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Found 220 results

  1. Indie developer Tower Five has revealed its upcoming action strategy game, Lornsword Winter Chronicles. The game comes courtesy of Renaud Charpentier, Mattijs van Delden, Nicolas Frath, and Horacio Cassinelli. The team previously worked together on strategy titles for Creative Assembly, but decided to strike out on their own to develop their upcoming early access title that aims to meld action and storytelling in a way many might not have experienced before. The story-driven action of Lornsword follows the exploits of the general of the Lorn Empire. As the world nears a disastrous precipice, players take on the role of a leader to a struggling group of people and guide them to victory and survival in a world riven by war and magic. What players decide to do on the battlefield will come back to help or haunt them later with a narrative that emphasizes moment-to-moment decision making. Co-op stands out as one of Lornsword's unique features. Players can drop in and out of the game's cooperative mode mid-game. This opens up a great number of tactical possibilities for those who can snag a friend to help them in their struggle against enemy factions. “We’re very excited about bringing Lornsword Winter Chronicle to Early Access at the end of May,” said Renaud Charpentier, game director at Tower Five. “Action strategy games have been in our blood for many years, so we’re excited to deliver our own take on it that encapsulates that collective experience and expertise.” What Tower Five has built so far should be immediately recognizable to fans of the RTS genre. The meat and potatoes of gameplay revolves around building up a base, securing resources, making units, and then commanding those units with (hopefully brilliant) tactical ability. However, the developers are attempting to take the game away from its native homeland, the PC, and bring it to consoles. Typically, this has been something of a death sentence for RTS games, but Tower Five will be using the Lornsword's time in Early Access to fine tune it for controller play. Of course, the Early Access will also be a time to take player feedback while the devs create the final two chapters of the game that will conclude the Winter Chronicle. Lornsword Winter Chronicle releases on May 30 for PC via Steam Early Access. That release will include the prologue and the first chapter, which will be followed by two additional chapters when the game launches before the end of 2019. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  2. Indie developer Tower Five has revealed its upcoming action strategy game, Lornsword Winter Chronicles. The game comes courtesy of Renaud Charpentier, Mattijs van Delden, Nicolas Frath, and Horacio Cassinelli. The team previously worked together on strategy titles for Creative Assembly, but decided to strike out on their own to develop their upcoming early access title that aims to meld action and storytelling in a way many might not have experienced before. The story-driven action of Lornsword follows the exploits of the general of the Lorn Empire. As the world nears a disastrous precipice, players take on the role of a leader to a struggling group of people and guide them to victory and survival in a world riven by war and magic. What players decide to do on the battlefield will come back to help or haunt them later with a narrative that emphasizes moment-to-moment decision making. Co-op stands out as one of Lornsword's unique features. Players can drop in and out of the game's cooperative mode mid-game. This opens up a great number of tactical possibilities for those who can snag a friend to help them in their struggle against enemy factions. “We’re very excited about bringing Lornsword Winter Chronicle to Early Access at the end of May,” said Renaud Charpentier, game director at Tower Five. “Action strategy games have been in our blood for many years, so we’re excited to deliver our own take on it that encapsulates that collective experience and expertise.” What Tower Five has built so far should be immediately recognizable to fans of the RTS genre. The meat and potatoes of gameplay revolves around building up a base, securing resources, making units, and then commanding those units with (hopefully brilliant) tactical ability. However, the developers are attempting to take the game away from its native homeland, the PC, and bring it to consoles. Typically, this has been something of a death sentence for RTS games, but Tower Five will be using the Lornsword's time in Early Access to fine tune it for controller play. Of course, the Early Access will also be a time to take player feedback while the devs create the final two chapters of the game that will conclude the Winter Chronicle. Lornsword Winter Chronicle releases on May 30 for PC via Steam Early Access. That release will include the prologue and the first chapter, which will be followed by two additional chapters when the game launches before the end of 2019. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  3. What can you accomplish in 21 days? That's the question the narrative adventure game A Place for the Unwilling poses its players. Live out the handful of days finding rich and fulfilling moments with new friends, dominate the markets, or uncover the secrets lurking beneath the layer of normality throughout the city. ALpixel Games pitches it as a game that mixes Sunless Sea with the time limitations of The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask, along with dashes of authors like Dickens and Lovecraft. With a ticking clock, players have three weeks before the city and all who live in it find themselves among the dead. Following the death of a close friend who leaves you his house and trading business, players move to an unfamiliar city full of quirky characters and dark mysteries. Players can choose how they approach living in this new location, exploring the streets and meeting locals, investigating the death of their friend, or carrying on with running the business. While many activities might overlap, there isn't enough time to go deeply into everything, meaning that players will have to playthrough multiple times if they want to experience everything that A Place for the Unwilling has to offer. Developer ALpixel Games has tried to give all of the NPCs quirks and hooks that make them interesting and draw player attention, whether it's the crazy old man who runs the local bookstore or the strange mother of the player's deceased friend who holds a stilted party shortly after the player arrives in town. Since this is an adventure game, how players spend their most precious resource, time, will have huge consequences. The open world nature of A Place for the Unwilling forces players to decide how best to tackle living in the city, both opening new paths and closing others. Diving into trading, for example, means that the player will have money to throw around. Money can be used to bribe NPCs or buy items that would be impossible to acquire otherwise. Of course, the distinctive aesthetic of A Place for the Unwilling stands out as another selling point. The character designs are reminiscent of The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, but with some slightly unnerving undertones. As players explore the city, NPCs go from being faceless, scribbled outlines to being fully realized people. However, despite how aggressively normal many of the city's residents might seem, the gloom that hangs over the city feels oppressive, constantly conveying that something isn't right underneath it all. And perhaps that twisted heart is better left alone and fate simply left to its own devices. How players choose to interact with the city's denizens, what paths they choose to pursue, and how they spend their time, all contribute to a changing world and, perhaps, the eventual outcome for the city itself. And, yes, the player can even choose to do nothing at all to change life in the city. The city itself isn't in the best shape - the developers want to investigate issues of income inequality, loneliness, and the way those concepts could fuel an oppressive and overwhelming eldritch evil. The king is coming. A Place for the Unwilling releases later this year for PC. If it interests you, take the warning of the developers, "The city is hungry. It will devour us all. Dream with caution." Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  4. What can you accomplish in 21 days? That's the question the narrative adventure game A Place for the Unwilling poses its players. Live out the handful of days finding rich and fulfilling moments with new friends, dominate the markets, or uncover the secrets lurking beneath the layer of normality throughout the city. ALpixel Games pitches it as a game that mixes Sunless Sea with the time limitations of The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask, along with dashes of authors like Dickens and Lovecraft. With a ticking clock, players have three weeks before the city and all who live in it find themselves among the dead. Following the death of a close friend who leaves you his house and trading business, players move to an unfamiliar city full of quirky characters and dark mysteries. Players can choose how they approach living in this new location, exploring the streets and meeting locals, investigating the death of their friend, or carrying on with running the business. While many activities might overlap, there isn't enough time to go deeply into everything, meaning that players will have to playthrough multiple times if they want to experience everything that A Place for the Unwilling has to offer. Developer ALpixel Games has tried to give all of the NPCs quirks and hooks that make them interesting and draw player attention, whether it's the crazy old man who runs the local bookstore or the strange mother of the player's deceased friend who holds a stilted party shortly after the player arrives in town. Since this is an adventure game, how players spend their most precious resource, time, will have huge consequences. The open world nature of A Place for the Unwilling forces players to decide how best to tackle living in the city, both opening new paths and closing others. Diving into trading, for example, means that the player will have money to throw around. Money can be used to bribe NPCs or buy items that would be impossible to acquire otherwise. Of course, the distinctive aesthetic of A Place for the Unwilling stands out as another selling point. The character designs are reminiscent of The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, but with some slightly unnerving undertones. As players explore the city, NPCs go from being faceless, scribbled outlines to being fully realized people. However, despite how aggressively normal many of the city's residents might seem, the gloom that hangs over the city feels oppressive, constantly conveying that something isn't right underneath it all. And perhaps that twisted heart is better left alone and fate simply left to its own devices. How players choose to interact with the city's denizens, what paths they choose to pursue, and how they spend their time, all contribute to a changing world and, perhaps, the eventual outcome for the city itself. And, yes, the player can even choose to do nothing at all to change life in the city. The city itself isn't in the best shape - the developers want to investigate issues of income inequality, loneliness, and the way those concepts could fuel an oppressive and overwhelming eldritch evil. The king is coming. A Place for the Unwilling releases later this year for PC. If it interests you, take the warning of the developers, "The city is hungry. It will devour us all. Dream with caution." Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  5. Rusty Moyher, an independent game developer, hails from Austin, Texas where he quietly works from his house to create small, engaging games. His first title, Astro Duel Deluxe, released on Nintendo Switch in May of 2017. Dig Dog stands as the latest game Moyher has released, but it holds the unique distinction of being the first title he created without the use of his hands. Due to a repetitive stress injury, Moyher retained limited use of his hands, but could not work on creating his games via traditional methods anymore. He set about the difficult task of coding and creating artwork for a game without using his hands. That might seem impossible to a lot of people, but Moyher came up with some ingenious methods to achieve his goals. Instead of typing out code with a keyboard, Moyher developed a shorthand language to speak into a microphone that would be able to translate into the symbols and words needed to create functional game code. The result is something that sounds like extremely fast gibberish, but in the video included below, you can see his computer translate it into code relatively easily. To create the art assets for the retro silhouette aesthetic, Moyher had to get even more creative. Using a mouse was out of the question with his hands, so he attached a small reflective dot to a hat and set up a webcam to track its movements. He was able to then link those movements with those of the cursor and manipulate it within the art program he was using to create assets. Of course, one might wonder how he was able to click without the use of a mouse - he simply connected a foot pedal to his computer and reconfigured it into a mouse click. With those two technological adaptations, Moyher was able to create Dig Dog, an amusing tribute to retro gaming staring a dog on a search for more bones. Of course, much like the retro classic Dig Dug, the world of Dig Dog is populated by a variety of enemies that pose a threat to the lovable canine. Players will have to stomp, dash, and dig their way to defeating enemies and bypassing environmental hazards. The game sports two different gameplay modes. The first is called Bone Hunt, which is the core roguelike game at the heart of Dig Dog. Players make their way through each stage searching for bones. However, as they make progress, they can discover shops that sell upgrades and a variety of other secrets. These stages shift with each playthrough, making each session a unique adventure. The deeper the dog delves, the more difficult the game becomes. Free Dig is similar, but enemies present less of a threat and the stages offer more freedom of movement. On top of all of that, players can unlock palette swaps for the game to change the ambiance while digging for those elusive bones. The game also comes with built-in achievements to preserve some sense of player progression and offer interesting goals. While Rusty Moyher programmed and created the art for Dig Dog himself, the music was composed by Matthew Grimm, who also goes by 8bitmatt. Dig Dog is currently available for the Nintendo Switch. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  6. Rusty Moyher, an independent game developer, hails from Austin, Texas where he quietly works from his house to create small, engaging games. His first title, Astro Duel Deluxe, released on Nintendo Switch in May of 2017. Dig Dog stands as the latest game Moyher has released, but it holds the unique distinction of being the first title he created without the use of his hands. Due to a repetitive stress injury, Moyher retained limited use of his hands, but could not work on creating his games via traditional methods anymore. He set about the difficult task of coding and creating artwork for a game without using his hands. That might seem impossible to a lot of people, but Moyher came up with some ingenious methods to achieve his goals. Instead of typing out code with a keyboard, Moyher developed a shorthand language to speak into a microphone that would be able to translate into the symbols and words needed to create functional game code. The result is something that sounds like extremely fast gibberish, but in the video included below, you can see his computer translate it into code relatively easily. To create the art assets for the retro silhouette aesthetic, Moyher had to get even more creative. Using a mouse was out of the question with his hands, so he attached a small reflective dot to a hat and set up a webcam to track its movements. He was able to then link those movements with those of the cursor and manipulate it within the art program he was using to create assets. Of course, one might wonder how he was able to click without the use of a mouse - he simply connected a foot pedal to his computer and reconfigured it into a mouse click. With those two technological adaptations, Moyher was able to create Dig Dog, an amusing tribute to retro gaming staring a dog on a search for more bones. Of course, much like the retro classic Dig Dug, the world of Dig Dog is populated by a variety of enemies that pose a threat to the lovable canine. Players will have to stomp, dash, and dig their way to defeating enemies and bypassing environmental hazards. The game sports two different gameplay modes. The first is called Bone Hunt, which is the core roguelike game at the heart of Dig Dog. Players make their way through each stage searching for bones. However, as they make progress, they can discover shops that sell upgrades and a variety of other secrets. These stages shift with each playthrough, making each session a unique adventure. The deeper the dog delves, the more difficult the game becomes. Free Dig is similar, but enemies present less of a threat and the stages offer more freedom of movement. On top of all of that, players can unlock palette swaps for the game to change the ambiance while digging for those elusive bones. The game also comes with built-in achievements to preserve some sense of player progression and offer interesting goals. While Rusty Moyher programmed and created the art for Dig Dog himself, the music was composed by Matthew Grimm, who also goes by 8bitmatt. Dig Dog is currently available for the Nintendo Switch. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  7. Cuphead captured the hearts of gamers around the world when it released during the tail end of 2017. The distinctive, early animation art style in particular caught the attention of artists and fans, which has lead to an incredible partnership between the game's developer, Studio MDHR, and the incredible illustrator Uki Hayashi. With the help of Bottleneck Gallery, a number of illustrated prints have been made for sale that meld the game's wonderful aesthetic with Hayashi's unmistakably Japanese stylings. The print collection has been put togehter to pay homage to the Japanese titles that inspired Cuphead, the indelible classics that many continue to hold up today as gold standards for gameplay and aesthetic. Cuphead took the finely balanced side-scrolling shooting from games like Contra and combined it with jaw-dropping visuals, garnering almost universal acclaim. Three unique prints have been made by Uki Hayashi and been made available through Bottleneck Gallery. Each Giclee print sells for either $40 or $50 and, though there are three basic designs, each one has a color variant that plays with and changes the use of white in each design. You can view the full collection on Bottleneck Gallery's site. Bottleneck Gallery hosts a variety of contemporary art and artists. It makes an effort to provide space to both new and well-known artists for events intended to build up the local community and benefit charity. It also focuses on bringing unique and interesting pieces of pop culture art to the masses with works ranging from Bob's Burgers enamel pins to incredible artistic renderings of iconic moments in cartoons, blockbuster movies, and more. Some mainstream critics maintain that Cuphead was one of if not the hardest games they have ever played. Despite that, or maybe because of it, Cuphead received some of the highest awards and scores outlets could bestow on a game, helping to propel the indie game's success around the world. Now, Cuphead is coming to the Nintendo Switch tomorrow, April 18. Maybe it's a good time to pick up a cool art print while buying the game for the first, second, or third time? Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  8. Cuphead captured the hearts of gamers around the world when it released during the tail end of 2017. The distinctive, early animation art style in particular caught the attention of artists and fans, which has lead to an incredible partnership between the game's developer, Studio MDHR, and the incredible illustrator Uki Hayashi. With the help of Bottleneck Gallery, a number of illustrated prints have been made for sale that meld the game's wonderful aesthetic with Hayashi's unmistakably Japanese stylings. The print collection has been put togehter to pay homage to the Japanese titles that inspired Cuphead, the indelible classics that many continue to hold up today as gold standards for gameplay and aesthetic. Cuphead took the finely balanced side-scrolling shooting from games like Contra and combined it with jaw-dropping visuals, garnering almost universal acclaim. Three unique prints have been made by Uki Hayashi and been made available through Bottleneck Gallery. Each Giclee print sells for either $40 or $50 and, though there are three basic designs, each one has a color variant that plays with and changes the use of white in each design. You can view the full collection on Bottleneck Gallery's site. Bottleneck Gallery hosts a variety of contemporary art and artists. It makes an effort to provide space to both new and well-known artists for events intended to build up the local community and benefit charity. It also focuses on bringing unique and interesting pieces of pop culture art to the masses with works ranging from Bob's Burgers enamel pins to incredible artistic renderings of iconic moments in cartoons, blockbuster movies, and more. Some mainstream critics maintain that Cuphead was one of if not the hardest games they have ever played. Despite that, or maybe because of it, Cuphead received some of the highest awards and scores outlets could bestow on a game, helping to propel the indie game's success around the world. Now, Cuphead is coming to the Nintendo Switch tomorrow, April 18. Maybe it's a good time to pick up a cool art print while buying the game for the first, second, or third time? Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  9. The solo indie developer that goes by bcubedlabs has returned. After an impressive showing with The Onus Helm's Kickstarter demo early last year failed to gain crowdfunding traction, bcubedlabs hit the drawing board. They have finally returned with their next project, an action-oriented boss rush game titled Far Blade. Unlike The Onus Helm, Far Blade has launched on itch.io for $5.99, allowing players to support the developer while the project finishes and reaches full retail readiness. Admittedly, bcubedlabs makes it clear that a considerable amount of work still needs to be done, like completing the design of all seven hand-crafted boss encounters. The current build possesses finalized mechanics and camera control, so while much of it remains to be completed, the basics are all in place. It seems like the intent with Far Blade is to see it through to the end without relying on crowdfunding; meaning that the finished project will actually see the light of day. Far Blade tells the story of a lone adventurer who must fight seven huge creatures while exploring an unknown corner of the world. The story has been left deliberately vague to serve as the central mystery of the title. As players explore and conquer their foes, bits of the story will come together to form a larger whole. It seems like this might take a bit of conjecture, but many people have excelled at parsing that sort of storytelling in recent years. It should be easy to recognize several different influences at work in the basic mechanics and ideas behind Far Blade like The Legend of Zelda, Shadow of the Colossus, Dark Souls, and more modern pixel action-adventure games like Hyper Light Drifter. While the boss design and environments undergo polishing, the striking aesthetic has been drawing many eyes to Far Blade. Bcubedlabs has been working on the project alone and developed a new technique that creates 3D models in a pixelated style, making camera movement possible without remaking the art for all the different angles shown. It manages to somehow look a bit like a beautiful version of an N64 game, straddling the line between two very different retro aesthetics in a way that few titles can. At the moment, Far Blade makes use of royalty free music, but depending on how well the game does in these early development days, bcubedlabs intends to hire a composer for a personalized soundtrack. So far only PC platforms (Windows, Mac, and Linux) have been confirmed for the final version of the game. However, Far Blade includes built-in support for Xbox controllers, meaning that a console port could very well be a possibility in the future. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  10. The solo indie developer that goes by bcubedlabs has returned. After an impressive showing with The Onus Helm's Kickstarter demo early last year failed to gain crowdfunding traction, bcubedlabs hit the drawing board. They have finally returned with their next project, an action-oriented boss rush game titled Far Blade. Unlike The Onus Helm, Far Blade has launched on itch.io for $5.99, allowing players to support the developer while the project finishes and reaches full retail readiness. Admittedly, bcubedlabs makes it clear that a considerable amount of work still needs to be done, like completing the design of all seven hand-crafted boss encounters. The current build possesses finalized mechanics and camera control, so while much of it remains to be completed, the basics are all in place. It seems like the intent with Far Blade is to see it through to the end without relying on crowdfunding; meaning that the finished project will actually see the light of day. Far Blade tells the story of a lone adventurer who must fight seven huge creatures while exploring an unknown corner of the world. The story has been left deliberately vague to serve as the central mystery of the title. As players explore and conquer their foes, bits of the story will come together to form a larger whole. It seems like this might take a bit of conjecture, but many people have excelled at parsing that sort of storytelling in recent years. It should be easy to recognize several different influences at work in the basic mechanics and ideas behind Far Blade like The Legend of Zelda, Shadow of the Colossus, Dark Souls, and more modern pixel action-adventure games like Hyper Light Drifter. While the boss design and environments undergo polishing, the striking aesthetic has been drawing many eyes to Far Blade. Bcubedlabs has been working on the project alone and developed a new technique that creates 3D models in a pixelated style, making camera movement possible without remaking the art for all the different angles shown. It manages to somehow look a bit like a beautiful version of an N64 game, straddling the line between two very different retro aesthetics in a way that few titles can. At the moment, Far Blade makes use of royalty free music, but depending on how well the game does in these early development days, bcubedlabs intends to hire a composer for a personalized soundtrack. So far only PC platforms (Windows, Mac, and Linux) have been confirmed for the final version of the game. However, Far Blade includes built-in support for Xbox controllers, meaning that a console port could very well be a possibility in the future. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  11. In an industry that likes to latch onto indie devs and hold them up as self-made creators who were able to create their piece of art all on their own, Toby Fox dominated headlines with the 2015 release of his critically acclaimed RPG Undertale. As is often the case with these narratives, Undertale was not created by Toby Fox in a vacuum. Undertale did, in fact, have a lead artist named Temmie Chang. Chang has now released a short, narrative game on itch.io called Escaped Chasm. Escaped Chasm tells the story of a lonely girl who dreams of another world and an end to her isolation. It only takes about 15-20 minutes to complete a run through the game and there are "around 4 different endings" to discover according to the game's page on itch.io, meaning that to experience all of them will take a little over an hour. Temmie Chang created Escaped Chasm with RPGmaker, following in the footsteps of games like To The Moon and Star Stealing Prince. The story lives up to the emotional tone of the images and trailer advertised on Escaped Chasm's page. It's melancholy, knows exactly what it wants to be, and executes on its potential in interesting ways. Toby Fox himself pitched in to create the music heard throughout Escaped Chasm. Meanwhile the television music included in the game comes courtesy of James Roach, the composer known for his work on the Hiveswap game. With games built in RPGmaker, especially with the assistance of the people who helped make Undertale a reality, there's a chance that this isn't the last time we will be hearing from Temmie Chang or Escaped Chasm. Chang closes out her game's page by saying, "Thank you for stopping by!! I hope you like it!! I'll try to make more one day." We could be seeing a many more games come out of Undertale's team if the talents behind it all begin branching out to make their own personal projects and that's a freaking cool prospect. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  12. In an industry that likes to latch onto indie devs and hold them up as self-made creators who were able to create their piece of art all on their own, Toby Fox dominated headlines with the 2015 release of his critically acclaimed RPG Undertale. As is often the case with these narratives, Undertale was not created by Toby Fox in a vacuum. Undertale did, in fact, have a lead artist named Temmie Chang. Chang has now released a short, narrative game on itch.io called Escaped Chasm. Escaped Chasm tells the story of a lonely girl who dreams of another world and an end to her isolation. It only takes about 15-20 minutes to complete a run through the game and there are "around 4 different endings" to discover according to the game's page on itch.io, meaning that to experience all of them will take a little over an hour. Temmie Chang created Escaped Chasm with RPGmaker, following in the footsteps of games like To The Moon and Star Stealing Prince. The story lives up to the emotional tone of the images and trailer advertised on Escaped Chasm's page. It's melancholy, knows exactly what it wants to be, and executes on its potential in interesting ways. Toby Fox himself pitched in to create the music heard throughout Escaped Chasm. Meanwhile the television music included in the game comes courtesy of James Roach, the composer known for his work on the Hiveswap game. With games built in RPGmaker, especially with the assistance of the people who helped make Undertale a reality, there's a chance that this isn't the last time we will be hearing from Temmie Chang or Escaped Chasm. Chang closes out her game's page by saying, "Thank you for stopping by!! I hope you like it!! I'll try to make more one day." We could be seeing a many more games come out of Undertale's team if the talents behind it all begin branching out to make their own personal projects and that's a freaking cool prospect. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  13. Hyper Light Drifter, a game that might just be an all-time great action-adventure, released in 2016 and has persisted in the gaming consciousness for years thanks to its stylish and imaginative use of pixel art as well as its tight, rewarding combat. Those stunning visuals and action-packed conflicts will be adapted into a Hyper Light Drifter television series thanks to a partnership between developer Heart Machine and Adi Shankar, the producer responsible for getting the Netflix Castlevania series off the ground (and who is currently doing the same for Devil May Cry and Assassin's Creed). Hyper Light Drifter tells the story of a lonely wanderer afflicted by a progressive illness who traverses a world full of others who have been displaced from their homes. His adventure eventually leads him through the ancient ruins and bones of long-dead creatures to recover memories and shards of power that are linked to a doorway at the center of a slowly growing settlement. The mystery that lingers in the heart of this world holds the key to understanding both the Drifter and his world. Polygon released details from a conversation they had with Alx Preston, the founder of Heart Machine, about the upcoming adaptation. "We're going to make it cool," said Preston, "Hyper Light as a game was pretty atmospheric and kind of overbearing at times. For a series, the question is: how do you sustain and keep your attention on a non-interactive run? Does it get really, really dark and serious? Does it have some levity?” Given Shankar's success with Castlevania, the solution likely involves a mixture of both gritty material unafraid to take a show to some uncomfortable places while injecting some quippy dialogue that conveys a lot in a short amount of time. Given how well Castlevania was received, it's likely Powerhouse Animation could be tapped once again to adapt Hyper Light Drifter. The animation studio has been on a roll recently between Castlevania (which is expected to get a third season this year), the upcoming action-adventure Gods & Heroes animated Netflix series, and their original production Seis Manos coming later this year. While the style of Hyper Light Drifter relied on a gorgeous pixel aesthetic, the series will be more directly taking inspiration from the anime work of Hayao Miyazaki in Studio Ghibli's heyday. The project of adapting Hyper Light Drifter is still in its infancy, so many details about the series are still up in the air. For one, the game featured no dialogue whatsoever, something that would be incredibly difficult for a series if it's looking to find anything resembling mainstream appeal. “Considering Hyper Light was wordless, there’s an idea there of how much that would carry over to to a show,” Preston mused, "Could it be a more silent series or would we have voice acting? There's also the question of whether this would be a straight adaptation of Hyper Light Drifter's story or whether Preston and Shankar will expand on the story - or take it entirely new places. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  14. Hyper Light Drifter, a game that might just be an all-time great action-adventure, released in 2016 and has persisted in the gaming consciousness for years thanks to its stylish and imaginative use of pixel art as well as its tight, rewarding combat. Those stunning visuals and action-packed conflicts will be adapted into a Hyper Light Drifter television series thanks to a partnership between developer Heart Machine and Adi Shankar, the producer responsible for getting the Netflix Castlevania series off the ground (and who is currently doing the same for Devil May Cry and Assassin's Creed). Hyper Light Drifter tells the story of a lonely wanderer afflicted by a progressive illness who traverses a world full of others who have been displaced from their homes. His adventure eventually leads him through the ancient ruins and bones of long-dead creatures to recover memories and shards of power that are linked to a doorway at the center of a slowly growing settlement. The mystery that lingers in the heart of this world holds the key to understanding both the Drifter and his world. Polygon released details from a conversation they had with Alx Preston, the founder of Heart Machine, about the upcoming adaptation. "We're going to make it cool," said Preston, "Hyper Light as a game was pretty atmospheric and kind of overbearing at times. For a series, the question is: how do you sustain and keep your attention on a non-interactive run? Does it get really, really dark and serious? Does it have some levity?” Given Shankar's success with Castlevania, the solution likely involves a mixture of both gritty material unafraid to take a show to some uncomfortable places while injecting some quippy dialogue that conveys a lot in a short amount of time. Given how well Castlevania was received, it's likely Powerhouse Animation could be tapped once again to adapt Hyper Light Drifter. The animation studio has been on a roll recently between Castlevania (which is expected to get a third season this year), the upcoming action-adventure Gods & Heroes animated Netflix series, and their original production Seis Manos coming later this year. While the style of Hyper Light Drifter relied on a gorgeous pixel aesthetic, the series will be more directly taking inspiration from the anime work of Hayao Miyazaki in Studio Ghibli's heyday. The project of adapting Hyper Light Drifter is still in its infancy, so many details about the series are still up in the air. For one, the game featured no dialogue whatsoever, something that would be incredibly difficult for a series if it's looking to find anything resembling mainstream appeal. “Considering Hyper Light was wordless, there’s an idea there of how much that would carry over to to a show,” Preston mused, "Could it be a more silent series or would we have voice acting? There's also the question of whether this would be a straight adaptation of Hyper Light Drifter's story or whether Preston and Shankar will expand on the story - or take it entirely new places. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  15. Slime Rancher is a farming sim/adventure game from indie developer Monomi Park. It released back in 2017 after spending over a year in Steam Early Access. With a colorful and friendly open-world and some subtly intriguing narrative hooks, Slime Rancher thoroughly charmed players. It offers a unique first-person perspective on the farming sim genre with the twist on the genre by making the central commodity the excretions of adorable and voracious slimes. Could Slime Rancher be one of the best games of all-time? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Chrono Cross 'If I Could... (Synthwave Mix)' by Jorito and JoyDreamer (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03888) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  16. Slime Rancher is a farming sim/adventure game from indie developer Monomi Park. It released back in 2017 after spending over a year in Steam Early Access. With a colorful and friendly open-world and some subtly intriguing narrative hooks, Slime Rancher thoroughly charmed players. It offers a unique first-person perspective on the farming sim genre with the twist on the genre by making the central commodity the excretions of adorable and voracious slimes. Could Slime Rancher be one of the best games of all-time? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Chrono Cross 'If I Could... (Synthwave Mix)' by Jorito and JoyDreamer (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03888) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  17. Today, Chet Faliszek, formerly of Valve and Bossa Games, and Dr. Kimberly Voll, a longtime designer at Riot Games, announced that they have formed a new independent game studio called Stray Bombay. The two have given themselves a mission to create projects that simply don't work within most existing studios. They want to make games where artificial intelligence can improve not just enemies but facilitate jolly co-operation and even narrative itself. Many people haven't heard about Chet Faliszek or Dr. Kimberly Voll by name, but their work is familiar with millions of people around the world. Faliszek was responsible for the creation of Left 4 Dead's stories as well as its sequel and both Portal 1 and 2 along with Erik Wolpaw. Dr. Voll, on the other hand, brings her expertise in AI and designing systems for humans to affably interact with AI. She has spent the last three years at Riot Games as a senior technical designer helping to smooth out the gameplay experience for League of Legends, one of the most played games in the world. She was also instrumental in the creation of Fantastic Contraption, a critically acclaimed VR puzzle title released in 2016 for the HTC Vive. Both Faliszek and Dr. Voll have come together to take a risk and make gameplay experiences and narratives that aren't possible without AI, what they call "collaborative gaming experiences." Their new Seattle-based studio will carry on with the vision of what Faliszek conceived and began working on at Bossa Games before he and the studio parted amicably to pursue other their respective creative visions. Stray Bombay will also prioritize personal time off so that even when development ramps up, people will be able to step away and properly take care of themselves. It's being founded with the help of Riot Games and venture capitalists. "As Kim and I talked over the years about the kind of games we want to make, we realized we want to create games that give players a place to breathe and live in the moment," Faliszek explained in the announcement on the studio's new website, referencing a letter he received from a soldier in Afghanistan who thanked him for saving his marriage with the game. "Games that tell stories knowing you are going to come back again and again, that change each time you play them without feeling completely random, and that help you feel like a real team that supports each other... not a bunch of folks in each other’s way. And where AI drives not just the enemies but helps drive the entire experience." According to a statement made to PC Games Insider, the project Stray Bombay will be tackling already has a working prototype running on Unity and Unreal Engine. Despite that, don't expect to see this AI-driven experience anytime soon. After they fill the several open positions at the studio, something they will likely be able to do during GDC itself, they plan to go dark and buckle down to bring this dream to life. "We know the direction we're going," Chet said as he laid out the plan going forward. "As people join the team, that'll help find the game more clearly. We're very iterative, everyone is a designer, everyone participates in the process. [...] Obviously, we have a plan, there's a framework that we can hang it all off, but everyone will be able to express themselves and have an impact." AI has the potential to improve human life in a lot of ways, but just how it could improve the narrative experience in games hasn't been explored in as much depth as one might think. What Dr. Voll and Faliszek are undertaking might change how games tell stories going forward. Imagine a roguelike adventure overseen by something akin to Left 4 Dead's AI Director, only not just enemies, but the story itself unfolds in response to player choices and actions. That could be a game changer in the industry and break down the longstanding barrier between liner and open narrative design in a way unlike anything before. We will have to wait and see. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  18. Today, Chet Faliszek, formerly of Valve and Bossa Games, and Dr. Kimberly Voll, a longtime designer at Riot Games, announced that they have formed a new independent game studio called Stray Bombay. The two have given themselves a mission to create projects that simply don't work within most existing studios. They want to make games where artificial intelligence can improve not just enemies but facilitate jolly co-operation and even narrative itself. Many people haven't heard about Chet Faliszek or Dr. Kimberly Voll by name, but their work is familiar with millions of people around the world. Faliszek was responsible for the creation of Left 4 Dead's stories as well as its sequel and both Portal 1 and 2 along with Erik Wolpaw. Dr. Voll, on the other hand, brings her expertise in AI and designing systems for humans to affably interact with AI. She has spent the last three years at Riot Games as a senior technical designer helping to smooth out the gameplay experience for League of Legends, one of the most played games in the world. She was also instrumental in the creation of Fantastic Contraption, a critically acclaimed VR puzzle title released in 2016 for the HTC Vive. Both Faliszek and Dr. Voll have come together to take a risk and make gameplay experiences and narratives that aren't possible without AI, what they call "collaborative gaming experiences." Their new Seattle-based studio will carry on with the vision of what Faliszek conceived and began working on at Bossa Games before he and the studio parted amicably to pursue other their respective creative visions. Stray Bombay will also prioritize personal time off so that even when development ramps up, people will be able to step away and properly take care of themselves. It's being founded with the help of Riot Games and venture capitalists. "As Kim and I talked over the years about the kind of games we want to make, we realized we want to create games that give players a place to breathe and live in the moment," Faliszek explained in the announcement on the studio's new website, referencing a letter he received from a soldier in Afghanistan who thanked him for saving his marriage with the game. "Games that tell stories knowing you are going to come back again and again, that change each time you play them without feeling completely random, and that help you feel like a real team that supports each other... not a bunch of folks in each other’s way. And where AI drives not just the enemies but helps drive the entire experience." According to a statement made to PC Games Insider, the project Stray Bombay will be tackling already has a working prototype running on Unity and Unreal Engine. Despite that, don't expect to see this AI-driven experience anytime soon. After they fill the several open positions at the studio, something they will likely be able to do during GDC itself, they plan to go dark and buckle down to bring this dream to life. "We know the direction we're going," Chet said as he laid out the plan going forward. "As people join the team, that'll help find the game more clearly. We're very iterative, everyone is a designer, everyone participates in the process. [...] Obviously, we have a plan, there's a framework that we can hang it all off, but everyone will be able to express themselves and have an impact." AI has the potential to improve human life in a lot of ways, but just how it could improve the narrative experience in games hasn't been explored in as much depth as one might think. What Dr. Voll and Faliszek are undertaking might change how games tell stories going forward. Imagine a roguelike adventure overseen by something akin to Left 4 Dead's AI Director, only not just enemies, but the story itself unfolds in response to player choices and actions. That could be a game changer in the industry and break down the longstanding barrier between liner and open narrative design in a way unlike anything before. We will have to wait and see. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  19. Way Deep Down's Half Past Fate aims to combine romantic comedy with the adventure game genre with delightful style. Published by Serenity Forge, the company behind games like Where the Water Tastes Like Wine and The King's Bird, Half Past Fate tells the story of three relationships, some forming within hours and others maturing over years. "To answer a big question we've been getting, yes you do get to play a very wide cast of characters. Imagine if you mash Love Actually (film) with To the Moon (game), that's pretty much our main inspiration," said Zhenghua Yang, the founder of Serenity Forge. Half Past Fate follows six different characters as their stories interweave with one another, making connections full of joy, comedy, love, and heartbreak. The story is careful to touch on people from all walks of life; Half Past Fate might rely on some rom-com cliches, but it has a few tricks up its sleeve to give those tropes a unique spin. Half Past Fate takes place in a gorgeous world that combines the classic look of 2D sprites and charming 3D environments that mesh well together. It basically looks like a game following in the endearing aesthetic footsteps of Paper Mario and Octopath Traveler. Way Deep Down conveys the story via text and adorable pixel portraits that do quite a bit of work characterizing the cast of colorful personalities. It's important to clarify that Half Past Fate doesn't appear to be a dating sim. Instead, it is a structured, linear narrative designed to tell a cohesive story, much like To the Moon. The core conceit of the game aims to show how love takes on many forms and can come out in unexpected, heartfelt, and occasionally hilarious ways. With that central ethos, expect the unexpected, especially if it relates to spilling tea or exploding coffee makers. With a year of development time under it's belt, Half Past Fate will be making its official debut at PAX East at the Indie Megabooth later this month. PAX East will run from March 28-31, so more information is nearly upon us for this intriguing indie game about romance. If you're going to be at PAX East, be sure to check it out! Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  20. Way Deep Down's Half Past Fate aims to combine romantic comedy with the adventure game genre with delightful style. Published by Serenity Forge, the company behind games like Where the Water Tastes Like Wine and The King's Bird, Half Past Fate tells the story of three relationships, some forming within hours and others maturing over years. "To answer a big question we've been getting, yes you do get to play a very wide cast of characters. Imagine if you mash Love Actually (film) with To the Moon (game), that's pretty much our main inspiration," said Zhenghua Yang, the founder of Serenity Forge. Half Past Fate follows six different characters as their stories interweave with one another, making connections full of joy, comedy, love, and heartbreak. The story is careful to touch on people from all walks of life; Half Past Fate might rely on some rom-com cliches, but it has a few tricks up its sleeve to give those tropes a unique spin. Half Past Fate takes place in a gorgeous world that combines the classic look of 2D sprites and charming 3D environments that mesh well together. It basically looks like a game following in the endearing aesthetic footsteps of Paper Mario and Octopath Traveler. Way Deep Down conveys the story via text and adorable pixel portraits that do quite a bit of work characterizing the cast of colorful personalities. It's important to clarify that Half Past Fate doesn't appear to be a dating sim. Instead, it is a structured, linear narrative designed to tell a cohesive story, much like To the Moon. The core conceit of the game aims to show how love takes on many forms and can come out in unexpected, heartfelt, and occasionally hilarious ways. With that central ethos, expect the unexpected, especially if it relates to spilling tea or exploding coffee makers. With a year of development time under it's belt, Half Past Fate will be making its official debut at PAX East at the Indie Megabooth later this month. PAX East will run from March 28-31, so more information is nearly upon us for this intriguing indie game about romance. If you're going to be at PAX East, be sure to check it out! Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  21. The upcoming indie platformer Hoa looks incredible. The hand-painted aesthetic and adorable character design bring a vast amount of charm to the adventure of the titular Hoa, a small spritely creature trying to make her way home. Hoa is being made by a group of university graduates based in Singapore. The team currently includes four members working in their spare time to bring their vision to life. The devs wish to follow in the footsteps of classic, visually interesting platformers like Limbo and Rayman. To that end, the team experimented with a variety of different designs and discovered that their work meshed nicely with the distinctive look of Japanese animation. Much like Limbo, the entire game has been designed to only encompass a few hours, bringing players on a memorable and moving journey as they struggle with being a little being in a big world. Deciding to emulate the style of a masterful animation outfit like Studio Ghibli proved to be difficult to follow through on. In a recent interview with 80 Level, the game's director Ryo Cao Son Tung said: At that moment I was not really sure if we can do it. Ghibli’s artist like Kazuo Oga have decades of painting experience, and we have to match that quality. If we cannot pull it off, then the project is over right at the beginning. We spent a lot of time watching all Ghibli movies, researching their background art, breaking down the techniques, then finding a way to recreate that in Photoshop. It was a really tough task, but as we paint more we start to get the hang of it. After a few months of continuous researching and practicing and playing with different brush settings in Photoshop, our works reach an acceptable level. [...] In production, take the forest scene we posted for example, it took us about two weeks to finish painting all the background elements for the scene. Though Hoa remains a long way off from being completed, a playable demo should be finished within the next several months. Based on community feedback the team plans to refine the demo into a proof of concept to entice their investors to stick around. If they succeed in wrangling the financial backing, they expect Hoa to ship sometime next year for PC and Nintendo Switch. If it proves to be popular, they're even open to considering a mobile port. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  22. The upcoming indie platformer Hoa looks incredible. The hand-painted aesthetic and adorable character design bring a vast amount of charm to the adventure of the titular Hoa, a small spritely creature trying to make her way home. Hoa is being made by a group of university graduates based in Singapore. The team currently includes four members working in their spare time to bring their vision to life. The devs wish to follow in the footsteps of classic, visually interesting platformers like Limbo and Rayman. To that end, the team experimented with a variety of different designs and discovered that their work meshed nicely with the distinctive look of Japanese animation. Much like Limbo, the entire game has been designed to only encompass a few hours, bringing players on a memorable and moving journey as they struggle with being a little being in a big world. Deciding to emulate the style of a masterful animation outfit like Studio Ghibli proved to be difficult to follow through on. In a recent interview with 80 Level, the game's director Ryo Cao Son Tung said: At that moment I was not really sure if we can do it. Ghibli’s artist like Kazuo Oga have decades of painting experience, and we have to match that quality. If we cannot pull it off, then the project is over right at the beginning. We spent a lot of time watching all Ghibli movies, researching their background art, breaking down the techniques, then finding a way to recreate that in Photoshop. It was a really tough task, but as we paint more we start to get the hang of it. After a few months of continuous researching and practicing and playing with different brush settings in Photoshop, our works reach an acceptable level. [...] In production, take the forest scene we posted for example, it took us about two weeks to finish painting all the background elements for the scene. Though Hoa remains a long way off from being completed, a playable demo should be finished within the next several months. Based on community feedback the team plans to refine the demo into a proof of concept to entice their investors to stick around. If they succeed in wrangling the financial backing, they expect Hoa to ship sometime next year for PC and Nintendo Switch. If it proves to be popular, they're even open to considering a mobile port. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  23. Bending the rules for the podcast a bit, this week we tackle A44's action-RPG Ashen. Released late last year, the Dark Souls-lite game takes players on a perilous journey through a world filled with monsters. With a disarming art style and tight controls, this indie came out of the shadows and surprised quite a few people. Could it be one of the best games period? To help us tackle that question, we brought on wonderful Noe Monsivais AKA Trobadour_XP on Twitter. The English teacher/streamer nominated Ashen to throw a bit more of a spotlight on what might be one of the most underappreciated indies from the past year. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening 'While the Wind Fish Sleeps' by bGevko (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03868) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  24. Bending the rules for the podcast a bit, this week we tackle A44's action-RPG Ashen. Released late last year, the Dark Souls-lite game takes players on a perilous journey through a world filled with monsters. With a disarming art style and tight controls, this indie came out of the shadows and surprised quite a few people. Could it be one of the best games period? To help us tackle that question, we brought on wonderful Noe Monsivais AKA Trobadour_XP on Twitter. The English teacher/streamer nominated Ashen to throw a bit more of a spotlight on what might be one of the most underappreciated indies from the past year. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening 'While the Wind Fish Sleeps' by bGevko (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03868) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available, as well! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  25. The spooky and talented folks at Red Hook Studios have teased a sequel to their dark and macabre roguelike RPG Darkest Dungeon. Here's everything we know so far about Darkest Dungeon 2. The reveal included a roughly 30-second trailer with an intriguing key visual and a haunting voice-over. It depicts a mountain, frozen with ice and snow half covering twisted rock formations set in what appear to be screaming faces. As the camera zooms out, one can pick out the six core classes that released in the original game (though none of the additional classes that released as DLC) standing astride a nearby mountain staring at the even more foreboding peak in the distance. The voice-over comes courtesy of Wayne June, who lent his vocal performance to the original Darkest Dungeon. PC Gamer conducted an interview with the developers that's very much worth reading in full. Beyond the trailer, we know that Darkest Dungeon 2 will be a departure from the manor-delving that made up the majority of the original's metagame. Instead, players will be on a journey that exposes more of what's going on in the outside world. The scope of the game seems to have expanded dramatically, too, with Red Hook almost tripling in size from its original team. Much like the first game, Darkest Dungeon 2 will enjoy a period in Steam's Early Access category while the developers add content, fix bugs, and listen to community feedback. Darkest Dungeon was one of the best indie roguelikes of 2016, and earned quite a bit of acclaim even during its Early Access period. It put players in the position of an inheritor of an estate that had belonged to a deranged family member. Of course, arriving on the estate grounds, all of its various sections are overrun by madmen and monsters. Using various adventurers willing to risk both mind and matter, each section must be cleared to fully claim the inheritance hidden beneath the manor. It's very much worth the current $6.24 asking price on Steam. No word yet on when fans should expect to see Darkest Dungeon 2 hitting Early Access, so we'll have to be patient and not succumb to madness... for now. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
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