhat concrete plan, I wouldn't be shocked if it veers off in completely unexpected directions. This episode manages to be equal parts gorgeous, funny, and searing all at the same time; gripping in such a way that you'll finish it in one sitting. It's going to be a long wait for Episode 2. Life Is Strange 2 Episode 1: Roads was reviewed on PC and is currently available for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
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