Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'indie'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Extra Life News
    • Extra Life Updates
    • Best Practices
    • Community Content
    • Why I Extra Life
    • Fundraising
    • Contests
  • Gaming News
  • Features
  • Podcast

Discussions

  • Extra Life Discussions
    • General Extra Life Discussion
    • Local Extra Lifers
    • Fundraising Ideas
    • Live Streaming Tips & Tricks
    • Official Extra Life Stream Team Discussion
    • Extra Life JSON Code Discussion & Sharing
    • Extra Life United
    • Extra Life Q & A
  • Articles & Extra Life Announcements
    • Announcements
  • Official Extra Life Guilds
    • Guild information and Discussion
    • Canada
    • Northeastern US
    • Southeastern US
    • Central US
    • Western US
  • Gaming Discussions
  • Other Stuff
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Recent Posts

Calendars

  • Extra Life Community Calendar
  • Extra Life Stream Team
  • Akron Guild
  • Albany Guild
  • Albuquerque Guild
  • Anchorage Guild
  • Atlanta Guild
  • Austin Guild
  • Bakersfield Guild
  • Baltimore Guild
  • Birmingham Guild
  • Boston Guild
  • Burlington Guild
  • Buffalo Guild
  • Calgary, AB Guild
  • Morgantown Guild
  • Charlottesville Guild
  • Chicago Guild
  • Cincinnati Guild
  • Cleveland Guild
  • Columbia, MO Guild
  • Columbus, OH Guild
  • Dallas Guild
  • Dayton Guild
  • Denver Guild
  • Des Moines Guild
  • Detroit Guild
  • Edmonton, AB Guild
  • Fargo-Valley City Guild
  • Fresno Guild
  • Ft. Worth Guild
  • Gainesville-Tallahassee Guild
  • Grand Rapids Guild
  • Halifax, NS Guild
  • Hamilton, ON Guild
  • Hartford Guild
  • Hershey Guild
  • Hudson Valley Guild
  • Houston Guild
  • Indianapolis Guild
  • Jacksonville Guild
  • Kansas City Guild
  • Knoxville Guild
  • Lansing Guild
  • London, ON Guild
  • Los Angeles Guild
  • Milwaukee / Madison Guild
  • Minneapolis / Twin Cities Guild
  • Montreal / Quebec City Guild
  • Nashville Guild
  • Newark Guild
  • NYC & Long Island Guild
  • Oakland / San Francisco Guild
  • Omaha Guild
  • Orange County Guild
  • Orlando Guild
  • Ottawa, ON Guild
  • Philadelphia Guild
  • Phoenix Guild
  • Pittsburgh Guild
  • Portland, OR Guild
  • Portland, ME Guild
  • Raleigh-Durham Guild
  • Richmond Guild
  • Sacramento Guild
  • Salt Lake City Guild
  • San Antonio Guild
  • San Diego Guild
  • San Juan, PR Guild
  • Saskatchewan Guild
  • Seattle Guild
  • Spokane Guild
  • Springfield-Champaign, IL Guild
  • Springfield, MA Guild
  • St. Louis Guild
  • Syracuse Guild
  • Tampa / St. Petersburg Guild
  • Toronto, ON Guild
  • Vancouver, BC Guild
  • Washington DC Guild
  • Winnipeg, MB Guild
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Events
  • Extra Life Akron's Events

Categories

  • Broadcasting Toolkit
  • Multimedia Kit
  • Extra Life Guild Tool Kit
  • Denver Extra Life Guild's Files
  • Extra Life Akron's Files

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Hospital


Location


Why I "Extra Life"


Interests


Twitter


Instagram


Twitch


Mixer


Discord


Blizzard Battletag


Nintendo ID


PSN ID


Steam


Origin


Xbox Gamertag

Found 204 results

  1. We've all lost someone along the way to the here and now. It's always tragic, always painful, and always hard to process. For Emery offers itself as a tribute to the people who are going through loss by presenting a story about searching for life after death. For Emery was developed by Sanud Games and bills itself as a point-and-click interactive novel inspired by the ancient Sumerian text the Epic of Gilgamesh. The story focuses on Germaine, a circus performer who refuses to accept the death of his friend and colleague Emery. On his quest, Germaine progresses through the five stages of grief to uncover the truth behind death itself. The game itself seems to come from a pretty personal place as the listing for the game concludes, "Isabelle, your classmates and loved ones still miss you. Linda Farkas, your inspiration bled beyond your fiery artform." Hopefully For Emery can help both developers and players find some measure of peace. So far the early access version of For Emery has only been released on Game Jolt for both PC and Mac. A free demo is available on both Game Jolt and itch.io that allows players to progress up to Act 1, Scene 2. View full article
  2. An intriguing indie adventure game has appeared on the horizon. Today, french indie studio Big Bad Wolf revealed The Council, an episodic adventure game set to launch this February. The new entry in the genre offers players the opportunity to make difficult choices that will have "permanent, long-lasting consequences." Aside from being a narrative adventure game in the same vein as Telltale's work, what exactly is The Council? Set in 1793, players become Louis de Richet who journeys to the private island estate of Lord Mortimer after receiving a cryptic invitation. Gentlemen and women from across the world seem to have been invited, as well. George Washington and Napoleon Bonaparte count themselves among Lord Mortimer's guests. Those who operate the levers of power in the world have all assembled for a mysterious purpose... and suddenly a murder interrupts the gathering. Everyone seems to have their own schemes and plots, but the players will have to uncover the mysteries of the island and guests while discovering the true nature of The Council. Big Bad Wolf has developed a new system for navigating conversations that they're promising will be unique. The Social Influence system relies on players to use skill and various resources to come out on top and achieve ideal outcomes. Those resources will be gathered during exploration segments that also provide opportunities for players to learn the weaknesses of the other island guests. Should an encounter be failed, there's no game over screen in The Council. Instead, player choices are permanent and can result in physical disfigurement, mental trauma, or (rarely) boons that will hinder or help players for the rest of the game. As players proceed, they will have opportunities for Richet to hone his skills. Perhaps the diplomatic approach appeals to you? Maybe history or science would make worthy allies? Or could it be that detective skills are what will make the difference? Over 15 skills are available, adding an almost RPG-like dimension to The Council. These skills will allow players to explore the island their own way, uncovering dark secrets as they progress into Lord Mortimer's abode. The Council’s first of five episodes, titled 'The Mad Ones,' arrives on PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One in February, 2018.
  3. An intriguing indie adventure game has appeared on the horizon. Today, french indie studio Big Bad Wolf revealed The Council, an episodic adventure game set to launch this February. The new entry in the genre offers players the opportunity to make difficult choices that will have "permanent, long-lasting consequences." Aside from being a narrative adventure game in the same vein as Telltale's work, what exactly is The Council? Set in 1793, players become Louis de Richet who journeys to the private island estate of Lord Mortimer after receiving a cryptic invitation. Gentlemen and women from across the world seem to have been invited, as well. George Washington and Napoleon Bonaparte count themselves among Lord Mortimer's guests. Those who operate the levers of power in the world have all assembled for a mysterious purpose... and suddenly a murder interrupts the gathering. Everyone seems to have their own schemes and plots, but the players will have to uncover the mysteries of the island and guests while discovering the true nature of The Council. Big Bad Wolf has developed a new system for navigating conversations that they're promising will be unique. The Social Influence system relies on players to use skill and various resources to come out on top and achieve ideal outcomes. Those resources will be gathered during exploration segments that also provide opportunities for players to learn the weaknesses of the other island guests. Should an encounter be failed, there's no game over screen in The Council. Instead, player choices are permanent and can result in physical disfigurement, mental trauma, or (rarely) boons that will hinder or help players for the rest of the game. As players proceed, they will have opportunities for Richet to hone his skills. Perhaps the diplomatic approach appeals to you? Maybe history or science would make worthy allies? Or could it be that detective skills are what will make the difference? Over 15 skills are available, adding an almost RPG-like dimension to The Council. These skills will allow players to explore the island their own way, uncovering dark secrets as they progress into Lord Mortimer's abode. The Council’s first of five episodes, titled 'The Mad Ones,' arrives on PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One in February, 2018. View full article
  4. The fine folks at Robot Loves Kitty found themselves in a bit of a bind recently. For the past few years, they'd been working on a game called Upsilon Circuit, a crazy mixture of game show, RPG, and online multiplayer. The studio consists of the self-taught indie duo Alix Stolzer and Calvin Goble. The scope of Upsilon Circuit and grew to the extent that it required more members on the team than Stolzer and Goble, so the team hired additional staff. Unfortunately, the funding source that they tapped into to hire those team members pulled out before the game was ready to be done. As part of the cancellation announcement, Robot Loves Kitty put out a statement saying, “We just wanted to make this game we were both so passionate about, and we were sacrificing so much to do it. When things fell apart it left both of us feeling overwhelmingly sad, angry, ashamed, and depressed.” The lack of funding brought the entire project to a screeching halt. As of right now, the quirky indie dream that was Upsilon Circuit is no more and the gaming landscape is poorer of the loss. That being said, Robot Loves Kitty has a new project on the horizon called Super Tony Land! The indie game thumbs its nose at the Super Mario Bros. series in an adventure starring Tony, a plumber from Brooklyn who finds himself in the world of video games. Players can build their own levels, share them via Steam Workshop, and even create entire story lines! The tool set being used to give players the power of creation is called Tronics, a visual programming language that can be used to make functional robots, ships, clockwork contraptions, or even dialogue trees. It opens up some really interesting possibilities that allow for never before seen mechanics, stories, and characters. Players will also be able to make use of power-ups and a character creator to really bring their world to life. Super Tony Land should be available on PC Spring 2018.
  5. The fine folks at Robot Loves Kitty found themselves in a bit of a bind recently. For the past few years, they'd been working on a game called Upsilon Circuit, a crazy mixture of game show, RPG, and online multiplayer. The studio consists of the self-taught indie duo Alix Stolzer and Calvin Goble. The scope of Upsilon Circuit and grew to the extent that it required more members on the team than Stolzer and Goble, so the team hired additional staff. Unfortunately, the funding source that they tapped into to hire those team members pulled out before the game was ready to be done. As part of the cancellation announcement, Robot Loves Kitty put out a statement saying, “We just wanted to make this game we were both so passionate about, and we were sacrificing so much to do it. When things fell apart it left both of us feeling overwhelmingly sad, angry, ashamed, and depressed.” The lack of funding brought the entire project to a screeching halt. As of right now, the quirky indie dream that was Upsilon Circuit is no more and the gaming landscape is poorer of the loss. That being said, Robot Loves Kitty has a new project on the horizon called Super Tony Land! The indie game thumbs its nose at the Super Mario Bros. series in an adventure starring Tony, a plumber from Brooklyn who finds himself in the world of video games. Players can build their own levels, share them via Steam Workshop, and even create entire story lines! The tool set being used to give players the power of creation is called Tronics, a visual programming language that can be used to make functional robots, ships, clockwork contraptions, or even dialogue trees. It opens up some really interesting possibilities that allow for never before seen mechanics, stories, and characters. Players will also be able to make use of power-ups and a character creator to really bring their world to life. Super Tony Land should be available on PC Spring 2018. View full article
  6. The indie title Mulaka has been gathering some buzz in recent months. The action-adventure game follows the shaman Sukurúame as he races to battle the otherworldly powers corrupting his homeland. Developer Lienzo created Mulaka in the hope that their game will be both enjoyable for players and also teach about the Tarahumara culture. Sukurúame and Mulaka are based largely on the Tarahumara, a people indigenous to northern Mexico. The Tarahumara were known for their stamina and ability to run vast distances in the sprawling landscape they called home, but they were far more than that. To help players better understand the beating cultural heart of Mulaka, Lienzo has launched the first episode of a three part educational series about the Tarahumara. Mulaka draws from the legends and myths passed down by the Tarahumara to create a visually unique world full of incredible demigods and magic - all grounded in real-world locations and beliefs. Lienzo hopes that giving the Tarahumara people a story within a modern game will help to shad some light on a culture many people might never have heard of otherwise. "Even though I didn't know the mythology, it is still part of the city I live in, and the state and the country I live in. So I really feel proud that we can get to share part of this amazing culture with the world," says Lienzo's lead developer Adolfo Rico. The next two videos will be coming soon. Expect to see them go up sometime before Mulaka's early 2018 release on PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch. View full article
  7. The indie title Mulaka has been gathering some buzz in recent months. The action-adventure game follows the shaman Sukurúame as he races to battle the otherworldly powers corrupting his homeland. Developer Lienzo created Mulaka in the hope that their game will be both enjoyable for players and also teach about the Tarahumara culture. Sukurúame and Mulaka are based largely on the Tarahumara, a people indigenous to northern Mexico. The Tarahumara were known for their stamina and ability to run vast distances in the sprawling landscape they called home, but they were far more than that. To help players better understand the beating cultural heart of Mulaka, Lienzo has launched the first episode of a three part educational series about the Tarahumara. Mulaka draws from the legends and myths passed down by the Tarahumara to create a visually unique world full of incredible demigods and magic - all grounded in real-world locations and beliefs. Lienzo hopes that giving the Tarahumara people a story within a modern game will help to shad some light on a culture many people might never have heard of otherwise. "Even though I didn't know the mythology, it is still part of the city I live in, and the state and the country I live in. So I really feel proud that we can get to share part of this amazing culture with the world," says Lienzo's lead developer Adolfo Rico. The next two videos will be coming soon. Expect to see them go up sometime before Mulaka's early 2018 release on PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch.
  8. The creators of Rock Band have a new game available today called Super Beat Friends that has just released on the Nintendo Switch. The party game features a cartoonish collection of sports mini-games that weave frantic multiplayer action with some boppin' music. The relentlessly positive title offers engrossing co-op and competitive modes in a package that's designed to appeal to all ages. Games included in Super Beat Sports include: Rhythm Racket - Protect your own goal while gunning for your friends' in a more musical take on a classic game set up. Whacky Bat - Players must hit back pitches using bats while timing their swings along with the music to build combos and earn points. Net Ball - Similar to volleyball but played with hockey sticks, 1-2 players try to keep the volley over the net going for as long as possible against alien opponents. Buddy Ball - Bash balls with 1-4 buddies! Gobble Golf - The goal here is to feed aliens by grooving along with the music either solo or with a friend. Super Beat Friends supports HD Rumble in the Switch's Joy-Cons, which leads to Harmonix claiming that "each swing feels unique" throughout the game's 100+ levels. Also, Super Beat Friends maintains 60 frames per second across all of the Switch's modes of play. Super Beat Friends is available now on the Nintendo Switch eShop - maybe a good game to pull out on Game Day? View full article
  9. The creators of Rock Band have a new game available today called Super Beat Friends that has just released on the Nintendo Switch. The party game features a cartoonish collection of sports mini-games that weave frantic multiplayer action with some boppin' music. The relentlessly positive title offers engrossing co-op and competitive modes in a package that's designed to appeal to all ages. Games included in Super Beat Sports include: Rhythm Racket - Protect your own goal while gunning for your friends' in a more musical take on a classic game set up. Whacky Bat - Players must hit back pitches using bats while timing their swings along with the music to build combos and earn points. Net Ball - Similar to volleyball but played with hockey sticks, 1-2 players try to keep the volley over the net going for as long as possible against alien opponents. Buddy Ball - Bash balls with 1-4 buddies! Gobble Golf - The goal here is to feed aliens by grooving along with the music either solo or with a friend. Super Beat Friends supports HD Rumble in the Switch's Joy-Cons, which leads to Harmonix claiming that "each swing feels unique" throughout the game's 100+ levels. Also, Super Beat Friends maintains 60 frames per second across all of the Switch's modes of play. Super Beat Friends is available now on the Nintendo Switch eShop - maybe a good game to pull out on Game Day?
  10. Happy Halloween everyone! It's that wonderful time of the year when we grab a bowl of candy, kick back, and try to scare the pants off of ourselves. In the spirit of the holiday, we've put together a list of some effective horror games that will chill, thrill, and fill you with dread. Most of you are probably familiar with the Alien: Isolations, the Amnesias, the Outlasts, and more of the horror giants that dominate the genre, so this list will be made up of some of the lesser-known titles that still manage to hold some surprises. Without further ado, here's your definitive list of interesting indie horror games presented in no particular order! Duskers If there is one lesson that the movie Alien taught us it is that few things are as scary as average joes just trying to survive in space. Duskers takes that premise and runs with it in a gripping, survival horror roguelike. As a lone salvage operator using technology that would be right at home in a 70s sci-fi film, players must attempt to eek out a living by investigating wrecked ships. However, those ships can only be explored and salvaged using remote controlled drones. Players need to juggle the control of the drones with hacking into the wreck's systems and also avoiding the unknown terrors that lurk in the bowels of these seemingly abandoned vessels. As it progresses a mystery slowly unfolds in the form of corrupted ship logs and strange environments. Meanwhile, dangers threaten to kill off the drones, the only tools available to sustain the player. Drones must be controlled by typing and hopping between them can be an absorbing task. The tension and learning curve created by the purposefully clunky retro interface lends itself to the horror - it really does feel like you're watching as your drones are taken out one by one with hope fading as each one goes offline. Duskers is available on PC. The Last Door Are you a fan of H.P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu mythos? Do you have a soft sport for the works of Edgar Allen Poe? The Last Door draws upon both of those giants in the realm of literature to create its own rich contribution to the horror genre. The Game Kitchen, the devs behind The Last Door, have actually created two seasons of this niche horror title, each consisting of four episodes. The first season follows the investigation of Jeremiah Devitt after he receives a letter from an old school friend and journeys to visit - only to find that an insidious force is at work and seems to be targeting his old associates. The second season serves as a direct sequel to the first, but to explain more would be to provide spoilers. While The Last Door certainly possesses some shortcomings commonly associated with retro adventure games, the journey and surprising effectiveness of its growing sense of dread are well worth the effort to overcome the game design obstacles that occasionally rear their heads. The Last Door Seasons 1 & 2 are available on Andorid, iOS, and PC, both as standalone collections and in-browser. Lone Survivor Lone Survivor released back in 2012 as a side-scrolling survival horror title. It attempts to walk the line between stealth and combat while painting a gruesome, engrossing world that constantly invites the player to question the sanity of the protagonist and the veracity of the world. The story centers on a nameless man in a surgical mask who must survive in a monster-filled apartment complex with no apparent logic to its construction. Players explore the world, encountering baffling characters and disturbing scenes. The game isn't so much a tour de force journey as it is a lengthy soak in madness. Its atmosphere has a darkly hypnotic effect that beckons players into Lone Survivor's twisted depths. It can take a little while to feel the title's hooks, but give it a chance in good faith and Lone Survivor will reward persistence. Lone Survivor is available on PC, PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita, PlayStation 4, and Wii U. OverBlood We've talked about OverBlood before. To be honest, it probably doesn't belong on this list because it simply isn't that scary by today's standards. What it lacks in spine-tingling thrills, OverBlood more than makes up for in sheer entertainment value as a so-bad-its-good game. Admittedly, people who enjoy playing games that are so bad they transcend badness and come back around to being worth playing represent a very, very niche group. But, if that's the kind of thing that you're looking for - the Troll 2 of video games - OverBlood definitely possesses the hapless charm necessary for a great night of failed scares and amazing character moments. OverBlood tells the story of Raz Karcy, a man jettisoned from cryo containment only to find that he was never supposed to wake up. Mysteries unfold and friendships form as he begins to explore a seemingly abandoned research facility. OverBlood is available on the PlayStation One and PSN. The Forest While The Forest has been available for several years now, it is unique on this list in that it remains in Early Access on Steam. While many might be put off by the mere association of Early Access-ness, The Forest has both come a long way since its initial release and offers a unique horror experience. Players take on the role of a man who survives a plane crash on a remote island only to find that his son has been kidnapped by the cannibals that inhabit the island's underground caves and come out to hunt at night. A pretty straightforward set up, right? Things get complicated by the fact that The Forest is an open world crafting/survival game at heart. Players will need to survive in the wilderness, construct a base of operations, and learn to survive the hair-raising night attacks by the island's blood thirsty humans. The result plays like a fusion between Outlast and Minecraft. In fact, it's entirely possible to succumb to the island's ways and become a cannibal yourself and abandon the central rescue mission. I don't hear The Forest talked about much, but if you are put off by the fact that it remains in Early Access, keep an eye out for it to officially release sometime in the near future. The Forest is currently available in Early Access on PC and will be coming to PlayStation 4.
  11. Happy Halloween everyone! It's that wonderful time of the year when we grab a bowl of candy, kick back, and try to scare the pants off of ourselves. In the spirit of the holiday, we've put together a list of some effective horror games that will chill, thrill, and fill you with dread. Most of you are probably familiar with the Alien: Isolations, the Amnesias, the Outlasts, and more of the horror giants that dominate the genre, so this list will be made up of some of the lesser-known titles that still manage to hold some surprises. Without further ado, here's your definitive list of interesting indie horror games presented in no particular order! Duskers If there is one lesson that the movie Alien taught us it is that few things are as scary as average joes just trying to survive in space. Duskers takes that premise and runs with it in a gripping, survival horror roguelike. As a lone salvage operator using technology that would be right at home in a 70s sci-fi film, players must attempt to eek out a living by investigating wrecked ships. However, those ships can only be explored and salvaged using remote controlled drones. Players need to juggle the control of the drones with hacking into the wreck's systems and also avoiding the unknown terrors that lurk in the bowels of these seemingly abandoned vessels. As it progresses a mystery slowly unfolds in the form of corrupted ship logs and strange environments. Meanwhile, dangers threaten to kill off the drones, the only tools available to sustain the player. Drones must be controlled by typing and hopping between them can be an absorbing task. The tension and learning curve created by the purposefully clunky retro interface lends itself to the horror - it really does feel like you're watching as your drones are taken out one by one with hope fading as each one goes offline. Duskers is available on PC. The Last Door Are you a fan of H.P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu mythos? Do you have a soft sport for the works of Edgar Allen Poe? The Last Door draws upon both of those giants in the realm of literature to create its own rich contribution to the horror genre. The Game Kitchen, the devs behind The Last Door, have actually created two seasons of this niche horror title, each consisting of four episodes. The first season follows the investigation of Jeremiah Devitt after he receives a letter from an old school friend and journeys to visit - only to find that an insidious force is at work and seems to be targeting his old associates. The second season serves as a direct sequel to the first, but to explain more would be to provide spoilers. While The Last Door certainly possesses some shortcomings commonly associated with retro adventure games, the journey and surprising effectiveness of its growing sense of dread are well worth the effort to overcome the game design obstacles that occasionally rear their heads. The Last Door Seasons 1 & 2 are available on Andorid, iOS, and PC, both as standalone collections and in-browser. Lone Survivor Lone Survivor released back in 2012 as a side-scrolling survival horror title. It attempts to walk the line between stealth and combat while painting a gruesome, engrossing world that constantly invites the player to question the sanity of the protagonist and the veracity of the world. The story centers on a nameless man in a surgical mask who must survive in a monster-filled apartment complex with no apparent logic to its construction. Players explore the world, encountering baffling characters and disturbing scenes. The game isn't so much a tour de force journey as it is a lengthy soak in madness. Its atmosphere has a darkly hypnotic effect that beckons players into Lone Survivor's twisted depths. It can take a little while to feel the title's hooks, but give it a chance in good faith and Lone Survivor will reward persistence. Lone Survivor is available on PC, PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita, PlayStation 4, and Wii U. OverBlood We've talked about OverBlood before. To be honest, it probably doesn't belong on this list because it simply isn't that scary by today's standards. What it lacks in spine-tingling thrills, OverBlood more than makes up for in sheer entertainment value as a so-bad-its-good game. Admittedly, people who enjoy playing games that are so bad they transcend badness and come back around to being worth playing represent a very, very niche group. But, if that's the kind of thing that you're looking for - the Troll 2 of video games - OverBlood definitely possesses the hapless charm necessary for a great night of failed scares and amazing character moments. OverBlood tells the story of Raz Karcy, a man jettisoned from cryo containment only to find that he was never supposed to wake up. Mysteries unfold and friendships form as he begins to explore a seemingly abandoned research facility. OverBlood is available on the PlayStation One and PSN. The Forest While The Forest has been available for several years now, it is unique on this list in that it remains in Early Access on Steam. While many might be put off by the mere association of Early Access-ness, The Forest has both come a long way since its initial release and offers a unique horror experience. Players take on the role of a man who survives a plane crash on a remote island only to find that his son has been kidnapped by the cannibals that inhabit the island's underground caves and come out to hunt at night. A pretty straightforward set up, right? Things get complicated by the fact that The Forest is an open world crafting/survival game at heart. Players will need to survive in the wilderness, construct a base of operations, and learn to survive the hair-raising night attacks by the island's blood thirsty humans. The result plays like a fusion between Outlast and Minecraft. In fact, it's entirely possible to succumb to the island's ways and become a cannibal yourself and abandon the central rescue mission. I don't hear The Forest talked about much, but if you are put off by the fact that it remains in Early Access, keep an eye out for it to officially release sometime in the near future. The Forest is currently available in Early Access on PC and will be coming to PlayStation 4. View full article
  12. UNTS UNTS UNTS. The beat of the music gets under your skin. UNTS UNTS UNTS. And rhythmic action seems to fit. Indie studio MythicOwl has revealed their upcoming arcade-music title Trancelation. With trance music blazing in the background, neon colors, and psychedelic shapes draped over unique-looking arcade mechanics, they are hoping to catch the attention of the criminally under-served music and rhythm gaming community. Oh, and it does all of that while attempting to teach the player new languages. “I love arcade games a lot – you dive into the flow, the rhythm, a kind of a trance really, which is maximized by the music and the lightning effects. And if you lose, you immediately hit 'retry' – involuntarily even,” said Piotr Korgul, Trancelation’s lead designer. “I wanted to make a game that would be enjoyable for those reasons. I’ve merged that idea with language learning, and I think no one has done something like this before – and turns out that those both elements fit together perfectly. Neon, trance, electronic music, languages… I know it sounds like a crazy idea, but who doesn’t like crazy ideas?” The core gameplay involves moving a lightning ball by putting together words from various languages. Other game modes task players with picking up glowing dots scattered across the maps. Players will need to navigate around enemies and obstacles or face the loss of a life. To help players have a good time, MythicOwl has included bombs, shields, extra lives, and points for every correct word pairing. Trancelation might not teach you the ins and outs of an entire language, but it might just be able to teach players enough to communicate with others, which would be very cool to see! No official release date has been announced, but Trancelation will be releasing on PC in the near future. View full article
  13. UNTS UNTS UNTS. The beat of the music gets under your skin. UNTS UNTS UNTS. And rhythmic action seems to fit. Indie studio MythicOwl has revealed their upcoming arcade-music title Trancelation. With trance music blazing in the background, neon colors, and psychedelic shapes draped over unique-looking arcade mechanics, they are hoping to catch the attention of the criminally under-served music and rhythm gaming community. Oh, and it does all of that while attempting to teach the player new languages. “I love arcade games a lot – you dive into the flow, the rhythm, a kind of a trance really, which is maximized by the music and the lightning effects. And if you lose, you immediately hit 'retry' – involuntarily even,” said Piotr Korgul, Trancelation’s lead designer. “I wanted to make a game that would be enjoyable for those reasons. I’ve merged that idea with language learning, and I think no one has done something like this before – and turns out that those both elements fit together perfectly. Neon, trance, electronic music, languages… I know it sounds like a crazy idea, but who doesn’t like crazy ideas?” The core gameplay involves moving a lightning ball by putting together words from various languages. Other game modes task players with picking up glowing dots scattered across the maps. Players will need to navigate around enemies and obstacles or face the loss of a life. To help players have a good time, MythicOwl has included bombs, shields, extra lives, and points for every correct word pairing. Trancelation might not teach you the ins and outs of an entire language, but it might just be able to teach players enough to communicate with others, which would be very cool to see! No official release date has been announced, but Trancelation will be releasing on PC in the near future.
  14. Thatgamecompany had a deal with Sony in the late 2000s. The studio, founded by Jenova Chen and Kellee Santiago, would make three games for the PlayStation 3's fledgling PSN service. The deal began with a remake of Chen's Flash title Flow which was then followed by Flower. The final part of Thatgamecompany's Sony trilogy was known as Journey and stands as perhaps the most well known art-house game on the planet. The title garnered a staggering number of awards for its visuals, unique, emotional gameplay, and player interaction, even earning the coveted game of the year spot from numerous publications. Austin Wintory's soundtrack catapulted the game into the mainstream consciousness as the only video game soundtrack ever to be nominated for a Grammy. Though it released five years ago and the game industry has covered a lot of ground since 2012, we now look back and ask: Is Journey one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro: Pokémon Gold/Silver/Crystal 'Journey's End' by pu_freak (http://missingno.ocremix.org/music.html) And while you're listening to our closing track this week, why not head over to check out Austin Wintory's discography? We promise you won't be disappointed! You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  15. Thatgamecompany had a deal with Sony in the late 2000s. The studio, founded by Jenova Chen and Kellee Santiago, would make three games for the PlayStation 3's fledgling PSN service. The deal began with a remake of Chen's Flash title Flow which was then followed by Flower. The final part of Thatgamecompany's Sony trilogy was known as Journey and stands as perhaps the most well known art-house game on the planet. The title garnered a staggering number of awards for its visuals, unique, emotional gameplay, and player interaction, even earning the coveted game of the year spot from numerous publications. Austin Wintory's soundtrack catapulted the game into the mainstream consciousness as the only video game soundtrack ever to be nominated for a Grammy. Though it released five years ago and the game industry has covered a lot of ground since 2012, we now look back and ask: Is Journey one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro: Pokémon Gold/Silver/Crystal 'Journey's End' by pu_freak (http://missingno.ocremix.org/music.html) And while you're listening to our closing track this week, why not head over to check out Austin Wintory's discography? We promise you won't be disappointed! You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  16. EA announced that Fe, one of the upcoming indie titles from their EA Originals program, would be launching early next year. Fe tells the story of a small animal that awakens in a forest full of sounds and music. Over the course of the game, players learn to communicate with the world around them and learn to interpret the wordless story as they encounter friends and foes on their journeys. Fe has been developed by Zoink Games, the Swedish studio behind indie titles like Stick it to the Man and Flipping Death. Klaus Lyngeled, the CEO and creative lead at Zoink released a statement alongside the release window saying, “We wanted to create a game that gives the feeling of exploring something special. We would spend hours in the woods as kids, and while it felt scary at first, eventually the strange sounds became familiar -- you become part of nature and the forest feels like home. Players will realize similar feelings as they play through Fe. Wherever and however the game is played, we ensure it will be a unique experience of discovery, unlike anything played before.” “Through Fe, Zoink has reminded us that everything is connected. They have created a game where the magic and beauty of nature, and all its creatures, come alive,” said Patrick Soderlund, the EVP at EA Worldwide Studios. “This game and this studio embody the spirit of the EA Originals program that we started a little over a year ago – the freedom to create, and to bring uniquely innovative and memorable games to players all over the world." Fe will release worldwide in early 2018 on Xbox One, PlayStation 4, PC, and Nintendo Switch.
  17. EA announced that Fe, one of the upcoming indie titles from their EA Originals program, would be launching early next year. Fe tells the story of a small animal that awakens in a forest full of sounds and music. Over the course of the game, players learn to communicate with the world around them and learn to interpret the wordless story as they encounter friends and foes on their journeys. Fe has been developed by Zoink Games, the Swedish studio behind indie titles like Stick it to the Man and Flipping Death. Klaus Lyngeled, the CEO and creative lead at Zoink released a statement alongside the release window saying, “We wanted to create a game that gives the feeling of exploring something special. We would spend hours in the woods as kids, and while it felt scary at first, eventually the strange sounds became familiar -- you become part of nature and the forest feels like home. Players will realize similar feelings as they play through Fe. Wherever and however the game is played, we ensure it will be a unique experience of discovery, unlike anything played before.” “Through Fe, Zoink has reminded us that everything is connected. They have created a game where the magic and beauty of nature, and all its creatures, come alive,” said Patrick Soderlund, the EVP at EA Worldwide Studios. “This game and this studio embody the spirit of the EA Originals program that we started a little over a year ago – the freedom to create, and to bring uniquely innovative and memorable games to players all over the world." Fe will release worldwide in early 2018 on Xbox One, PlayStation 4, PC, and Nintendo Switch. View full article
  18. Afterthought Games, an indie game studio based in Michigan, recently launched a Kickstarter for their upcoming Violent Sol Worlds. The two-man indie studio is looking to raise $5,000 to complete development, with the goal of completing the title by December of this year. Violent Sol Worlds is a top-down shooter where players are stranded on an alien world to send supplies back to the core worlds while surviving in the rough and tumble wilds. Players must scour the world for resources to craft defenses and upgrades while also shipping supplies home to get the support of the Aviro Corporation. At the heart of Violent Sol Worlds is an AI director to help make sure that there are always new events and stories happening around the procedurally generated world. This AI ensures that players will feel consistently challenged, avoiding that pesky feeling of power creep in the later stages of open world games that leads to action feeling more routine. Players will clash with alien monsters and sentient beings, some good, some bad, all at the whim of the AI director. Players can find vehicles and use them to explore the world. Exploration will unveil stories of ancient alien races and previous settlers sent by Aviro Corp. While Aviro might not care much for its settlers, those who provide the company with enough resources gain access to its space station and 3D printing technologies to make new weapons and gear. Regardless of whether Violent Sol Worlds meets its modest goal, the developers have sworn that it will be finished. However, they can't guarantee that it will be finished by the end of December 2017 if they don't meet their $5,000 target. "This game is getting made one way or the other," Afterthought Games' statement reads, "it will just be better with your help. The only risk is that it could be delayed. We are shooting for a Christmas release, but as life happens delays are possible. We are pretty good about digging in and getting the job done in the time frame set in front of us, so we are not too worried about delays." One of the really cool parts about Violent Sol Worlds lies in its connection to Extra Life. Phillip Brossia, one of Afterthought Games' co-founders, also volunteers as the Extra Life Guild president in Grand Rapids, Michigan and has been participating in Extra Life for the past four years. He shared Violent Sol Worlds in the forums and announced a plan to give 5% of the Kickstarter earnings to Extra Life! I have been with Extra Life for 4 years now and I am the President of the Grand Rapids guild. So this isn't spam. My little company Afterthought Games is going to be doing a Kickstarter campaign next week for a game we are making called Violent Sol Worlds. We're not allowed to advertise it on the Kickstarter (which is ridiculous) but our plan is to give 5% of our earnings to Extra Life, 10% if we are funded in the first 24 hours. Violent Sol Worlds will be coming to PC (hopefully) later this year. Afterthought plans to launch the final game with modding in mind - players should be able to pick up Violent Sol Worlds and find it easy to mod, both for veteran modders and beginners alike.
  19. Afterthought Games, an indie game studio based in Michigan, recently launched a Kickstarter for their upcoming Violent Sol Worlds. The two-man indie studio is looking to raise $5,000 to complete development, with the goal of completing the title by December of this year. Violent Sol Worlds is a top-down shooter where players are stranded on an alien world to send supplies back to the core worlds while surviving in the rough and tumble wilds. Players must scour the world for resources to craft defenses and upgrades while also shipping supplies home to get the support of the Aviro Corporation. At the heart of Violent Sol Worlds is an AI director to help make sure that there are always new events and stories happening around the procedurally generated world. This AI ensures that players will feel consistently challenged, avoiding that pesky feeling of power creep in the later stages of open world games that leads to action feeling more routine. Players will clash with alien monsters and sentient beings, some good, some bad, all at the whim of the AI director. Players can find vehicles and use them to explore the world. Exploration will unveil stories of ancient alien races and previous settlers sent by Aviro Corp. While Aviro might not care much for its settlers, those who provide the company with enough resources gain access to its space station and 3D printing technologies to make new weapons and gear. Regardless of whether Violent Sol Worlds meets its modest goal, the developers have sworn that it will be finished. However, they can't guarantee that it will be finished by the end of December 2017 if they don't meet their $5,000 target. "This game is getting made one way or the other," Afterthought Games' statement reads, "it will just be better with your help. The only risk is that it could be delayed. We are shooting for a Christmas release, but as life happens delays are possible. We are pretty good about digging in and getting the job done in the time frame set in front of us, so we are not too worried about delays." One of the really cool parts about Violent Sol Worlds lies in its connection to Extra Life. Phillip Brossia, one of Afterthought Games' co-founders, also volunteers as the Extra Life Guild president in Grand Rapids, Michigan and has been participating in Extra Life for the past four years. He shared Violent Sol Worlds in the forums and announced a plan to give 5% of the Kickstarter earnings to Extra Life! I have been with Extra Life for 4 years now and I am the President of the Grand Rapids guild. So this isn't spam. My little company Afterthought Games is going to be doing a Kickstarter campaign next week for a game we are making called Violent Sol Worlds. We're not allowed to advertise it on the Kickstarter (which is ridiculous) but our plan is to give 5% of our earnings to Extra Life, 10% if we are funded in the first 24 hours. Violent Sol Worlds will be coming to PC (hopefully) later this year. Afterthought plans to launch the final game with modding in mind - players should be able to pick up Violent Sol Worlds and find it easy to mod, both for veteran modders and beginners alike. View full article
  20. Hey guys, I have been with Extra Life for 4 years now and I am the President of the Grand Rapids guild. So this isn't spam. My little company Afterthought Games is going to be doing a Kickstarter campaign next week for a game we are making called Violent Sol Worlds. We're not allowed to advertise it on the Kickstarter (which is ridiculous) but our plan is to give 5% of our earnings to Extra Life, 10% if we are funded in the first 24 hours. We are also launching a game called Cornflower Corbin the day before and we are going to be promoting both of them at the Maker Faire in our city next weekend. Anyway, I just wanted to post about both here to try to get the word out. I will post again when they both are live. Below are the relevant links if anyone is interested. Violent Sol Kickstarter: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/651297750/1491401610?ref=328434&token=4afc02f2 Cornflower Corbin on Steam: http://store.steampowered.com/app/624780/Cornflower_Corbin/ Thanks in advance for checking them out.
  21. Have you ever dreamed about who would win in a no holds barred fight between Guacamelee's Juan and Trace from Axiom Verge? Or pondered the result of a conflict between the fish-man from Nuclear Throne and Captain Flinthook from... well, Flinthook? Bounty Battle aims to satisfy your itch for indie action by throwing 30 characters from various independent franchises together for one of the most unique grudge matches in gaming. Developed by DarkScreen Games, Bounty Battle draws heavily upon fighters like Super Smash Bros. and PlayStation All-Stars to deliver its odd charm. Up to four players can select their characters from a roster of 30 fighters (20 indie guests and 10 original characters - with up to 18 additional contenders coming as free DLC post-launch). Controls are simple and universal across all characters; no unique Street Fighter or Mortal Kombat combos to memorize in Bounty Battle. Players have a limited amount of energy that allows them to use strong attacks, special attacks, ultimate attacks, and dodge. As players rack up combos and kills, they earn Bounty Points. Those Bounty Points can be used to to perform devastating attacks or to summon a minion to aid in combat. Minions exist in the background and survive until your character falls in battle. Each minion has been taken from the game specific to each hero. While the fight rages on, players can pick up both positive and negative status effects known as marks. Colored energy orbs will occasionally fall from the sky, granting temporary boosts to speed, life, or stamina. A number of different arenas will ship with Bounty Battle. These will include one arena for each indie guest on the roster, with possibly more coming for each DLC character. That makes for over 25 arenas at the very least! Players will battle over these locations in local co-op, arcade, challenge, and story modes. Oh, yes. Bounty Battle has a story that explains how all these indie heroes appeared together. At some point, a flash in the sky heralded the arrival of a giant vortex above a multitude of worlds. This vortex introduced a new material to these worlds. Known as Ethereal Mana, people could use this material to communicate and even travel to those distant planets. This substance even granted seemingly magical powers to those who handled it. Eventually, the power of Ethereal Mana created strife and war across the worlds and a tournament was agreed upon that would decide the fate of the universe. Each world anointed a champion, each with a bounty on their head. The greatest bounty hunter in the universe would rule the cosmos. Each character will have their own unique ending, so players will have an incentive to play through the story mode multiple times. The full roster of Bounty Battle's guest fighters can be found below: Juan from Guacamelee! (Drinkbox Studios) The Crusader from Darkest Dungeon (RedHook Studios) Thora from Jotun (Thunder Lotus) Sheriff Lonestar from Awesomenauts (Ronimo Games) Shield maiden from EITR (Eneme Entertainement) Trace from Axiom Verge (Thomas Happ Games llc) Pankapu from Pankapu (Too Kind Studio) Captain Flinthook from Flinthook (Tribute Games) Fish from Nuclear throne (Vlambeer) The Unslain from Doko Roko (Okobu Games) Tetrobot from Blocks that matter (Swing Swing Submarines) Gully from Battle Chasers: Nightwar (Airship Syndicate) Hermetic Champion from Tower of Samsara (Martelo Nero) Harry from The Bug Butcher (Awfully Nice Studio) Rudy fromBlubber Busters (Thar be Monster) Rad Rodgers from Rad Rodgers (Slipgate Studios) Otus from Owlboy (D-Pad Studio) Marduk from Undungeon (Laughing Machines) Eshe from Sundered (Thunder Lotus) Violet from The Metronomicon (Puuba/ Akupara games/Kasedo Games) DarkScreen Games has been working on the title for the past three years. The team consists of François von Orelli and Grégoire Laporte who collaborated with Benjamin Daniel for Bounty Battle's narrator and Jon Lankry's for the illustrated multiple endings. Bounty Battle will be closing its crowdfunding campaign next week, but it has already surpassed its fundraising goal of $30,000. If it makes it to $45,000, DarkScreen will be adding 12 more indie guests to Bounty Battle, each with their own arena and minion. If the project makes it to $60,000 more animated cutscenes will flesh out the story. Bounty Battle is slated for release in late 2018 on Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, PC, and Mac.
  22. Have you ever dreamed about who would win in a no holds barred fight between Guacamelee's Juan and Trace from Axiom Verge? Or pondered the result of a conflict between the fish-man from Nuclear Throne and Captain Flinthook from... well, Flinthook? Bounty Battle aims to satisfy your itch for indie action by throwing 30 characters from various independent franchises together for one of the most unique grudge matches in gaming. Developed by DarkScreen Games, Bounty Battle draws heavily upon fighters like Super Smash Bros. and PlayStation All-Stars to deliver its odd charm. Up to four players can select their characters from a roster of 30 fighters (20 indie guests and 10 original characters - with up to 18 additional contenders coming as free DLC post-launch). Controls are simple and universal across all characters; no unique Street Fighter or Mortal Kombat combos to memorize in Bounty Battle. Players have a limited amount of energy that allows them to use strong attacks, special attacks, ultimate attacks, and dodge. As players rack up combos and kills, they earn Bounty Points. Those Bounty Points can be used to to perform devastating attacks or to summon a minion to aid in combat. Minions exist in the background and survive until your character falls in battle. Each minion has been taken from the game specific to each hero. While the fight rages on, players can pick up both positive and negative status effects known as marks. Colored energy orbs will occasionally fall from the sky, granting temporary boosts to speed, life, or stamina. A number of different arenas will ship with Bounty Battle. These will include one arena for each indie guest on the roster, with possibly more coming for each DLC character. That makes for over 25 arenas at the very least! Players will battle over these locations in local co-op, arcade, challenge, and story modes. Oh, yes. Bounty Battle has a story that explains how all these indie heroes appeared together. At some point, a flash in the sky heralded the arrival of a giant vortex above a multitude of worlds. This vortex introduced a new material to these worlds. Known as Ethereal Mana, people could use this material to communicate and even travel to those distant planets. This substance even granted seemingly magical powers to those who handled it. Eventually, the power of Ethereal Mana created strife and war across the worlds and a tournament was agreed upon that would decide the fate of the universe. Each world anointed a champion, each with a bounty on their head. The greatest bounty hunter in the universe would rule the cosmos. Each character will have their own unique ending, so players will have an incentive to play through the story mode multiple times. The full roster of Bounty Battle's guest fighters can be found below: Juan from Guacamelee! (Drinkbox Studios) The Crusader from Darkest Dungeon (RedHook Studios) Thora from Jotun (Thunder Lotus) Sheriff Lonestar from Awesomenauts (Ronimo Games) Shield maiden from EITR (Eneme Entertainement) Trace from Axiom Verge (Thomas Happ Games llc) Pankapu from Pankapu (Too Kind Studio) Captain Flinthook from Flinthook (Tribute Games) Fish from Nuclear throne (Vlambeer) The Unslain from Doko Roko (Okobu Games) Tetrobot from Blocks that matter (Swing Swing Submarines) Gully from Battle Chasers: Nightwar (Airship Syndicate) Hermetic Champion from Tower of Samsara (Martelo Nero) Harry from The Bug Butcher (Awfully Nice Studio) Rudy fromBlubber Busters (Thar be Monster) Rad Rodgers from Rad Rodgers (Slipgate Studios) Otus from Owlboy (D-Pad Studio) Marduk from Undungeon (Laughing Machines) Eshe from Sundered (Thunder Lotus) Violet from The Metronomicon (Puuba/ Akupara games/Kasedo Games) DarkScreen Games has been working on the title for the past three years. The team consists of François von Orelli and Grégoire Laporte who collaborated with Benjamin Daniel for Bounty Battle's narrator and Jon Lankry's for the illustrated multiple endings. Bounty Battle will be closing its crowdfunding campaign next week, but it has already surpassed its fundraising goal of $30,000. If it makes it to $45,000, DarkScreen will be adding 12 more indie guests to Bounty Battle, each with their own arena and minion. If the project makes it to $60,000 more animated cutscenes will flesh out the story. Bounty Battle is slated for release in late 2018 on Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, PC, and Mac. View full article
  23. Nobody at Queasy Games wanted to work with Beck. Well, almost nobody. The alt-rock musician can be a divisive figure, for sure, but that wasn’t really why the team working on 2012’s Sound Shapes had misgivings about his involvement in its game. Prior to this, the game’s development possessed a distinctly “indie” feel, and the publisher, Sony, had kept red tape to a minimum. Throwing a Grammy winning rock star into the mix would surely overcomplicate things, as far as they were concerned. Yet the partnership ended up producing what many fans consider to be the highlight of the Sound Shapes experience. “Cities,” the first of three Beck-soundtracked levels in the game, is all gloom and groove, presenting a strange dichotomy between the song and the visuals on screen. It’s set against the backdrop of a war-torn metropolis and a dance-able beat. Beck sings of a dead city as the refrain “You weren’t made for this place/ It’s not your fault,” billows from smoke stacks, while missiles, bulldozers, and other instruments of destruction strut along to the beat. It’s at once distressing, relaxing, beautiful, and sad. It’s Sound Shapes at its best. Originally, Sound Shapes wasn’t even conceived as a video game, but rather as a music visualizer. Shaw-Han Liem is a Toronto based musician known by the stage name I Am Robot and Proud. After a show in his home town, Liem met Queasy Games founder, and fellow Toronto native, Jonathan Mak. The two began hanging out and playing around with the concept of fusing interactive art with sound. “At first,” says Liem, “our intention wasn’t to create a game, we just wanted to explore, in general, music and visuals.” Though Sound Shapes would grow into a multi-studio production, involving major label musicians, according to Liem, “it literally started out with two people in a basement.” In the beginning, Liem was the only musician on the project and thus, he set the groundwork for how the design teams would work with the other musicians. “I was working with the team every day so I was the closest one,” explains Liem, “so with the levels I did, we tried to have the musical aspect of the game involved at a much earlier stage for the level.” That would require the music itself to be fluid and moldable. If an object needed to make a different sound, Liem could easily make that change in his song. As Liem describes it, “The levels and music were written as one process.” When the alt-folk songwriter Jim Guthrie became involved, the process didn’t need to change too much. “He’s also in Toronto and he’s a friend of ours, so it was easier for him to be more involved and do more iterations and revisions,” says Liem. The team of designers that worked with Guthrie to make four levels based on his songs, was the same team that would go on to work with Beck’s music, though the process would prove to be very different. When it came to Beck, the team simply didn’t enjoy the same collaborative benefits it had experienced with Guthrie and Liem. “With me and Jim,” says Liem, “you could do that, but obviously you can’t call up Beck and be like, ‘can you try this drum beat 10 BPMs slower? Because the level’s too hard.’ It was an experiment for us to see – does this concept scale? Does it allow us to take an already completed song and turn it into visuals or gameplay in a way that feels organic?” Beck’s lack of involvement was a big sticking point for the team at Queasy Games, but Sony’s marketing department saw it as a worthwhile trade-off. Level designer Danny Vader and producer Mathew Kumar – both on loan from Capy Games – were handed what was, at that time, the unenviable task of translating Beck’s songs into the Sound Shapes format. Vader was the only Beck fan on staff and remembers the initial hesitation. “The other artists,” he says, referring to Beck and Deadmau5, “were secured by Sony corporate as like, ‘here, we paid these guys some money to use these songs.’ That’s totally fine, it’s just different from how we did all the other stuff.” As Vader explains, “Beck has singing and lyrics and nothing else in the game had done that. So that was a huge challenge.” Every object in Sound Shapes visually represents a part of the song that accompanies each stage. A kick drum might be represented by a hopping enemy that always lands on the beat, or a dancing blob might represent a song’s buoyant bass line. Lyrics required a completely different approach; they needed a physical, on-screen representation. However, whereas instrumentals left room for interpretation, the lyrics told a story that somewhat dictated what the designers could do. “We can’t just do whatever we want with this “Cities” level because it’s sort of saying something and we had to discern what was being said,” explains Vader, “I remember all of us sitting around listening to this song over and over again, not just trying to figure out what he’s saying, but figuring out what we are going to do with these lyrics in terms of conveying the meaning of the song.” At one point, the team even considered cutting the lyrics altogether. “I think we were pretty beaten down trying to figure it out,” recalls Vader, “it was even floated, ‘F___ it, let’s just cut the lyrics. Let’s cut the singing and just use the instrumentals. I was pretty adamant and maybe even a jerk about keeping them… We have Beck, we gotta have Beck singing. You can’t call it Beck if it’s just some beats and s___. We gotta have his voice.” They devised a few clever solutions to the problem. At one point in the song, the words “move a little/ shake a little/ hurt a little/ break a little” are personified by a platform that does exactly as the words say. When Beck says move, it moves, and when he says hurt, the platform turns red and hurts the player’s little avatar. The lyrics end up providing context and warn the player of coming danger. It’s a clever little solution to the problem, and “Cities” is full of examples just like that. Originally, however, when Queasy received the “Cities” track from Beck, it was only instrumental. Without the lyrics, the song does possess a more uplifting vibe. The original instrumental track that the developers received from Beck’s team was even titled “Happy Africa”, which caused a bit of a mix-up. Vader and Kumar worked with Pyramid Attack, a Toronto based art studio, to develop the level based on the “Happy Africa” theme. Kumar recalls the confusion. “When we got more feedback from Beck’s people, we were like, ‘oh we need to throw all of that away.’ We’d actually gotten it all wrong.” “There was all this sort of African mask stuff. We went heavily in that direction,” adds Vader. “I think the file we got from Beck – he probably just… had made the beat first and just named it Happy Africa as a file name. We got that file, and then [his people said], no no here’s the song. And we hear the lyrics and we’re like, ‘oh f___, this has nothing to do with Africa at all. He’s just using a kalimba and calling it that.” Meanwhile at Pyramid Attack, Steven Wilson, the artist working on the Beck stages, needed to redo all of the artwork he had originally conceived for the “Happy Africa” version of the level. Every time Vader and Kumar had to change an asset – which was often – they asked Wilson for a different take on something he’d already given them. “He was a trooper,” jokes Kumar, “we got back five versions of everything we asked for, until we could drill down exactly how the level looked.” In the final version, none of the African themes made the cut. “It ended up having what I think is an unexpected visual vocabulary,” says Wilson. “The concept of this level doesn’t fit the song at all, but somehow it works. The song has a sense of space and place that I really liked. I pictured an African savannah at sunset with baobab trees, swooping insects looping in the air, friendly-looking animals, huts, campfires, dancing musical instruments, etc.” Though he tends to have a fondness for the Happy Africa version of the level, Wilson appreciates that the final design helped distinguish “Cities” from the pep and color of other levels in the game. Another point of contention between Vader and Kumar and the rest of the design team, was the giant red sun that slowly envelopes the screen several times in the song. Some of the team leads were afraid that the sun wouldn’t be pliable enough for player creators in the user generated content. Player created content was the number one priority for Queasy Games – if something wasn’t useful in the level editor, it wasn’t worth putting in the game. But the designers fought to keep the sun in there. “I remember there being a lot of discussion on that,” says Kumar, “because it was such an overpowering entity in the game. But to me, that’s one of the Beck moments that we wanted. We kinda had to fight about that.” Vader and Kumar had to convince the project leads that the sun was worth keeping in the level. “I think there was a lot of discussion about, ‘ok, that is an important sound in the song,” says Vader, “but how are we going to make an entity out of that? So let’s just make that into notes, or let’s cut that sound.’ But that is such an important sound. For that not to have a gameplay component just seemed like it was going to be such a glaring omission.” The legacy of Sound Shapes is one of collaboration; players are not only listening to a song, but actually engaging with it, contorting it, and taking some ownership of it. “It speaks so much to how music is different things to different people,” says Kumar, reflecting on the game’s legacy. “We were able to create this thing that people could bring themselves to by playing the level and seeing what we have to say about it, or by taking those pieces and making their own stories with it.” Despite the challenges of working with a major artist like Beck, the team found that his involvement was well worth the added complications. “With this, we were sort of changing the idea of what authorship means - what does it mean to have a completed piece of music? So Beck was a great match because just before we had talked to him he had released an album that was just sheet music,” says Liem, referring to Beck’s sheet music album, Song Reader, which encouraged listeners to record their own versions of his songs for YouTube, just as so many Sound Shapes players have remixed the pieces from “Cities” into thousands of creative levels. Liem continues, “so he’s obviously interested in experimenting with ways of releasing music that aren’t an album on CD.” Beck has never released “Cities” or any of his Sound Shapes tracks in any other form. They exist today, only as interactive songs inside the game. “Cities” lives almost exclusively inside that context, and the team is proud of that fact. “We’re the only people to hear those songs the way he recorded them,” recalls Kumar, “We were basically told that as far as he’s concerned, the versions in the game are the versions that should be out there. That’s something I appreciate and I think Beck understood that when he gave it to us.” View full article
  24. Nobody at Queasy Games wanted to work with Beck. Well, almost nobody. The alt-rock musician can be a divisive figure, for sure, but that wasn’t really why the team working on 2012’s Sound Shapes had misgivings about his involvement in its game. Prior to this, the game’s development possessed a distinctly “indie” feel, and the publisher, Sony, had kept red tape to a minimum. Throwing a Grammy winning rock star into the mix would surely overcomplicate things, as far as they were concerned. Yet the partnership ended up producing what many fans consider to be the highlight of the Sound Shapes experience. “Cities,” the first of three Beck-soundtracked levels in the game, is all gloom and groove, presenting a strange dichotomy between the song and the visuals on screen. It’s set against the backdrop of a war-torn metropolis and a dance-able beat. Beck sings of a dead city as the refrain “You weren’t made for this place/ It’s not your fault,” billows from smoke stacks, while missiles, bulldozers, and other instruments of destruction strut along to the beat. It’s at once distressing, relaxing, beautiful, and sad. It’s Sound Shapes at its best. Originally, Sound Shapes wasn’t even conceived as a video game, but rather as a music visualizer. Shaw-Han Liem is a Toronto based musician known by the stage name I Am Robot and Proud. After a show in his home town, Liem met Queasy Games founder, and fellow Toronto native, Jonathan Mak. The two began hanging out and playing around with the concept of fusing interactive art with sound. “At first,” says Liem, “our intention wasn’t to create a game, we just wanted to explore, in general, music and visuals.” Though Sound Shapes would grow into a multi-studio production, involving major label musicians, according to Liem, “it literally started out with two people in a basement.” In the beginning, Liem was the only musician on the project and thus, he set the groundwork for how the design teams would work with the other musicians. “I was working with the team every day so I was the closest one,” explains Liem, “so with the levels I did, we tried to have the musical aspect of the game involved at a much earlier stage for the level.” That would require the music itself to be fluid and moldable. If an object needed to make a different sound, Liem could easily make that change in his song. As Liem describes it, “The levels and music were written as one process.” When the alt-folk songwriter Jim Guthrie became involved, the process didn’t need to change too much. “He’s also in Toronto and he’s a friend of ours, so it was easier for him to be more involved and do more iterations and revisions,” says Liem. The team of designers that worked with Guthrie to make four levels based on his songs, was the same team that would go on to work with Beck’s music, though the process would prove to be very different. When it came to Beck, the team simply didn’t enjoy the same collaborative benefits it had experienced with Guthrie and Liem. “With me and Jim,” says Liem, “you could do that, but obviously you can’t call up Beck and be like, ‘can you try this drum beat 10 BPMs slower? Because the level’s too hard.’ It was an experiment for us to see – does this concept scale? Does it allow us to take an already completed song and turn it into visuals or gameplay in a way that feels organic?” Beck’s lack of involvement was a big sticking point for the team at Queasy Games, but Sony’s marketing department saw it as a worthwhile trade-off. Level designer Danny Vader and producer Mathew Kumar – both on loan from Capy Games – were handed what was, at that time, the unenviable task of translating Beck’s songs into the Sound Shapes format. Vader was the only Beck fan on staff and remembers the initial hesitation. “The other artists,” he says, referring to Beck and Deadmau5, “were secured by Sony corporate as like, ‘here, we paid these guys some money to use these songs.’ That’s totally fine, it’s just different from how we did all the other stuff.” As Vader explains, “Beck has singing and lyrics and nothing else in the game had done that. So that was a huge challenge.” Every object in Sound Shapes visually represents a part of the song that accompanies each stage. A kick drum might be represented by a hopping enemy that always lands on the beat, or a dancing blob might represent a song’s buoyant bass line. Lyrics required a completely different approach; they needed a physical, on-screen representation. However, whereas instrumentals left room for interpretation, the lyrics told a story that somewhat dictated what the designers could do. “We can’t just do whatever we want with this “Cities” level because it’s sort of saying something and we had to discern what was being said,” explains Vader, “I remember all of us sitting around listening to this song over and over again, not just trying to figure out what he’s saying, but figuring out what we are going to do with these lyrics in terms of conveying the meaning of the song.” At one point, the team even considered cutting the lyrics altogether. “I think we were pretty beaten down trying to figure it out,” recalls Vader, “it was even floated, ‘F___ it, let’s just cut the lyrics. Let’s cut the singing and just use the instrumentals. I was pretty adamant and maybe even a jerk about keeping them… We have Beck, we gotta have Beck singing. You can’t call it Beck if it’s just some beats and s___. We gotta have his voice.” They devised a few clever solutions to the problem. At one point in the song, the words “move a little/ shake a little/ hurt a little/ break a little” are personified by a platform that does exactly as the words say. When Beck says move, it moves, and when he says hurt, the platform turns red and hurts the player’s little avatar. The lyrics end up providing context and warn the player of coming danger. It’s a clever little solution to the problem, and “Cities” is full of examples just like that. Originally, however, when Queasy received the “Cities” track from Beck, it was only instrumental. Without the lyrics, the song does possess a more uplifting vibe. The original instrumental track that the developers received from Beck’s team was even titled “Happy Africa”, which caused a bit of a mix-up. Vader and Kumar worked with Pyramid Attack, a Toronto based art studio, to develop the level based on the “Happy Africa” theme. Kumar recalls the confusion. “When we got more feedback from Beck’s people, we were like, ‘oh we need to throw all of that away.’ We’d actually gotten it all wrong.” “There was all this sort of African mask stuff. We went heavily in that direction,” adds Vader. “I think the file we got from Beck – he probably just… had made the beat first and just named it Happy Africa as a file name. We got that file, and then [his people said], no no here’s the song. And we hear the lyrics and we’re like, ‘oh f___, this has nothing to do with Africa at all. He’s just using a kalimba and calling it that.” Meanwhile at Pyramid Attack, Steven Wilson, the artist working on the Beck stages, needed to redo all of the artwork he had originally conceived for the “Happy Africa” version of the level. Every time Vader and Kumar had to change an asset – which was often – they asked Wilson for a different take on something he’d already given them. “He was a trooper,” jokes Kumar, “we got back five versions of everything we asked for, until we could drill down exactly how the level looked.” In the final version, none of the African themes made the cut. “It ended up having what I think is an unexpected visual vocabulary,” says Wilson. “The concept of this level doesn’t fit the song at all, but somehow it works. The song has a sense of space and place that I really liked. I pictured an African savannah at sunset with baobab trees, swooping insects looping in the air, friendly-looking animals, huts, campfires, dancing musical instruments, etc.” Though he tends to have a fondness for the Happy Africa version of the level, Wilson appreciates that the final design helped distinguish “Cities” from the pep and color of other levels in the game. Another point of contention between Vader and Kumar and the rest of the design team, was the giant red sun that slowly envelopes the screen several times in the song. Some of the team leads were afraid that the sun wouldn’t be pliable enough for player creators in the user generated content. Player created content was the number one priority for Queasy Games – if something wasn’t useful in the level editor, it wasn’t worth putting in the game. But the designers fought to keep the sun in there. “I remember there being a lot of discussion on that,” says Kumar, “because it was such an overpowering entity in the game. But to me, that’s one of the Beck moments that we wanted. We kinda had to fight about that.” Vader and Kumar had to convince the project leads that the sun was worth keeping in the level. “I think there was a lot of discussion about, ‘ok, that is an important sound in the song,” says Vader, “but how are we going to make an entity out of that? So let’s just make that into notes, or let’s cut that sound.’ But that is such an important sound. For that not to have a gameplay component just seemed like it was going to be such a glaring omission.” The legacy of Sound Shapes is one of collaboration; players are not only listening to a song, but actually engaging with it, contorting it, and taking some ownership of it. “It speaks so much to how music is different things to different people,” says Kumar, reflecting on the game’s legacy. “We were able to create this thing that people could bring themselves to by playing the level and seeing what we have to say about it, or by taking those pieces and making their own stories with it.” Despite the challenges of working with a major artist like Beck, the team found that his involvement was well worth the added complications. “With this, we were sort of changing the idea of what authorship means - what does it mean to have a completed piece of music? So Beck was a great match because just before we had talked to him he had released an album that was just sheet music,” says Liem, referring to Beck’s sheet music album, Song Reader, which encouraged listeners to record their own versions of his songs for YouTube, just as so many Sound Shapes players have remixed the pieces from “Cities” into thousands of creative levels. Liem continues, “so he’s obviously interested in experimenting with ways of releasing music that aren’t an album on CD.” Beck has never released “Cities” or any of his Sound Shapes tracks in any other form. They exist today, only as interactive songs inside the game. “Cities” lives almost exclusively inside that context, and the team is proud of that fact. “We’re the only people to hear those songs the way he recorded them,” recalls Kumar, “We were basically told that as far as he’s concerned, the versions in the game are the versions that should be out there. That’s something I appreciate and I think Beck understood that when he gave it to us.”
  25. Rime begins with stormy seas, a red scrap of cloth buffeted by the wind whipping through the air, and a young boy washed up on the shores of an island covered in the ruins of a once mighty civilization. Without a word, players assume control of this child and help him to move through this world full of spirits, magic, and ancient technology. In fact, Rime contains not one line of dialogue – Tequila Works communicate their entire narrative through breathtaking visuals and an absolutely astounding score by David Garcia Diaz. Bright colors swirl across the landscape making everything feel alive and vibrant. The use of these popping colors make it all the more potent when the adventure inevitably descends into darkness and mystery. Majestic soundscapes weave an element of vanished magic into the game, as if the music itself was always grasping to reclaim just a little more of the lost glory the island’s ruined spires. The world of Rime is one that has been afflicted by something terrible. Something so destructive that it has shattered the very fabric of the world. This loss permeates every facet of the adventure. Weeping statues and grasping, shade-filled halls lay in the world’s forgotten corners. For every bright, shining moment in the sun, there is one in which the shadows envelop the red-caped protagonist. That ever-present conflict between light and dark? That escalating tension and deepening mystery? Those are the building blocks of every great adventure. The entire presentation readily draws comparisons to the work of Studio Ghibli, a similarity noted in other reviews of Rime. While I think the observation surprisingly apt for the audio-visual elements, Ghibli tends to make their work aimed squarely at children – Rime takes aim at an older crowd. While it can certainly be enjoyed by younger gamers, the themes and payoff will affect more seasoned players on a deeper level. The seemingly overplayed narrative carries an edge that cuts to the bone with loss and love. <a data-cke-saved-href="http://music.greybox.com/album/rime-deluxe-soundtrack" href="http://music.greybox.com/album/rime-deluxe-soundtrack">RiME (Deluxe Soundtrack) by David García Díaz</a> Each step of Rime’s journey presents an obstacle to be overcome, puzzles to be solved, or enemies to defeat. However, Rime isn’t about any one of those aspects on their own. There are some platforming sections, but it isn’t a platformer. Problems beg for solutions, but Rime isn’t a puzzle game. While sometimes enemies do make an appearance, few would ever describe Rime as a game about combat. Instead, Rime places its focus squarely on maintaining a sense of adventure and subtle storytelling. That emphasis on adventure smooths the gameplay experience. Few will need to grab a strategy guide or watch a walkthrough in order to find the solution to a puzzle. The platforming demands little in the way of reflexes. Combat is about as far from hack and slash as one can get; it’s more of a larger, faster puzzle than anything else. One might wonder how Rime manages to remain compelling with its gameplay when enjoyment doesn’t come from reflexive skill. The narrative hook of learning what happened to the island and our protagonist pulls the player relentlessly forward. Lacking any dialogue to explain the situation or internal monologue to learn what kind of a person the protagonist might be, all we learn about him is from what we can see during gameplay – how he chooses to interact with the world. Perhaps most informative interaction comes from the child’s ability to shout, which causes different interactions with objects throughout the world. Sometimes that shout is a call; other times it becomes a humming sing-song of a half remembered song; and as danger mounts it becomes a whimper. That one interaction can show our protagonist cry, laugh, and grieve. But through all those emotions, he continues to move through the world on his journey, leaving much up to the player’s interpretation. Rime certainly doesn’t overstay its welcome. A relatively focused playthrough can make it from beginning to end in about four hours. Tequila Works doesn’t reuse puzzles – though occasionally similar puzzles reappear as character-building moments. The short length works in Rime’s favor and lends itself to multiple playthroughs. Players who love to scour every inch of their game worlds will find a nice challenge in discovering all the knickknacks hidden away (which all serve a narrative purpose as well). There are certain tropes that fledgling story writers are taught to avoid at all costs: Never open a scene with an alarm clock going off; do not include a gunshot followed by a cut to black; and never ever end with the dreaded phrase, “it was all a dream.” The overuse of these storytelling devices drill them into the public consciousness and rendering them clichés. However – and this is one of storytelling’s biggest secrets - a story can use a cliché, provided that it works. For example, a house full of alarm clocks fills the opening of Back to the Future and that works because the movie revolves around our human relationship with time. The film makes appropriate use of the device in a refreshing way - it’s played as a joke that reinforces the central premise of the film - turning it from a cliché back into a trope, and tropes are just tools in a storyteller’s toolbox. In a gaming landscape filled to bursting with indies, many might take a look at Rime and imagine it to be the latest in a long line of Ben “Yahtzee” Croshaw dubbed Small Child, Scary World (SCSW) games. Limbo, Ico, Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons, Braid, these games all take similar forms and tackle themes of being alone in an unknowable world that threatens danger at every turn. The storytelling trope of SCSW has certainly proven to be effective, but its overuse threatens to plunge into cliché territory. And while Rime certainly does fit into the same category, it turns the very concept on its head in a way that works beautifully. Conclusion: Some people might have certain expectations as to what Rime will be – Set those expectations aside and to go into it blind. While Rime certainly might seem to have the trappings of indie gaming tropes that are coming closer to cliché, Tequila Works subverts those expectations in a masterful fashion. 2017 has been a fantastic year for video games – so many quality titles, both big and small, have released. It is a testament to Rime’s quality that it stands as the best thing I have played so far amid the AAA giants that have flexed their gaming muscle over the past several months. It conjures up a mythical adventure that sweeps players up in its majesty. Rime expertly plays with emotion like a master pianist would compose a captivating solo. Rime ends on a haunting final note that doesn’t deliver the empowering resolution many might desire, but it leaves the player with something much better: A powerful artistic statement about how beautiful and terrible and lovely and difficult life can be – and how we can all recover from the worst tragedies and find peace. Rime is now available on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC - a Switch version is scheduled to release later this year View full article
×
×
  • Create New...