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Found 278 results

  1. Did you miss the meeting last month? No problem, we got your covered in the October 2015 edition of the ELOC News, Extra Life Orange County's video newsletter. This month, with a little Halloween flavor!
  2. Hello Extra Lifers, My name is Patrick and I am the President of the SLC Extra Life Guild. Children's Miracle Network has given us 24 tickets to SLC Comic Con. Each ticket is on valid for THURSDAY. HOW TO GET A TICKET 12 Tickets will be given to people who are interested in helping SLC Extra Life Guild recruit during SLC Comic Con.We are only asking a maximum of 4 hours (over the course of the convention) of your time be donated to help us recruit.The remaining 12 tickets will be given away at a first come, first served basis. WHO TO TALK TO ME! Please eMail, Facebook message, call, text, etc! Get your info to me and I'll try and get you a ticket. VOLUNTEER INFO Burns, Jon and Robert will be available on sight to answer question and help organize the endeavor.I'm trying to get access to a special room so signup sheets can be "left/ dropped off" at a safe location if no one is around to gather them.ONLY 18 LEFT!
  3. It took me a long time to get involved in the wider gaming community. My brother and I both gamed while I was growing up of course, as did many of our friends. When I was a kid that was all that mattered since the internet wasn't yet a part of everyday life. Later though, when others were excited to play the new online games and join online communities, I tended to avoid MMO's and forums. It wasn’t so much that I was inherently asocial, it just felt safer and more comfortable keeping to myself and playing single player games. Besides, I didn't feel I had anything worth saying to anyone outside my own circles. These days, I write a blog, contribute to a website, am on a weekly podcast, try to be active on game forums, and was excited to write this piece for the Extra Life community. I have a voice and try to share my thoughts in both writing and speech. I enjoy connecting with other gamers, and this very community is one reason I can say that now. 2013 was the first year I heard about Extra Life. A friend of mine mentioned on his livestream that he would be participating and told stories about the previous year. The idea of gamers getting together for an amazing cause like Children's Miracle Network Hospitals sounded like something I'd love to do. There was only one problem: I'd never streamed, and wanted to do more than just hang out during his stream. With plenty of trepidation, I started learning the basics of streaming and was soon practicing for the main event. Streaming had always sounded like fun, which was why I tended to guest on other streams. But running a stream myself? So many things could go wrong, and I could end up looking foolish. I made myself push through my nervousness, knowing this was for something bigger than me. In doing so, I realized the community was clearly willing to help. I wasn't the only one focused on the larger goal. As the day approached, I received advice and good wishes from gamers I'd never met before. “For the kids,” bridged the gap to make an instant connection. I noticed we weren't just supporting a charity, we were supporting each other. To my surprise, I started to see a side of gaming I'd been missing out on. My stream, incidentally, went just fine. I had to close it off a couple hours early due to my laptop wanting to overheat, but the rest of it was perfectly enjoyable. My only regret is forgetting to save it before it was auto-deleted by Twitch. I felt good about what I'd done, not just in collecting donations, but in becoming a part of such a supportive community. In 2014, I didn't quite trust my laptop to hold up for a 24 hour stream. I planned to spend the day doing a group run of DC Universe Online with some friends instead. While that worked fine for hours, we had to end early due to the streamer's health. I was at a complete loss for what to do. I couldn't stream, didn't have anything planned, but didn't want to stop the marathon. Instead of heading to bed, I logged into my favorite MMO, The Secret World. At the time I didn't know many people there, but I knew a number of players were participating in Extra Life. I thought I'd tag along with them, if I could find them and they let me. If not, at least I knew I could play the game for hours. When I asked in chat if anyone was still running, the response was immediate warmth and welcome. Once again, players I didn't even know were jumping over themselves to include me and congratulate me for participating. The beginning of my connections in this game wound up being incredibly important, as those connections are one reason I later auditioned for, and became a part of, the Beyond the Veil podcast! This year, I have a new computer for marathon day. I'll be running with my friends over in The Secret World and co-streaming on my own channel. I am comfortable in belonging and excited for another chance to support the cause. I know I can reach out to other runners for support and friendship, and when I do stream I know I can ask and receive helpful advice. Extra Life is always primarily about the kids. It's an amazing thing we do each year, and it's important to keep the real goals in mind. What we do during these gaming marathons makes a very real difference to very real people. Many children of my friends and family have been helped greatly by Children's Miracle Network Hospitals. I can't say enough about how valuable supporting them is. Still, the way the community members open up and support each other is also a beautiful thing to see and an important aspect to recognize. While we're doing something great for the kids, we can do something great for each other, too. As I get ready for Extra Life 2015, I'll be taking some time to welcome new participants and appreciate the old. I hope we not only break our high score for donations this year, but also bring a record number of new gamers into a supportive and friendly community.
  4. It took me a long time to get involved in the wider gaming community. My brother and I both gamed while I was growing up of course, as did many of our friends. When I was a kid that was all that mattered since the internet wasn't yet a part of everyday life. Later though, when others were excited to play the new online games and join online communities, I tended to avoid MMO's and forums. It wasn’t so much that I was inherently asocial, it just felt safer and more comfortable keeping to myself and playing single player games. Besides, I didn't feel I had anything worth saying to anyone outside my own circles. These days, I write a blog, contribute to a website, am on a weekly podcast, try to be active on game forums, and was excited to write this piece for the Extra Life community. I have a voice and try to share my thoughts in both writing and speech. I enjoy connecting with other gamers, and this very community is one reason I can say that now. 2013 was the first year I heard about Extra Life. A friend of mine mentioned on his livestream that he would be participating and told stories about the previous year. The idea of gamers getting together for an amazing cause like Children's Miracle Network Hospitals sounded like something I'd love to do. There was only one problem: I'd never streamed, and wanted to do more than just hang out during his stream. With plenty of trepidation, I started learning the basics of streaming and was soon practicing for the main event. Streaming had always sounded like fun, which was why I tended to guest on other streams. But running a stream myself? So many things could go wrong, and I could end up looking foolish. I made myself push through my nervousness, knowing this was for something bigger than me. In doing so, I realized the community was clearly willing to help. I wasn't the only one focused on the larger goal. As the day approached, I received advice and good wishes from gamers I'd never met before. “For the kids,” bridged the gap to make an instant connection. I noticed we weren't just supporting a charity, we were supporting each other. To my surprise, I started to see a side of gaming I'd been missing out on. My stream, incidentally, went just fine. I had to close it off a couple hours early due to my laptop wanting to overheat, but the rest of it was perfectly enjoyable. My only regret is forgetting to save it before it was auto-deleted by Twitch. I felt good about what I'd done, not just in collecting donations, but in becoming a part of such a supportive community. In 2014, I didn't quite trust my laptop to hold up for a 24 hour stream. I planned to spend the day doing a group run of DC Universe Online with some friends instead. While that worked fine for hours, we had to end early due to the streamer's health. I was at a complete loss for what to do. I couldn't stream, didn't have anything planned, but didn't want to stop the marathon. Instead of heading to bed, I logged into my favorite MMO, The Secret World. At the time I didn't know many people there, but I knew a number of players were participating in Extra Life. I thought I'd tag along with them, if I could find them and they let me. If not, at least I knew I could play the game for hours. When I asked in chat if anyone was still running, the response was immediate warmth and welcome. Once again, players I didn't even know were jumping over themselves to include me and congratulate me for participating. The beginning of my connections in this game wound up being incredibly important, as those connections are one reason I later auditioned for, and became a part of, the Beyond the Veil podcast! This year, I have a new computer for marathon day. I'll be running with my friends over in The Secret World and co-streaming on my own channel. I am comfortable in belonging and excited for another chance to support the cause. I know I can reach out to other runners for support and friendship, and when I do stream I know I can ask and receive helpful advice. Extra Life is always primarily about the kids. It's an amazing thing we do each year, and it's important to keep the real goals in mind. What we do during these gaming marathons makes a very real difference to very real people. Many children of my friends and family have been helped greatly by Children's Miracle Network Hospitals. I can't say enough about how valuable supporting them is. Still, the way the community members open up and support each other is also a beautiful thing to see and an important aspect to recognize. While we're doing something great for the kids, we can do something great for each other, too. As I get ready for Extra Life 2015, I'll be taking some time to welcome new participants and appreciate the old. I hope we not only break our high score for donations this year, but also bring a record number of new gamers into a supportive and friendly community. View full article
  5. The Humble Bundle featuring a vast array of Ubisoft Tom Clancy titles only has three days left before it is gone forever. This bundle includes a total of thirteen games (plus access to the Rainbow Six Siege Multiplayer Beta). As with every Humble Bundle, you can choose how your money will be distributed among the publisher, Humble Bundle, and the charity organizations. This bundle supports both Extra Life and Operation Supply Drop with adjustable distribution between the two charities. The offer is only available for the next three days or so, so get on it if you want a slew of new games, really love Tom Clancy, or just want to support Extra Life. Below you can find a full list of the included titles and goodies under their price tier. For $1 or more Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six 3 Gold Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Vegas Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Chaos Theory Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon and Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Siege - Multiplayer Beta Pay more than the average price (currently $8.54) Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Vegas 2 Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Double Agent Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Conviction Deluxe Edition Tom Clancy's EndWar Pay $10 or more Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon: Future Soldier Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Blacklist Pay $75 Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Siege when it's released on October 13 An exclusive Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Siege t-shirt A coupon for 66% off up to any three Ubisoft titles in the Humble Store (excludes pre-orders) View full article
  6. The Humble Bundle featuring a vast array of Ubisoft Tom Clancy titles only has three days left before it is gone forever. This bundle includes a total of thirteen games (plus access to the Rainbow Six Siege Multiplayer Beta). As with every Humble Bundle, you can choose how your money will be distributed among the publisher, Humble Bundle, and the charity organizations. This bundle supports both Extra Life and Operation Supply Drop with adjustable distribution between the two charities. The offer is only available for the next three days or so, so get on it if you want a slew of new games, really love Tom Clancy, or just want to support Extra Life. Below you can find a full list of the included titles and goodies under their price tier. For $1 or more Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six 3 Gold Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Vegas Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Chaos Theory Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon and Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Siege - Multiplayer Beta Pay more than the average price (currently $8.54) Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Vegas 2 Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Double Agent Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Conviction Deluxe Edition Tom Clancy's EndWar Pay $10 or more Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon: Future Soldier Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Blacklist Pay $75 Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Siege when it's released on October 13 An exclusive Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Siege t-shirt A coupon for 66% off up to any three Ubisoft titles in the Humble Store (excludes pre-orders)
  7. Since the beginning of the Extra Life movement, the Entertainment Software Association (ESA) and the ESA Foundation have been prolific partners. I’m thrilled to announce the kickoff of the 2015 ESA Foundation Extra Life Challenge. This is a chance for you to unlock a huge donation for your local Children’s Miracle Network Hospital by doing what you do best; Playing Games to Heal Kids. This year, The ESA Foundation is offering up two $30,000 grants, for a total of $60,000 in life-saving funds! The Internet simply does not have enough bandwidth for us to fully transmit our gratitude. THANK YOU, ESA FOUNDATION! Two Winning Hospitals A donation of $30,000 is up for grabs for the hospital whose Extra Life gamers raise the most money overall by 9am CDT on Sunday, November 8th. Last year, that went to UCSF Beniof Children’s Hospital in the San Francisco/Oakland area. This particular “prize” favors bigger cities. Which is why… A second donation of $30,000 will be unlocked for the hospital whose gamers raise the most money per capita by 9am on Sunday, November 8th. For this we simply divide the number of dollars raised by the population of that market. Last year, the mighty Extra Lifers of Austin, Texas brought home this prize for local kids at Dell Children’s Medical Center. Nitty Gritty A hospital can only receive one of the two donations amounts.All funds submitted through our website prior to the deadline will be counted instantly towards the 2015 ESA Foundation-Extra Life Challenge.If you are submitting offline funds (Checks) they must be received no later than Monday, November 2nd in order to be processed and credited to your hospital before the deadline.Funds can be received after the deadline, they just won’t count towards this challenge. Make the biggest difference Obviously the more you can raise for sick and injured local kids in your area, the better your hospital’s chances of getting these critical funds. An even better way to skew the odds in your favor is to simply recruit more people in your community to join Extra Life. Did you know that the average donation is $35, but the average amount raised by someone you recruit is $100? If you can get a friend to join Extra Life, you’ll be making triple the impact for this challenge and For The Kids. About ESA Foundation Created by the American entertainment software industry, the ESA Foundation works to make a positive difference in the lives of America’s youth. ESA Foundation creates educational opportunities by providing scholarships to the next generation of industry innovators and supporting organizations that leverage entertainment software and technology. The proceeds from a signature annual fundraiser, Nite to Unite – for Kids and other charitable initiatives support this mission. For more information, visit the ESA Foundation’s website or follow them on Twitter: @ESA Foundation. View full article
  8. Since the beginning of the Extra Life movement, the Entertainment Software Association (ESA) and the ESA Foundation have been prolific partners. I’m thrilled to announce the kickoff of the 2015 ESA Foundation Extra Life Challenge. This is a chance for you to unlock a huge donation for your local Children’s Miracle Network Hospital by doing what you do best; Playing Games to Heal Kids. This year, The ESA Foundation is offering up two $30,000 grants, for a total of $60,000 in life-saving funds! The Internet simply does not have enough bandwidth for us to fully transmit our gratitude. THANK YOU, ESA FOUNDATION! Two Winning Hospitals A donation of $30,000 is up for grabs for the hospital whose Extra Life gamers raise the most money overall by 9am CDT on Sunday, November 8th. Last year, that went to UCSF Beniof Children’s Hospital in the San Francisco/Oakland area. This particular “prize” favors bigger cities. Which is why… A second donation of $30,000 will be unlocked for the hospital whose gamers raise the most money per capita by 9am on Sunday, November 8th. For this we simply divide the number of dollars raised by the population of that market. Last year, the mighty Extra Lifers of Austin, Texas brought home this prize for local kids at Dell Children’s Medical Center. Nitty Gritty A hospital can only receive one of the two donations amounts.All funds submitted through our website prior to the deadline will be counted instantly towards the 2015 ESA Foundation-Extra Life Challenge.If you are submitting offline funds (Checks) they must be received no later than Monday, November 2nd in order to be processed and credited to your hospital before the deadline.Funds can be received after the deadline, they just won’t count towards this challenge. Make the biggest difference Obviously the more you can raise for sick and injured local kids in your area, the better your hospital’s chances of getting these critical funds. An even better way to skew the odds in your favor is to simply recruit more people in your community to join Extra Life. Did you know that the average donation is $35, but the average amount raised by someone you recruit is $100? If you can get a friend to join Extra Life, you’ll be making triple the impact for this challenge and For The Kids. About ESA Foundation Created by the American entertainment software industry, the ESA Foundation works to make a positive difference in the lives of America’s youth. ESA Foundation creates educational opportunities by providing scholarships to the next generation of industry innovators and supporting organizations that leverage entertainment software and technology. The proceeds from a signature annual fundraiser, Nite to Unite – for Kids and other charitable initiatives support this mission. For more information, visit the ESA Foundation’s website or follow them on Twitter: @ESA Foundation.
  9. There's an awesome tabletop game night at Video Game Rescue this evening. Join Steven as he shares some of fun games by Steve Jackson!Munchkin, Chez Geek and more! Event details are on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1701314190087450/Learn how to play or pick up a different game! Hosted by Steven and Joseph C. Tremain Jr.Game demo will start at 6:45pm and will have limited slots available so show up early! Address: Hide Map Video Game Rescue2415 Blanding Blvd Suite 7, Jacksonville, Florida 32210
  10. Here is the July/August edition of the Extra Life Orange County video newsletter. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hwa24j_b1xc
  11. until
    Heya folks! The 12Lead Gaming team would like to invite you all to join us August 7th in Grayslake, IL (NW Chi burbs) for an Extra Life fundraiser being held at Gamers HQ gaming lounge! From 4P - 2A you can come hang out and play on PCs and XB1s! There will be a very casual Smash Bros tourney for donators (we ask that you donate $5 to participate) with a $20 Steam gift card prize! We'll have raffles as well for game keys and other little prizes that were donated to us by GameStop! It's $4/hr or $15/all day to play! They've got headsets for every system and if you want to play a game you don't own, they have accounts you can use to do so! After 10P it's BYOB for those 21+! If you're hungry, no sweat, you can buy gamer fuel at the counter from pocky to Red Bull, or, walk next door and enjoy some awesome pizza or sandwiches from Wayne's! You may RSVP here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1620646431536531/ The event will be broadcast live through Twitch with support from other ELers hosting the stream! From Heroes of the Storm to Rocket League to Minecraft and CSGO, take some time out of your weekend to hang out with other gamers for a great cause! Any questions, just toss me a message here or e-mail me: xgnomedicx@gmail.com Aug 7th, 2015 4pm-2am Gamers HQ 34165 US Hwy Rt45 Grayslake, IL, right next to Jay's Comics! Hosted by 12Lead Gaming Broadcasting on twitch.tv/gnomedic
  12. ELOC Members! Thanks to our very own Frank Perkins, ELOC will be attending the StrategiCon Convention in Los Angeles this September 4-7. We will be double-staffing a booth with our Extra Life LA brothers and sisters! We only have two passes, so we will be working out the details. Most likely we will be having Extra Life LA there with a team two days and we will take two days. Details to come soon, but start thinking about it if you're interested in representing Extra Life at the Con! Point of Contact: Frank Perkins
  13. Hello All, I'm trying to get a feel to see if anyone has a contact at Anime California in Anaheim. We'd like to have a presence there this year. Please let me know if you have someone or know how we could get some donated booth space at the event! http://animecalifornia.com/
  14. Hello All! Kash from Extra Life Orange County and MOG Nation Gaming here! I wanted to let you know that on Saturday 8/1 my community at MOG Nation Gaming will be running a 24-hour Marathon-before-the-Marathon for Extra Life. We will be concentrating on getting as many viewers as possible to sign up for the official November event. We will be playing some of the latest games, interviewing some heavy-hitters in the Extra Life community and giving away prizes. Please join us and show some support if you have some free time. The event runs from 9AM Saturday to 9AM Sunday. Thanks and have a wonderful weekend! Good luck to all of you that have your own events this weekend!! www.MOGNation.com www.Twitch.tv/mognation Mike "Kash" Liberto Extra Life OC PresidentFounder, MOG Nation GamingNutrition & Fitness Coach at Grinds4Gamers.com
  15. It's time to reach into the past and pull out our lost June Episode. Recorded, but never released until now this episode is chock full of things from June. Sit back and relax, there are some surprises in there along with much vaguebooking. So very much vaguebooking. In this month's podcast Mike learns Gum etiquette.Rick breaks down all the community and Guild changes the team has been working on.Mike Talks about all the things coming up for Extra Life this summer. With much Vague booking.Rick, Mike and Jeromy can't figure out what to share and what not to share.Liz has the final word. Mostly.Note: A portion of this episode involves a "thing" happening in February. This is Extra Life United 2016. There will not be an ELU in 2015. As our organization has moved the annual Momentum conference and celebration of our champions to February, we felt holding a stand alone Extra Life United wouldn't have the same impact. A large part of the success and impact of ELU was getting to meet the kids we play for. Taking that element away would have seriously diminished the event. We'll share full details when we have them. We just wanted to make sure everyone was aware of the change. Download the file here. Extra Life Podcast: Ep. 06 Subscribe in iTunes | RSS | Other Please note the RSS feeds may not update immediately. Please be patient. View full article
  16. It's time to reach into the past and pull out our lost June Episode. Recorded, but never released until now this episode is chock full of things from June. Sit back and relax, there are some surprises in there along with much vaguebooking. So very much vaguebooking. In this month's podcast Mike learns Gum etiquette.Rick breaks down all the community and Guild changes the team has been working on.Mike Talks about all the things coming up for Extra Life this summer. With much Vague booking.Rick, Mike and Jeromy can't figure out what to share and what not to share.Liz has the final word. Mostly.Note: A portion of this episode involves a "thing" happening in February. This is Extra Life United 2016. There will not be an ELU in 2015. As our organization has moved the annual Momentum conference and celebration of our champions to February, we felt holding a stand alone Extra Life United wouldn't have the same impact. A large part of the success and impact of ELU was getting to meet the kids we play for. Taking that element away would have seriously diminished the event. We'll share full details when we have them. We just wanted to make sure everyone was aware of the change. Download the file here. Extra Life Podcast: Ep. 06 Subscribe in iTunes | RSS | Other Please note the RSS feeds may not update immediately. Please be patient.
  17. We've been approved! Here is our official guild logo! Big thanks to JB at MOGNation.com for designing this from scratch. There was a lot of chatter about using some iconic parts of OC for this design, but unfortunately we would have been encroaching on some trademark and copyright issues. The leadership was in agreement that the ocean was a great way to capture the essence of Orange County. I hope you all like it!
  18. When: Thursday August 13th 6:30 - 8:00 p.m. (Note...we made this a little later for those of you struggling with traffic.) Where: Southeast Regional Public Library 10599 Deerwood Park Blvd, Jacksonville, FL 32256 RSVP here by saying "I'll be there!" Emily Williamson, Director of the Children's Miracle Network here in Jacksonville will be attending and bringing us presents! This picture is from our June guild meeting! Don't miss the next photo opp!
  19. To help Extra life prepare for the upcoming October 25 gaming event, OnLive is holding its own 24-hour fundraising event tomorrow. The cloud gaming company will open up over 250 games for anyone and everyone to play for the low cost of $0. OnLive will open up their PlayPack game collection starting tomorrow at 12:01 AM PST and make them all available until 11:59 PM PST. Additionally, anyone who registers for Extra Life and joins the OnLive team will receive rewards for raising certain amounts of money for the Children's Miracle Network Hospital of their choice. The rewards come come courtesy of OnLive and its partners Nordic Games, Mad Catz, and Wikipad. “We’re excited to team up with Extra Life and gaming enthusiasts everywhere to truly make a difference for these kids and their families,” said Jeff Wood, captain of OnLive’s Extra Life Team. “Our hope is to rally awareness and participation for Extra Life in advance of their Game Day marathon by offering free gaming and multiple tiers of rewards to anyone who joins in and games for the cause. And we’re thrilled that our partners are joining forces with us to help maximize our impact for these kids.” To take advantage of OnLive’s CloudPlay for a Cause day of free gaming tomorrow, users can create an OnLive account at games.onlive.com or onlive.co.uk for free, no credit card required, and jump right in to playing some great games. To join the team, help kids and earn rewards as you play, visit www.extra-life.org/team/OnLive. Remember when I mentioned rewards for meeting fundraising goals? Those rewards include: Raise $5: One free month of the OnLive Service Bundle Raise $25: First 1000 gamers get a free download of MX vs ATV Reflex from Nordic Games Raise $50: A second free month of the OnLive Service Bundle* Raise $100: One free game code (up to $19.99) Raise $200: A second free game code (up to $49.99) Raise $300: Receive a third month of the OnLive Service Bundle + 1 free game code (up to $19.99) Raise $500: Receive a fourth month of the OnLive Service Bundle + 1 free game code (up to $49.99) The top 5 OnLive Team participants with the most donations by 6 AM PST on October 26, 2014, will receive their choice of a Mad Catz M.O.J.O. Micro-console + C.T.R.L.R. or a Wikipad 7” Gaming Tablet. If you've never tried cloud gaming or have been skeptical, tomorrow would be a great time to check it out for yourself and raise some money for the kids. This is a fantastic showing of support from our friends at OnLive, for which we are very thankful. View full article
  20. To help Extra life prepare for the upcoming October 25 gaming event, OnLive is holding its own 24-hour fundraising event tomorrow. The cloud gaming company will open up over 250 games for anyone and everyone to play for the low cost of $0. OnLive will open up their PlayPack game collection starting tomorrow at 12:01 AM PST and make them all available until 11:59 PM PST. Additionally, anyone who registers for Extra Life and joins the OnLive team will receive rewards for raising certain amounts of money for the Children's Miracle Network Hospital of their choice. The rewards come come courtesy of OnLive and its partners Nordic Games, Mad Catz, and Wikipad. “We’re excited to team up with Extra Life and gaming enthusiasts everywhere to truly make a difference for these kids and their families,” said Jeff Wood, captain of OnLive’s Extra Life Team. “Our hope is to rally awareness and participation for Extra Life in advance of their Game Day marathon by offering free gaming and multiple tiers of rewards to anyone who joins in and games for the cause. And we’re thrilled that our partners are joining forces with us to help maximize our impact for these kids.” To take advantage of OnLive’s CloudPlay for a Cause day of free gaming tomorrow, users can create an OnLive account at games.onlive.com or onlive.co.uk for free, no credit card required, and jump right in to playing some great games. To join the team, help kids and earn rewards as you play, visit www.extra-life.org/team/OnLive. Remember when I mentioned rewards for meeting fundraising goals? Those rewards include: Raise $5: One free month of the OnLive Service Bundle Raise $25: First 1000 gamers get a free download of MX vs ATV Reflex from Nordic Games Raise $50: A second free month of the OnLive Service Bundle* Raise $100: One free game code (up to $19.99) Raise $200: A second free game code (up to $49.99) Raise $300: Receive a third month of the OnLive Service Bundle + 1 free game code (up to $19.99) Raise $500: Receive a fourth month of the OnLive Service Bundle + 1 free game code (up to $49.99) The top 5 OnLive Team participants with the most donations by 6 AM PST on October 26, 2014, will receive their choice of a Mad Catz M.O.J.O. Micro-console + C.T.R.L.R. or a Wikipad 7” Gaming Tablet. If you've never tried cloud gaming or have been skeptical, tomorrow would be a great time to check it out for yourself and raise some money for the kids. This is a fantastic showing of support from our friends at OnLive, for which we are very thankful.
  21. I have the pleasure of being involved in Extra Life both as a writer on this website and in a local capacity with the Minneapolis Extra Life Guild. Through my involvement in the guild I managed to connect with Dylan Zellmer who provides the social face for MurWare, an independent development studio that released their first game, titled Oley Poley, a little over two weeks ago. MurWare has decided that charity is a core part of their business and will be donating 5% of the profits from Oley Poley to Extra Life! That is just so great that I decided to have a chat with Dylan about the studio and what it is like to be a relatively unknown game developer. --- Jack Gardner: I'm going to be honest, I don't know much about MurWare. Could you tell me a bit about how MurWare came into existence and what it is all about? Dylan Zellmer: There's good reason for your unfamiliarity; we're brand new! Myself and two skilled programmers (Aaron and Ryan) decided to formulate MurWare about 60 days ago. Most of us have either been directly involved in the games industry, or have been toying with games creation for a long time. At its heart, MurWare is the quintessential independent development company. We want to keep our operations relatively small, and will likely hold onto our day jobs while creating and self-publishing fun games. It's likely we'll stick to the mobile games as we hone our skills, and set out to the PC and console space later-on. JG: What is your role in the company and the development process? DZ: I'm the artist. So far, I've been tasked with taking the overarching game ideas and bringing them to life visually. Being a three-man team, we collaborate on just about everything. I've also taken the helm on the social aspects of MurWare, and our outreach. We're hoping to find someone (FREE) to manage that piece as it's rather taxing on top of the rest of our work. JG: As a developer, what are your priorities for the games you make? DZ: Well, as an indie we aren't concerned with creating the next Call of Duty. Essentially, we're making games for ourselves, and are really stoked when other people enjoy them. From a design standpoint, I'm concerned with creating clean visuals that compliment our gameplay; gameplay being the most important aspect of our creative process. If we don't think something is fun to play, we won't let it past the early prototype phase. JG: Could you describe some of the challenges in being a game developer working on that company's first game and getting it onto the Android and iOS app stores? DZ: There are several, very real obstacles for us to overcome. It's amazing when you think of a studio like Supercell hitting the jackpot with their first outing (Clash of Clans). First off, staying organized and having any semblance of a plan to work with is problematic when we aren't devoted to the process full-time. Another large undertaking is discoverability. Even after making plenty of connections within the industry, it's not easy to get your app in front of key people. In the end, whatever success, or lack thereof, Oley Poley garners is an important step in the evolution of our studio. JG: On July 18, MurWare released Oley Poley for Android and (soon) iOS, could you tell me a bit about that game? DZ: Well, I describe Oley Poley as "The Dark Souls of cute and cuddly reverse-platformers"; whatever that means. A more general description of the game would sound something like an informercial, but I'll take a stab at it. It's inspired by the Coin-Op arcade games all of us used to shove our allowances into. It's fast-paced, extremely challenging, and wonderfully satisfying. The object of Oley Poley is to help him survive a never-ending stream of obstacles, and while doing so, earn points for your hard work. JG: You are personally involved in the Minneapolis Extra Life Guild. What is your story with Extra Life?' DZ: In 2013 I was introduced to Extra-Life by a long-time family friend. He thought it was a great opportunity for me to get involved in charitable giving while doing something I truly love; gaming. I thought it sounded like a perfect fit, formed a team (House Nerd), and raised more money than I'd ever hoped to. I was honored to donate to an institute that holds a very personal connection to another life-long friend whose son has received life-changing treatment therein; Gillette Children's Hospital. JG: MurWare is a relatively new studio, but you have already announced that 5% of the money earned from your games will go to charity and that this year's charity will be Extra Life! Not many devs, to my knowledge, give direct cuts of their game revenue. What led to the decision to make charity a priority for MurWare. DZ: To my knowledge (not extremely extensive, haven't dug for hours or anything) we're at least the only MN-based development team, possibly US-based development team, to give a direct cut of our profits to charity. (Editor’s note: MurWare is currently the only developer giving a direct cut of profits to Extra Life.) As I stated earlier, we all have day jobs, at the same company even, so our game dev career isn't ONLY about money; it's about doing something we love. The decision to give to charity was one that was made very early-on; it was important to all of us to do so. My hope is that we are able to receive enough exposure to start donating large amounts of financial support to great organizations like Extra-Life. As I mentioned earlier, discoverability is the hardest hurdle to overcome, so help us spread the word! --- It is absolutely amazing to be supported by a developer in this way! Thank you to the MurWare team for their support! Also, an update for the game was released today that includes new background music, art, and an updated logo. Oley Poley is currently available on the Google Play store for Android devices for $1.
  22. I have the pleasure of being involved in Extra Life both as a writer on this website and in a local capacity with the Minneapolis Extra Life Guild. Through my involvement in the guild I managed to connect with Dylan Zellmer who provides the social face for MurWare, an independent development studio that released their first game, titled Oley Poley, a little over two weeks ago. MurWare has decided that charity is a core part of their business and will be donating 5% of the profits from Oley Poley to Extra Life! That is just so great that I decided to have a chat with Dylan about the studio and what it is like to be a relatively unknown game developer. --- Jack Gardner: I'm going to be honest, I don't know much about MurWare. Could you tell me a bit about how MurWare came into existence and what it is all about? Dylan Zellmer: There's good reason for your unfamiliarity; we're brand new! Myself and two skilled programmers (Aaron and Ryan) decided to formulate MurWare about 60 days ago. Most of us have either been directly involved in the games industry, or have been toying with games creation for a long time. At its heart, MurWare is the quintessential independent development company. We want to keep our operations relatively small, and will likely hold onto our day jobs while creating and self-publishing fun games. It's likely we'll stick to the mobile games as we hone our skills, and set out to the PC and console space later-on. JG: What is your role in the company and the development process? DZ: I'm the artist. So far, I've been tasked with taking the overarching game ideas and bringing them to life visually. Being a three-man team, we collaborate on just about everything. I've also taken the helm on the social aspects of MurWare, and our outreach. We're hoping to find someone (FREE) to manage that piece as it's rather taxing on top of the rest of our work. JG: As a developer, what are your priorities for the games you make? DZ: Well, as an indie we aren't concerned with creating the next Call of Duty. Essentially, we're making games for ourselves, and are really stoked when other people enjoy them. From a design standpoint, I'm concerned with creating clean visuals that compliment our gameplay; gameplay being the most important aspect of our creative process. If we don't think something is fun to play, we won't let it past the early prototype phase. JG: Could you describe some of the challenges in being a game developer working on that company's first game and getting it onto the Android and iOS app stores? DZ: There are several, very real obstacles for us to overcome. It's amazing when you think of a studio like Supercell hitting the jackpot with their first outing (Clash of Clans). First off, staying organized and having any semblance of a plan to work with is problematic when we aren't devoted to the process full-time. Another large undertaking is discoverability. Even after making plenty of connections within the industry, it's not easy to get your app in front of key people. In the end, whatever success, or lack thereof, Oley Poley garners is an important step in the evolution of our studio. JG: On July 18, MurWare released Oley Poley for Android and (soon) iOS, could you tell me a bit about that game? DZ: Well, I describe Oley Poley as "The Dark Souls of cute and cuddly reverse-platformers"; whatever that means. A more general description of the game would sound something like an informercial, but I'll take a stab at it. It's inspired by the Coin-Op arcade games all of us used to shove our allowances into. It's fast-paced, extremely challenging, and wonderfully satisfying. The object of Oley Poley is to help him survive a never-ending stream of obstacles, and while doing so, earn points for your hard work. JG: You are personally involved in the Minneapolis Extra Life Guild. What is your story with Extra Life?' DZ: In 2013 I was introduced to Extra-Life by a long-time family friend. He thought it was a great opportunity for me to get involved in charitable giving while doing something I truly love; gaming. I thought it sounded like a perfect fit, formed a team (House Nerd), and raised more money than I'd ever hoped to. I was honored to donate to an institute that holds a very personal connection to another life-long friend whose son has received life-changing treatment therein; Gillette Children's Hospital. JG: MurWare is a relatively new studio, but you have already announced that 5% of the money earned from your games will go to charity and that this year's charity will be Extra Life! Not many devs, to my knowledge, give direct cuts of their game revenue. What led to the decision to make charity a priority for MurWare. DZ: To my knowledge (not extremely extensive, haven't dug for hours or anything) we're at least the only MN-based development team, possibly US-based development team, to give a direct cut of our profits to charity. (Editor’s note: MurWare is currently the only developer giving a direct cut of profits to Extra Life.) As I stated earlier, we all have day jobs, at the same company even, so our game dev career isn't ONLY about money; it's about doing something we love. The decision to give to charity was one that was made very early-on; it was important to all of us to do so. My hope is that we are able to receive enough exposure to start donating large amounts of financial support to great organizations like Extra-Life. As I mentioned earlier, discoverability is the hardest hurdle to overcome, so help us spread the word! --- It is absolutely amazing to be supported by a developer in this way! Thank you to the MurWare team for their support! Also, an update for the game was released today that includes new background music, art, and an updated logo. Oley Poley is currently available on the Google Play store for Android devices for $1. View full article
  23. During the month of May, Extra Life’s current top fundraiser, Aureylian, worked with Twitch to set up the event Mining for Charity. Four teams totaling forty-eight Twitch broadcasters competed in ten different Mineplex minigames. Each team represented a different charity organization: AbleGamers, Child’s Play, Extra Life, and Stand for the Silent. The team that racked up the most points over the course of the month of Mineplex games won a $5,000 prize for their charity. Unfortunately, Extra Life came in third place, but even third place received a pretty nice chunk of change courtesy of some Twitch auctions. I had the opportunity to ask Aureylian some questions regarding Mining for Charity and her own involvement in Extra Life. --- How did you first get involved in Extra Life? I was invited to go along to the Celebration last year in Orlando along with some other gamers and Twitch employees to learn more about Extra Life. After meeting all of the kids, and being a gamer and mom myself, it seems like I was meant to be there. I have become so passionate about Extra Life, because it literally hits every major aspect of my life. What is your goal for this year and what are you going to try differently to achieve it (besides Minecraft charity tournaments)? My goal for this year is $25k. I've done a few shorter livestreams already this year and am planning at least two more (including the National Game Day). I've started integrating incentives in my game play (like renaming missions in Minecraft to donators of certain levels) and stopping livestreams to sing karaoke when someone donates $25. It's a continued effort throughout the year and a big part of my daily life, not just something I do once a year. You are currently our top fundraiser (which is so flippin' amazing). How have you gone about raising money and what do you think other people do to emulate your success on that particular front? Or, to put it another way, how can other people be as fantastic as yourself? Haha, well, not sure I'm THAT fantastic. Like I said before, Extra Life is something I am so passionate about that I speak about it and involve it on an almost daily basis. I work in my local office to donate my time, as well as raise funds and involve as many people I can. I don't know that anyone [could exactly] emulate my success, but I did help write a pretty cool tips piece on the blog for Extra Life last year that seemed to help a few people. You work at Twitch, so can you speak to how Twitch has gotten involved with Extra Life on a company-wide level? Twitch supports many charities. As an organization, we donate many resources to help promote and ensure the success of streamers who choose to stream for charity. Specifically for events like Mining For Charity, we leverage our user base to help nonprofits get exposure and involve content creators in the promotion of great causes. Okay, I pay follow eSports a fair amount and I've played many more hours of Minecraft than I'd care to admit in polite company, but I've never really heard about a Minecraft tournament. Could you explain how that works, where did the idea come from, etc.? I came up with the idea and Mineplex made it come to life. For Mining for Charity, we had four teams of 12 players (8 full time and 4 alternates). They competed each week in a series of Minecraft minigames for four weeks. Depending on their placement in each round, they received points, and at the end of the day, the place of their points determined the daily points they received. At the end of the tournament, two teams tied for first, so they went into a tiebreaker round. The goal was not only to have our content creators collaborate and help grow their audiences, but to help support charities we are passionate about in the process. Prior to the start of the tournament, each team was allowed to pick their own charity to play on behalf of, and we of course were thrilled when one of our teams chose to play on behalf of Extra Life. Twitch donated a designated amount to first place and funds were also raised by auctioning off a rare White Twitch hoodie and limited edition Twitch Minecraft shirt, both signed by Minecraft content creator. Those proceeds were all divided among 2nd, 3rd and 4th place teams. As Mike said in that introductory email, who were the casters that got involved so we can shower them with praise? AnikiDomo - Bashurverse - BlameTheController - ChaosChunk - Fyrflies - RubenDelight - Darkmalmine - Siyliss - tehneyrzomb - TerasHD - thejarren - wyld --- A huge thanks to Aureylian, he co-workers at Twitch, and all of the amazing people who participated in Mining for Charity!
  24. During the month of May, Extra Life’s current top fundraiser, Aureylian, worked with Twitch to set up the event Mining for Charity. Four teams totaling forty-eight Twitch broadcasters competed in ten different Mineplex minigames. Each team represented a different charity organization: AbleGamers, Child’s Play, Extra Life, and Stand for the Silent. The team that racked up the most points over the course of the month of Mineplex games won a $5,000 prize for their charity. Unfortunately, Extra Life came in third place, but even third place received a pretty nice chunk of change courtesy of some Twitch auctions. I had the opportunity to ask Aureylian some questions regarding Mining for Charity and her own involvement in Extra Life. --- How did you first get involved in Extra Life? I was invited to go along to the Celebration last year in Orlando along with some other gamers and Twitch employees to learn more about Extra Life. After meeting all of the kids, and being a gamer and mom myself, it seems like I was meant to be there. I have become so passionate about Extra Life, because it literally hits every major aspect of my life. What is your goal for this year and what are you going to try differently to achieve it (besides Minecraft charity tournaments)? My goal for this year is $25k. I've done a few shorter livestreams already this year and am planning at least two more (including the National Game Day). I've started integrating incentives in my game play (like renaming missions in Minecraft to donators of certain levels) and stopping livestreams to sing karaoke when someone donates $25. It's a continued effort throughout the year and a big part of my daily life, not just something I do once a year. You are currently our top fundraiser (which is so flippin' amazing). How have you gone about raising money and what do you think other people do to emulate your success on that particular front? Or, to put it another way, how can other people be as fantastic as yourself? Haha, well, not sure I'm THAT fantastic. Like I said before, Extra Life is something I am so passionate about that I speak about it and involve it on an almost daily basis. I work in my local office to donate my time, as well as raise funds and involve as many people I can. I don't know that anyone [could exactly] emulate my success, but I did help write a pretty cool tips piece on the blog for Extra Life last year that seemed to help a few people. You work at Twitch, so can you speak to how Twitch has gotten involved with Extra Life on a company-wide level? Twitch supports many charities. As an organization, we donate many resources to help promote and ensure the success of streamers who choose to stream for charity. Specifically for events like Mining For Charity, we leverage our user base to help nonprofits get exposure and involve content creators in the promotion of great causes. Okay, I pay follow eSports a fair amount and I've played many more hours of Minecraft than I'd care to admit in polite company, but I've never really heard about a Minecraft tournament. Could you explain how that works, where did the idea come from, etc.? I came up with the idea and Mineplex made it come to life. For Mining for Charity, we had four teams of 12 players (8 full time and 4 alternates). They competed each week in a series of Minecraft minigames for four weeks. Depending on their placement in each round, they received points, and at the end of the day, the place of their points determined the daily points they received. At the end of the tournament, two teams tied for first, so they went into a tiebreaker round. The goal was not only to have our content creators collaborate and help grow their audiences, but to help support charities we are passionate about in the process. Prior to the start of the tournament, each team was allowed to pick their own charity to play on behalf of, and we of course were thrilled when one of our teams chose to play on behalf of Extra Life. Twitch donated a designated amount to first place and funds were also raised by auctioning off a rare White Twitch hoodie and limited edition Twitch Minecraft shirt, both signed by Minecraft content creator. Those proceeds were all divided among 2nd, 3rd and 4th place teams. As Mike said in that introductory email, who were the casters that got involved so we can shower them with praise? AnikiDomo - Bashurverse - BlameTheController - ChaosChunk - Fyrflies - RubenDelight - Darkmalmine - Siyliss - tehneyrzomb - TerasHD - thejarren - wyld --- A huge thanks to Aureylian, he co-workers at Twitch, and all of the amazing people who participated in Mining for Charity! View full article
  25. At some point, everyone who participates in Extra Life has no idea what they are going to play for 24 (this year 25!) hours. Some people plan out their gaming session weeks or months in advance, others decide to wing the whole event, giving it no forethought. Then there are the people who are caught somewhere in-between those two groups. Hopefully, if you are one of those individuals wracking your brains regarding what titles you'll be playing for 25 hours, this list of suggestions will help you narrow down your options. As we all know, livestreaming games has become one of the most popular activities marathon-ing activities for Extra Lifers. Broadcasting gameplay to the world, raising money from strangers to do ridiculous things or talk in funny voices, it sounds like a relatively simple. However, one of the tricks to putting on a successful livestream is picking games that people will be interested in watching. Streamers need to hook viewers in with something weird, fast-paced, relevant, or nostalgic. Here are some ideas to consider if you are planning to go the livestream route. StarCraft II/League of Legends/Dota 2 - All three of these games have several things in common, but most importantly they are fast-paced, fun, and three of the most played games in the world. Have some gaps in your schedule? You might want to consider showing off your pro gamer skill. Alternatively, grab several friends and undertake a mission to be as silly as possible in your games. Mass reaper rush? All Yordles, all mid? Courier-minion push? The possibilities are endless(ly entertaining)! Also, all three are free (thought the free version of StarCraft II is pretty limited), so what are you waiting for? Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time - Some people just want to see one of their favorite games from the past replayed. With the live chat functions, viewers can shout out encouragement, reveal secrets in the level, and berate marathoners for skipping side quests. Ocarina of Time is a great option for streamers because it holds entire warehouses of nostalgia for gamers who played it back in 1999 and is still incredibly fun to play. Also, give someone grief if they are going to skip the Biggoron’s Sword quest. Shadow of the Colossus - The goal is to show viewers a game they may have never seen before or a type of game that they would never play/have the opportunity to play on their own. Shadow of the Colossus accomplishes this because there has never been a game quite like it, aesthetically or structurally. Sharing unique experiences is the lifeblood of an interesting livestreaming event and Shadow of the Colossus is certainly an experience worth sharing. Outlast - If there is one thing that people love to see on a livestream more than anything else is someone devolve into a laughing blubber-mess while playing a video game. Horror game accomplish this feat with ease, especially if they are actually designed well. There are millions of videos of people trying to play Amnesia: The Dark Descent, so why not play Outlast, a game that improves on the formula set forth by Amnesia. Just remember to bring your safety blanket in case you need to hide from the monsters. Dark Souls - Overcoming seemingly impossible challenges is fun to watch for spectators; almost as much fun as watching someone rage at a video game. Blisteringly difficult titles like Dark Souls or Demon Souls fit both accounts marvelously. Just make sure that people know your stream is going to be NSFW if you are planning to cuss like a sailor after the Taurus demon beats you senseless for the fourteenth time. There is a small but ever-growing subset of games that can only be described as bizarre. These oddities are a blast to play with a small group of friends or as a livestream event. Some fall into the category of so-bad-they're-good, while others are mystifyingly strange, yet intriguing. People love to watch these spectacles unfold and love even more when people are confounded by outdated controls, terrible graphics, or awkward design decisions. Deadly Premonition - There is something charming, yet utterly broken about Deadly Premonition. Animations look odd, characters are baffling, and the story is full of things like invisible friends, squirrel-obsessed nuts, and imaginary zombies. And pop-culture references. Lots of pop culture references. OverBlood - If you want to see one of the least terrifying horror games from the early days of the PS1, look no further than cult favorite OverBlood. Polygonal zombies, awkward relationships with robots, archaic game design and more contribute to one of the most entertaining spectacle games. Earth Defense Force 2017 - Have you ever wanted to have access to weapons with infinite ammo and take on hundreds of giant ants, giant spiders, flying saucers, and death robots? If your answer is something resembling yes, then you might want to check out EDF 2017. The gameplay is incredibly fun and everything from the story to the animations to the over-the-top-weapon-effects is silly. Oh, and it is co-op. Grab a friend and blast everything that moves. Mr. Mosquito - In Mr. Mosquito you play as a mosquito/robot that preys upon a Japanese family. As you suck their blood, you slowly drive the family insane. Strangely enough, this game is actually pretty fun. Where else are you going to see a Japanese mother doing back-flips and uttering death threats to a mosquito? El Shaddai: Ascension of the Metatron - Honestly, it is pretty hard to describe El Shaddai other than by saying it is what I'd imagine an acid trip would look like. When it first came out, I played through it and took notes. A few excerpts from those notes: “Creepy line lady,” “Face sticks,” “Girl on a ghost sheet, thing,” and “running on cloud waves.” If you want to play a visually stunning and mentally befuddling title, it might be time to meet the ascending Metatron. Sometimes gamers are in it for the long haul. They want a game that can occupy their attention for an entire 24-hour (or 25-hour) marathon. There are a number of quality games out there, but many of them simply aren't long enough to involve a person or a group of people for a whole day. Luckily, we came up with a few ideas for games that can last for weeks and sometimes years. Total War: Rome II - Just start a campaign of Total War. Just... start one. I recently finished my first full campaign of Rome II. I would not have been able to finish it within the Extra Life time frame. Can any of you finish a Total War: Rome II campaign during Extra Life? *Throws down the gauntlet.* If so, you should let us know and maybe we can recognize your achievement. Civilization V - There is literally a marathon setting for Civilization. However, even on the quick setting, one game of Civilization can easily kill time for an entire Extra Life marathon. If you are playing a Civ game with friends, all the backstabbing, backroom deals, and the just-one-more-turn nature of Civilization are perfectly suited to a 25-hour gaming session. Sins of a Solar Empire - Sins of a Solar Empire has been around for five years and might not be as well-known as other RTS games like StarCraft, but the scale of the game is well beyond any other RTS I've encountered. Players conquer solar systems that can encompass dozens or hundreds of worlds with fleet sizes that can number in the thousands. The game is paced slowly, but can quickly ratchet up the tension when large scale conflicts ensue. Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch - Role-playing games have a long and storied tradition of lasting for a year and a day. If you want to cultivate the patience of a Jedi, play through all of the Final Fantasy games in sequential order. Ni no Kuni is no different, but it is well worth spending the time playing, if for no other reason than to witness the beautiful world created by the famed Studio Ghibli. XCOM: Enemy Unknown - A game that revolves around tactical, grid-based combat and fighting off an alien invasion that can last for hours and hours with the fate of your squads and humanity resting on every choice that you make? Yes, please. XCOM will stretch you to the limits of your tactical prowess and it won't pull any punches on the higher difficulties, nor will it allow you to reload earlier saves if you lock yourself into an iron man mode. While longer games are great, there is something to be said about games that you can finish in one sitting. Some gamers have large backlogs of games that they’ve been meaning to play, but haven’t gotten around to finishing. With 25 hours to fill, now is a great opportunity to play some of those smaller games that may have fallen off the radar. If you want to play and finish multiple games within the broad confines of the Extra Life marathon, here are some ideas to consider. Call of Juarez: Gunslinger - One of my favorite games from this year, Call of Juarez: Gunslinger is a fast-paced, arcade-y FPS that takes place as an old drifter is telling about his life as a bounty hunter. Of course, since it is a story, embellishments occur and the levels shift around you as you play. It is pretty creative and fun. And of course, you can play this game from start to finish and still have time for other games during your marathon. The Stanley Parable - The Stanley Parable has a limited appeal. It has a lot of things to say about philosophy, game design, choices, and storytelling. If you aren't interested in those topics, then The Stanley Parable might not be for you. You control Stanley as he walks through an office building to discover where his co-workers have gone. Every choice you make has consequences, but then again, every choice you make has no consequences. That previous sentence sums up the title rather well. If you play through the game once, it might take you around a half-hour to finish. Playing through several times trying to see all there is to see, will take maybe three hours. Mark of the Ninja - One of the best stealth games in recent memory, mark of the Ninja places players in the role of a ninja who has been marked, giving him terrible power, but at a price. The gameplay is tight and the stealth feels simple and fair. The game can be completed in about five hours the first time, through, but in as little as two or three hours (possibly even less than an hour?) by someone who really knows what they are doing. Brothers - A Tale of Two Sons - Brothers is a neat little indie game from Starbreeze studios. Made in collaboration with Swedish filmmaker Josef Farnes, the game revolves around two brothers searching for a cure for their ailing father. Gameplay revolves around having the two brothers interact with the environment and solve basic puzzles. The end result is a roughly three hour long work of beauty that leaves players satisfied. The Wolf Among Us - The latest episodic series from Telltale is pretty enthralling. Characters are interesting, the plot thickens in a satisfying manner, and, as of right now, there is only one episode available, which means that the completion of The Wolf Among Us takes only a few scant hours. On November 2nd, not just video games can be played. Tabletop games are also more than welcome. If you're leaning toward gathering a few friends and throwing dice or flipping cards, we have a few suggestions so you aren't completely without ideas. Risk - This game has ruined friendships. People tend to get mad when you break a diplomatic arrangement in an attempt to conquer all of Asia. There are numerous variations of Risk (my favorite being Lord of the Rings) and most of them are pretty fun. You just need to be able to gather a group of people who are willing to spend several hours or days with you, depending on the luck of the dice. If you are lucky enough to have such true friends, be careful who you stab in the back in your quest for world domination. Arkham Horror - Set in the midst of a Lovecraftian Armageddon, Arkham Horror tasks players to work together to stop a randomly selected horror from beyond time and space from coming into our dimension and destroying everything. Monsters must be fought, clues must be found, and be careful not to lose your mind to madness. Munchkin - Another game that destroys friendships (I had a friend who nearly flipped our game table), Munchkin combines various fantasy tropes and very basic Dungeons and Dragons concepts into a simple, fun card game. There are oodles of expansions that bring in other genres, like Westerns, Sci-Fi, etc. and can be combined with the core Munchkin deck. Any Tabletop RPG - There are an awful lot of pen and paper RPGs out there and there is no reason why people can't summon up their Dungeons and Dragons or Exalted or World of Darkness groups to run a huge role-playing session. Maybe you are finally having that long-awaited final confrontation with the main villain that would otherwise take three or four sessions to conclude, or maybe you are going to start a new campaign and want to have a really cool, prolonged inciting incident. There are tons of possibilities. Settlers of Catan - If you've never played Settlers of Catan, the name might make it sound a bit odd. The basic premise is that a bunch of different people decide to settle this island called Catan and begin building settlements and roads with the goal of becoming the most powerful faction on the island. Building requires resources, which need to be acquired from the surrounding countryside or by trading with other players. Settlers quickly becomes similar to a poker game, with each player trying to bamboozle the other into thinking they aren't far enough along in their faction's development to pose a game-ending threat. It might be worth a look if you've never tried it. That's all of our recommendations for now, but we'd love to hear some of yours! Share in the comments below or on Facebook to give more ideas on what you think would be good games for the marathon. View full article
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