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Found 826 results

  1. I've been spending a fair bit of time fighting on the massive, free-for-all battlefield of PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds. The Steam early access game has taken the indie world by storm since its release, garnering a playerbase of over 4 million in the handful of months since its March 2017 release onto early access. For those who haven't yet set foot into the battlegrounds, the concept is deceptively simple: Roughly 100 players are dropped from a cargo plane onto a sprawling island with cities, towns, and various types of terrain and then battle to be the last one standing. The game can be tackled solo, co-op, or in a three to four person squad. Players drop onto the island without any items or equipment aside from the clothing (or in some cases underwear) on their backs and must frantically scavenge for supplies while keeping an eye out for fellow scavengers. The island is, as mentioned before, massive. Even with 100 players, players find themselves facing long periods of silence, the occasional gunshot ringing out in the distance. In order to bring players together, the map will periodically flood everything outside of a white ring with blue energy, slowly killing everyone who doesn't make it to the safe zone. This white ring continues to collapse as the game progresses, forcing everyone into smaller and smaller spaces until the last player, or the last team, is standing. And winners? They get to feast upon delicious, delicious chicken. The message "WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER!" appears on screen to congratulate players on their victory - before booting everyone out of the match. I won my first chicken dinner alongside some trusty teammates just a few days ago. As the feeling of accomplishment swelled within me, I became curious about the lore of Battlegrounds. Why were all these people parachuting onto an island to battle to the death, day after day? How are the same player-created characters able to die, rise, and then die again? What is really going on? The various materials available online about PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds seem to have precisely nothing to do with the surrounding context of the events happening within the game. This lack of clarification could be explained with the old "it's just a game, don't think about it, too much" answer, but where's the fun in that? While pondering over the dreamlike quality of Battlegrounds' setting and internal game logic, I think I hit upon an explanation for the entire game: Valhalla. In Norse mythology, Valhalla was the golden hall where Odin and his Valkyries brought chosen warriors for their afterlife. Once there, those warriors would fight all day and then retire at night to drink, eat, and heal their wounds. They fought each day to hone their abilities and combat prowess to prepare for the coming end of the world when they would march forth from their otherworldly training ground to fight in the final battle alongside Odin. Why do I think that PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds is Valhalla? Let's look at the facts. Fact: There are no 100% night conditions in PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds. Fighting in the moonlight is not something that happens in Battlegrounds. Sure, there are maps with varied lighting conditions and even a rare version of the map that is played at sunset, but no outright nighttime versions of the island are playable. Why is this important? Because the night is when those who have gone to Valhalla feast and heal from the day's fighting! And who gets the finest portion of the feast? The day's winner in combat, of course! They eat to the tune of, "WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER!" Fact: The vast majority of player-characters rise from their mortal wounds to fight again. Now, true, this happens in a lot of multiplayer games. However, it is an important data point that each player character is the same character. This seems to fit with the first fact - we're not faceless killers, but people with names, styles, and personalities. Fact: The last authoritative text describing Valhalla was written in the 1200s. The authoritative sources on exactly what Valhalla is like come from ancient Norse poems and histories. The most useful of those sources comes in the form of Icelandic historian Snorri Sturluson who lived from 1179-1241. Valhalla was described as a golden hall thatched with the shields of heroes, spear shafts holding them aloft, and benches adorned with chainmail. You might notice that this bears no resemblance to anything seen in Battlegrounds. However, Valhalla being a heavenly realm - who is to say that over 800 years of advancement might not make the Valhalla of 1200 much different than the Valhalla of 2017? It seems to me warriors of today would keep pace with modern technology, so it stands to reason that they'd be magically transported to a cargo plane to drop onto a Soviet-esque island to do battle for the day before being whisked away for feasting and healing in the golden hall. Fact: Friendships and rivalries extended into the Valhallan afterlife. There are stories in the Norse Eddas of great heroes making their way to Valhalla only to encounter old allies and possibly forgotten enemies. In PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds, I've gone into battle alongside numerous friends, but also encountered rivals who had killed me in the past. These smaller stories, the stories of minute to minute gameplay would constitute the conversation, laughter, and jokes told at night within Odin's hall. Many outlets have written about how Battlegrounds is a veritable factory of emergent stories friends share together. Fact: No one knows exactly why they are fighting on the island, they just know that they must fight or die. if you ask several people why people are fighting in PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds and you'll likely get several different answers. The only thing everything can agree on is that they are magically transported onto a small island, then into a cargo plane, and then trapped on a larger island until a magical blue energy field starts closing in - and if they don't survive to be the last person/group alive, they'll succumb to either the deadly blue energy or to the bullets of enemies. From all the hard, irrefutable evidence present in the game and the lack of information from the developers, PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds is definitely the mythological Norse hall of the slain, Valhalla. I rest my case. Do you have a theory that explains what's going on in PUBG? Share it in the comments and maybe we can all come up with an even better theory!
  2. Oblivion released in 2006 bringing a massive open-world geared toward a mainstream audience to PC and console gamers alike. Players were able to explore Cyrodiil, a fantasy land full of kings and gods while experiencing a myriad of stories ranging from becoming the greatest thief in the land to stopping a full-blown demonic invasion. Does Oblivion stand on its own as one of the best games period or is it overshadowed by the likes of Morrowind and Skyrim? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion 'Beyond the Imperial Prison' by HyperDuck SoundWorks (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03522) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  3. Oblivion released in 2006 bringing a massive open-world geared toward a mainstream audience to PC and console gamers alike. Players were able to explore Cyrodiil, a fantasy land full of kings and gods while experiencing a myriad of stories ranging from becoming the greatest thief in the land to stopping a full-blown demonic invasion. Does Oblivion stand on its own as one of the best games period or is it overshadowed by the likes of Morrowind and Skyrim? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion 'Beyond the Imperial Prison' by HyperDuck SoundWorks (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03522) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  4. Multiplayer shooter fans curious about Lawbreakers have a chance to give the physics-defying shooter a whirl before it releases later this summer. An open beta went live today on Steam and will run until July 5. The beta features a new map, the mountainous Vertigo, as well as a new mode called Uplink. Teams are tasked with capturing an uplink from the center of the map and delivering it to their base where it must be protected it to earn points. Players can also test out customizable weapon stickers, including a special sticker earned by finishing five matches. This sticker will transfer into the full release. You can hop in on the open beta by visiting the Lawbreakers site. Lawbreakers releases August 8 for $29.99 on PC and PS4. For more on the title, check out its trailer from the PC Gaming Show View full article
  5. Multiplayer shooter fans curious about Lawbreakers have a chance to give the physics-defying shooter a whirl before it releases later this summer. An open beta went live today on Steam and will run until July 5. The beta features a new map, the mountainous Vertigo, as well as a new mode called Uplink. Teams are tasked with capturing an uplink from the center of the map and delivering it to their base where it must be protected it to earn points. Players can also test out customizable weapon stickers, including a special sticker earned by finishing five matches. This sticker will transfer into the full release. You can hop in on the open beta by visiting the Lawbreakers site. Lawbreakers releases August 8 for $29.99 on PC and PS4. For more on the title, check out its trailer from the PC Gaming Show
  6. Outreach takes the narrative-focused space exploration of titles like Adr1ft and injects a hefty does of historical accuracy and an unshakable eeriness. Pixel Spill’s four-man team has been cranking away at the project for about two years, and during E3 last week I got to play the game's unnerving first 20 minutes. “I love sci-fi. I watch Star Trek on my lunch breaks,” James Booth, producer and writer, said. “But something I wanted to do differently with Outreach, I wanted it to be steeped in the history of space travel rather than being alternate history or future.” Outreach draws inspiration from the space race between the then-Soviet Union and the United States and how the Soviets beat the Americans by sending the first human, Yuri Gagarin, into space. Chiefly, Outreach explores the “lost cosmonaut” conspiracy theory that alleges that prior to Gagarin, the Soviets secretly launched cosmonauts into space. However, all of them perished and the government covered up the mission. Additionally, espionage films such as The Hunt for Red October provided further influence. Set in 1986, players control a lone Soviet cosmonaut (voiced by The Wolf Among Us’ Adam Harrington) sent in orbit to investigate a space station and determine the fate of its crew. Booth says that while Outreach plays off events from the 1960's, the game takes place a few decades later to allow for the existence of a full space station. Pixel Spill values historical accuracy above all else. Archival footage and historical designs were referenced during development. The composition was made using actual Soviet-era synthesizers, creating a soundtrack that captures the authentic sound of the period. There are no jetpacks – Soviet cosmonauts didn’t have them at the time – so players must push themselves off objects to move around. “It’s literally set in 1986. All of the technology is era-specific.,” Booth explained. “The space station is based on pictures of the real thing. You can look at the two side by side and you probably couldn’t tell the difference apart from the fact that one’s a game.” While Outreach can be classified as walking simulator sub-genre, Booth refers to it as a “floating simulator” due to the zero gravity exploration. The unique control scheme took a fair bit of trial and error for me to adapt to. One shoulder trigger pushes forward while the other halts movement. Moving the left analog stick spins your view. I bounced against the station like a pinball before I got comfortable enough to navigate the station somewhat competently. Although movement felt strange and mildly nauseating, it did a decent job of selling the sensation of being suspended in zero gravity. You might think Outreach would be a perfect fit for VR. However, Booth cites the occasionally stomach-turning traversal as the primary reason Outreach won’t be coming to headsets. “It works [in VR], but don’t do it. We’d have to ship it with a branded sick bag.” After receiving my orders from my commander, I set out on the search for the crew. I soar from room to room, inspecting floating objects including letters and audio tapes, which can be played on a recorder. Booth promises that although the game is story-focused, Outreach will feature more gameplay than the average walking simulator thanks to richer mechanics, puzzles, and mini-games. At one point, I interacted with a terminal that featured a working game of Pong. After exploring the pods and finding no trace of the crew, only one area remains for inspection. Unfortunately, I break the latch off the door trying to open it, leaving me locked out. The only way around is to exit the station and reach the area from the outside. This is where Outreach’s intensity took really off. Since jetpacks aren’t a thing, the only way to make my way across the outside of the station was by a series of rungs on the station’s hull. The process involved kicking myself off a platform and carefully steering myself close enough to a rung to grab. It was an extremely nerve-racking segment thanks to how little control you have in maneuverability and the intimidating ambiance of space. Unlike many walking simulators, players can die in Outreach. In order to allow this, Pixel Spill needed to tweak the facts a bit. “Historically, you would have a tether that would connect you to the station,” Booth said. But we took that out. It’s kind of one of the only things we don’t do realistically because we wanted that fear of death.” Missing a rung and veering into orbit led to a very intense scene of the character quickly panicking as he realized he’d be helplessly hovering for the rest of his life. That emotional performance completely sold the terror of being stranded in space and only raised my anxiety about screwing up. I held my breath with every leap to a new handhold. After a few more trips to the scary death scene, I finally reached my destination, where the demo concluded. I welcomed the chance to calm my nerves, but I felt I’d just gotten the hang of the controls enough to inspire me to play more. On top of being an effective thriller, Outreach feels like it could be a great period piece of 1980's space travel thanks to its painstaking attention to detail. Most importantly, I left my play session wanting answers to the game's primary questions. What exactly happened on this ship? Are any members of the crew alive, and if so, where are they? These answers will have to wait until later this fall when Outreach launches for PC and Mac.
  7. Outreach takes the narrative-focused space exploration of titles like Adr1ft and injects a hefty does of historical accuracy and an unshakable eeriness. Pixel Spill’s four-man team has been cranking away at the project for about two years, and during E3 last week I got to play the game's unnerving first 20 minutes. “I love sci-fi. I watch Star Trek on my lunch breaks,” James Booth, producer and writer, said. “But something I wanted to do differently with Outreach, I wanted it to be steeped in the history of space travel rather than being alternate history or future.” Outreach draws inspiration from the space race between the then-Soviet Union and the United States and how the Soviets beat the Americans by sending the first human, Yuri Gagarin, into space. Chiefly, Outreach explores the “lost cosmonaut” conspiracy theory that alleges that prior to Gagarin, the Soviets secretly launched cosmonauts into space. However, all of them perished and the government covered up the mission. Additionally, espionage films such as The Hunt for Red October provided further influence. Set in 1986, players control a lone Soviet cosmonaut (voiced by The Wolf Among Us’ Adam Harrington) sent in orbit to investigate a space station and determine the fate of its crew. Booth says that while Outreach plays off events from the 1960's, the game takes place a few decades later to allow for the existence of a full space station. Pixel Spill values historical accuracy above all else. Archival footage and historical designs were referenced during development. The composition was made using actual Soviet-era synthesizers, creating a soundtrack that captures the authentic sound of the period. There are no jetpacks – Soviet cosmonauts didn’t have them at the time – so players must push themselves off objects to move around. “It’s literally set in 1986. All of the technology is era-specific.,” Booth explained. “The space station is based on pictures of the real thing. You can look at the two side by side and you probably couldn’t tell the difference apart from the fact that one’s a game.” While Outreach can be classified as walking simulator sub-genre, Booth refers to it as a “floating simulator” due to the zero gravity exploration. The unique control scheme took a fair bit of trial and error for me to adapt to. One shoulder trigger pushes forward while the other halts movement. Moving the left analog stick spins your view. I bounced against the station like a pinball before I got comfortable enough to navigate the station somewhat competently. Although movement felt strange and mildly nauseating, it did a decent job of selling the sensation of being suspended in zero gravity. You might think Outreach would be a perfect fit for VR. However, Booth cites the occasionally stomach-turning traversal as the primary reason Outreach won’t be coming to headsets. “It works [in VR], but don’t do it. We’d have to ship it with a branded sick bag.” After receiving my orders from my commander, I set out on the search for the crew. I soar from room to room, inspecting floating objects including letters and audio tapes, which can be played on a recorder. Booth promises that although the game is story-focused, Outreach will feature more gameplay than the average walking simulator thanks to richer mechanics, puzzles, and mini-games. At one point, I interacted with a terminal that featured a working game of Pong. After exploring the pods and finding no trace of the crew, only one area remains for inspection. Unfortunately, I break the latch off the door trying to open it, leaving me locked out. The only way around is to exit the station and reach the area from the outside. This is where Outreach’s intensity took really off. Since jetpacks aren’t a thing, the only way to make my way across the outside of the station was by a series of rungs on the station’s hull. The process involved kicking myself off a platform and carefully steering myself close enough to a rung to grab. It was an extremely nerve-racking segment thanks to how little control you have in maneuverability and the intimidating ambiance of space. Unlike many walking simulators, players can die in Outreach. In order to allow this, Pixel Spill needed to tweak the facts a bit. “Historically, you would have a tether that would connect you to the station,” Booth said. But we took that out. It’s kind of one of the only things we don’t do realistically because we wanted that fear of death.” Missing a rung and veering into orbit led to a very intense scene of the character quickly panicking as he realized he’d be helplessly hovering for the rest of his life. That emotional performance completely sold the terror of being stranded in space and only raised my anxiety about screwing up. I held my breath with every leap to a new handhold. After a few more trips to the scary death scene, I finally reached my destination, where the demo concluded. I welcomed the chance to calm my nerves, but I felt I’d just gotten the hang of the controls enough to inspire me to play more. On top of being an effective thriller, Outreach feels like it could be a great period piece of 1980's space travel thanks to its painstaking attention to detail. Most importantly, I left my play session wanting answers to the game's primary questions. What exactly happened on this ship? Are any members of the crew alive, and if so, where are they? These answers will have to wait until later this fall when Outreach launches for PC and Mac. View full article
  8. Telltale followed up their first entry into the world of The Walking Dead with a second season that did a number of risky things in the world of video games. Players took on the role of Clementine, a young girl who has been burdened with the onerous task of growing up during the apocalypse. The brutality, the cruelty of life under those desperate circumstances permeate Season 2. Tough decisions allow players to shape what kind of a person our hero may become and the haunting prompts from the previous season, "Clementine will remember that," are now left unsaid, but hang heavy in every facial expression. As a sequel to an episodic game that some claimed was the greatest adventure game of all time, does The Walking Dead: Season Two stand up on its own merits as one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Walking Dead: Season Two 'In the Pines - Credits Theme' by Jared Emerson-Johnson & Janel Drewis (https://telltalegames.bandcamp.com/) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  9. Telltale followed up their first entry into the world of The Walking Dead with a second season that did a number of risky things in the world of video games. Players took on the role of Clementine, a young girl who has been burdened with the onerous task of growing up during the apocalypse. The brutality, the cruelty of life under those desperate circumstances permeate Season 2. Tough decisions allow players to shape what kind of a person our hero may become and the haunting prompts from the previous season, "Clementine will remember that," are now left unsaid, but hang heavy in every facial expression. As a sequel to an episodic game that some claimed was the greatest adventure game of all time, does The Walking Dead: Season Two stand up on its own merits as one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Walking Dead: Season Two 'In the Pines - Credits Theme' by Jared Emerson-Johnson & Janel Drewis (https://telltalegames.bandcamp.com/) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  10. During today's PC Gaming Show, Cliff Blenzinski's announced the release date and price for his multiplayer arena first-person shooter, Lawbreakers. Prepare to take the fight to the skies on PC and PlayStation 4 August 3 for a cool $29.99. Lawbreakers gameplay emphasizes verticality and maneuverability thanks to it's anti-gravity gameplay. Despite being off your feet for much of combat, players don't just float around helplessly. The action is frantic and intense due to the plethora of angles opponents can strike from. The trailer below does a good job of demonstrating the title's insane moment-to-moment gameplay. If you want to take Lawbreakers for a spin before you buy, developer Boss Key will hold a final closed beta from June 30 to July 4 that you can sign up for on the game's official website. Do you think Lawbreaker's unique spin on arena multiplayer can separate it from the genre's competitors?
  11. During today's PC Gaming Show, Cliff Blenzinski's announced the release date and price for his multiplayer arena first-person shooter, Lawbreakers. Prepare to take the fight to the skies on PC and PlayStation 4 August 3 for a cool $29.99. Lawbreakers gameplay emphasizes verticality and maneuverability thanks to it's anti-gravity gameplay. Despite being off your feet for much of combat, players don't just float around helplessly. The action is frantic and intense due to the plethora of angles opponents can strike from. The trailer below does a good job of demonstrating the title's insane moment-to-moment gameplay. If you want to take Lawbreakers for a spin before you buy, developer Boss Key will hold a final closed beta from June 30 to July 4 that you can sign up for on the game's official website. Do you think Lawbreaker's unique spin on arena multiplayer can separate it from the genre's competitors? View full article
  12. Those absurd Battlegrounds highlight videos are about to get squirrely. Brendan Greene, creator of PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds, announced new content and mechanical updates to the game at the PC Gaming Show at E3 on Monday. Most notably, the update will give players the ability to vault walls and other in-game objects in modest to downright wacky fashion. Needless to say, my favorite is the full somersault. Weather effects will also be coming to Battlegrounds map, including fog, rain (a new form of it, as the original version had a rain effect that dampened noise), and a naturally occurring sunset. The OTS Groza, a new bullpup rifle, is on its way, which can only be obtained from the highly contested loot drops mid-match. If you're a Playunknown's Battlegrounds, do these updates sound appealing? How do you think they will affect the core experience?
  13. Those absurd Battlegrounds highlight videos are about to get squirrely. Brendan Greene, creator of PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds, announced new content and mechanical updates to the game at the PC Gaming Show at E3 on Monday. Most notably, the update will give players the ability to vault walls and other in-game objects in modest to downright wacky fashion. Needless to say, my favorite is the full somersault. Weather effects will also be coming to Battlegrounds map, including fog, rain (a new form of it, as the original version had a rain effect that dampened noise), and a naturally occurring sunset. The OTS Groza, a new bullpup rifle, is on its way, which can only be obtained from the highly contested loot drops mid-match. If you're a Playunknown's Battlegrounds, do these updates sound appealing? How do you think they will affect the core experience? View full article
  14. Ooblets, from Double Fine and Glumberlands, is a bit of a trip. It's got shades of Pikmin, and it looks about as ridiculous. A new trailer debuted at the PC Gamer Show Monday, featuring some of the customization options the player character can utilize, including wardrobe and hair style changes and the ability to decorate your own house. Ooblets is out on PC and Xbox One in 2018.
  15. Ooblets, from Double Fine and Glumberlands, is a bit of a trip. It's got shades of Pikmin, and it looks about as ridiculous. A new trailer debuted at the PC Gamer Show Monday, featuring some of the customization options the player character can utilize, including wardrobe and hair style changes and the ability to decorate your own house. Ooblets is out on PC and Xbox One in 2018. View full article
  16. You thought the punishment was over, didn't you? Turns out everyone's favorite turn-based alien combat strategy game XCOM 2 is back this August with its "War of the Chosen" expansion. War of the Chosen will introduce a ton of new content to XCOM, including new maps, enemies, and strategic options. Chief among these enemies are the Chosen, the "ultimate enemies" of the XCOM force and champions of the alien army. There's the stealthy cloaking assassin, the sniper rifle-touting Hunter, and the self-explanatory Warlock. Players will encounter each Chosen multiple times over the course of the new campaign, which details XCOM's efforts to recruit new human resistance forces to the fight against the alien threat. The Chosen will be able to learn procedural strategies to counter your favorite tactics as the game goes on, according to XCOM 2 designer Jake Solomon. Humans won't be alone in their fight, as you'll be able to recruit three new factions of human resistance fighters. There's the Reavers, the half-alien, half-human hybrid Skirmishers, and the psionic wildling clan of Templars. The Skirmishers will have a mix of alien and human abilities to make them single-unit powerhouses, while the Templars can charge up their magic turn-by-turn for damaging attacks. Both sides of the war for Earth will have to contend with the Lost, AKA the remnants of humanity that were mutated and twisted into zombie-like creatures as a result of the alien army's initial attacks. The Lost will act as a wildcard element in XCOM skirmishes, ditching tactical thinking for horde mentality, attacking both humans and aliens in large numbers. XCOM 2: War of the Chosen is out on August 29, giving you just enough time to remember how painful losing your favorite squad captain to a stray laser bolt is.
  17. You thought the punishment was over, didn't you? Turns out everyone's favorite turn-based alien combat strategy game XCOM 2 is back this August with its "War of the Chosen" expansion. War of the Chosen will introduce a ton of new content to XCOM, including new maps, enemies, and strategic options. Chief among these enemies are the Chosen, the "ultimate enemies" of the XCOM force and champions of the alien army. There's the stealthy cloaking assassin, the sniper rifle-touting Hunter, and the self-explanatory Warlock. Players will encounter each Chosen multiple times over the course of the new campaign, which details XCOM's efforts to recruit new human resistance forces to the fight against the alien threat. The Chosen will be able to learn procedural strategies to counter your favorite tactics as the game goes on, according to XCOM 2 designer Jake Solomon. Humans won't be alone in their fight, as you'll be able to recruit three new factions of human resistance fighters. There's the Reavers, the half-alien, half-human hybrid Skirmishers, and the psionic wildling clan of Templars. The Skirmishers will have a mix of alien and human abilities to make them single-unit powerhouses, while the Templars can charge up their magic turn-by-turn for damaging attacks. Both sides of the war for Earth will have to contend with the Lost, AKA the remnants of humanity that were mutated and twisted into zombie-like creatures as a result of the alien army's initial attacks. The Lost will act as a wildcard element in XCOM skirmishes, ditching tactical thinking for horde mentality, attacking both humans and aliens in large numbers. XCOM 2: War of the Chosen is out on August 29, giving you just enough time to remember how painful losing your favorite squad captain to a stray laser bolt is. View full article
  18. When I woke up this morning, I didn't expect to be writing about a new Bubsy game. I mean, for crying out loud, the last Bubsy game released in 1996 - that's over two decades ago! Through some kind of alchemy that doubtlessly included human sacrifices, Bubsy has a new game slated for release this year. With the aid of Billionsoft, an investment company that revives old gaming IPs with an eye to make a profit, Accolade has risen from the grave to create an all new Bubsy game. Titled Bubsy: The Woolies Strike Back, the reinvention of the classic platformer has our furred hero traveling to various locales in search of the golden fleece. Bubsy returns this September on the PlayStation 4 and PC.
  19. When I woke up this morning, I didn't expect to be writing about a new Bubsy game. I mean, for crying out loud, the last Bubsy game released in 1996 - that's over two decades ago! Through some kind of alchemy that doubtlessly included human sacrifices, Bubsy has a new game slated for release this year. With the aid of Billionsoft, an investment company that revives old gaming IPs with an eye to make a profit, Accolade has risen from the grave to create an all new Bubsy game. Titled Bubsy: The Woolies Strike Back, the reinvention of the classic platformer has our furred hero traveling to various locales in search of the golden fleece. Bubsy returns this September on the PlayStation 4 and PC. View full article
  20. Rebellion, the developers behind the successful Sniper Elite franchise, are trying their hand at something a little, dare I say... strange? They have pulled back the curtain on their newest game titled Strange Brigade, a third-person shooter for 1-4 players to tackle solo or co-op. We don't know much beyond those few facts and what's provided in the reveal trailer. The shooter takes on the decidedly campy tone of a 1930s adventure serial. Players will be exploring a far flung corner of the British empire and come face to face with an otherworldly threat amidst the sprawling ruins of a once magnificent city. Zombies, colossal humanoid monstrosities, and even ancient gods all converge on the Strange Brigade to tear them limb from limb. The one thing that strikes a dissonant cord for me in this trailer is the character design of the black woman. Her design is weirdly exotic and "othering" compared to her companion characters in the ensemble. Maybe the full game provides more context or perhaps I'm being overly critical of a game meant to be taken as a camp throwback, but it struck a sour note in a trailer that otherwise appeals to me. Overall, Strange Brigade appears to possess a great deal of promise as a co-op shooter in a similar vein as the Left 4 Dead franchise. More details will be released next week at E3. At the moment, Strange Brigade is slated for release on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.
  21. Rebellion, the developers behind the successful Sniper Elite franchise, are trying their hand at something a little, dare I say... strange? They have pulled back the curtain on their newest game titled Strange Brigade, a third-person shooter for 1-4 players to tackle solo or co-op. We don't know much beyond those few facts and what's provided in the reveal trailer. The shooter takes on the decidedly campy tone of a 1930s adventure serial. Players will be exploring a far flung corner of the British empire and come face to face with an otherworldly threat amidst the sprawling ruins of a once magnificent city. Zombies, colossal humanoid monstrosities, and even ancient gods all converge on the Strange Brigade to tear them limb from limb. The one thing that strikes a dissonant cord for me in this trailer is the character design of the black woman. Her design is weirdly exotic and "othering" compared to her companion characters in the ensemble. Maybe the full game provides more context or perhaps I'm being overly critical of a game meant to be taken as a camp throwback, but it struck a sour note in a trailer that otherwise appeals to me. Overall, Strange Brigade appears to possess a great deal of promise as a co-op shooter in a similar vein as the Left 4 Dead franchise. More details will be released next week at E3. At the moment, Strange Brigade is slated for release on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. View full article
  22. The modding community that grew up around Skyrim is legendary among PC players of Bethesda's open-world RPG. However, a large segment of that community stretches all the way back to 2002 to the release of The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind. That segment has organized to try to streamline modding efforts, eventually resulting in the formation of Beyond Skyrim, an organization that streamlines multiple teams and departments of modders to help unique and creative Skyrim mods become a reality. The current mission of Beyond Skyrim is as follows: The ultimate goal of all of our teams is to create a single end user experience allowing players to travel around Tamriel in as immersive and seamless a manner as possible. This is the guiding philosophy behind everything which we do. We must always consider the final experience first and foremost, ensuring that all of our products are completely compatible with each other, both in terms of technical and gameplay matters, as well as the lore that we’ve developed for our projects, so that they all add up together into a single cohesive world. Beyond Skyrim is in the process of tackling the entirety of The Elder Scrolls' continent of Tamriel, one region at a time. There are teams working on the following adventures/areas: Black Marsh: The Roots of the World Elsweyr: Sugar and Blood Expedition to Atmora Iliac Bay: Tower of Dawn Morrowind: The Star-Wounded East Roscrea: Voices of the Deep Thras: The Coral Kingdom Cyrodil: The Seat of Sunderd Kings These projects have all been in development for years, and finally the first part of the Beyond Skyrim: Cyrodil mod is slated for release next month. Titled Beyond Skyrim: Bruma, this new addition to Skyrim allows players to take part into an entirely new adventure. It spans an area larger than the official Dragonborn DLC from Bethesda. According to the modders, Bruma is larger than Dragonborn by a half. The mod includes over 24,000 new lines of voiced dialogue and three hours of original music. New quests and storylines fill out the new area to provide structure for players to explore the new chunk of Tamriel. And, of course, a large number of new weapons, armor, items, spells, and creatures accompany Bruma's release. Beyond Skyrim: Bruma releases for PC on July 1. The modders behind it say that their progress on the rest of Beyond Skyrim: Cyrodil is chugging along at a rapid pace, so perhaps it might not be a huge wait for subsequent parts of the mod.
  23. The modding community that grew up around Skyrim is legendary among PC players of Bethesda's open-world RPG. However, a large segment of that community stretches all the way back to 2002 to the release of The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind. That segment has organized to try to streamline modding efforts, eventually resulting in the formation of Beyond Skyrim, an organization that streamlines multiple teams and departments of modders to help unique and creative Skyrim mods become a reality. The current mission of Beyond Skyrim is as follows: The ultimate goal of all of our teams is to create a single end user experience allowing players to travel around Tamriel in as immersive and seamless a manner as possible. This is the guiding philosophy behind everything which we do. We must always consider the final experience first and foremost, ensuring that all of our products are completely compatible with each other, both in terms of technical and gameplay matters, as well as the lore that we’ve developed for our projects, so that they all add up together into a single cohesive world. Beyond Skyrim is in the process of tackling the entirety of The Elder Scrolls' continent of Tamriel, one region at a time. There are teams working on the following adventures/areas: Black Marsh: The Roots of the World Elsweyr: Sugar and Blood Expedition to Atmora Iliac Bay: Tower of Dawn Morrowind: The Star-Wounded East Roscrea: Voices of the Deep Thras: The Coral Kingdom Cyrodil: The Seat of Sunderd Kings These projects have all been in development for years, and finally the first part of the Beyond Skyrim: Cyrodil mod is slated for release next month. Titled Beyond Skyrim: Bruma, this new addition to Skyrim allows players to take part into an entirely new adventure. It spans an area larger than the official Dragonborn DLC from Bethesda. According to the modders, Bruma is larger than Dragonborn by a half. The mod includes over 24,000 new lines of voiced dialogue and three hours of original music. New quests and storylines fill out the new area to provide structure for players to explore the new chunk of Tamriel. And, of course, a large number of new weapons, armor, items, spells, and creatures accompany Bruma's release. Beyond Skyrim: Bruma releases for PC on July 1. The modders behind it say that their progress on the rest of Beyond Skyrim: Cyrodil is chugging along at a rapid pace, so perhaps it might not be a huge wait for subsequent parts of the mod. View full article
  24. The first Mega Man Legacy Collection released back in 2015 and covered the first six titles of the Mega Man series. Those first six games represent the entire NES era of Mega Man. Capcom has announced that a second Legacy Collection will release containing the further adventures of side-scrolling Mega Man that released following Mega Man 6. Mega Man Legacy Collection 2 will contain Mega Man 7-10, covering the period of time when the series broke out of 8-bit graphics and into 16/32-bit action before returning to its 8-bit roots. Since 9 and 10 are modern installments, both will contain all DLC released for them to date. There will be minor tweaks and improvements throughout the four games of the collection. One of the major additions that could help new players appreciate Mega Man without the frustration is the new "Extra Armor" option that halves all damage taken and a checkpoint system to help pick up the action from a convenient distance instead of starting the level over from scratch. If that seems too easy, stages have been remixed for difficulty in the new Challenge Mode where players can compete and compare completion time with others around the world. For those who value gaming history, Capcom has also included an in-game museum that includes production art, sketches, development material, concepts, and a music player to listen to all the catchy bloops and bleeps of the Mega Man soundtracks. Mega Man Legacy Collection 2 releases on August 8th for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Oddly, the title doesn't appear to be coming to the Nintendo Switch at this time.
  25. The first Mega Man Legacy Collection released back in 2015 and covered the first six titles of the Mega Man series. Those first six games represent the entire NES era of Mega Man. Capcom has announced that a second Legacy Collection will release containing the further adventures of side-scrolling Mega Man that released following Mega Man 6. Mega Man Legacy Collection 2 will contain Mega Man 7-10, covering the period of time when the series broke out of 8-bit graphics and into 16/32-bit action before returning to its 8-bit roots. Since 9 and 10 are modern installments, both will contain all DLC released for them to date. There will be minor tweaks and improvements throughout the four games of the collection. One of the major additions that could help new players appreciate Mega Man without the frustration is the new "Extra Armor" option that halves all damage taken and a checkpoint system to help pick up the action from a convenient distance instead of starting the level over from scratch. If that seems too easy, stages have been remixed for difficulty in the new Challenge Mode where players can compete and compare completion time with others around the world. For those who value gaming history, Capcom has also included an in-game museum that includes production art, sketches, development material, concepts, and a music player to listen to all the catchy bloops and bleeps of the Mega Man soundtracks. Mega Man Legacy Collection 2 releases on August 8th for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Oddly, the title doesn't appear to be coming to the Nintendo Switch at this time. View full article
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