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Found 194 results

  1. As a fan of Metroid/Castlevania-inspired titles, it’s been great to play so many creative iterations on the concept in the last generation. Chasm, another Metroidvania tribute from the publisher of Axiom Verge, separates itself from the pack by utilizing procedural generation in its level design. I got my hands on it at E3, and thus far it feels like another well-crafted homage to the 16-bit era. Chasm is more akin to Castlevania: Symphony of the Night than Metroid. As the lone soldier Daltyn, players earn experience points to level up, outfit themselves head to toe with an assortment of gear, and arm themselves with swords and whips, as well as sub-items such as magical daggers and Molotovs. Symphony’s influence is further evident in Daltyn’s backwards dash and even his jumping pose is resembles Alucard’s. Unlike Castlevania, procedural generation plays a big role. When I spoke to publisher Dan Adelman (who also published 2015's Axiom Verge), he said the idea stemmed from the realization that Super Metroid and similar titles lose their sense of discovery in subsequent playthroughs because players eventually memorize every location. In Chasm, rooms are hand-crafted but are stitched together in different ways on the map each time you load the game. The route taken to reach a certain room won’t be the same in your next game. Despite being randomized, the game engine is sophisticated enough to know when players are able to progress by recognizing their current upgrades and arranging levels accordingly so that they’ll never encounter total dead ends. It’s a smart idea, ensuring the game stays fresh and keeps players guessing after multiple playthroughs. So is it fun? So far, the answer is yes. Jumping feels good, albeit a bit floaty (Adelman assured me it’s being tweaked). Traversal upgrades, such as a ledge grab present in the demo, makes platforming more fun by letting players wall jump and pull themselves up cliff edges. Striking foes with your weapon has a similar snappiness to it that always made Castlevania’s relatively simple combat enjoyable. Despite being an original title, it was interesting how my Symphony of the Night muscle memory was still triggered and helped me quickly settle into Chasm. I encountered a few challenging platforming segments. One room had me leaping across a spiked floor with only a couple of distant, fragile platforms before ascending to a higher level using the ledge grab to bounce between walls to reach the upgrade awaiting me. It was tough, but rewarding. Even in its unfinished state, Chasm's current polish makes difficult areas a joy to get through rather than a chore. Putting Chasm down was tough. The Metroidvania bug had bitten me, and I wanted nothing more than to continue exploring and overcoming more platforming obstacles. Its procedural elements already leave me excited for a second playthrough before I've even completed the first. I have high hopes for the full release. Chasm doesn’t have a concrete launch window, but Adelman hopes to see it hit PlayStation 4 and PC (with Mac and Linux supported through Steam) later this year. View full article
  2. As a fan of Metroid/Castlevania-inspired titles, it’s been great to play so many creative iterations on the concept in the last generation. Chasm, another Metroidvania tribute from the publisher of Axiom Verge, separates itself from the pack by utilizing procedural generation in its level design. I got my hands on it at E3, and thus far it feels like another well-crafted homage to the 16-bit era. Chasm is more akin to Castlevania: Symphony of the Night than Metroid. As the lone soldier Daltyn, players earn experience points to level up, outfit themselves head to toe with an assortment of gear, and arm themselves with swords and whips, as well as sub-items such as magical daggers and Molotovs. Symphony’s influence is further evident in Daltyn’s backwards dash and even his jumping pose is resembles Alucard’s. Unlike Castlevania, procedural generation plays a big role. When I spoke to publisher Dan Adelman (who also published 2015's Axiom Verge), he said the idea stemmed from the realization that Super Metroid and similar titles lose their sense of discovery in subsequent playthroughs because players eventually memorize every location. In Chasm, rooms are hand-crafted but are stitched together in different ways on the map each time you load the game. The route taken to reach a certain room won’t be the same in your next game. Despite being randomized, the game engine is sophisticated enough to know when players are able to progress by recognizing their current upgrades and arranging levels accordingly so that they’ll never encounter total dead ends. It’s a smart idea, ensuring the game stays fresh and keeps players guessing after multiple playthroughs. So is it fun? So far, the answer is yes. Jumping feels good, albeit a bit floaty (Adelman assured me it’s being tweaked). Traversal upgrades, such as a ledge grab present in the demo, makes platforming more fun by letting players wall jump and pull themselves up cliff edges. Striking foes with your weapon has a similar snappiness to it that always made Castlevania’s relatively simple combat enjoyable. Despite being an original title, it was interesting how my Symphony of the Night muscle memory was still triggered and helped me quickly settle into Chasm. I encountered a few challenging platforming segments. One room had me leaping across a spiked floor with only a couple of distant, fragile platforms before ascending to a higher level using the ledge grab to bounce between walls to reach the upgrade awaiting me. It was tough, but rewarding. Even in its unfinished state, Chasm's current polish makes difficult areas a joy to get through rather than a chore. Putting Chasm down was tough. The Metroidvania bug had bitten me, and I wanted nothing more than to continue exploring and overcoming more platforming obstacles. Its procedural elements already leave me excited for a second playthrough before I've even completed the first. I have high hopes for the full release. Chasm doesn’t have a concrete launch window, but Adelman hopes to see it hit PlayStation 4 and PC (with Mac and Linux supported through Steam) later this year.
  3. Something has gone wrong on the planet Meridian. The first shipload of colonists has gone missing. The leaders of United Earth have dispatched a highly skilled team to track down the vanished colonists and bring them home safely. Created by one man, Ede Tarsoly, Meridian: Squad 22 is a single-player squad RTS that features base-building and emphasizes tactical decision-making. The sequel to 2014's Meridian: New World, Squad 22 features a story mode that spans over 10 hours, a planetary conquest mode that takes place across one hundred worlds, and a story that Tarsoly promises will hang on the tactical choices players make during combat. Meridian: Squad 22 releases into Steam Early Access on June 2. The developer claims that the time spent in Early Access will be spent working out bugs and balancing the combat. It's estimated that Squad 22 will clear Early Access in a little over three months. The main campaign will also be in the process of testing and may be unavailable at Early Access launch.
  4. Something has gone wrong on the planet Meridian. The first shipload of colonists has gone missing. The leaders of United Earth have dispatched a highly skilled team to track down the vanished colonists and bring them home safely. Created by one man, Ede Tarsoly, Meridian: Squad 22 is a single-player squad RTS that features base-building and emphasizes tactical decision-making. The sequel to 2014's Meridian: New World, Squad 22 features a story mode that spans over 10 hours, a planetary conquest mode that takes place across one hundred worlds, and a story that Tarsoly promises will hang on the tactical choices players make during combat. Meridian: Squad 22 releases into Steam Early Access on June 2. The developer claims that the time spent in Early Access will be spent working out bugs and balancing the combat. It's estimated that Squad 22 will clear Early Access in a little over three months. The main campaign will also be in the process of testing and may be unavailable at Early Access launch. View full article
  5. Being a small studio, 11 bit studios doesn't have a robust translation department. However, they want their indie hit about people struggling for survival during wartime to be played by as many people around the world as possible. Their solution to bring This War of Mine to the widest possible audience is kind of brilliant. We've seen a lot of companies and people tapping into the power of crowdsourcing to get games funded, prove concepts, and support ongoing projects. What we've never seen before is a company turning officially to the internet to crowdsource translations. Usually, games are translated by in-house translators or third party companies that specialize in translation. If a game achieves a large enough following or find its way into the hands of super fans who have the necessary skills, they are sometimes unofficially translated into languages that are outside of the core market languages like English, Japanese, French, German, Spanish, etc. 11 bit studios aims to change that with their new tool, Babel. Babel was created with the help of community members from Vietnam and Hungary and, alongside the launch of the Babel tool, This War of Mine can now be played in Vietnamese and Hungarian with Czech following soon. People who are interested in joining and translating the game into new languages can register at babel.thiswarofmine.com and join/create the team translating This War of Mine into the language they'd like to see it in. Granted, this tool is only for This War of Mine, but imagine if it proved to be immensely popular and was modified to work with other titles. This could be really amazing for populations that might not otherwise see games in their native language. View full article
  6. Being a small studio, 11 bit studios doesn't have a robust translation department. However, they want their indie hit about people struggling for survival during wartime to be played by as many people around the world as possible. Their solution to bring This War of Mine to the widest possible audience is kind of brilliant. We've seen a lot of companies and people tapping into the power of crowdsourcing to get games funded, prove concepts, and support ongoing projects. What we've never seen before is a company turning officially to the internet to crowdsource translations. Usually, games are translated by in-house translators or third party companies that specialize in translation. If a game achieves a large enough following or find its way into the hands of super fans who have the necessary skills, they are sometimes unofficially translated into languages that are outside of the core market languages like English, Japanese, French, German, Spanish, etc. 11 bit studios aims to change that with their new tool, Babel. Babel was created with the help of community members from Vietnam and Hungary and, alongside the launch of the Babel tool, This War of Mine can now be played in Vietnamese and Hungarian with Czech following soon. People who are interested in joining and translating the game into new languages can register at babel.thiswarofmine.com and join/create the team translating This War of Mine into the language they'd like to see it in. Granted, this tool is only for This War of Mine, but imagine if it proved to be immensely popular and was modified to work with other titles. This could be really amazing for populations that might not otherwise see games in their native language.
  7. Several seasoned developers from 343 Industries who left the company some months ago have announced their new indie studio First Strike Games. Three of the four founders specifically worked on the multiplayer portions of Halo 4 and Halo 5: Guardians. The fourth founder, Jeff Hilbert has experience with securing financing and his profile on the First Strike website boasts that he has attracted a mind-boggling $750,000,000 for game development over his career. The First Strike team appears to be focusing their efforts specifically on their own vision of a multiplayer game. The motto on their website is "We make multiplayer" and it also states that they are "open for business... multiplayer business." The people involved with First Strike have extensive experience with video games of all types from the Gears of War 3 to Age of Mythology to Shenmue II. Below you can see a selection of titles that the devs have worked on. So, what exactly are they working on? No word as of yet as the company is still in talks with publishers and investors to develop a PC and/or console title. View full article
  8. Several seasoned developers from 343 Industries who left the company some months ago have announced their new indie studio First Strike Games. Three of the four founders specifically worked on the multiplayer portions of Halo 4 and Halo 5: Guardians. The fourth founder, Jeff Hilbert has experience with securing financing and his profile on the First Strike website boasts that he has attracted a mind-boggling $750,000,000 for game development over his career. The First Strike team appears to be focusing their efforts specifically on their own vision of a multiplayer game. The motto on their website is "We make multiplayer" and it also states that they are "open for business... multiplayer business." The people involved with First Strike have extensive experience with video games of all types from the Gears of War 3 to Age of Mythology to Shenmue II. Below you can see a selection of titles that the devs have worked on. So, what exactly are they working on? No word as of yet as the company is still in talks with publishers and investors to develop a PC and/or console title.
  9. Would you go through Hell itself for someone you loved? Thomas Brush's Pinstripe poses that very question as a gorgeous 2D adventure game that has met its initial Kickstarter goal and it now on track to release on PC August 2016. Brush will be using the Kickstarter money to focus on the game full time to finish it in time for an end of summer release. Pinstripe tells a story about fatherhood and Hell, tasking Teddy, an ex-priest, with tracking down his daughter Bo through Hell itself. A variety of creepy, unnerving creatures inhabit the place and one who claims to be God has spirited her away. All of this plays out as a detective adventure game with light platforming elements. Add an incredible, haunting 2D aesthetic complimented by a moody piano soundtrack with a classical accompaniment and that's a recipe for a grandly compelling title with some interesting things to say. Currently Pinstripe has achieved its base goal of $28,000. Its stretch goals include expanded levels, a New Game +, voice acting, and a version of the title for mobile devices. For those interested, people can play Thomas Brush's earlier games, Coma and Skinny, online. I remember playing Brush's solo project for the first time almost three years ago at E3 2013. It was an incredibly crazy year and I stumbled into the IndieCade booth during a bit of down time to see what some of the smaller projects were bringing to the table. And on a small laptop in the back of the IndieCade area was a build of Pinstripe waiting by itself. Brush must have been taking a break, so with no preamble I sat down and began playing. A lot has changed since then. For one thing, the protagonist is no longer named James Weaks. For another, from what I played that day, the setting was left as a vaguely sinister surreal location rather than blatantly stated as being Hell. The character models have received a rework or two. Perhaps most importantly, the main character is now searching for his daughter rather than his wife, which presents a dramatic change in theme. However, even after all that time, I still remember the odd moments, the strange characters and the puppy companion named George. Spiders the size of rooms, black sludge monsters that row boats, a taunting black cat, and the enigmatic pinstripe man wedged themselves into my brain and just hearing the word pinstripe is enough to bring back those memories. I still remember how touched I was by the moment George the puppy, with the blind love and devotion of a dog, allowed himself to be trapped in what seemed like an eternal prison to free his master. I don't know if that scene remains in Pinstripe after three years, though I hope so. I do know that I am excited to see what the final game has in store when Thomas Brush's labor of love is finally complete. View full article
  10. Jack Gardner

    Pinstripe Funded on Kickstarter

    Would you go through Hell itself for someone you loved? Thomas Brush's Pinstripe poses that very question as a gorgeous 2D adventure game that has met its initial Kickstarter goal and it now on track to release on PC August 2016. Brush will be using the Kickstarter money to focus on the game full time to finish it in time for an end of summer release. Pinstripe tells a story about fatherhood and Hell, tasking Teddy, an ex-priest, with tracking down his daughter Bo through Hell itself. A variety of creepy, unnerving creatures inhabit the place and one who claims to be God has spirited her away. All of this plays out as a detective adventure game with light platforming elements. Add an incredible, haunting 2D aesthetic complimented by a moody piano soundtrack with a classical accompaniment and that's a recipe for a grandly compelling title with some interesting things to say. Currently Pinstripe has achieved its base goal of $28,000. Its stretch goals include expanded levels, a New Game +, voice acting, and a version of the title for mobile devices. For those interested, people can play Thomas Brush's earlier games, Coma and Skinny, online. I remember playing Brush's solo project for the first time almost three years ago at E3 2013. It was an incredibly crazy year and I stumbled into the IndieCade booth during a bit of down time to see what some of the smaller projects were bringing to the table. And on a small laptop in the back of the IndieCade area was a build of Pinstripe waiting by itself. Brush must have been taking a break, so with no preamble I sat down and began playing. A lot has changed since then. For one thing, the protagonist is no longer named James Weaks. For another, from what I played that day, the setting was left as a vaguely sinister surreal location rather than blatantly stated as being Hell. The character models have received a rework or two. Perhaps most importantly, the main character is now searching for his daughter rather than his wife, which presents a dramatic change in theme. However, even after all that time, I still remember the odd moments, the strange characters and the puppy companion named George. Spiders the size of rooms, black sludge monsters that row boats, a taunting black cat, and the enigmatic pinstripe man wedged themselves into my brain and just hearing the word pinstripe is enough to bring back those memories. I still remember how touched I was by the moment George the puppy, with the blind love and devotion of a dog, allowed himself to be trapped in what seemed like an eternal prison to free his master. I don't know if that scene remains in Pinstripe after three years, though I hope so. I do know that I am excited to see what the final game has in store when Thomas Brush's labor of love is finally complete.
  11. The creator behind last year's indie hit, Her Story, has teased a sequel currently in the works. Sam Barlow went so far as to call the next title Her Story 2, though he stated that Her Story 2 is a working title. Sam Barlow tweeted early yesterday that the new game was beginning development. It will apparently have no story connection to the first Her Story, though it could very well imitate the live-action storytelling of the first. The full teaser image can be seen below: View full article
  12. Jack Gardner

    Her Story 2 in Development

    The creator behind last year's indie hit, Her Story, has teased a sequel currently in the works. Sam Barlow went so far as to call the next title Her Story 2, though he stated that Her Story 2 is a working title. Sam Barlow tweeted early yesterday that the new game was beginning development. It will apparently have no story connection to the first Her Story, though it could very well imitate the live-action storytelling of the first. The full teaser image can be seen below:
  13. If you're looking for something creepy and unnerving to play around Halloween, Pathologic Classic HD might just be the perfect choice. Players choose one of three doctors: The Bachelor, The Changeling, and The Haruspex. The Bachelor possesses a refined education, while The Changeling is a young girl who believes she can heal the sick with her hands. The third doctor, The Haruspex, has no education, just a natural talent and a penchant for twisted surgery. As one of those doctors, players arrive as strangers in town just as a the deadly Sand Plague breaks out and threatens to wipe out everyone. Pathologic is interesting because, while its primary antagonist is the plague, the townspeople are capable of turning against the player as well. When players begin in town, all the residents have pre-existing relationships with one another, which governs how they behave and react toward the player. Each person has their own motivations and intentions and you can never be truly sure of anyone's true allegiances in town. As the residents of the town become ill and die, their relationships will be tested and their minds could break leading to panic, chaos, and even deadly violence. You cannot save everyone in Pathologic and no one will save you. A decade after it's release as an indie oddity, Ice-Pick Lodge has gone back to fix and revamp their original work. Updated graphics and effects make the game look and run better on modern systems. A new translation of the script from its original Russian makes it easier to understand, while new voice overs give nuance to the characters. Ice-Pick Lodge is currently working on a complete redesign the classic Pathologic called Pathologic Remake. The remake will be completely different from their remaster, which captures the essence of what they envisioned the original game to be. Pathologic Remake will be released sometime next year. Pathologic Classic HD is available today for PC.
  14. If you're looking for something creepy and unnerving to play around Halloween, Pathologic Classic HD might just be the perfect choice. Players choose one of three doctors: The Bachelor, The Changeling, and The Haruspex. The Bachelor possesses a refined education, while The Changeling is a young girl who believes she can heal the sick with her hands. The third doctor, The Haruspex, has no education, just a natural talent and a penchant for twisted surgery. As one of those doctors, players arrive as strangers in town just as a the deadly Sand Plague breaks out and threatens to wipe out everyone. Pathologic is interesting because, while its primary antagonist is the plague, the townspeople are capable of turning against the player as well. When players begin in town, all the residents have pre-existing relationships with one another, which governs how they behave and react toward the player. Each person has their own motivations and intentions and you can never be truly sure of anyone's true allegiances in town. As the residents of the town become ill and die, their relationships will be tested and their minds could break leading to panic, chaos, and even deadly violence. You cannot save everyone in Pathologic and no one will save you. A decade after it's release as an indie oddity, Ice-Pick Lodge has gone back to fix and revamp their original work. Updated graphics and effects make the game look and run better on modern systems. A new translation of the script from its original Russian makes it easier to understand, while new voice overs give nuance to the characters. Ice-Pick Lodge is currently working on a complete redesign the classic Pathologic called Pathologic Remake. The remake will be completely different from their remaster, which captures the essence of what they envisioned the original game to be. Pathologic Remake will be released sometime next year. Pathologic Classic HD is available today for PC. View full article
  15. Jack Gardner

    A Summary of Paris Games Week Briefing 2015

    If you didn't have time to sit down and watch the announcements from Sony's press event in Paris yesterday, we've got you covered with a condensed version of the conference. You can view the recorded version of the entire Paris Games Week kickoff event. Jim Ryan, President and CEO of Sony Computer Entertainment Europe, took the stage to start the announcements. Ryan made it clear what Sony was going to be emphasizing with its bombshells. “Tonight is all about games,” he stated to applause. Things began relatively light, discussing European PlayStation 4 price drops and bundles before easing into the first game-related announcement. Sony is expanding its partnership with Activision. The first sign of this improved cooperation between the two corporations will be PlayStation gamers having access to all foreseeable Call of Duty map packs thirty days before any other platform. Following this announcement, a new trailer for Call of Duty Black Ops 3’s zombie mode on a bonus map called The Giant. A new trailer for Star Wars: Battlefront manipulates some serious nostalgia. The new trailer focuses on a variety of new heroes including Princess Leia, Han Solo, Boba Fett, and the Emperor. It also prominently features the different alien races that players will be able to customize their various avatars to look like. Additionally, a new Darth Vader PlayStation 4 bundle releases when Battlefront launches next month. A new Street Fighter V trailer displays almost the complete roster in action, debuting a bearded Dhalsim beating a poor Zangief into submission. Yoshinori Ono, executive producer of Street Fighter V made an appearance to give a few more details about the fighting title. On top of the revamped look, new moves and abilities complement Dhalsim’s new look. Six characters will be added over the year following release. All can be unlocked through normal play by using an in-game currency called Fight Money. An image accompanying this information hints at the identity of those characters. Street Fighter V will be coming to PlayStation 4 on February 16, 2016. Transitioning smoothly from one fighting game into another, Sony pulled Tekken 7 out of the arcades and onto their console. The seventh installment of Tekken progresses the series’ storyline in a decidedly over-the-top and dramatic fashion. The secrets of the Mishima clan are teased in the latest trailer, which also features armies, fights in volcanoes, and people being thrown off cliffs. Later on in the show an off-hand comment revealed that Tekken 7 will be compatible with PlayStation VR Gearbox Software showcased a new Battleborn trailer that gives a small tease of the tongue-in-cheek story while primarily focusing on the gameplay. Specifically singled out are the different gameplay modes and some of the mechanics of the first-person MOBA. PlayStation 4 owners will be the first to gain access to the console beta of Battleborn next year. Sony made it clear that the next few games to be announced would be console exclusives for the PlayStation 4. Developer Wonderstruck presented a trailer of Boundless that revels in voxel visuals and dimension spanning works of wonder. The project looks like it has some definite Minecraft ambitions and seems like the grappling hooks, moving terrain, and large scale worlds might be enough to back those aspirations. Vector, a new indie music-rhythm game shows some promise. Taking a lot of inspiration from titles like Audiosurf, Hello There’s upcoming game allows players to design their own levels and compete against other one another. Trailer stars the artist Avicii talking about his collaboration on the project. Finally, No Man’s Sky has resurfaced! The new trailer features an amazing voice over that many have related to an iconic speech from the movie Blade Runner. The trailer attempts to mash a lot of different gameplay demonstrations into its short duration while also flaunting the title’s scope. Most importantly, we now know that No Man’s Sky will release sometime June 2016. Michael Denny senior VP of Sony’s World Wide Studios Europe took the stage to introduce Housemarque’s Matterfall, a voxel-based shooter with a main character that looks like a cross between the protagonist from Vanquish and Megaman. A new trailer debuted for Insomniac Games’ Ratchet and Clank that shows off a wide range of activities. Players can expect the usual running, gunning, and rail grinding, but will also be flying jets, spaceships, and even scuba diving throughout the adventure. The title will release this coming spring. Horizon Zero Dawn has been one of the most hotly anticipated games since it was first presented at this year’s E3. They demoed the gameplay on stage, showing how hunting colossal and dangerous machines would work in practice. Guerilla Games set traps, using specialized ammo to manipulate enemies. Described as an action-RPG, players will use materials picked up from fallen robots. The developer took pains to point out that damage to larger creatures is area-specific, leading to situations where you can systematically dismantle powerful foes. A variety of different tactics are available with the tools at the player’s disposal, whether that is a straightforward assault (generally not a good idea) or tethering enemies to the ground and leaving them defenseless AT-AT style. Guerilla plans for a 2016 release. Bloodborne: The Old Hunters expansion teased in a new trailer that shows some of the new weapons and one of the grotesque fallen hunters that players will have to contend with should they brave the horrors. The expansion drops November 24. Driveclub Bikes introduces the best super-bikes in the world to Drive Club. Players can purchase it either standalone or as an expansion for Driveclub. It released immediately following the conference and should be available to download now. Japan Studio’s creative director Keiichiro Toyama took the stage to confirm that Gravity Rush 2 would be coming to Europe and North America (there had been some doubt on that point since its initial announcement during this year’s TGS). Toyama made it clear that a lot of new features differentiate the game from its predecessor. A new combat system was shown with gameplay demonstrating the three different gravity fighting styles: Normal style – as seen in the first game, Luna style – lighter and quicker, and Jupiter style – heavier and more powerful. Environments take damage and shift based on how players use their gravity powers and those changes persist as fights progress. The title promises challenging battles that you can tackle alone or with the assistance of an AI ally. Christophe Balestra, co-president at Naughty Dog, hopped up on stage following Gravity Rush 2 to talk about Uncharted 4, specifically its multiplayer. Using lessons learned from Uncharted 3 and The Last of Us, Naughty Dog has implemented some intriguing features to A Thief’s End. Balestra stated that players will be able to summon sidekicks, use supernatural relics, and more. Uncharted 4 releases March 18, 2016. If that sounds like too long a wait, Balestra also stated that the multiplayer beta will be active from December 4 through December 18 of this year. Media Molecule followed up Naughty Dog’s Uncharted announcements with new information on their creation tool/game Dreams. The title’s technical director, Alex Evans, talked about what the game will actually be like when players get their hands on it. To do this effectively, Evans demonstrated the game live on stage, the first time it has ever been seen outside of their studio. Every player creates a customizable imp that goes everywhere in Dreams and is used to explore and communicate. Imps follow the movements of the PlayStation controller and players can give them different expressions with the controller’s touch pad. “You use the imp to grab, pull, and poke at the world. It’s very direct, tactile, and intuitive,” said Evans. The imp can also possess characters, vehicles, or inanimate objects, which allows players to move them around inside the game worlds. Creation and gameplay are intertwined. “Each dream can go from traditional platforming, to racing, to sandboxes, puzzles, and of course making things.” Doors are special in Dreams. Each door can take you to a completely different place, and almost anything can be a gateway to another world. No premade assets were shown in the gameplay demo; everything was made on the PlayStation 4. The beta begins sometime during 2016. Shuhei Yoshida, president of Sony’s World Wide Studios, arrived on stage to show Sony’s commitment to bringing virtual reality to mainstream gaming with PlayStation VR. “We believe that virtual reality doesn’t have to be a solo experience. There’s unlimited potential for social and competitive interaction in VR,” said Yoshida. He then went on to introduce RIGS Mechanized Combat League, a competitive shooter in which players battle in giant mech suits in sporting arenas. RIGS makes a compelling case for competitive VR experiences and invites the comparison to modern sports through bright visuals and sports commentators in the trailer. The existence of a VR game based on the surprise hit Until Dawn was revealed. Until Dawn: Rush of Blood could best be described as a roller coaster in which everything is out to kill you. Players must try to survive the hazards of the track and escape unscathed. Beware, dangers can come from any direction. Cevat Yerli, the co-founder, CEO, and president of Crytek, ascended to the stage to discuss Crytek’s VR effort with PlayStation. Robinson: The Journey looks like an amazing adventure with dinosaurs that will make everyone who ever dreamed about Jurassic Park being real a little bit giddy inside. Walking around with the robot from Destiny and seeing colossal dinosaurs seems like a good time to me! Rebellion debuted their geometric VR title following Crytek’s announcement, showing a flashing tank combat game called Battle Zone. Without a whole lot of details, it looks fairly straightforward, flashy, and fun. Yoshida then shifted from talk of VR games to VR movies, giving a small demonstration of the VR experience from The Walk, a film about a man who walked on a tightrope suspended between the World Trade Center towers in 1974. And, just in case there was any lingering doubt over PlayStation’s commitment to making VR work, Yoshida casually mentioned that over 100 developers are currently working on VR projects for PlayStation. This segment of the show was largely to show that PlayStation VR is strong and in it for the long haul. The gaming landscape could look very different in a few years if this technology catches on. A few final surprise announcements landed after the VR showcase. First, Polyphony Digital showed the debut trailer for Gran Turismo Sport, which will appear on PS4 for the first time. Kazunori Tamauchi, president of Polyphony Digital, talked about the improvements in graphical fidelity they were able to make with the hardware of the PS4. Additionally, Polyphony will be partnering with the Federation Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) for Gran Turismo Sport. Two flagship FIA championships will run simultaneously throughout the year within Sport. One will be the Nations Cup where players represent their country. The other will be the Manufacturer Fan Cup where players represent their favorite car manufacturer. The champions of these competitive racing circuits will be awarded their prizes alongside the winners of real-world FIA races around the holiday season. This partnership between the Federation International Autosport and Polyphony Digital represents efforts from both sides to move racing ahead into the future. A beta test should be going public in early 2016. Gran Turismo Sport will be compatible with PlayStation VR. Wild Sheep Studio’s creative director, Michel Ancel, stepped up to talk about their upcoming project Wild, another PlayStation console exclusive. Gameplay depicts animal summoning, possession, and combat as players try to solve problems and allow their primitive tribe to survive. The segment shows one route a player might take to attempt to heal a poisoned clan member. The final announcement of Paris Game Week featured David Cage taking the stage to reveal Quantic Dream’s new project. It’s an extension of the Kara tech demo that the studio released several years ago to show what was possible with the PlayStation 3’s technology. The new title, called Detroit: Become Human, stars a robotic woman who has gained sentience in a world where robots are resented and treated as tools. However, the trailer makes it abundantly clear that there is something different about Kara and that other robots might not be as robotic as they seem. There were a lot of really phenomenal announcements at the show and a fair number of downright surprising reveals. PlayStation’s dedication to making VR a viable thing shows a lot of confidence in their technology and the draw of its novelty. The sheer number of exclusives for PlayStation 4 was a bit staggering, though it was surprising that Sony made next to no mention of the PlayStation Vita, PSTV, or the PS Vue service that they pushed so strongly earlier this year. Most importantly, a lot of actual gameplay was shown. Only a few trailers were composed of entirely cutscenes or pre-rendered animations. Notably, we saw more of No Man’s Sky, Horizon: Zero Dawn, Wild, Uncharted 4 multiplayer, and Street Fighter V. While the wait could be quite long for some of these titles, there seems to be a lot of good things coming down the pipeline for PlayStation owners.
  16. If you didn't have time to sit down and watch the announcements from Sony's press event in Paris yesterday, we've got you covered with a condensed version of the conference. You can view the recorded version of the entire Paris Games Week kickoff event. Jim Ryan, President and CEO of Sony Computer Entertainment Europe, took the stage to start the announcements. Ryan made it clear what Sony was going to be emphasizing with its bombshells. “Tonight is all about games,” he stated to applause. Things began relatively light, discussing European PlayStation 4 price drops and bundles before easing into the first game-related announcement. Sony is expanding its partnership with Activision. The first sign of this improved cooperation between the two corporations will be PlayStation gamers having access to all foreseeable Call of Duty map packs thirty days before any other platform. Following this announcement, a new trailer for Call of Duty Black Ops 3’s zombie mode on a bonus map called The Giant. A new trailer for Star Wars: Battlefront manipulates some serious nostalgia. The new trailer focuses on a variety of new heroes including Princess Leia, Han Solo, Boba Fett, and the Emperor. It also prominently features the different alien races that players will be able to customize their various avatars to look like. Additionally, a new Darth Vader PlayStation 4 bundle releases when Battlefront launches next month. A new Street Fighter V trailer displays almost the complete roster in action, debuting a bearded Dhalsim beating a poor Zangief into submission. Yoshinori Ono, executive producer of Street Fighter V made an appearance to give a few more details about the fighting title. On top of the revamped look, new moves and abilities complement Dhalsim’s new look. Six characters will be added over the year following release. All can be unlocked through normal play by using an in-game currency called Fight Money. An image accompanying this information hints at the identity of those characters. Street Fighter V will be coming to PlayStation 4 on February 16, 2016. Transitioning smoothly from one fighting game into another, Sony pulled Tekken 7 out of the arcades and onto their console. The seventh installment of Tekken progresses the series’ storyline in a decidedly over-the-top and dramatic fashion. The secrets of the Mishima clan are teased in the latest trailer, which also features armies, fights in volcanoes, and people being thrown off cliffs. Later on in the show an off-hand comment revealed that Tekken 7 will be compatible with PlayStation VR Gearbox Software showcased a new Battleborn trailer that gives a small tease of the tongue-in-cheek story while primarily focusing on the gameplay. Specifically singled out are the different gameplay modes and some of the mechanics of the first-person MOBA. PlayStation 4 owners will be the first to gain access to the console beta of Battleborn next year. Sony made it clear that the next few games to be announced would be console exclusives for the PlayStation 4. Developer Wonderstruck presented a trailer of Boundless that revels in voxel visuals and dimension spanning works of wonder. The project looks like it has some definite Minecraft ambitions and seems like the grappling hooks, moving terrain, and large scale worlds might be enough to back those aspirations. Vector, a new indie music-rhythm game shows some promise. Taking a lot of inspiration from titles like Audiosurf, Hello There’s upcoming game allows players to design their own levels and compete against other one another. Trailer stars the artist Avicii talking about his collaboration on the project. Finally, No Man’s Sky has resurfaced! The new trailer features an amazing voice over that many have related to an iconic speech from the movie Blade Runner. The trailer attempts to mash a lot of different gameplay demonstrations into its short duration while also flaunting the title’s scope. Most importantly, we now know that No Man’s Sky will release sometime June 2016. Michael Denny senior VP of Sony’s World Wide Studios Europe took the stage to introduce Housemarque’s Matterfall, a voxel-based shooter with a main character that looks like a cross between the protagonist from Vanquish and Megaman. A new trailer debuted for Insomniac Games’ Ratchet and Clank that shows off a wide range of activities. Players can expect the usual running, gunning, and rail grinding, but will also be flying jets, spaceships, and even scuba diving throughout the adventure. The title will release this coming spring. Horizon Zero Dawn has been one of the most hotly anticipated games since it was first presented at this year’s E3. They demoed the gameplay on stage, showing how hunting colossal and dangerous machines would work in practice. Guerilla Games set traps, using specialized ammo to manipulate enemies. Described as an action-RPG, players will use materials picked up from fallen robots. The developer took pains to point out that damage to larger creatures is area-specific, leading to situations where you can systematically dismantle powerful foes. A variety of different tactics are available with the tools at the player’s disposal, whether that is a straightforward assault (generally not a good idea) or tethering enemies to the ground and leaving them defenseless AT-AT style. Guerilla plans for a 2016 release. Bloodborne: The Old Hunters expansion teased in a new trailer that shows some of the new weapons and one of the grotesque fallen hunters that players will have to contend with should they brave the horrors. The expansion drops November 24. Driveclub Bikes introduces the best super-bikes in the world to Drive Club. Players can purchase it either standalone or as an expansion for Driveclub. It released immediately following the conference and should be available to download now. Japan Studio’s creative director Keiichiro Toyama took the stage to confirm that Gravity Rush 2 would be coming to Europe and North America (there had been some doubt on that point since its initial announcement during this year’s TGS). Toyama made it clear that a lot of new features differentiate the game from its predecessor. A new combat system was shown with gameplay demonstrating the three different gravity fighting styles: Normal style – as seen in the first game, Luna style – lighter and quicker, and Jupiter style – heavier and more powerful. Environments take damage and shift based on how players use their gravity powers and those changes persist as fights progress. The title promises challenging battles that you can tackle alone or with the assistance of an AI ally. Christophe Balestra, co-president at Naughty Dog, hopped up on stage following Gravity Rush 2 to talk about Uncharted 4, specifically its multiplayer. Using lessons learned from Uncharted 3 and The Last of Us, Naughty Dog has implemented some intriguing features to A Thief’s End. Balestra stated that players will be able to summon sidekicks, use supernatural relics, and more. Uncharted 4 releases March 18, 2016. If that sounds like too long a wait, Balestra also stated that the multiplayer beta will be active from December 4 through December 18 of this year. Media Molecule followed up Naughty Dog’s Uncharted announcements with new information on their creation tool/game Dreams. The title’s technical director, Alex Evans, talked about what the game will actually be like when players get their hands on it. To do this effectively, Evans demonstrated the game live on stage, the first time it has ever been seen outside of their studio. Every player creates a customizable imp that goes everywhere in Dreams and is used to explore and communicate. Imps follow the movements of the PlayStation controller and players can give them different expressions with the controller’s touch pad. “You use the imp to grab, pull, and poke at the world. It’s very direct, tactile, and intuitive,” said Evans. The imp can also possess characters, vehicles, or inanimate objects, which allows players to move them around inside the game worlds. Creation and gameplay are intertwined. “Each dream can go from traditional platforming, to racing, to sandboxes, puzzles, and of course making things.” Doors are special in Dreams. Each door can take you to a completely different place, and almost anything can be a gateway to another world. No premade assets were shown in the gameplay demo; everything was made on the PlayStation 4. The beta begins sometime during 2016. Shuhei Yoshida, president of Sony’s World Wide Studios, arrived on stage to show Sony’s commitment to bringing virtual reality to mainstream gaming with PlayStation VR. “We believe that virtual reality doesn’t have to be a solo experience. There’s unlimited potential for social and competitive interaction in VR,” said Yoshida. He then went on to introduce RIGS Mechanized Combat League, a competitive shooter in which players battle in giant mech suits in sporting arenas. RIGS makes a compelling case for competitive VR experiences and invites the comparison to modern sports through bright visuals and sports commentators in the trailer. The existence of a VR game based on the surprise hit Until Dawn was revealed. Until Dawn: Rush of Blood could best be described as a roller coaster in which everything is out to kill you. Players must try to survive the hazards of the track and escape unscathed. Beware, dangers can come from any direction. Cevat Yerli, the co-founder, CEO, and president of Crytek, ascended to the stage to discuss Crytek’s VR effort with PlayStation. Robinson: The Journey looks like an amazing adventure with dinosaurs that will make everyone who ever dreamed about Jurassic Park being real a little bit giddy inside. Walking around with the robot from Destiny and seeing colossal dinosaurs seems like a good time to me! Rebellion debuted their geometric VR title following Crytek’s announcement, showing a flashing tank combat game called Battle Zone. Without a whole lot of details, it looks fairly straightforward, flashy, and fun. Yoshida then shifted from talk of VR games to VR movies, giving a small demonstration of the VR experience from The Walk, a film about a man who walked on a tightrope suspended between the World Trade Center towers in 1974. And, just in case there was any lingering doubt over PlayStation’s commitment to making VR work, Yoshida casually mentioned that over 100 developers are currently working on VR projects for PlayStation. This segment of the show was largely to show that PlayStation VR is strong and in it for the long haul. The gaming landscape could look very different in a few years if this technology catches on. A few final surprise announcements landed after the VR showcase. First, Polyphony Digital showed the debut trailer for Gran Turismo Sport, which will appear on PS4 for the first time. Kazunori Tamauchi, president of Polyphony Digital, talked about the improvements in graphical fidelity they were able to make with the hardware of the PS4. Additionally, Polyphony will be partnering with the Federation Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) for Gran Turismo Sport. Two flagship FIA championships will run simultaneously throughout the year within Sport. One will be the Nations Cup where players represent their country. The other will be the Manufacturer Fan Cup where players represent their favorite car manufacturer. The champions of these competitive racing circuits will be awarded their prizes alongside the winners of real-world FIA races around the holiday season. This partnership between the Federation International Autosport and Polyphony Digital represents efforts from both sides to move racing ahead into the future. A beta test should be going public in early 2016. Gran Turismo Sport will be compatible with PlayStation VR. Wild Sheep Studio’s creative director, Michel Ancel, stepped up to talk about their upcoming project Wild, another PlayStation console exclusive. Gameplay depicts animal summoning, possession, and combat as players try to solve problems and allow their primitive tribe to survive. The segment shows one route a player might take to attempt to heal a poisoned clan member. The final announcement of Paris Game Week featured David Cage taking the stage to reveal Quantic Dream’s new project. It’s an extension of the Kara tech demo that the studio released several years ago to show what was possible with the PlayStation 3’s technology. The new title, called Detroit: Become Human, stars a robotic woman who has gained sentience in a world where robots are resented and treated as tools. However, the trailer makes it abundantly clear that there is something different about Kara and that other robots might not be as robotic as they seem. There were a lot of really phenomenal announcements at the show and a fair number of downright surprising reveals. PlayStation’s dedication to making VR a viable thing shows a lot of confidence in their technology and the draw of its novelty. The sheer number of exclusives for PlayStation 4 was a bit staggering, though it was surprising that Sony made next to no mention of the PlayStation Vita, PSTV, or the PS Vue service that they pushed so strongly earlier this year. Most importantly, a lot of actual gameplay was shown. Only a few trailers were composed of entirely cutscenes or pre-rendered animations. Notably, we saw more of No Man’s Sky, Horizon: Zero Dawn, Wild, Uncharted 4 multiplayer, and Street Fighter V. While the wait could be quite long for some of these titles, there seems to be a lot of good things coming down the pipeline for PlayStation owners. View full article
  17. Jack Gardner

    Feature: Review: Euclidean

    There are places in the twisted windings of the world where what we take for reality breaks down and allows a malicious madness from beyond our comprehension to seep through the cracks. Euclidean rips us through one such warped fissure into a realm of impossible creatures and huge, gloating malevolence. Whatever intellect built and encompasses the crumbling structures of that beyond-ancient place never meant for humans to trespass. Those who find themselves in that drowning, suffocating space soon find themselves obliterated to less than dust. However, this time is different. We are to descend into the depths of Euclidean. Developer Alpha Wave describes their first project as an adventure of “geometric horror” which is an apt description for a game that brings writhing geometric patterns to life with a strange wickedness. A deep, cruel voice soon informs you that everything here will kill you as you begin sinking into the darkness that awaits. In the blackness below, it waits and mocks, taking a subtle pleasure in degrading what it believes to be your final moments. Euclidean plays a bit like a slow-paced endless runner, but with sinking through an ocean of monsters instead of running from imminent danger. You use the WASD to avoid obstacles and beasts and have the ability to become insubstantial for a couple seconds in order to pass through the creatures that wish you ill. Touching anything beside the strange glowing orbs on the floor of every level results in death. It never evolves past those concepts and feels more contemplative and puzzle-like than a more action-packed endless runner. This design choice really allows the atmosphere and creepiness to seep into the action. For its benefits, the slow pace cuts both ways for Euclidean. The leisurely sinking speed leads to controls that feel sluggish as moving out of the way of mad horrors and floating ruins seems just as unhurried. That can be pretty frustrating when an instant death means you restart the stage over from the beginning, which can mean another several minutes slowly floating down through the detritus of madness. A visually dark aesthetic, while effectively reinforcing the title’s murky themes, compounds the irritation by obscuring obstacles. Just seeing enemies becomes a struggle. Your gaze in this first-person game naturally gravitates down, the only direction in which you move, making it hard to see the geometric monstrosities coming from the sides or above. Euclidean boasts virtual reality integration, which might have been able to alleviate my frustrations with perceiving the dangers in the depths. Unfortunately, I did not play Euclidean on Oculus Rift. I get the distinct impression that it was designed specifically with virtual reality in mind. It is almost impossible to get a good feel for the environment without leaving yourself open to immediate and unexpected death. Being able to look around by turning your own head probably both fixes that problem and provides a larger sense of scope by allowing you to really soak in all angles of the game world. I keep talking about the environment and atmosphere. Imagine being in the middle of an ocean that teems with the indistinct shapes of squids and sharks and whales on a colossal scale and knowing that they all would like nothing better than to rip you apart and savor your landling flesh. That unnerving sensation encapsulates what Euclidean feels like. The environments give the impression of gigantic, watery graves filled with pulsing, alien lights and occasional bits of living anatomy that should not be. This is all supported by amazingly solid art design that creates menacing and frightening enemies out of geometric shapes. It manages to be wordlessly eloquent, eerie, and eldritch all at the same time. The environments and concepts are all very influenced by Lovecraft, but I think it is underselling the talents of the people who worked on Euclidean to leave it at that. Each enemy type has its own personality that comes out through their movements and overall design. The structures in the water give the world a very lived-in quality that speaks to a history we will never know. That scope, that understated bigness, takes a lot of effort and skill to pay off and I thought it worked swimmingly. Conclusion: Euclidean feels like a fully realized idea. Its nine stages are interesting and fascinating. Despite three other difficulties and a mode with permadeath, I don’t know if I will ever go back to it. However, I am definitely glad that I had the chance to spend time in its otherworldly space. It speaks to an inevitability that we can all relate to; an existential truth that none of us asked for, but with which we have to live. At two hours, it isn’t a long game, but it felt worth the $3.99 price of admission. If that sounds like a bit much for a solid and memorable two hour experience, pick it up for a couple bucks when a price drop hits. My biggest takeaway from this, though, is an anticipation for Alpha Wave’s next project. Euclidean tested the waters, but I can’t wait to see Alpha Wave dive in with heedless abandon. Euclidean is available now for PC. View full article
  18. Jack Gardner

    Review: Euclidean

    There are places in the twisted windings of the world where what we take for reality breaks down and allows a malicious madness from beyond our comprehension to seep through the cracks. Euclidean rips us through one such warped fissure into a realm of impossible creatures and huge, gloating malevolence. Whatever intellect built and encompasses the crumbling structures of that beyond-ancient place never meant for humans to trespass. Those who find themselves in that drowning, suffocating space soon find themselves obliterated to less than dust. However, this time is different. We are to descend into the depths of Euclidean. Developer Alpha Wave describes their first project as an adventure of “geometric horror” which is an apt description for a game that brings writhing geometric patterns to life with a strange wickedness. A deep, cruel voice soon informs you that everything here will kill you as you begin sinking into the darkness that awaits. In the blackness below, it waits and mocks, taking a subtle pleasure in degrading what it believes to be your final moments. Euclidean plays a bit like a slow-paced endless runner, but with sinking through an ocean of monsters instead of running from imminent danger. You use the WASD to avoid obstacles and beasts and have the ability to become insubstantial for a couple seconds in order to pass through the creatures that wish you ill. Touching anything beside the strange glowing orbs on the floor of every level results in death. It never evolves past those concepts and feels more contemplative and puzzle-like than a more action-packed endless runner. This design choice really allows the atmosphere and creepiness to seep into the action. For its benefits, the slow pace cuts both ways for Euclidean. The leisurely sinking speed leads to controls that feel sluggish as moving out of the way of mad horrors and floating ruins seems just as unhurried. That can be pretty frustrating when an instant death means you restart the stage over from the beginning, which can mean another several minutes slowly floating down through the detritus of madness. A visually dark aesthetic, while effectively reinforcing the title’s murky themes, compounds the irritation by obscuring obstacles. Just seeing enemies becomes a struggle. Your gaze in this first-person game naturally gravitates down, the only direction in which you move, making it hard to see the geometric monstrosities coming from the sides or above. Euclidean boasts virtual reality integration, which might have been able to alleviate my frustrations with perceiving the dangers in the depths. Unfortunately, I did not play Euclidean on Oculus Rift. I get the distinct impression that it was designed specifically with virtual reality in mind. It is almost impossible to get a good feel for the environment without leaving yourself open to immediate and unexpected death. Being able to look around by turning your own head probably both fixes that problem and provides a larger sense of scope by allowing you to really soak in all angles of the game world. I keep talking about the environment and atmosphere. Imagine being in the middle of an ocean that teems with the indistinct shapes of squids and sharks and whales on a colossal scale and knowing that they all would like nothing better than to rip you apart and savor your landling flesh. That unnerving sensation encapsulates what Euclidean feels like. The environments give the impression of gigantic, watery graves filled with pulsing, alien lights and occasional bits of living anatomy that should not be. This is all supported by amazingly solid art design that creates menacing and frightening enemies out of geometric shapes. It manages to be wordlessly eloquent, eerie, and eldritch all at the same time. The environments and concepts are all very influenced by Lovecraft, but I think it is underselling the talents of the people who worked on Euclidean to leave it at that. Each enemy type has its own personality that comes out through their movements and overall design. The structures in the water give the world a very lived-in quality that speaks to a history we will never know. That scope, that understated bigness, takes a lot of effort and skill to pay off and I thought it worked swimmingly. Conclusion: Euclidean feels like a fully realized idea. Its nine stages are interesting and fascinating. Despite three other difficulties and a mode with permadeath, I don’t know if I will ever go back to it. However, I am definitely glad that I had the chance to spend time in its otherworldly space. It speaks to an inevitability that we can all relate to; an existential truth that none of us asked for, but with which we have to live. At two hours, it isn’t a long game, but it felt worth the $3.99 price of admission. If that sounds like a bit much for a solid and memorable two hour experience, pick it up for a couple bucks when a price drop hits. My biggest takeaway from this, though, is an anticipation for Alpha Wave’s next project. Euclidean tested the waters, but I can’t wait to see Alpha Wave dive in with heedless abandon. Euclidean is available now for PC.
  19. bizarrorollins

    Playcrafting NYC Fall Expo

    until
  20. If you haven't heard of Titan Souls yet, you are missing out. Conceived of as an entry in the Ludum Dare game jam back in 2013, the idea stuck with creators Mark Foster, David Fenn, and Andrew Gleeson. Together, they decided that they would make Titan Souls a full game. And make it, they did! It releases on April 14. Until then, you can try your hand at mastering the demo they've put together that remasters their original game jam prototype. The core idea of Titan Souls is that you are armed with a bow and only one arrow. You can slay the bosses in one shot, but they can also kill you instantly if one of their attacks connects. Titan Souls revolves around carefully timing and positioning attacks. It is intense and more than a little nerve-racking in the best possible way. You can download the demo on the Steam Store page for if you're curious. Titan Souls releases on April 14 for PC, Mac, PlayStation 4, and PS Vita. View full article
  21. Jack Gardner

    Titan Souls Demo Goes Live on Steam

    If you haven't heard of Titan Souls yet, you are missing out. Conceived of as an entry in the Ludum Dare game jam back in 2013, the idea stuck with creators Mark Foster, David Fenn, and Andrew Gleeson. Together, they decided that they would make Titan Souls a full game. And make it, they did! It releases on April 14. Until then, you can try your hand at mastering the demo they've put together that remasters their original game jam prototype. The core idea of Titan Souls is that you are armed with a bow and only one arrow. You can slay the bosses in one shot, but they can also kill you instantly if one of their attacks connects. Titan Souls revolves around carefully timing and positioning attacks. It is intense and more than a little nerve-racking in the best possible way. You can download the demo on the Steam Store page for if you're curious. Titan Souls releases on April 14 for PC, Mac, PlayStation 4, and PS Vita.
  22. The nerd art dealing site Cook & Becker has begun selling prints of the tarot card artwork from Dragon Age: Inquisition and will be opening up a program for smaller studios to distribute prints of their artwork in the near future. The Inquisition collection includes (from left to right): Judgement, Temperance, Six of Cups, Queen of Staves, and Queen of Swords. These come straight from BioWare concept artists Ramil Sunga and Casper Konefal. Each one comes with a $99 price tag, so if you're looking for something classy and unassumingly nerdy to hang on your wall and appreciate, you can find these five prints in BioWare's Cook & Becker collection. As for Cook & Becker's indie program, it has been quietly chugging along for the past month with the somewhat quiet release of an Awesomenauts Assemble print with the help of Ronimo Games. This release will soon be followed by prints from Vlambeer's Ridiculous Fishing and The Astronauts' The Vanishing of Ethan Carter.
  23. The nerd art dealing site Cook & Becker has begun selling prints of the tarot card artwork from Dragon Age: Inquisition and will be opening up a program for smaller studios to distribute prints of their artwork in the near future. The Inquisition collection includes (from left to right): Judgement, Temperance, Six of Cups, Queen of Staves, and Queen of Swords. These come straight from BioWare concept artists Ramil Sunga and Casper Konefal. Each one comes with a $99 price tag, so if you're looking for something classy and unassumingly nerdy to hang on your wall and appreciate, you can find these five prints in BioWare's Cook & Becker collection. As for Cook & Becker's indie program, it has been quietly chugging along for the past month with the somewhat quiet release of an Awesomenauts Assemble print with the help of Ronimo Games. This release will soon be followed by prints from Vlambeer's Ridiculous Fishing and The Astronauts' The Vanishing of Ethan Carter. View full article
  24. AER tells the story of Auk, a shape-shifting girl who can transform into a bird. Her ability to become a bird will prove incredibly helpful as players explore her fractured world of floating islands. As Auk, players will embark on a journey to discover her people's "Memories of the Past." These memories are scattered far and wide, in remote areas that only Auk can find. During this journey, players will encounter other shape-shifters, find the ruins of old gods, and vanquish menacing shadow creatures. AER makes use of a colorful, low-poly aesthetic that serves to emphasize the game's quiet demeanor. You can see more screenshots on the Extra Life Facebook page. AER will be coming to PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC, Mac, and Linux in 2016. View full article
  25. Jack Gardner

    Indie Studio Forgotten Key Reveals AER

    AER tells the story of Auk, a shape-shifting girl who can transform into a bird. Her ability to become a bird will prove incredibly helpful as players explore her fractured world of floating islands. As Auk, players will embark on a journey to discover her people's "Memories of the Past." These memories are scattered far and wide, in remote areas that only Auk can find. During this journey, players will encounter other shape-shifters, find the ruins of old gods, and vanquish menacing shadow creatures. AER makes use of a colorful, low-poly aesthetic that serves to emphasize the game's quiet demeanor. You can see more screenshots on the Extra Life Facebook page. AER will be coming to PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC, Mac, and Linux in 2016.
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