Showing results for tags 'nintendo switch'. - Extra Life Community Hub Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'nintendo switch'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Extra Life News
    • Extra Life Updates
    • Best Practices
    • Community Content
    • Why I Extra Life
    • Fundraising
    • Contests
  • Gaming News
  • Features
  • Podcast

Discussions

  • Extra Life Discussions
    • General Extra Life Discussion
    • Local Extra Lifers
    • Fundraising Ideas
    • Live Streaming Tips & Tricks
    • Official Extra Life Stream Team Discussion
    • Extra Life JSON Code Discussion & Sharing
    • Extra Life United
    • Extra Life Q & A
  • Articles & Extra Life Announcements
    • Announcements
  • Official Extra Life Guilds
    • Guild information and Discussion
    • Canada
    • Northeastern US
    • Southeastern US
    • Central US
    • Western US
  • Gaming Discussions
  • Other Stuff
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Recent Posts

Calendars

  • Extra Life Community Calendar
  • Extra Life Stream Team
  • Akron Guild
  • Albany Guild
  • Albuquerque Guild
  • Anchorage Guild
  • Atlanta Guild
  • Austin Guild
  • Bakersfield Guild
  • Baltimore Guild
  • Birmingham Guild
  • Boston Guild
  • Burlington Guild
  • Buffalo Guild
  • Calgary, AB Guild
  • Morgantown Guild
  • Charlottesville Guild
  • Chicago Guild
  • Cincinnati Guild
  • Cleveland Guild
  • Columbia, MO Guild
  • Columbus, OH Guild
  • Dallas Guild
  • Dayton Guild
  • Denver Guild
  • Des Moines Guild
  • Detroit Guild
  • Edmonton, AB Guild
  • Fargo-Valley City Guild
  • Fresno Guild
  • Ft. Worth Guild
  • Gainesville-Tallahassee Guild
  • Grand Rapids Guild
  • Halifax, NS Guild
  • Hamilton, ON Guild
  • Hartford Guild
  • Hershey Guild
  • Hudson Valley Guild
  • Houston Guild
  • Indianapolis Guild
  • Jacksonville Guild
  • Kansas City Guild
  • Knoxville Guild
  • Lansing Guild
  • London, ON Guild
  • Los Angeles Guild
  • Milwaukee / Madison Guild
  • Minneapolis / Twin Cities Guild
  • Montreal / Quebec City Guild
  • Nashville Guild
  • Newark Guild
  • NYC & Long Island Guild
  • Oakland / San Francisco Guild
  • Omaha Guild
  • Orange County Guild
  • Orlando Guild
  • Ottawa, ON Guild
  • Philadelphia Guild
  • Phoenix Guild
  • Pittsburgh Guild
  • Portland, OR Guild
  • Portland, ME Guild
  • Raleigh-Durham Guild
  • Richmond Guild
  • Sacramento Guild
  • Salt Lake City Guild
  • San Antonio Guild
  • San Diego Guild
  • San Juan, PR Guild
  • Saskatchewan Guild
  • Seattle Guild
  • Spokane Guild
  • Springfield-Champaign, IL Guild
  • Springfield, MA Guild
  • St. Louis Guild
  • Syracuse Guild
  • Tampa / St. Petersburg Guild
  • Toronto, ON Guild
  • Vancouver, BC Guild
  • Washington DC Guild
  • Winnipeg, MB Guild
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Events
  • Extra Life Akron's Events

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Hospital


Location


Why I "Extra Life"


Interests


Twitter


Instagram


Twitch


Mixer


Discord


Blizzard Battletag


Nintendo ID


PSN ID


Steam


Origin


Xbox Gamertag

Found 46 results

  1. Hideki Kamiya, the director of Clover Studio's Okami, has tweeted indicating that the beloved action-adventure title will be receiving a sequel. The hints of a sequel in the works came in the form of several tweets between Kamiya and Ikumi Nakamura, the creative director formerly employed at Tango Gameworks. Nakamura has been touring a number of prominent game studios around the world with her latest stop being PlatinumGames where Kamiya now works. There are those on the internet, however, that remain skeptical. Kamiya has a history of playing with fan expectations on Twitter. The director, who know works as a game designer at PlatinumGames, teased impatient fans of Scalebound back in 2015 by routinely telling them that new screenshots would be released next week. Each week, the elusive screenshots were pushed back another week and never emerged. His account even puts forward rules for followers and fans. Those who violate his Twitter rules find themselves quickly blocked. However, the announcement was made alongside Ghostwire Tokyo's former creative director, Ikumi Nakamura. Nakamura posted a video to Twitter earlier today in which Kamiya said with a smile and a thumbs up that "Okami is going to come back." Nakamura looks surprised and asks, "Really?" "Really," Kamiya responds, before laughing. The cheeky announcement might well be a joke, but Nakamura seems to sincerely want Okami 2 to become a reality. She worked at Clover Studio as a concept artist alongside Kamiya on the original Bayonetta. While Kamiya is one to pull a joke on fans, Nakamura's sincerity and energy has made her a popular developer in the game industry, even after her departure from the recently announced Ghostwire Tokyo. Nakamura followed up her video with Kamiya by saying, "Okami is going to be back. We want to make Okami sequel and fans are looking forward to it too. You guys want to see Kamiya’s Okami again, right, everyone? I want to work on it too!” While this is all very exciting to hear, Capcom has confirmed to outlets like Polygon that it hasn't made any official announcements. However, the love for Okami runs deep. The game originally released in 2006 for the PlayStation 2 before transitioning over to the Wii via a port in 2008. In 2010, a Nintendo DS sequel released called Okamiden. 2012 saw an HD remaster release on the PlayStation 3. A five year lull followed without much in the way of Okami happening before a surprise port of the PlayStation 3 remaster appeared on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC in 2017. A year later, the remaster appeared on Nintendo Switch. Capcom sits on a game franchise that has become known as one of the greatest artistic achievements in gaming. The reaction to this strange, small tweet (regardless of whether it's a joke or not) speaks to how eager fans are for more Okami. With a new console generation coming up and the recent ports selling well, there might very well be another Okami in the works at this moment or in the near future - and that's very exciting. Kamiya capped all of this off by tweeting: “Okami will be back,” he wrote. “... Someday ... I believe.” Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  2. Hideki Kamiya, the director of Clover Studio's Okami, has tweeted indicating that the beloved action-adventure title will be receiving a sequel. The hints of a sequel in the works came in the form of several tweets between Kamiya and Ikumi Nakamura, the creative director formerly employed at Tango Gameworks. Nakamura has been touring a number of prominent game studios around the world with her latest stop being PlatinumGames where Kamiya now works. There are those on the internet, however, that remain skeptical. Kamiya has a history of playing with fan expectations on Twitter. The director, who know works as a game designer at PlatinumGames, teased impatient fans of Scalebound back in 2015 by routinely telling them that new screenshots would be released next week. Each week, the elusive screenshots were pushed back another week and never emerged. His account even puts forward rules for followers and fans. Those who violate his Twitter rules find themselves quickly blocked. However, the announcement was made alongside Ghostwire Tokyo's former creative director, Ikumi Nakamura. Nakamura posted a video to Twitter earlier today in which Kamiya said with a smile and a thumbs up that "Okami is going to come back." Nakamura looks surprised and asks, "Really?" "Really," Kamiya responds, before laughing. The cheeky announcement might well be a joke, but Nakamura seems to sincerely want Okami 2 to become a reality. She worked at Clover Studio as a concept artist alongside Kamiya on the original Bayonetta. While Kamiya is one to pull a joke on fans, Nakamura's sincerity and energy has made her a popular developer in the game industry, even after her departure from the recently announced Ghostwire Tokyo. Nakamura followed up her video with Kamiya by saying, "Okami is going to be back. We want to make Okami sequel and fans are looking forward to it too. You guys want to see Kamiya’s Okami again, right, everyone? I want to work on it too!” While this is all very exciting to hear, Capcom has confirmed to outlets like Polygon that it hasn't made any official announcements. However, the love for Okami runs deep. The game originally released in 2006 for the PlayStation 2 before transitioning over to the Wii via a port in 2008. In 2010, a Nintendo DS sequel released called Okamiden. 2012 saw an HD remaster release on the PlayStation 3. A five year lull followed without much in the way of Okami happening before a surprise port of the PlayStation 3 remaster appeared on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC in 2017. A year later, the remaster appeared on Nintendo Switch. Capcom sits on a game franchise that has become known as one of the greatest artistic achievements in gaming. The reaction to this strange, small tweet (regardless of whether it's a joke or not) speaks to how eager fans are for more Okami. With a new console generation coming up and the recent ports selling well, there might very well be another Okami in the works at this moment or in the near future - and that's very exciting. Kamiya capped all of this off by tweeting: “Okami will be back,” he wrote. “... Someday ... I believe.” Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  3. Having been in development since 2015, Eastward's train finally seems poised to pull into the station. A new trailer has been released pinning the visually unique indie RPG down to a 2020 release window and revealing that the title will be coming to the Nintendo Switch. Developer Pixpil's latest peek at the world of Eastward reveals a stunning landscape rich with character and incredible animated details. We last saw Eastward at the beginning of 2018 when Chucklefish, the publisher behind Eastward, Starbound, and Stardew Valley, released an impressive announcement trailer. With the reveal of Eastward, we learned that it tells the story of John, a miner who uncovers a scientific facility while working his claim. Inside the dark facility, John encounters Sam, a strange white-haired young girl. This discovery sets the pair on a journey across the ruins of a world plagued by monsters. Their adventure will take them through towns where the remnants of humanity band together for survival, scavenging resources from ruins and creating bold new technologies. The mysteries behind Sam's origins propels the story forward as John struggles to care for the young child and get them through just one more day. A new trailer surfaced at Gamescom offers such an intriguing look into the world of Eastward. A pristine train takes viewers through a world where a boat has been made into a salvaged house on top of a mountain, complete with a beached whale on its roof. Bustling tent markets sit among the ruins of metropolises, with some stalls run by steampunk androids. We watch as John leads Sam through a wilderness populated by aggressive vultures and multi-legged mushrooms. Skeletons with gatling guns, rampaging mechanical monstrosities, carnivorous snake plants, flaming slugs, sentient bundles of electrical cords, and a robotic eyeball boss all inject Eastward with a sense of danger and wonder. The combat shown so far seems to revolve around John swinging his frying pan into monsters, dodging attacks, and solving puzzles. There are brief snippets of John wielding a shotgun and charging up a melee attack, but the lack of focus on the battle mechanics implies Eastward has other ambitions. While we haven't seen nearly enough of the game yet, Eastward's priority seems to be presenting a narrative journey through a world rich with detail and history. We see glimpses of charismatic supporting characters like Alva and the antagonistic Mayor Huffman along with a slew of unnamed and intriguing characters. Pixpil set out to create a modern pixel game that took inspiration from Earthbound and The Legend of Zelda as well as more recent releases like The Last of Us. Eastward seems like a near-perfect realization of that goal. Shockingly gorgeous, imaginative, and armed with an intriguing narrative, Eastward should be on your radar. It's clearly something special. Eastward releases in 2020 for PC and Nintendo Switch. One of the common misconceptions about Extra Life is that someone can only participate if they play video games. Not true! Extra Life supports and encourages all kinds of play. To that end, we have been supporting Tabletop Appreciation Weekend for the past few years. This year, the event takes place August 24-25th and will be a time for players to gather together and play board games for the kids. Learn more about Extra Life Tabletop Appreciation Weekend and be sure to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  4. Having been in development since 2015, Eastward's train finally seems poised to pull into the station. A new trailer has been released pinning the visually unique indie RPG down to a 2020 release window and revealing that the title will be coming to the Nintendo Switch. Developer Pixpil's latest peek at the world of Eastward reveals a stunning landscape rich with character and incredible animated details. We last saw Eastward at the beginning of 2018 when Chucklefish, the publisher behind Eastward, Starbound, and Stardew Valley, released an impressive announcement trailer. With the reveal of Eastward, we learned that it tells the story of John, a miner who uncovers a scientific facility while working his claim. Inside the dark facility, John encounters Sam, a strange white-haired young girl. This discovery sets the pair on a journey across the ruins of a world plagued by monsters. Their adventure will take them through towns where the remnants of humanity band together for survival, scavenging resources from ruins and creating bold new technologies. The mysteries behind Sam's origins propels the story forward as John struggles to care for the young child and get them through just one more day. A new trailer surfaced at Gamescom offers such an intriguing look into the world of Eastward. A pristine train takes viewers through a world where a boat has been made into a salvaged house on top of a mountain, complete with a beached whale on its roof. Bustling tent markets sit among the ruins of metropolises, with some stalls run by steampunk androids. We watch as John leads Sam through a wilderness populated by aggressive vultures and multi-legged mushrooms. Skeletons with gatling guns, rampaging mechanical monstrosities, carnivorous snake plants, flaming slugs, sentient bundles of electrical cords, and a robotic eyeball boss all inject Eastward with a sense of danger and wonder. The combat shown so far seems to revolve around John swinging his frying pan into monsters, dodging attacks, and solving puzzles. There are brief snippets of John wielding a shotgun and charging up a melee attack, but the lack of focus on the battle mechanics implies Eastward has other ambitions. While we haven't seen nearly enough of the game yet, Eastward's priority seems to be presenting a narrative journey through a world rich with detail and history. We see glimpses of charismatic supporting characters like Alva and the antagonistic Mayor Huffman along with a slew of unnamed and intriguing characters. Pixpil set out to create a modern pixel game that took inspiration from Earthbound and The Legend of Zelda as well as more recent releases like The Last of Us. Eastward seems like a near-perfect realization of that goal. Shockingly gorgeous, imaginative, and armed with an intriguing narrative, Eastward should be on your radar. It's clearly something special. Eastward releases in 2020 for PC and Nintendo Switch. One of the common misconceptions about Extra Life is that someone can only participate if they play video games. Not true! Extra Life supports and encourages all kinds of play. To that end, we have been supporting Tabletop Appreciation Weekend for the past few years. This year, the event takes place August 24-25th and will be a time for players to gather together and play board games for the kids. Learn more about Extra Life Tabletop Appreciation Weekend and be sure to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  5. In November 2017, Trinket Studios released a unique puzzle-fighting game onto PC and Nintendo Switch. The title, Battle Chef Brigade, had garnered a colossal amount of support following a successful Kickstarter campaign raised over $100,000 in 2014. The game focuses on Mina Han, an up and coming chef who leaves her rural home to make it as a member of the Battle Chef Brigade, an elite group of chefs who battle monsters and use the spoils to make the most delectable dishes in all the land. Battle Chef Brigade currently sits with a spotless rating of 10/10 on Steam and has earned itself a persistent cult following since release. This week we are joined by game critic and noted Battle Chef Brigade evangelist Caitlin Galiz-Rowe to talk about the wild world of culinary contests. Is Battle Chef Brigade one of the best games of all-time? Each week on The Best Games Period, we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Fantasy Zone 'Opa and Over' by Rexy (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03954) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! Follow Caitlin Galiz-Rowe on Twitter: @CGRRRRRRRR If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday One of the common misconceptions about Extra Life is that someone can only participate if they play video games. Not true! Extra Life supports and encourages all kinds of play. To that end, we have been supporting Tabletop Appreciation Weekend for the past few years. This year, the event takes place August 24-25th and will be a time for players to gather together and play board games for the kids. Learn more about Extra Life Tabletop Appreciation Weekend and be sure to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  6. In November 2017, Trinket Studios released a unique puzzle-fighting game onto PC and Nintendo Switch. The title, Battle Chef Brigade, had garnered a colossal amount of support following a successful Kickstarter campaign raised over $100,000 in 2014. The game focuses on Mina Han, an up and coming chef who leaves her rural home to make it as a member of the Battle Chef Brigade, an elite group of chefs who battle monsters and use the spoils to make the most delectable dishes in all the land. Battle Chef Brigade currently sits with a spotless rating of 10/10 on Steam and has earned itself a persistent cult following since release. This week we are joined by game critic and noted Battle Chef Brigade evangelist Caitlin Galiz-Rowe to talk about the wild world of culinary contests. Is Battle Chef Brigade one of the best games of all-time? Each week on The Best Games Period, we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Fantasy Zone 'Opa and Over' by Rexy (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03954) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! Follow Caitlin Galiz-Rowe on Twitter: @CGRRRRRRRR If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday One of the common misconceptions about Extra Life is that someone can only participate if they play video games. Not true! Extra Life supports and encourages all kinds of play. To that end, we have been supporting Tabletop Appreciation Weekend for the past few years. This year, the event takes place August 24-25th and will be a time for players to gather together and play board games for the kids. Learn more about Extra Life Tabletop Appreciation Weekend and be sure to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  7. The quirky and lovable tale about a really big rock barrels onto Nintendo Switch today, opening up a whole new audience to the Rock of Ages franchise. The digital release mixes an incredibly inaccurate retelling of history with the odd surrealism of Katamari Damancy to create a gaming experience that really can't be found in other games. Rock of Ages 2: Bigger & Boulder follows a conflict between titans of the art world doing surreal battle across a wide variety of impossible spaces. Pitting the player against the likes of Vincent van Gogh, The Thinker, and the Great Sphinx. The story introduces a wide variety of silly characters taken from world mythologies and history. Ace Team developed the game in Unreal Engine 4, an underlying game engine that allowed the team to improve the game's physics and make even more destructible environments. In a game about crushing things with a big rock, physics might be the absolute most important aspect of the technology under the hood. Of course, what silly time is complete without friends? Players can compete against one another across several 4-player multiplayer modes. Customizable boulders and banners help players stand out on the battlefield and provide a signature flair for their victories. Of course, these modes, as well as the core single-player campaign, have been furnished with a greater number of units and more avenues for strategic boulder maneuvering than the first Rock of Ages. This gives players more tools and options than ever before (to crush their foes with a giant boulder). Rock of Ages 2: Bigger & Boulder has released on the Nintendo Switch's eShop and more than stands on its own merits. However, if you need extra motivation and own The Binding of Isaac, buying the game within the next two weeks (ending on May 28) will net you DLC inspired by the excellent roguelike dungeon crawler. That DLC includes a boulder designed in honor of the titular Isaac, three in-game avatars based on Isaac, Azazel, and Blue Baby, and three The Binding of Isaac banners to fly over the battlefield. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  8. The quirky and lovable tale about a really big rock barrels onto Nintendo Switch today, opening up a whole new audience to the Rock of Ages franchise. The digital release mixes an incredibly inaccurate retelling of history with the odd surrealism of Katamari Damancy to create a gaming experience that really can't be found in other games. Rock of Ages 2: Bigger & Boulder follows a conflict between titans of the art world doing surreal battle across a wide variety of impossible spaces. Pitting the player against the likes of Vincent van Gogh, The Thinker, and the Great Sphinx. The story introduces a wide variety of silly characters taken from world mythologies and history. Ace Team developed the game in Unreal Engine 4, an underlying game engine that allowed the team to improve the game's physics and make even more destructible environments. In a game about crushing things with a big rock, physics might be the absolute most important aspect of the technology under the hood. Of course, what silly time is complete without friends? Players can compete against one another across several 4-player multiplayer modes. Customizable boulders and banners help players stand out on the battlefield and provide a signature flair for their victories. Of course, these modes, as well as the core single-player campaign, have been furnished with a greater number of units and more avenues for strategic boulder maneuvering than the first Rock of Ages. This gives players more tools and options than ever before (to crush their foes with a giant boulder). Rock of Ages 2: Bigger & Boulder has released on the Nintendo Switch's eShop and more than stands on its own merits. However, if you need extra motivation and own The Binding of Isaac, buying the game within the next two weeks (ending on May 28) will net you DLC inspired by the excellent roguelike dungeon crawler. That DLC includes a boulder designed in honor of the titular Isaac, three in-game avatars based on Isaac, Azazel, and Blue Baby, and three The Binding of Isaac banners to fly over the battlefield. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  9. Rusty Moyher, an independent game developer, hails from Austin, Texas where he quietly works from his house to create small, engaging games. His first title, Astro Duel Deluxe, released on Nintendo Switch in May of 2017. Dig Dog stands as the latest game Moyher has released, but it holds the unique distinction of being the first title he created without the use of his hands. Due to a repetitive stress injury, Moyher retained limited use of his hands, but could not work on creating his games via traditional methods anymore. He set about the difficult task of coding and creating artwork for a game without using his hands. That might seem impossible to a lot of people, but Moyher came up with some ingenious methods to achieve his goals. Instead of typing out code with a keyboard, Moyher developed a shorthand language to speak into a microphone that would be able to translate into the symbols and words needed to create functional game code. The result is something that sounds like extremely fast gibberish, but in the video included below, you can see his computer translate it into code relatively easily. To create the art assets for the retro silhouette aesthetic, Moyher had to get even more creative. Using a mouse was out of the question with his hands, so he attached a small reflective dot to a hat and set up a webcam to track its movements. He was able to then link those movements with those of the cursor and manipulate it within the art program he was using to create assets. Of course, one might wonder how he was able to click without the use of a mouse - he simply connected a foot pedal to his computer and reconfigured it into a mouse click. With those two technological adaptations, Moyher was able to create Dig Dog, an amusing tribute to retro gaming staring a dog on a search for more bones. Of course, much like the retro classic Dig Dug, the world of Dig Dog is populated by a variety of enemies that pose a threat to the lovable canine. Players will have to stomp, dash, and dig their way to defeating enemies and bypassing environmental hazards. The game sports two different gameplay modes. The first is called Bone Hunt, which is the core roguelike game at the heart of Dig Dog. Players make their way through each stage searching for bones. However, as they make progress, they can discover shops that sell upgrades and a variety of other secrets. These stages shift with each playthrough, making each session a unique adventure. The deeper the dog delves, the more difficult the game becomes. Free Dig is similar, but enemies present less of a threat and the stages offer more freedom of movement. On top of all of that, players can unlock palette swaps for the game to change the ambiance while digging for those elusive bones. The game also comes with built-in achievements to preserve some sense of player progression and offer interesting goals. While Rusty Moyher programmed and created the art for Dig Dog himself, the music was composed by Matthew Grimm, who also goes by 8bitmatt. Dig Dog is currently available for the Nintendo Switch. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  10. Rusty Moyher, an independent game developer, hails from Austin, Texas where he quietly works from his house to create small, engaging games. His first title, Astro Duel Deluxe, released on Nintendo Switch in May of 2017. Dig Dog stands as the latest game Moyher has released, but it holds the unique distinction of being the first title he created without the use of his hands. Due to a repetitive stress injury, Moyher retained limited use of his hands, but could not work on creating his games via traditional methods anymore. He set about the difficult task of coding and creating artwork for a game without using his hands. That might seem impossible to a lot of people, but Moyher came up with some ingenious methods to achieve his goals. Instead of typing out code with a keyboard, Moyher developed a shorthand language to speak into a microphone that would be able to translate into the symbols and words needed to create functional game code. The result is something that sounds like extremely fast gibberish, but in the video included below, you can see his computer translate it into code relatively easily. To create the art assets for the retro silhouette aesthetic, Moyher had to get even more creative. Using a mouse was out of the question with his hands, so he attached a small reflective dot to a hat and set up a webcam to track its movements. He was able to then link those movements with those of the cursor and manipulate it within the art program he was using to create assets. Of course, one might wonder how he was able to click without the use of a mouse - he simply connected a foot pedal to his computer and reconfigured it into a mouse click. With those two technological adaptations, Moyher was able to create Dig Dog, an amusing tribute to retro gaming staring a dog on a search for more bones. Of course, much like the retro classic Dig Dug, the world of Dig Dog is populated by a variety of enemies that pose a threat to the lovable canine. Players will have to stomp, dash, and dig their way to defeating enemies and bypassing environmental hazards. The game sports two different gameplay modes. The first is called Bone Hunt, which is the core roguelike game at the heart of Dig Dog. Players make their way through each stage searching for bones. However, as they make progress, they can discover shops that sell upgrades and a variety of other secrets. These stages shift with each playthrough, making each session a unique adventure. The deeper the dog delves, the more difficult the game becomes. Free Dig is similar, but enemies present less of a threat and the stages offer more freedom of movement. On top of all of that, players can unlock palette swaps for the game to change the ambiance while digging for those elusive bones. The game also comes with built-in achievements to preserve some sense of player progression and offer interesting goals. While Rusty Moyher programmed and created the art for Dig Dog himself, the music was composed by Matthew Grimm, who also goes by 8bitmatt. Dig Dog is currently available for the Nintendo Switch. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  11. Pendulo Studios and YS Interactive just announced an ambitious adaptation of the French graphic novel series Blacksad. The striking multi-volume string of mysteries and adventures from authors Juan Díaz Canales and Juanjo Guarnido follows the exploits of John Blacksad, a dedicated independent investigator who gets wrapped up in something bigger than another easily solved missing persons case. The series relies heavily on the hardboiled and noir genres with unique spins on tropes that should be instantly familiar to anyone who has watched films like John Huston's The Maltese Falcon or Alfred Hitchcock's Strangers on a Train. It's a rare genre to see in video games, with the only notable examples being LA Noir from Rockstar and another graphic novel adaptation, The Wolf Among Us. Blacksad: Under the Skin takes place in an alternate version of 1950s New York City populated entirely by anthropomorphic animals. A strange series of disappearances and deaths take place around a boxing club in town. Joe Dunn, the owner of the club, is found dead in a possible suicide. The club's premier fighter, Bobby Yale, can't be found. With these two mysteries looming over the gym, Sonia Dunn, Joe's daughter, turns to John Blacksad to get to the bottom of whatever is going on. How players wish to pursue the answers they need will have lasting consequences in this narrative adventure game. Depending on decisions made over the course of the investigation, the outcome could be wildly different. Characters will react differently to Blacksad if he chooses to play hardball instead of by the rules of the ever-shifting underworld he's about to enter. Sometimes to get to the bottom of nasty business, someone might have to get a bit dirty. Honestly, Blacksad: Under the Skin looks really cool and fresh. There aren't a ton of games tackling this sort of subject matter, especially not through an anthropomorphic lens. It's interesting that the game, despite the silly visuals seems to be playing it all straight. The deadly serious tone of the game really makes it come together as an interesting project. Even though I haven't heard of either of the developers behind this adaptation of Blacksad before, it looks really competently made and boldly different. No matter how you cut it, that's exciting. Blacksad: Under the Skin will be releasing for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, and PC later this year on September 26. The game will feature full voice support for English, French and Spanish along with subtitles in English, French, Italian, German, Spanish and Dutch. A collector's edition of the game will be available at launch that includes the base game along with an artbook and a resin statue of John Blacksad himself. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  12. Pendulo Studios and YS Interactive just announced an ambitious adaptation of the French graphic novel series Blacksad. The striking multi-volume string of mysteries and adventures from authors Juan Díaz Canales and Juanjo Guarnido follows the exploits of John Blacksad, a dedicated independent investigator who gets wrapped up in something bigger than another easily solved missing persons case. The series relies heavily on the hardboiled and noir genres with unique spins on tropes that should be instantly familiar to anyone who has watched films like John Huston's The Maltese Falcon or Alfred Hitchcock's Strangers on a Train. It's a rare genre to see in video games, with the only notable examples being LA Noir from Rockstar and another graphic novel adaptation, The Wolf Among Us. Blacksad: Under the Skin takes place in an alternate version of 1950s New York City populated entirely by anthropomorphic animals. A strange series of disappearances and deaths take place around a boxing club in town. Joe Dunn, the owner of the club, is found dead in a possible suicide. The club's premier fighter, Bobby Yale, can't be found. With these two mysteries looming over the gym, Sonia Dunn, Joe's daughter, turns to John Blacksad to get to the bottom of whatever is going on. How players wish to pursue the answers they need will have lasting consequences in this narrative adventure game. Depending on decisions made over the course of the investigation, the outcome could be wildly different. Characters will react differently to Blacksad if he chooses to play hardball instead of by the rules of the ever-shifting underworld he's about to enter. Sometimes to get to the bottom of nasty business, someone might have to get a bit dirty. Honestly, Blacksad: Under the Skin looks really cool and fresh. There aren't a ton of games tackling this sort of subject matter, especially not through an anthropomorphic lens. It's interesting that the game, despite the silly visuals seems to be playing it all straight. The deadly serious tone of the game really makes it come together as an interesting project. Even though I haven't heard of either of the developers behind this adaptation of Blacksad before, it looks really competently made and boldly different. No matter how you cut it, that's exciting. Blacksad: Under the Skin will be releasing for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, and PC later this year on September 26. The game will feature full voice support for English, French and Spanish along with subtitles in English, French, Italian, German, Spanish and Dutch. A collector's edition of the game will be available at launch that includes the base game along with an artbook and a resin statue of John Blacksad himself. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  13. You know the massive boss ships that float down from the top of the screen in classic bullet hell games? Have you ever wondered what it would be like to play as one of those for a change? Now you can thanks to Spacewave Software's Rival Megagun! Rival Megagun has two players competing against one another as they battle through SHMUP (Shoot 'Em Up) levels while trying to take one another out. When hitting certain power levels, players can cross the vertical divide to attack their opponent as a colossal boss ship - a Mega Gunship, if you will. Players can tackle the game solo against the AI, play against friends in local couch co-op, or take on all comers online. The game features a number of different playable characters each with their own strengths and weaknesses and unique Mega Gunship forms. There's also a solo play arcade mode for those who want to immerse themselves in the classic roots of the genre. As players progress through the Rival Megagun, they'll unlock new components and weapons for their various ships, enabling customizations and opening up devious tactics to spring on unsuspecting rivals. Rival Megagun is available today for PC and PlayStation 4, November 30 for Xbox One, and December 12 for the Nintendo Switch. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  14. You know the massive boss ships that float down from the top of the screen in classic bullet hell games? Have you ever wondered what it would be like to play as one of those for a change? Now you can thanks to Spacewave Software's Rival Megagun! Rival Megagun has two players competing against one another as they battle through SHMUP (Shoot 'Em Up) levels while trying to take one another out. When hitting certain power levels, players can cross the vertical divide to attack their opponent as a colossal boss ship - a Mega Gunship, if you will. Players can tackle the game solo against the AI, play against friends in local couch co-op, or take on all comers online. The game features a number of different playable characters each with their own strengths and weaknesses and unique Mega Gunship forms. There's also a solo play arcade mode for those who want to immerse themselves in the classic roots of the genre. As players progress through the Rival Megagun, they'll unlock new components and weapons for their various ships, enabling customizations and opening up devious tactics to spring on unsuspecting rivals. Rival Megagun is available today for PC and PlayStation 4, November 30 for Xbox One, and December 12 for the Nintendo Switch. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  15. Titan Quest may have been out for over a decade, but it has just released on consoles for the first time. Players can now experience the Diablo-like ARPG based on mythologies from around the world. Crafted by Brian Sullivan, one of the co-creators of Age of Empires, players travel across Europe, the Middle East, and Asia in an attempt to stop the long imprisoned Titans from destroying the planet. With the help of the gods themselves, it might just be possible. Titan Quest is notable for its story having been written by Randall Wallace, the mind behind the film Braveheart. The console version features completely overhauled graphics that bring the 2006 game up to modern graphical standards. It also supports online co-op play for up to six players. That's right, up to five of your friends can run around the ancient world doing battle with mythical creatures. With controls remapped to console gamepads, it's never been easier to play. Titan Quest is available now for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. A Nintendo Switch version is currently in development, but the official word is that it will be released when it is done. A couch co-op mode is also on the way. What do you think? Will you be picking up Titan Quest? View full article
  16. Titan Quest may have been out for over a decade, but it has just released on consoles for the first time. Players can now experience the Diablo-like ARPG based on mythologies from around the world. Crafted by Brian Sullivan, one of the co-creators of Age of Empires, players travel across Europe, the Middle East, and Asia in an attempt to stop the long imprisoned Titans from destroying the planet. With the help of the gods themselves, it might just be possible. Titan Quest is notable for its story having been written by Randall Wallace, the mind behind the film Braveheart. The console version features completely overhauled graphics that bring the 2006 game up to modern graphical standards. It also supports online co-op play for up to six players. That's right, up to five of your friends can run around the ancient world doing battle with mythical creatures. With controls remapped to console gamepads, it's never been easier to play. Titan Quest is available now for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. A Nintendo Switch version is currently in development, but the official word is that it will be released when it is done. A couch co-op mode is also on the way. What do you think? Will you be picking up Titan Quest?
  17. Indie developer The Molasses Flood is bringing the charming, country rogue-like the Flame in the Flood to the Switch's eShop later this month. The bleak, beautiful game has players scrambling to survive in a hostile wilderness as they traverse the currents of a procedurally generated river. Camping spots to scavenge for supplies and contend with beasts of all kinds offer both safe havens and danger. Accompanied by your dog, Aesop, players must try to make their way down the river to find peace. The Flame in the Flood released last year to generally positive reviews that praised the challenge of its survival elements, while also acknowledging flaws like a less than compelling narrative and a clunky menu system. The gameplay seems to have been what captured the attention of many, which isn't surprising since The Molasses Flood's ranks are composed of developers who worked on titles like BioShock and Halo 2. Perhaps one of the biggest hooks for The Flame in the Flood remains it soundtrack. Composed and performed by Chuck Ragan, it perfectly captures the rambling, serene, and intense feeling The Flame and the Flood provokes in players. Give it a listen if you're the kind of person who enjoys good music. “The natural rhythm of The Flame In The Flood—sailing from island to island, gathering resources and hunting wild animals—is a perfect fit for the Nintendo Switch,” said Forrest Dowling, lead designer of The Flame in the Flood. “Like Scout’s journey of survival, players will be able to shape their story wherever they see fit, be it on the couch, the bus, or even on a boat gently meandering down the Mississippi river.” The Flame in the Flood will release on the Nintendo Switch eShop October 12.
  18. Indie developer The Molasses Flood is bringing the charming, country rogue-like the Flame in the Flood to the Switch's eShop later this month. The bleak, beautiful game has players scrambling to survive in a hostile wilderness as they traverse the currents of a procedurally generated river. Camping spots to scavenge for supplies and contend with beasts of all kinds offer both safe havens and danger. Accompanied by your dog, Aesop, players must try to make their way down the river to find peace. The Flame in the Flood released last year to generally positive reviews that praised the challenge of its survival elements, while also acknowledging flaws like a less than compelling narrative and a clunky menu system. The gameplay seems to have been what captured the attention of many, which isn't surprising since The Molasses Flood's ranks are composed of developers who worked on titles like BioShock and Halo 2. Perhaps one of the biggest hooks for The Flame in the Flood remains it soundtrack. Composed and performed by Chuck Ragan, it perfectly captures the rambling, serene, and intense feeling The Flame and the Flood provokes in players. Give it a listen if you're the kind of person who enjoys good music. “The natural rhythm of The Flame In The Flood—sailing from island to island, gathering resources and hunting wild animals—is a perfect fit for the Nintendo Switch,” said Forrest Dowling, lead designer of The Flame in the Flood. “Like Scout’s journey of survival, players will be able to shape their story wherever they see fit, be it on the couch, the bus, or even on a boat gently meandering down the Mississippi river.” The Flame in the Flood will release on the Nintendo Switch eShop October 12. View full article
  19. Indie retro platformers are a dime a dozen in 2017. Since the success of Super Meat Boy in 2010, the independent scene has become cluttered with also-ran, ultra-challenging, quirky platformers of the 8-bit variety. As an ultra-challenging, quirky platformer of the 8-bit variety, Slime-San, from developer Fabraz and publisher Headup Games, will likely fall squarely into that also-ran category, to no fault of its own. Slime-San’s titular protagonist finds himself trapped inside a worm. The reasons are unknown, but probably have something to do with the fact that it’s… ya know, a slime. Inside the worm, an entire community of slimes has developed, with NPC’s offering up quirky flavor text and gameplay modifications. Everyone seems to have resigned themselves to their fate, eternally trapped inside this volatile invertebrate, but not Slime-San. He’s going to get out, and he’s going to free everyone else in the process. Slime-San’s amusing story, but silly story made me laugh more than a handful of times. Slime-San is a fine example of what has made the platformer genre so enduring even three decades after Mario first bounced off a goomba’s head. The platforming presents an intense dance of thumbs and reflexes as each level tests your ability to flip back and forth between the numerous pitfalls and traps in each stage. Those obstacles range from enemies that chase you around the level, to lasers that rise and fall in tandem, to an ever-present red slime that acts as a timer lending some more tension to each stage. The environments inside the giant worm in which Slime-San is trapped, mainly consist of green and red surfaces. You can bounce and climb up green surfaces, while red surfaces will kill your gungy, little protagonist. You can slow time to pass through green surfaces or perform a quick forward dash to more easily maneuver through the game’s many obstacles. These abilities are key to Slime-San’s mobility, which feels tight and joyful, always keeping you on your toes without becoming too frustrating. This is greatly aided by the game’s generous checkpoint system. Death in Slime-San serves as a lesson in how to avoid it on the next run through a level, rather than a frustrating penalty. That’s not to say Slime-San avoids frustration altogether. As the game progresses, new concepts and obstacles are introduced at a steady drip. While some effectively enhance the challenge, others detract from what Slime-San does well. There are a number of puzzle levels that, when combined with the game’s already perplexing platforming sequences, serve to slow things down and create a repetitive loop that often tested my patience to its breaking point. In addition, underwater levels show up more often that they should, which is to say they should’ve been nixed completely. The underwater stages simply don’t play to Slime-San’s strengths, slowing Slime-San’s movement speed to a crawl and evoking the feeling of swimming through a bowl of Jell-O rather than zipping around tightly designed corridors. At times like this, Slime-San’s creativity undermines its tight, smooth game design. Slime-San’s best moments are challenges that require unimpeachable control, precise timing, and speed. Slime-San is designed for forward momentum, and each one-screen stage lays out where you need to go right from the beginning, so all you need to do is figure out how to get there and the quickest route to take. Boss fights break up the challenges nicely, allowing you to experiment with different techniques to take down each beast. These fights test your skills to the max, but they’re also a lot of fun. I only wish there were more of them. My biggest issue with Slime-San relates directly to the platform I played it on. The Nintendo Switch Joy-Con controllers were not designed well for someone with large hands, and playing Slime-San exasperates that problem. The game demands precise timing and thumb-work, but the Joy-Cons can’t accommodate that for someone like myself. Whereas I find that minimalist, chill games like Death Squared seem perfectly suited to the Switch, games like Slime-San and, similarly, Super Meat Boy (which also recently released on Switch) are hindered by the console’s standard input controllers. I have never wished I had a Nintendo Switch Pro Controller more than after some of the more harrowing sections of Slime-San. The lack of a real d-pad and the close proximity of the face buttons and the shoulder buttons on the Joy-Cons force my hands into a claw position that aches for about ten minutes afterwards. Listen, I know that not everyone will have this problem. Maybe I’m just old, or maybe I just have big hands, or god forbid, maybe I’m developing carpal tunnel or early stage arthritis, but playing Slime-San on Switch made me feel like my hands were falling apart. It’s a shame, because this is the kind of game that can ensnare you for hours on end as you try “just one more level” over and over until your thumbs go numb. Conclusion: Slime-San isn’t perfect, but it is charming, and provides a challenging good time for any fan of the genre. I’m glad it released on Switch, so that it’s now on all of the major platforms; PS4, Xbox One, Switch, and Steam. It’s the kind of game that fits nicely on Switch (provided you have a pro controller, or the joy-cons fit your hands perfectly), and especially benefits from the new Nintendo system’s less-congested marketplace. It’s a great game, but it doesn’t stand out from the pack of indie platformers on offer. Heck, it’s not even the most recognizable slime-themed game this year. While never quite reaching the heights of some of its predecessors, Slime-San makes for an enjoyable, but imperfect little platforming adventure. View full article
  20. Indie retro platformers are a dime a dozen in 2017. Since the success of Super Meat Boy in 2010, the independent scene has become cluttered with also-ran, ultra-challenging, quirky platformers of the 8-bit variety. As an ultra-challenging, quirky platformer of the 8-bit variety, Slime-San, from developer Fabraz and publisher Headup Games, will likely fall squarely into that also-ran category, to no fault of its own. Slime-San’s titular protagonist finds himself trapped inside a worm. The reasons are unknown, but probably have something to do with the fact that it’s… ya know, a slime. Inside the worm, an entire community of slimes has developed, with NPC’s offering up quirky flavor text and gameplay modifications. Everyone seems to have resigned themselves to their fate, eternally trapped inside this volatile invertebrate, but not Slime-San. He’s going to get out, and he’s going to free everyone else in the process. Slime-San’s amusing story, but silly story made me laugh more than a handful of times. Slime-San is a fine example of what has made the platformer genre so enduring even three decades after Mario first bounced off a goomba’s head. The platforming presents an intense dance of thumbs and reflexes as each level tests your ability to flip back and forth between the numerous pitfalls and traps in each stage. Those obstacles range from enemies that chase you around the level, to lasers that rise and fall in tandem, to an ever-present red slime that acts as a timer lending some more tension to each stage. The environments inside the giant worm in which Slime-San is trapped, mainly consist of green and red surfaces. You can bounce and climb up green surfaces, while red surfaces will kill your gungy, little protagonist. You can slow time to pass through green surfaces or perform a quick forward dash to more easily maneuver through the game’s many obstacles. These abilities are key to Slime-San’s mobility, which feels tight and joyful, always keeping you on your toes without becoming too frustrating. This is greatly aided by the game’s generous checkpoint system. Death in Slime-San serves as a lesson in how to avoid it on the next run through a level, rather than a frustrating penalty. That’s not to say Slime-San avoids frustration altogether. As the game progresses, new concepts and obstacles are introduced at a steady drip. While some effectively enhance the challenge, others detract from what Slime-San does well. There are a number of puzzle levels that, when combined with the game’s already perplexing platforming sequences, serve to slow things down and create a repetitive loop that often tested my patience to its breaking point. In addition, underwater levels show up more often that they should, which is to say they should’ve been nixed completely. The underwater stages simply don’t play to Slime-San’s strengths, slowing Slime-San’s movement speed to a crawl and evoking the feeling of swimming through a bowl of Jell-O rather than zipping around tightly designed corridors. At times like this, Slime-San’s creativity undermines its tight, smooth game design. Slime-San’s best moments are challenges that require unimpeachable control, precise timing, and speed. Slime-San is designed for forward momentum, and each one-screen stage lays out where you need to go right from the beginning, so all you need to do is figure out how to get there and the quickest route to take. Boss fights break up the challenges nicely, allowing you to experiment with different techniques to take down each beast. These fights test your skills to the max, but they’re also a lot of fun. I only wish there were more of them. My biggest issue with Slime-San relates directly to the platform I played it on. The Nintendo Switch Joy-Con controllers were not designed well for someone with large hands, and playing Slime-San exasperates that problem. The game demands precise timing and thumb-work, but the Joy-Cons can’t accommodate that for someone like myself. Whereas I find that minimalist, chill games like Death Squared seem perfectly suited to the Switch, games like Slime-San and, similarly, Super Meat Boy (which also recently released on Switch) are hindered by the console’s standard input controllers. I have never wished I had a Nintendo Switch Pro Controller more than after some of the more harrowing sections of Slime-San. The lack of a real d-pad and the close proximity of the face buttons and the shoulder buttons on the Joy-Cons force my hands into a claw position that aches for about ten minutes afterwards. Listen, I know that not everyone will have this problem. Maybe I’m just old, or maybe I just have big hands, or god forbid, maybe I’m developing carpal tunnel or early stage arthritis, but playing Slime-San on Switch made me feel like my hands were falling apart. It’s a shame, because this is the kind of game that can ensnare you for hours on end as you try “just one more level” over and over until your thumbs go numb. Conclusion: Slime-San isn’t perfect, but it is charming, and provides a challenging good time for any fan of the genre. I’m glad it released on Switch, so that it’s now on all of the major platforms; PS4, Xbox One, Switch, and Steam. It’s the kind of game that fits nicely on Switch (provided you have a pro controller, or the joy-cons fit your hands perfectly), and especially benefits from the new Nintendo system’s less-congested marketplace. It’s a great game, but it doesn’t stand out from the pack of indie platformers on offer. Heck, it’s not even the most recognizable slime-themed game this year. While never quite reaching the heights of some of its predecessors, Slime-San makes for an enjoyable, but imperfect little platforming adventure.
  21. Slime-san released on PC back in April, but the charming, goopy platformer about a slime with a heart of gold has released for the Nintendo Switch. The adventure is simple enough - Slime-san was living happily in the forest until one day a gigantic worm ate him! Players must help the intrepid little slime ball escape the digestive tract of the worm while navigating around hazards and making new friends who survive within the gargantuan worm. However, in order to complete his escape, Slime-san will have to conquer 100 different levels, all rendered lovingly in a retro art style. Players will be able to unlock new play styles, outfits, shaders, and multiplayer mini-games that make use of the Switch's Joy-Con controllers. Mastery of the fast-paced platforming is a must for players looking to escape the worm alive and avoid an oncoming wall of stomach acid. Slime-san uses his slime body to his advantage, squeezing through tight nooks, dashing through broken obstacles, slipping and sliding off of walls. Sliming around on the ground slows time, while dashing speeds it up. Players looking for a more competitive challenge will definitely find one in Slime-San. Fabraz, the title's developer, has added a timer to each level. Players can compare their times with online rankings to see how they measure up to Slime-san players around the world. New challenge modes like a New Game+, Speed Running, and Boss Rush can also be unlocked to up the ante. Last, but certainly not least, Slime-san features a wonderful soundtrack from over 10 different composers including the likes of Richard Gould, Adhesive Wombat, Tiasu, Meganeko, Kubbi, and Inverse Phase. It's definitely worth a listen, even if you're not a fan of platformers. Slime-san has been recognized on numerous occasions for its standout gameplay and aesthetic, including being part of the Smithsonian Arcade Selection in July. View full article
  22. Slime-san released on PC back in April, but the charming, goopy platformer about a slime with a heart of gold has released for the Nintendo Switch. The adventure is simple enough - Slime-san was living happily in the forest until one day a gigantic worm ate him! Players must help the intrepid little slime ball escape the digestive tract of the worm while navigating around hazards and making new friends who survive within the gargantuan worm. However, in order to complete his escape, Slime-san will have to conquer 100 different levels, all rendered lovingly in a retro art style. Players will be able to unlock new play styles, outfits, shaders, and multiplayer mini-games that make use of the Switch's Joy-Con controllers. Mastery of the fast-paced platforming is a must for players looking to escape the worm alive and avoid an oncoming wall of stomach acid. Slime-san uses his slime body to his advantage, squeezing through tight nooks, dashing through broken obstacles, slipping and sliding off of walls. Sliming around on the ground slows time, while dashing speeds it up. Players looking for a more competitive challenge will definitely find one in Slime-San. Fabraz, the title's developer, has added a timer to each level. Players can compare their times with online rankings to see how they measure up to Slime-san players around the world. New challenge modes like a New Game+, Speed Running, and Boss Rush can also be unlocked to up the ante. Last, but certainly not least, Slime-san features a wonderful soundtrack from over 10 different composers including the likes of Richard Gould, Adhesive Wombat, Tiasu, Meganeko, Kubbi, and Inverse Phase. It's definitely worth a listen, even if you're not a fan of platformers. Slime-san has been recognized on numerous occasions for its standout gameplay and aesthetic, including being part of the Smithsonian Arcade Selection in July.
  23. We've known for a while that Tequila Works was going to be bringing their adventure game Rime to Nintendo Switch. Now we know when it will be hitting Nintendo's flagship console. Rime launches for Nintendo Switch on November 14. It will be receiving a special, physical edition that contains the full game and the original soundtrack by David García Díaz (a soaring, magical score that would be right at home in a Studio Ghibli film). The physical edition will retail at $39.99 and a digital version will be available on the Nintendo eShop for $29.99. Rime is being ported to the Nintendo Switch by Tantalus, a company that specializes in bringing third-party titles to Nintendo systems. "As big fans of Nintendo, we truly appreciate our fans’ patience as Tantalus and Tequila Works continue working on RiME on Nintendo Switch; we are all committed to making sure all players get the high-quality experience they deserve," said Raúl Rubio Munárriz, CEO and creative director of Tequila Works. Now that Tequila Works has completed work on Rime, they've moved on to developing several other original IPs. The only one publicly known at this time is The Invisible Hours, a VR murder mystery. Rime is currently available for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Be sure to read our review of the PS4 version! View full article
  24. We've known for a while that Tequila Works was going to be bringing their adventure game Rime to Nintendo Switch. Now we know when it will be hitting Nintendo's flagship console. Rime launches for Nintendo Switch on November 14. It will be receiving a special, physical edition that contains the full game and the original soundtrack by David García Díaz (a soaring, magical score that would be right at home in a Studio Ghibli film). The physical edition will retail at $39.99 and a digital version will be available on the Nintendo eShop for $29.99. Rime is being ported to the Nintendo Switch by Tantalus, a company that specializes in bringing third-party titles to Nintendo systems. "As big fans of Nintendo, we truly appreciate our fans’ patience as Tantalus and Tequila Works continue working on RiME on Nintendo Switch; we are all committed to making sure all players get the high-quality experience they deserve," said Raúl Rubio Munárriz, CEO and creative director of Tequila Works. Now that Tequila Works has completed work on Rime, they've moved on to developing several other original IPs. The only one publicly known at this time is The Invisible Hours, a VR murder mystery. Rime is currently available for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Be sure to read our review of the PS4 version!
  25. I’ve had my Nintendo Switch for just over a month now, but it’s already my preferred way to play video games. As a father, I have very little time to relax once everyone goes to sleep, so I often have to choose between playing video games and just vegging out and watching Netflix or YouTube. With my Switch, I don’t have to choose, I can do both. I’ve also gotten some use out of the system’s built-in portable co-op, playing Mario Kart 8 Deluxe with my nephews and, more recently, playing Death Squared with my wife – in bed, nonetheless. Death Squared released earlier this year for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Windows PC, but like so many other independent games, it feels most at home on the Switch. The puzzle game tasks players with moving two or four different-colored robot cubes across grid-based levels from point A to point B. In single-player mode, each joystick on the Joy-Cons controls a different robot (two at a time). Things can get a bit tricky when you have to move both robots at the same time. However, in co-op, with the Joy-Cons detached, each player can naturally control a separate robot independently. It’s simple and intuitive to just pick up and play the game – in a way that only really works on the Switch. Death Squared never over complicates things on the gameplay front. The only input you need to know is how to move the joystick. That’s it. The rest is a matter of learning the various traps and mechanics that are layered on top of that simple premise of getting each robot to point B without dying. The game feels right at home among easy-to-learn but difficult to master Nintendo games like Mario Kart 8 and Arms. As the name implies, Death Squared uses death to teach players how the game works – which isn’t always to its benefit. Each new puzzle layers new challenges onto the formula, oftentimes without warning. For example, you only learn about the spikes that pop up from the floor and kill your robot at the very moment they kill your robot. Playing in co-op, dying repeatedly due to your partner’s impatience, incompetence, or mischievousness can be a good time. But in single-player, the trial and error gameplay can feel unfair and quickly becomes maddening as you gingerly try to navigate around each level while the game’s characters – a man named David and his A.I. overseer – mock your poor performance. It’s all much more enjoyable while playing co-op and can become pretty addictive once it sinks its hooks in you. With each level lasting no longer than a few minutes, once my wife and I got into a groove, we didn’t want to stop playing. With each new conundrum, we became better at coordinating and anticipating the game’s dastardly traps. My wife, who rarely plays games, ended up getting sucked into the clever puzzles and every time I suggested we quit, she would plead for just one more level. While a lot of credit goes to SMG Studio for designing the most enjoyable co-op puzzle game I’ve played since Portal 2, I can almost guarantee that my wife would’ve balked at the idea of playing Death Squared on PlayStation 4. The difference comes down to simplicity. Despite the controls being essentially the same across platforms, the Nintendo Switch Joy-Cons present a far less intimidating form factor than the sixteen different buttons on the Dual Shock 4. It’s not that my wife is a simpleton (in fact, she’s much smarter than I am), it’s just that she isn’t as fluent in the language of video games. Neither are most people outside of the gaming bubble that we often find ourselves in. My three-year-old daughter never showed an interest in actually playing video games until I brought home my Switch. Now she can actually finish a race in Mario Kart 8. She hasn’t beaten me yet, but I look forward to the day when she does. So, even though the game is relatively friction-less for newcomers, some frustration rears its head through odd design decisions and technical quibbles. Each of the game’s test rooms (read: levels) are designed as floating constructs in some seemingly dark, vast warehouse. None of the test rooms have walls, so you’ll often just fall off the side of the structure and die when all you were trying to do was navigate in a straight line, especially in single-player when you’re often controlling both cubes at the same time, similar to Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons. So many times, I knew what I needed to do, but actually executing it was not as easy as it should’ve been. This makes simply going through the steps of completing a puzzle more frustrating than it needs to be. This is especially compounded by the fact that the game doesn’t consistently auto-save. Too often, I would load an old save only to find that I had to start a couple of levels back from where I had last stopped. And when simply moving around the environment can be treacherous, that problem isn’t as minor as it would otherwise be. Despite some of its minor issues, I’m still having a blast with Death Squared, and I think my wife is too. We haven’t made it through all of the game’s 80 plus levels (which is why you shouldn’t consider this to be a full review), but we have every intention of going back and seeing what new predicaments we can solve for those adorable little cubes. I can sincerely say, this is a game I’d much rather play on my Switch over any other system - and the list of games I can say that about is rapidly growing in number. A game as simple and accessible as Death Squared just makes more sense on Switch, but the fact that it’s also a smaller indie title that released to very little fanfare on other systems doesn’t hurt either. With less competition, now is the perfect time for games like this to find an audience. Death Squared benefits from being a kid friendly pick-up-and-play game on a kid friendly, mobile console. Though it isn’t a perfect game, it deserves to be seen and played by more people, and I’m glad it might have that chance on Nintendo’s nifty young console. View full article
×
×
  • Create New...